Research Studentships

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Funding Your Research

At the University of Lincoln, postgraduate students are an integral part of our research community. They work alongside talented academics and researchers from around the world, contributing to our growing reputation for internationally excellent research.

There are opportunities to get involved in exciting research projects by applying for a studentship. The University offers a range of studentships including funded and part-funded opportunities, please refer to the current studentships information below.  

CDT 2 Col

EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Agri-Food Robotics: AgriFoRwArdS

The University of Lincoln has launched the world's first Centre for Doctoral Training in Agri-Food Robotics in collaboration with the University of Cambridge and the University of East Anglia. This new advanced training centre in agri-food robotics is creating the largest ever cohort of Robotics and Autonomous Systems (RAS) specialists for the global food and farming sectors, thanks to a multi-million pound funding award the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Applications for entry into the CDT programme starting in October 2023 are now open.

Find out More

Current Studentship Opportunities

Use the dropdown menus below to browse current funded and part-funded studentship opportunities at the University of Lincoln, listed by academic College. 

Studentship Terms and Conditions

Antimicrobial Resistance in Foodborne Bacteria – Characterising Amr Bacteria and Genes in the Food Chain

PhD Funded Studentship

Reference Number: 2AO-22-2

Project Supervisors: Dr Bukola Onarinde, Dr Ron Dixon

The World Health Organization (WHO) definition of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is “resistance of a microorganism to an antimicrobial drug that was originally effective for treatment of infections caused by it. Resistant microorganisms (including bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites) are able to withstand attack by antimicrobial drugs, such as antibacterial drugs (e.g., antibiotics), antifungals, antivirals, and antimalarials, so that standard treatments become ineffective and infections persist, increasing the risk of spread to others” (WHO, 2018a).

AMR is a major global threat to humans, animals, plants, food systems, and the environment, that is already affecting lives and livelihoods. New evidence suggests that this global threat is more immediate and severe than originally thought in 2019 1.27million deaths were estimated to be directly attributable to AMR and 4.95 million deaths to be associated with AMR (Antimicrobial Resistance Collaborators, 2022). This level of mortality threatens the attainment of the SDGs at every level. Addressing the public health threat posed by AMR is a national strategic priority for the UK and led to the Government publishing both a 20-year vision of AMR and a 5-year (2019 to 2024) AMR National Action Plan (NAP) which sets out actions to slow the development and spread of AMR with a focus on antimicrobials. The NAP used an integrated ‘One-Health’ approach which spanned people, animals, agriculture, and the environment and calls for activities to “identify and assess the sources, pathways, and exposure risks” of AMR.

Antimicrobial resistance is a complex issue driven by a variety of interconnected factors enabling microorganisms to withstand the killing or microstatic effects of antimicrobial treatments, such as antibiotics, antifungals, disinfectants, preservatives. Microorganisms may be inherently resistant to such treatments or can change and adapt to overcome the effects of such treatments. Microorganisms can acquire antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs) because of mutation or from other microorganisms through a range of mechanisms. The widespread use of antimicrobial treatments is known to result in selection for AMR in microorganisms.

Food plays an important role in the development and spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and is one of many routes by which consumers can be exposed to AMR bacteria. The ingestion of pathogenic AMR bacteria via food may result in human illness which may be difficult to treat with antibiotics. Non-pathogenic AMR bacteria also contribute to the reservoir of AMR within our food chain which may lead to the onward transmission of antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs) to pathogenic bacteria.

The overall aim of this project is to improve our understanding of the transmission and flow of AMR in the food chain by characterising AMR bacteria (pathogens and commensals) and their genes recovered from a continuing field study of foods and the environment. AMR bacteria with interesting profiles recovered from the food samples will be selected and further characteristics including virulence assay, molecular mechanisms of resistance and/or biofilm production will be studied. Areas such as plasmid based colistin resistance or ESBL resistance in Gram-negative bacteria are also likely mechanisms for further study.

The ideal candidate for this 3 year full-time post will have experience of working in a microbiology laboratory with a range of Category 2 organisms, be aware of molecular approaches to microbiology analysis and be capable of writing detailed monthly scientific reports. The student appointed will be expected to work closely with a full time Research Assistant under the supervision of the Director of Studies.

We are strongly committed to equality and diversity, and to creating an inclusive working environment where all can thrive. We encourage applications from any interested candidate.

We welcome informal enquiries about the project, role, or the University and surrounding area. Please direct these to the project director of studies, Dr Bukola Onarinde at bonarinde@lincoln.ac.uk.

Location

The successful applicant will be based at National Centre for Food Manufacturing's (NCFM) Holbeach Campus. The NCFM is a satellite campus of the University of Lincoln, situated in Holbeach in South Lincolnshire.

How to Apply

Applicants should have a first or upper second-class honours degree or equivalent in a relevant area (e.g. microbiology, food microbiology, or molecular biology). Applicants with a relevant Master's degree are particularly welcome. Applicants should possess excellent report writing and English language communication skills, teamwork skills, collaboration skills, and an ability to work to deadlines. Past experience of microbiology and molecular biology research would be highly desirable.

Please email your CV (no longer than 2 pages) and a 1 page cover letter outlining your interest, relevant experience to Dr Bukola Onarinde at bonarinde@lincoln.ac.uk.

Those called for interview will be required to prepare a presentation. Please quote reference ID in the subject line of the email.

Closing Date: 23 October 2022

Interviews: w/c 21 November 2022. Shortlisted candidates will be contacted directly to arrange a suitable time for an interview.

Start date: By agreement

Eligibility and Funding

This is a fully funded studentship for three years, applicable to Home students and International students over 3 years.

Stipend: £1,338.50 per month for 36 months (£16,062 per annum stipend paid in 36 monthly instalments).

The studentship may require you to offer up to 6 hours of teaching or laboratory demonstration or related work per week, the income from which will go towards the cost of your tuition fees.

Phase-transfer catalysis for nucleophilic fluorination

PhD Studentship

Reference: 2CA-22-171

It is important that the reactions that we use to make chemicals are as safe and sustainable as possible. This fully-funded PhD project will examine the use of fluoride salts as safe and readily-available reagents for the synthesis of important fluorinated molecules. Over 25% of all drugs on the marked today contain a fluorine atom.

Fluoride salts have been under-used for the synthesis of fluorinated molecules as they have challenges around their low solubility and high basicity. This project will involve the synthesis of novel phase-transfer catalysts to solve these challenges, and to study the reactivity of these catalysts in fluorination reactions.

This PhD will train a student in a broad range of techniques in synthetic chemistry, as well as important analytical methods such as NMR, mass spectrometry and GC/HPLC. There will be opportunities to use modern synthetic methods such as photochemistry and electrochemistry.

The School of Chemistry at Lincoln is ideally set-up to perform this research, with a range of equipment for synthetic chemistry including Schlenk lines/glovebox for air-sensitive techniques and automated chromatography. Advanced analytical instrumentation including a 500 MHz NMR spectrometer and a range of Mass Spectrometry and HPLC/GC equipment are also available. 

We are strongly committed to equality and diversity, and to creating an inclusive working environment where all can thrive. We encourage applications from any interested candidate.

We welcome informal enquiries about the project, role, or the university and surrounding area. Please direct these to the project supervisor, Dr Graham Pattison at gpattison@lincoln.ac.uk.

How to Apply

An application of a CV and covering letter to Dr Graham Pattison at gpattison@lincoln.ac.uk.

Applications Open: 18 July 2022

Applications Close: 15 August 2022

Funding

Full fees, Home/EU students over 3.5 years
 
£1,338.50 per month for 42 months
 

PhD Studentship

Health 4: Improving Resilience of Future Healthcare Systems Through Digitalisation and Industry 4.0 Base Technologies

Supervisors: Professor Dirk Schaefer, Dr Sepehr Maleki.

Background

Today’s complex healthcare networks are plagued by problems such as high cost, varying levels of customer satisfaction, and the inability of network administrators to respond effectively to short-term variations in operations and disruptions (planned or unplanned).

In a different context, Industry 4.0 is redefining how companies manufacture “goods” today and in future. Digital/Smart Manufacturing sets out the concepts for how companies can achieve faster innovation and increase efficiencies across horizontal and vertically integrated value chains. However, in the domain of healthcare delivery service provision (a “good” of utmost importance to society at large), its entities and supply networks, which is still largely dependent on siloed, segregated information and paper-based processes, incorporating the paradigm of Industry 4.0 would allow us to redefine efficient and effective future healthcare service provision, along with new business and strategic operational models based on digitization and virtualization. If future complex healthcare networks are to incorporate Industry 4.0 core principles to enable similar innovations and reap synergy effects Industry 4.0 released in the manufacturing domain, they require a framework within which to incorporate these core principles.

The aim of this project is to investigate and understand if, and to what extent, lessons learned from research in the digital manufacturing domain may be applied/adapted to the domain of future healthcare service delivery systems to improve their resilience through digitalisation, digital twins, and data analytics.

The project consists of the following phases:

Phase 1: Background research and literature review, comparison of the manufacturing systems and healthcare service delivery systems domains.

Phase 2: Definition of resilience and suitable metrics in the context of healthcare service delivery systems and networks in general and concerning the UK National Health Service in particular, and analysis of past events and root causes that triggered bottlenecks and other disturbances that negatively impacted resilience.

Phase 3: Development of an agent-based model of one NHS subsystem or entity of manageable complexity as a framework for studying the impact of digitalization and data analytics on the resilience of this subsystem.

Phase 4: Development of a digital twin of this select subsystem and its critical processes for data capture, visualisation, and data analytics, including computational methods to identify and predict potential issues and propose interventions to prevent or alleviate their impact.

Phase 5: Test, verify and validate a proof-of-concept demonstrator system.

The successful candidate will work within a vibrant and rapidly growing community of PhD students and postdoctoral researchers in the School of Engineering. They will become a member of the School’s Industrial Digitalisation and Systems Intelligence (IDSI) Research Group, and have the opportunity to collaborate with a clinical advisor and colleagues from the School of Computer Science, Lincoln Medical School, and other groups across the College of Science and beyond as needed.

Funding

This is a fully-funded studentship for three years, applicable to Home and International applicants. It covers all fees and provides an annual stipend of £16,062 paid in monthly instalments.

How to Apply

Applicants must have a first or upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) in a relevant area. Candidates with background/experience in manufacturing, systems engineering, data analytics, etc. are strongly encouraged to apply. Excellent English language communication skills (IELTS score of 6.5 for international students) and the ability to work to deadlines are essential.

Please apply through the University of Lincoln’s online application system with a CV (2 pages), covering letter, certified copies of degree certificates and transcripts, and a personal statement outlining your approach to the project and also explaining how your qualifications and experience meet the requirements (about 1 page), and contact details for at least two academic references.

Shortlisted candidates will be contacted directly to arrange a suitable time for an interview. Applications are reviewed continuously until the position is filled. The anticipated start date is 1 October 2022 or earlier.

PhD Studentship

Education 4.0: Design of Cyber-Physical Social Systems for Advancing Personalised Learning in Engineering Education

Supervisors: Professor Dirk Schaefer, Dr Sepehr Maleki.

Background

To prepare future graduates for work, universities must align their teaching and processes with technological advancements. Education 4.0 is an approach to learning that aligns itself with the fourth industrial revolution.

The most significant change we are likely to see as part of Education 4.0 is a more profound fusion of technology into the teaching process. The ultimate purpose of utilising this technology and adopting new methods is to place students at the centre of the education process, shifting the focus from teaching to learning. Higher education institutions are also moving towards a more personalized way of learning.

Personalised learning refers to instruction in which the pace of learning and the instructional approach are optimised for the needs of each learner. Learning objectives, instructional practices, instructional content (and its sequencing) and assessment vehicles may vary based on learner needs. In addition, learning activities are meaningful and relevant to learners, driven by their interests, and often self-initiated.

By utilising data and tracking student performance, universities will be able to identify struggling students and provide optimised learning strategies to suit their needs. Education 4.0 embraces this advance in analytics and uses it to treat each student as an individual, understanding that everyone's learning needs and desired outcomes will be different.

The aim of this project is to explore the possibilities of Cyber-Physical Social Systems (CPSS) as educational platforms for advancing personalised learning.

The project consists of the following phases:

Phase 1: Background research and literature review to understand the fundamental principles of Education 4.0, personalised learning, and cyber-physical technical and social systems and how to utilise and integrate them into future education delivery platforms.

Phase 2: Identification of the general requirements for the design and realisation of future CPSSs for personalized learning from the perspectives of learners, educators, and learning technologists, with particular emphasis on the context of engineering subjects.

Phase 3: Design of a theoretical framework for CPSSs for personalised learning in the context of engineering education.

Phase 4: Development of a basic prototype system and demonstrator in the context of a suitable engineering class.

Phase 5: Implementation and test of the system as a proof-of-concept and evaluation of its efficacy.

The successful candidate will work within a vibrant and rapidly growing community of PhD students and postdoctoral researchers in the School of Engineering. They will become a member of the School's Industrial Digitalisation and Systems Intelligence (IDSI) Research Group, and have the opportunity to collaborate with colleagues from Education, Psychology, Computer Science, and other groups across the College of Science and beyond as needed.

Funding

This is a fully-funded studentship for three years, applicable to Home and International applicants. It covers all fees and provides an annual stipend of £16,062 paid in monthly instalments.

How to Apply

Applicants must have a first or upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) in a relevant area. Candidates with background/experience in engineering education, engineering design and systems engineering, computer science, and ICT are strongly encouraged to apply. Excellent English language communication skills (IELTS score of 6.5 or above for international students) and the ability to work to deadlines are essential.

Please apply through the University of Lincoln's online applications system with a CV (2 pages), covering letter, certified copies of degree certificates and transcripts, and a personal statement outlining your approach to the project and also explaining how your qualifications and experience meet the requirements (about 1 page), and contact details for at least two academic references.

Shortlisted candidates will be contacted directly to arrange a suitable time for an interview. Applications are reviewed continuously until the position is filled. The anticipated start date is 1 October 2022 or earlier.

PhD Funded Studentship

Reference number: 2AU-22-1

Project leads: Dr Mo Ray and Mr Chris Erskine

Self-directed Care and Strengths Based Practice

Adult social care policy highlights the importance of supporting people to use self-directed care (for example, via direct payments). Research has suggested that direct payments and other forms of self-directed care can support people to make choices about how to meet their care and support needs which realises personal aspiration and is built on individual strengths. Yet, evidence suggests that there are differences in the extent to which different groups of people benefit from self-directed care as well as differences in the extent to which self-directed care moves beyond meeting care needs. 

Strengths based approaches should arguably provide a practice framework which supports and encourages people to find creative and innovative solutions to their support and care needs. Questions about the extent to which strengths based care enhances the experience and outcomes of self-directed care merit investigation. For example, can strengths based approaches realise their potential if services are built on a different premise? How are strengths based approaches used with people with complex and changing needs? How do strengths based approaches work alongside other approaches such as, rights based approaches? 

This PhD should be focused on self-directed care and strengths based approaches but, beyond that, the student can shape the focus of their research question/area of investigation.

We envisage that the research will take place in the East Midlands and the studentship is part-funded by Lincolnshire County Council.

The successful candidate will be part of the Healthy Ageing Research Group (HARG) based in the School of Health and Social Care in the College of Social Science at the University of Lincoln. 

Please contact Mo Ray (mray@lincoln.ac.uk) for further discussion.

Entry Requirements

Applicants should have a first or upper second-class honours degree or equivalent in a relevant area and those with a Master’s degree in social work, social sciences, or sociology are strongly encouraged to apply. Applicants should possess excellent written and English language communication skills, the ability to forge relationships with a wide range of stakeholders, and an ability to plan goals and work to deadlines.

The studentship will cover the tuition fees at the Home student rate and there is also a £10,000 per annum stipend that will be paid in monthly instalments for 3 years.

Please email your CV (no longer than two pages) and a one-page cover letter outlining your interest, relevant experience, and proposed research question/area for the topic to Maureen Young (studentshipscss@lincoln.ac.uk). Those called for interview will be required to complete an online application form, and prepare a presentation. Please quote project ID in the subject line of the email.

Closing Date: 19 September 2022

Interviews: Week commencing 26 September 2022

Start Date: 3 October 2022 (subject to agreement)

Ecological Populism: The Representation, Governance and Mobilisation of Climate Politics

PhD GTA Funded Studentship

Reference Number: 2AW-22-3

Project Leads: Dr Rico Isaacs, Dr Andrew Kythreotis and Dr Conohar Scott

Do you want to explore two of the most pressing issues of our age? Do you want to make a difference to climate politics? Populism and ecologism are two of the most important issues of our age, yet we know little about the relationship between the two phenomena. This research studentship will focus on populist ecologies and the successful candidate will investigate the relationship between populism and ecologism, taking account of the multivalent nature of the relationship, the discourse and aesthetics of ecologism within populism, the institutional management of ecological issues by populist leaders, the extent to which populist discourse and techniques can be used to mobilise climate action, and the policy implications of populist approaches to climate crisis. Prospective areas of focus could include:

- The multi-scalar and multi-faceted relationship between ecologism and populism (e.g., local, national, global levels; distinction between populist leaders for and against climate action; and the political economy of climate capitalism)

- The representation, discourse, and aesthetics of ecologism within populism

- The impact of populism on the governance and management of ecological concerns

- The extent to which populist discourses, strategies, and techniques can be used for the mobilisation of climate action.

There is no specific case or country study which has been set, so the studentship could focus on a single case or be more comparative in nature.

The successful candidate will be part of the Politics of Disorder Research Group and the Centre for Ecological Justice, both of which are housed in the College of Social Sciences at the University of Lincoln. The successful candidate will also have the opportunity to work with the Lincoln Climate Commission (LCC) and use their engagement with the Commission to develop the policy facing implications of their research.

Contact: Dr. Rico Isaacs (risaacs@lincoln.ac.uk) for further discussion.

How to Apply

Applicants should have a first or upper second-class honours degree or equivalent in a relevant area and those with a Master’s degree in politics, international relations, sociology, human geography, or environmental sciences are strongly encouraged to apply. Applicants should possess excellent written and English language communication skills and an ability to work to deadlines.

Please email your CV (no longer than two pages) and a one-page cover letter outlining your interest, relevant experience, and proposed research question/puzzle for the topic to Maureen Young (studentshipscss@lincoln.ac.uk).

Those called for interview will be required to complete an online application form and prepare a presentation. Please quote project ID in the subject line of the email.

Closing Date: 11 July 2022

Interviews: w/c 1 August 2022

Start date: 1 September 2022 (subject to agreement)

Eligibility and Funding

Suitably qualified candidates worldwide may apply, although international students must self-fund the difference between the International and Home fee rate - £10,104 per annum.

£16,062 per annum stipend paid in monthly instalments.

The studentship may require you to do up to six hours of teaching or related work per week, the income from which will go towards the cost of your tuition fees and any surplus fees will be paid by the College.

 

Barriers and Enablers to Health and Care Staff Accessing Health and Wellbeing Support in Rural and Urban Settings

PhD GTA Funded Studentship

Reference Number: 2CJ-22-1

Project Leads: Professor Mark Gussy, Dr Ian McGonagle, Dr David Nelson

The University of Lincoln’s newly established Lincoln International Institute for Rural Health (LIIRH) based in the Lincoln Medical School, is offering a fully funded PhD studentship that will investigate access, experiences, and outcomes of the current occupational health and wellbeing offer in rural and urban service settings.

Prior to Covid-19 staff stress, burn-out, turn over, recruitment difficulties within some professions in specific operational or geographical areas, retention, and sickness and absence were key workforce challenges facing the health and care workforce in the Lincolnshire Integrated Care System (ICS). The pandemic has brought these issues into sharp focus and highlighted known and unknown inequities in access to support. A considerable amount of health and wellbeing offers, support, and funding have been made available to staff. However, uptake of these offers has been sporadic and better utilised by some organisations and/or groups than others. For example, we know that minority ethnic groups were disproportionately impacted by the pandemic and are keen to understand what health and wellbeing support would be helpful and accessible to this group of staff.

This research project will be embedded in the Lincolnshire Integrated Care System (ICS) and will be interdisciplinary in its focus and in the methods/techniques underpinning it. A strong aptitude for mixed methods in particular is desirable. The successful candidate will be based in the new Lincoln Medical School Building as part of the Lincoln International Institute for Rural Health in the College of Social Sciences.

Contact: Professor Mark Gussy: mgussy@lincoln.ac.uk

How to Apply

Applicants should have a first or upper second class honours degree or equivalent in a relevant area (e.g. mental health, nursing, allied health, public health, psychology, social science). Applicants with a relevant Master's degree are particularly welcome. Applicants should possess excellent report writing and English language communication skills, and an ability to work to deadlines. Past experience of applied research methods would be highly desirable.

Those called for interview will be required to prepare a presentation.

Closing Date: 1 May 2022

Interviews: provisionally week beginning 23 May 2022

Start date: By agreement

Eligibility and Funding

Suitably qualified candidates worldwide may apply. Home fees will be covered by the studentship but international students must self-fund the difference between the International and UK fee rate – for 2021/22 entry this would be £11,600.

An annual stipend of £15,609 will be paid in monthly instalment.

The studentship may require you to offer up to 6 hours of teaching or related work per week, the income from which will go towards the cost of your tuition fees and any surplus fees will be paid by the College.

Integrating oral health into general health and social care

PhD GTA-funded Studentship

Reference: 2CJ-22-2

Project Leads: Prof. Mark Gussy, Dr David Nelson, Prof. Amanda Kenny

The University of Lincoln’s newly established Lincoln International Institute for Rural Health (LIIRH) based in the Lincoln Medical School is offering a fully funded PhD studentship that will investigate the barriers facilitators to the effective integration of oral health into primary and social care.

Optimal oral health is essential for positive general health and wellbeing. Non-dental health professionals may be well placed to support and promote oral health. Simple and low-cost interventions delivered alongside routine health care delivery has the potential to reduce dental diseases, improve quality of life and reduce the overall cost burden to the health system. Despite this, there has been little integration of oral health into general health and social care systems. Multiple barriers and facilitators at different levels have been identified including the lack of interprofessional education and discipline-oriented training in health and social care tertiary courses.       

This research will examine the current curricula of health and social care disciplines offered by universities to understand how oral health competencies are currently integrated across and within programmes with the aim of better preparing non-dental health band care professionals to support integrated oral health. The research project will be interdisciplinary in its focus and in the methods/techniques underpinning it. A strong aptitude for mixed methods is desirable. The successful candidate will be based in the new Lincoln Medical School as part of the Lincoln International Institute for Rural Health in the College of Social Sciences.

Contact: Prof Mark Gussy: mgussy@lincoln.ac.uk

How to Apply

Applicants should have a first or upper second-class honours degree or equivalent in a relevant area (e.g. oral/dental health, nursing, allied health, public health, psychology, social science). Applicants with a relevant Master's degree are particularly welcome. Applicants should possess excellent report writing and English language communication skills, and an ability to work to deadlines. Past experience of applied research methods would be highly desirable.

Please email your CV (no longer than 2 pages) and a 1-page cover letter outlining your interest, relevant experience to Professor Mark Gussy at mgussy@lincoln.ac.uk

Those called for interview will be required to prepare a presentation. Please quote reference ID in the subject line of the email.

Closing Date: 16 September 2022  

Interviews: provisionally week beginning 4 October 2022

Start date: By agreement

Eligibility and Funding

Suitably qualified candidates worldwide may apply, although international students must self-fund the difference between the International and UK/EU fee rate. 

Home/EU fees will be covered by the studentship and a £16,062 per annum stipend will be paid in 36 monthly instalments.

 

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Postgraduate Enquiries
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