Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Part-time

5 years

Typical Offer

BCC (104 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

L510

Course Code

HEAHEAUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Part-time

5 years

Typical Offer

BCC (104 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Subject to Revalidation

Fees

View

UCAS Code

L510

Course Code

HEAHEAUB

BSc (Hons) Health and Social Care BSc (Hons) Health and Social Care

98% of BSc (Hons) Health and Social Care students at Lincoln were satisfied overall with their course according to the National Student Survey 2020.

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Part-time

5 years

Typical Offer

BCC (104 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

L510

Course Code

HEAHEAUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Part-time

5 years

Typical Offer

BCC (104 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Subject to Revalidation

Fees

View

UCAS Code

L510

Course Code

HEAHEAUB

Julie Burton - Programme Leader

Julie Burton - Programme Leader

I have been teaching at Lincoln since 2005 in many different aspects of Health and Social Care. I have collaborated with the World Health Organisation (WHO) developing Online Teaching Materials to help reduce domestic violence worldwide and have written Study Guides for Health Psychology.

School Staff List

Welcome to BSc (Hons) Health and Social Care

Health and social care practitioners can make a profound difference to the lives of vulnerable people, working in a variety of settings including healthcare, education, and public health.

The BSc (Hons) Health and Social Care degree at Lincoln takes an integrated approach, combining policy and practice. It aims to develop the knowledge, skills, and values required to take on many of the new and emerging responsibilities within a range of care sectors.

During the course, there are opportunities to undertake further training in First Aid, Mental Health First Aid, Suicide Awareness and Intervention Training.

You are taught by researchers and academics with both practical experience and professional links in the sector. The School of Health and Social Care maintains close links with health trusts, local authorities and numerous voluntary and private organisations to ensure that teaching is informed by the latest developments in practice and policy.

Welcome to BSc (Hons) Health and Social Care

Health and social care practitioners can make a profound difference to the lives of vulnerable people, working in a variety of settings including healthcare, education, and public health.

The BSc (Hons) Health and Social Care degree at Lincoln takes an integrated approach, combining policy and practice. It aims to develop the knowledge, skills, and values required to take on many of the new and emerging responsibilities within a range of care sectors.

Students are taught by researchers and academics with both practical experience and professional links in the sector. The School of Health and Social Care maintains close links with health trusts, local authorities, and numerous voluntary and private organisations to ensure that teaching is informed by the latest developments in practice and policy.

How You Study

The programme offers practice-based learning, underpinned by academic knowledge and theory.

The first year introduces students to the fundamental theories, skills, and knowledge of health and social care. This includes the context of practice in health and social care, the social and psychological development of children and adults, and the values that underpin practice.

Modules focus on developing communication skills and the consideration of professional values and ethics. Lectures and seminars are complemented by workshops, role-play exercises, debates, visits, and independent study.

The course progresses to explore the wider context of practice, including mental health and wellbeing, public policy, and research skills for health and social care practice. It provides opportunities to compare health and social care practice in other countries.

Students are expected to develop quantitative and qualitative research skills and begin to assess how their learning will shape their future career path.

In the final year, there is a focus on extending professional knowledge, skills, and development. A range of optional modules on specialist topics can enable students to choose those most aligned to their personal interests and career aspirations including counselling and guidance, working with children and families and working with adults. Students undertake work experience during this year and an independent research study.

Learning methods on the course consist of lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials, visits, and directed independent study. These sessions will include a range of learning experiences including didactic input, student interaction and role-play, videos, podcast discussions, and debates. Students have the opportunity to work with those from other Schools including law, sport, criminology and social and political sciences.

Timetabled attendance is approximately 18 hours per week.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

How You Study

The first year introduces students to the fundamental theories, skills, and knowledge of health and social care. This includes the context of practice in health and social care, the social and psychological development of children and adults, and the values that underpin practice.

The course progresses to explore the wider context of practice, including mental health and wellbeing, public policy, and research skills for health and social care practice. It provides opportunities to compare health and social care practice in other countries.

In the final year, there is a focus on extending professional knowledge, skills, and development. A range of optional modules on specialist topics can enable students to choose those most aligned
to their personal interests and career aspirations, including counselling and guidance, working with children and families, and working with adults.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

The aim of this module is for students to develop a range of communication and interpersonal skills necessary to communicate and engage effectively with others including service users, colleagues and other agencies. Emphasis will be placed on developing the ability to communicate and engage with warmth and empathy in differing contexts, including group settings, and overcoming barriers to communication.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide students with the necessary background in anatomy and physiology for understanding the structure and functions of the human body. It is structured to promote an introductory understanding of human physiology relevant to students of health and social care. The importance of structures will be examined and also what can happen when things go wrong. Anatomy and physiology will be studied in relation to health (and wellbeing) and disease.

Module Overview

Following on from the earlier module, students have the opportunity to study late adolescent and adult development from late teens to older age and death, especially in relation to physical, psychological and social changes. This will offer the opportunity to explore the impact on development of individual factors (such as disability or gender), events (such as abuse or loss) and context (such as beliefs or legal frameworks). This will also continue to look at Study Skills especially following the first round of assessment (how to make feedback feed forward).

Module Overview

Students will be provided with a framework of theoretical and applied perspectives on the study of child and adolescent development (from birth to eighteen years) in relation to physical, psychological and social changes. Students will have the opportunity to study a range of contemporary social issues, typically including self–harming; teenage pregnancy; self-image; and bullying (and the implications of social media). The impact will be assessed on not only children and young people but also their families and carers. This module will also utilise these topics to familiarise you with Study Skills e.g. using the Library, academic writing and all forms of academic assessment.

Module Overview

A variety of major sociological theories will be discussed. Students will be supported to apply these theories to a selection of social institutions such as the family, social class and education. Students will be introduced to the impact the family has on informal care provision in the UK, the impact social class has on health inequality in the UK and the role education plays on people’s health status.

Module Overview

Why is this important? This module aims to introduce students to the concept of public health. It outlines earlier and more recent policy influencing the provision of public health services. The main themes of white papers, ‘Choosing Health: Making Healthy Choices Easier’ (DH, 2004) and ‘Our health, our care, our say: a new direction for community services (DH, 2006) are explored in relation to public health service provision.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to introduce students to the subjects of values, ethics and rights in Health and Social Care. Students may develop an understanding of values, both personal and professional. Students will have the opportunity to explore ideas and discussions relating to values, including personal values, professional codes of ethics, inter-professional working practice, accountability, dominant social values, rights, organisational values and values conflict.

Module Overview

The module allows students to study a range of contemporary issues in health and social care. The course team aims to keep the curriculum content exciting and current by updating the curriculum on an annual basis. The areas that are included will reflect the expertise of the team as well as the current concerns for health and social care. At the present time the curriculum is likely to include the following areas/themes: domestic violence, substance misuse, homelessness, nosocomial infections, prisoners’ health and other relevant contemporary issues.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is for students to examine contemporary International and European perspectives on health and welfare, with a focus on policy, provision, systems and practice. The focus will be on supporting students to use comparative analysis to understand different provision, explore ways of working within and across geographical boundaries. Students may examine a range of global issues and their impact on populations and their wellbeing. A specific feature of this module is the choice to participate in a study trip abroad that will explore the range of health and social care services available to older people. More information, including costs relating to this trip are outlined in the Fees Tab.

Module Overview

The module will take an interdisciplinary approach by examining how people think, act and interact with one another. In doing so it will challenge 'taken for granted' notions about crime and punishment. By focusing upon the development of the individual person behind the crime this allows us to address the question of motivations for crime as well as the role of psychology in responding to crime. Students will be expected to consider the implications of crime not only the prisoner but also the children, the family and wider society.

Module Overview

This module aims to give students the opportunity to examine how different people respond to health, wellbeing and illness. The role of the rapidly expanding discipline of health psychology can be discussed in relation to psychological procedures for the assessment, intervention and prevention of ill health. Students also have the opportunity to consider individuals, families, age, cultures, religions, gender, psychological and social health and wellbeing.

Module Overview

The module will provide students with an opportunity to study mental health and wellbeing. This will include a broad coverage of the history of research and treatment relating to mental health and illness; the legal framework and the particular role of health and social care practitioners; diagnostic categories and frameworks and typical mental illnesses; social science and social understandings of mental health and illness: mental health problems and particular groups in society, including children and adolescents; the service user movement in mental health; alternative treatments and some current research trends.

Module Overview

This module aims to increase students awareness of the extent to which the policy process of government affects individuals in their everyday personal and professional lives. It will build on knowledge through a critical analysis of substantive areas of health and social care policy documentation, such a government policy on ageing, on disability, on social housing, on public transport, on benefits systems, on health and communities, on access to leisure and recreation and on communities.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to introduce students to contemporary debates about responding to social change in health and social care. It aims to encourage a critical understanding of the analyses within health and social policy transformations and the theories and evidence that matter in these debates. Students will have the opportunity to be introduced to the institutions, policies and populations implicated in responses to change and how people can make a difference.

Module Overview

The research methods module is intended to enable students to explore and develop a critical appreciation of health and social care research, utilising both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Students may develop skills in reading, analysing, critically evaluating and utilising research, whilst having an opportunity to explore research methods. This will also help to prepare students for your Dissertation (Independent Study) in level three.

Module Overview

This module is optional for students within the BSc Health and Social Care programme. Study abroad is a year-long module which allows students to spend a year abroad, between their second and third year at Lincoln, at one of the University’s approved partner institutions. Students must have successfully completed their second year of study at Lincoln (and have a good record of attendance) to be eligible for this opportunity.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is for students to undertake an extended, independently produced, literature based research study in an area of health and/or social care in an area of their choosing. Utilising and building on knowledge, theory, skills and values developed throughout their studies, students will be supported to synthesise a broad range of information into a coherent and competent study, demonstrating a capacity for independent thought and to use critical and analytical abilities.

Module Overview

Students have the opportunity to examine the construction of difference, specifically its construction by dominant groups to form a basis for discrimination and oppression and erosion of human rights. Students may consider how emotions and beliefs can negatively impact on communication and how barriers to working across difference can be overcome, including the development of effective ways of communicating and working across difference, students will critically reflect on their own beliefs and their own practice in relation to working across difference in an unequal and diverse society.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is for students to gain an understanding and skills in promotion of health and wellbeing. Students can examine the historical, political, policy, economic, social and cultural influences that have determined and influenced initiatives and the provision of services to support individuals, groups and communities to make informed, healthy life style choices. The focus will be on developing knowledge of health and its determinants through an analyses of the complex issues regarding how health is created and how health behaviours are brought about. Students may consider how to champion ways of working to promote health and wellbeing, based on evidence of effectiveness and also clear ethical principles.

Module Overview

Following historical discussions, this module will focus on the contemporary provision of health and social care, particularly the challenges and rewards offered by the implementation of a partnership (multi-agency) approach. Students will have the opportunity to develop a greater understanding of the impact on day-to-day management of organisational culture by looking at how to manage time, people and quality and the impact of good mentorship and leadership on effective management.

Module Overview

Although not engaged on a vocational programme with formally assessed placements, all students on the Health and Social Care programme are expected to acquire some relevant experience, either in a paid or voluntary capacity, whilst undertaking undergraduate studies. More details on this can be found under Placements in the Features Tab. This module provides an opportunity to utilise relevant experience acquired in Health, Social Care, and Education and associated welfare practice environments as a basis for an organisational analysis and practice reflection. The module will be of particular value as a preparation for making career choices and to enhance employability by virtue of learning from experience.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to a range of contemporary models of counselling and guidance practice. The aim is to give students the opportunity to develop skills and attitudes that can be of value in a variety of human service settings. A key feature of the module will be to allow students the opportunity to make judgements as to the appropriateness of using such techniques in different scenarios.

Module Overview

This module aims to offer students the opportunity to explore in depth the context and issues of adult health and social care and the work roles available within it. It focuses on both national policy developments and local provision, with the emphasis on the perspectives of service users and practitioners. The module will be of particular value to students as a preparation for making career choices and to enhance their employability.

Module Overview

This module considers how to engage with children and families to assess and respond to needs and how to make professional judgements in decisions to safeguard and promote children’s welfare. A further key theme is working in partnership both with children and families and other agencies, considering how, in practice this can best be promoted at different levels and stages of decision-making. Emphasis will be on current research and developments. This module will be of particular value to students as a preparation for making career choices and to enhance their employability.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

The aim of this module is for students to develop a range of communication and interpersonal skills necessary to communicate and engage effectively with others including service users, colleagues and other agencies. Emphasis will be placed on developing the ability to communicate and engage with warmth and empathy in differing contexts, including group settings, and overcoming barriers to communication.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide students with the necessary background in anatomy and physiology for understanding the structure and functions of the human body. It is structured to promote an introductory understanding of human physiology relevant to students of health and social care. The importance of structures will be examined and also what can happen when things go wrong. Anatomy and physiology will be studied in relation to health (and wellbeing) and disease.

Module Overview

Following on from the earlier module, students have the opportunity to study late adolescent and adult development from late teens to older age and death, especially in relation to physical, psychological and social changes. This will offer the opportunity to explore the impact on development of individual factors (such as disability or gender), events (such as abuse or loss) and context (such as beliefs or legal frameworks). This will also continue to look at Study Skills especially following the first round of assessment (how to make feedback feed forward).

Module Overview

Students will be provided with a framework of theoretical and applied perspectives on the study of child and adolescent development (from birth to eighteen years) in relation to physical, psychological and social changes. Students will have the opportunity to study a range of contemporary social issues, typically including self–harming; teenage pregnancy; self-image; and bullying (and the implications of social media). The impact will be assessed on not only children and young people but also their families and carers. This module will also utilise these topics to familiarise you with Study Skills e.g. using the Library, academic writing and all forms of academic assessment.

Module Overview

A variety of major sociological theories will be discussed. Students will be supported to apply these theories to a selection of social institutions such as the family, social class and education. Students will be introduced to the impact the family has on informal care provision in the UK, the impact social class has on health inequality in the UK and the role education plays on people’s health status.

Module Overview

Why is this important? This module aims to introduce students to the concept of public health. It outlines earlier and more recent policy influencing the provision of public health services. The main themes of white papers, ‘Choosing Health: Making Healthy Choices Easier’ (DH, 2004) and ‘Our health, our care, our say: a new direction for community services (DH, 2006) are explored in relation to public health service provision.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to introduce students to the subjects of values, ethics and rights in Health and Social Care. Students may develop an understanding of values, both personal and professional. Students will have the opportunity to explore ideas and discussions relating to values, including personal values, professional codes of ethics, inter-professional working practice, accountability, dominant social values, rights, organisational values and values conflict.

Module Overview

The module allows students to study a range of contemporary issues in health and social care. The course team aims to keep the curriculum content exciting and current by updating the curriculum on an annual basis. The areas that are included will reflect the expertise of the team as well as the current concerns for health and social care. At the present time the curriculum is likely to include the following areas/themes: domestic violence, substance misuse, homelessness, nosocomial infections, prisoners’ health and other relevant contemporary issues.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is for students to examine contemporary International and European perspectives on health and welfare, with a focus on policy, provision, systems and practice. The focus will be on supporting students to use comparative analysis to understand different provision, explore ways of working within and across geographical boundaries. Students may examine a range of global issues and their impact on populations and their wellbeing. A specific feature of this module is the choice to participate in a study trip abroad that will explore the range of health and social care services available to older people. More information, including costs relating to this trip are outlined in the Fees Tab.

Module Overview

The module will take an interdisciplinary approach by examining how people think, act and interact with one another. In doing so it will challenge 'taken for granted' notions about crime and punishment. By focusing upon the development of the individual person behind the crime this allows us to address the question of motivations for crime as well as the role of psychology in responding to crime. Students will be expected to consider the implications of crime not only the prisoner but also the children, the family and wider society.

Module Overview

This module aims to give students the opportunity to examine how different people respond to health, wellbeing and illness. The role of the rapidly expanding discipline of health psychology can be discussed in relation to psychological procedures for the assessment, intervention and prevention of ill health. Students also have the opportunity to consider individuals, families, age, cultures, religions, gender, psychological and social health and wellbeing.

Module Overview

The module will provide students with an opportunity to study mental health and wellbeing. This will include a broad coverage of the history of research and treatment relating to mental health and illness; the legal framework and the particular role of health and social care practitioners; diagnostic categories and frameworks and typical mental illnesses; social science and social understandings of mental health and illness: mental health problems and particular groups in society, including children and adolescents; the service user movement in mental health; alternative treatments and some current research trends.

Module Overview

This module aims to increase students awareness of the extent to which the policy process of government affects individuals in their everyday personal and professional lives. It will build on knowledge through a critical analysis of substantive areas of health and social care policy documentation, such a government policy on ageing, on disability, on social housing, on public transport, on benefits systems, on health and communities, on access to leisure and recreation and on communities.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to introduce students to contemporary debates about responding to social change in health and social care. It aims to encourage a critical understanding of the analyses within health and social policy transformations and the theories and evidence that matter in these debates. Students will have the opportunity to be introduced to the institutions, policies and populations implicated in responses to change and how people can make a difference.

Module Overview

The research methods module is intended to enable students to explore and develop a critical appreciation of health and social care research, utilising both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Students may develop skills in reading, analysing, critically evaluating and utilising research, whilst having an opportunity to explore research methods. This will also help to prepare students for your Dissertation (Independent Study) in level three.

Module Overview

This module is optional for students within the BSc Health and Social Care programme. Study abroad is a year-long module which allows students to spend a year abroad, between their second and third year at Lincoln, at one of the University’s approved partner institutions. Students must have successfully completed their second year of study at Lincoln (and have a good record of attendance) to be eligible for this opportunity.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is for students to undertake an extended, independently produced, literature based research study in an area of health and/or social care in an area of their choosing. Utilising and building on knowledge, theory, skills and values developed throughout their studies, students will be supported to synthesise a broad range of information into a coherent and competent study, demonstrating a capacity for independent thought and to use critical and analytical abilities.

Module Overview

Students have the opportunity to examine the construction of difference, specifically its construction by dominant groups to form a basis for discrimination and oppression and erosion of human rights. Students may consider how emotions and beliefs can negatively impact on communication and how barriers to working across difference can be overcome, including the development of effective ways of communicating and working across difference, students will critically reflect on their own beliefs and their own practice in relation to working across difference in an unequal and diverse society.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is for students to gain an understanding and skills in promotion of health and wellbeing. Students can examine the historical, political, policy, economic, social and cultural influences that have determined and influenced initiatives and the provision of services to support individuals, groups and communities to make informed, healthy life style choices. The focus will be on developing knowledge of health and its determinants through an analyses of the complex issues regarding how health is created and how health behaviours are brought about. Students may consider how to champion ways of working to promote health and wellbeing, based on evidence of effectiveness and also clear ethical principles.

Module Overview

Following historical discussions, this module will focus on the contemporary provision of health and social care, particularly the challenges and rewards offered by the implementation of a partnership (multi-agency) approach. Students will have the opportunity to develop a greater understanding of the impact on day-to-day management of organisational culture by looking at how to manage time, people and quality and the impact of good mentorship and leadership on effective management.

Module Overview

Although not engaged on a vocational programme with formally assessed placements, all students on the Health and Social Care programme are expected to acquire some relevant experience, either in a paid or voluntary capacity, whilst undertaking undergraduate studies. More details on this can be found under Placements in the Features Tab. This module provides an opportunity to utilise relevant experience acquired in Health, Social Care, and Education and associated welfare practice environments as a basis for an organisational analysis and practice reflection. The module will be of particular value as a preparation for making career choices and to enhance employability by virtue of learning from experience.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to a range of contemporary models of counselling and guidance practice. The aim is to give students the opportunity to develop skills and attitudes that can be of value in a variety of human service settings. A key feature of the module will be to allow students the opportunity to make judgements as to the appropriateness of using such techniques in different scenarios.

Module Overview

This module aims to offer students the opportunity to explore in depth the context and issues of adult health and social care and the work roles available within it. It focuses on both national policy developments and local provision, with the emphasis on the perspectives of service users and practitioners. The module will be of particular value to students as a preparation for making career choices and to enhance their employability.

Module Overview

This module considers how to engage with children and families to assess and respond to needs and how to make professional judgements in decisions to safeguard and promote children’s welfare. A further key theme is working in partnership both with children and families and other agencies, considering how, in practice this can best be promoted at different levels and stages of decision-making. Emphasis will be on current research and developments. This module will be of particular value to students as a preparation for making career choices and to enhance their employability.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

How you are assessed

A variety of assessment strategies are used including formative assessment, essays, reports, poster presentations, reflective journals, group work, in-class tests and, MCQ's, examinations.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

A variety of assessment strategies are used including formative assessment, essays, reports, poster presentations, reflective journals, group work, in-class tests and, MCQs, examinations.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Fees and Scholarships

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

There is an opportunity for an overseas work experience visit to Europe as part of the Comparative Health and Social Care module. Students will be able to explore policies and practices relating to the needs of a service user group. The cost of this is approximately £400, which students are required to pay upfront. There are no marks awarded for participation in this trip, students who decide not to go would not be disadvantaged.

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

There is an opportunity for an overseas work experience visit to Europe as part of the Comparative Health and Social Care module. Students will be able to explore policies and practices relating to the needs of a service user group. The cost of this is approximately £400, which students are required to pay upfront. There are no marks awarded for participation in this trip, students who decide not to go would not be disadvantaged.

Entry Requirements 2020-21

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 104 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

Other requirements include:

• Satisfactory completion of an Enhanced Disclosure from the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) (formerly the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB)).

When you choose Health and Social in your UCAS application, you will be asked an additional question regarding criminal convictions. Here you must declare all spent and unspent criminal convictions including (but not limited to) cautions, reprimands, final warnings, bind over orders or similar and details of any minor offences, fixed penalty notices, penalty notices for disorder, ASBOs or VOOs.


International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

This programme is not open to students who require a Tier 4 visa to study in the UK.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Entry Requirements 2021-22

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 104 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

Other requirements include:

• Satisfactory completion of an Enhanced Disclosure from the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) (formerly the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB)).

When you choose Health and Social in your UCAS application, you will be asked an additional question regarding criminal convictions. Here you must declare all spent and unspent criminal convictions including (but not limited to) cautions, reprimands, final warnings, bind over orders or similar and details of any minor offences, fixed penalty notices, penalty notices for disorder, ASBOs or VOOs.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Teaching and Learning During Covid-19

At Lincoln, Covid-19 has encouraged us to review our practices and, as a result, to take the opportunity to find new ways to enhance the student experience. We have made changes to our teaching and learning approach and to our campus, to ensure that students and staff can enjoy a safe and positive learning experience. We will continue to follow Government guidance and work closely with the local Public Health experts as the situation progresses, and adapt our teaching and learning accordingly to keep our campus as safe as possible.

Study

The Comparative Health in Health and Social Care module offers students the chance to participate in a study trip abroad where they can explore the range of health and social care services available to older people. There are opportunities to gain work experience. Please note that students are responsible for covering their own travel, accommodation, and general living costs while studying abroad or on work experience.

The study abroad year is available to those who have successfully completed the first and second year of the degree. There are two places available. Places are subject to academic criteria and good attendance. The year includes funding for accommodation, food, and travel expenses, however, students will be responsible for their living costs.

Placements

Although not engaged on a vocational programme with formally assessed placements, all students on the Health and Social Care course are required to acquire relevant work experience in a paid or voluntary setting.

This can be undertaken at home during the summer or during term time in Lincoln, and the surrounding areas. Students will be fully supported as they produce a written assignment about the organisation and plan their own professional development. Students are responsible for their own travel, accommodation, and general living costs while on a study trip or placement.

Placements are not formally assessed, however, the work undertaken during any voluntary and paid placements in the first two years of the programme will inform the third year core module: Skills and Professional Development.

Training Opportunities

Students can gain a certificate for First Aid training (basic and advanced) as part of the Human Bioscience module in the first year, at no extra cost.

You will also have the chance to gain a Mental Health First Aid certificate as part of the Mental Health and Wellbeing module in the second year, at no extra cost.

In year three, students who choose the Counselling and Guidance Skills module have the opportunity to undergo Suicide Awareness and Intervention Training.

"Studying Health and Social Care at Lincoln was life changing. The course content and quality of teaching was excellent. It provided me with a sound knowledge and skills base for studying at postgraduate level."

Alice, BSc (Hons) Health and Social Care graduate

Virtual Open Days

While you may not be able to visit us in person at the moment, you can still find out more about the University of Lincoln and what it is like to live and study here at one of our live Virtual Open Days.

Book Your Place

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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