Key Information

Full-time

MPhil: 1.5-3 years. PhD: 2-4 years.

Part-time

MPhil: 2-4 years. PhD: 3-6 years part-time.

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

CONCONRP

MPhil/PhD Conservation of Cultural Heritage

With a magnificent array of historical resources, Lincoln is an ideal location in which to undertake study and research in conservation.

Key Information

Full-time

MPhil: 1.5-3 years. PhD: 2-4 years.

Part-time

MPhil: 2-4 years. PhD: 3-6 years part-time.

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

CONCONRP

Teaching and Learning During COVID-19

The current COVID-19 pandemic has meant that at Lincoln we are making changes to our teaching and learning approach and to our campus, to ensure that students and staff can enjoy a safe and positive learning experience here at Lincoln.

From autumn 2020 our aim is to provide an on-campus learning experience. Our intention is that teaching will be delivered through a mixture of face-to-face and online sessions. There will be social activities in place for students - all in line with appropriate social distancing and fully adhering to any changes in government guidance as our students' safety is our primary concern.

We want to ensure that your Lincoln experience is as positive, exciting and enjoyable as possible as you embark on the next phase of your life. COVID-19 has encouraged us to review our practices and, as a result, to take the opportunity to find new ways to enhance the Lincoln experience. It has challenged us to find innovative new approaches to supporting students' learning and social interactions. These learning experiences, which blend digital and face-to-face, will be vital in helping to prepare our students for a 21st Century workplace.

Of course at Lincoln, personal tutoring is key to our delivery, providing every student with a dedicated tutor to support them throughout their time here at the University. Smaller class sizes mean our academic staff can engage with each student as an individual, and work with them to enhance their strengths. In this environment we hope that students have more opportunities for discussion and engagement and get to know each other better.

Course learning outcomes are vital to prepare you for your future and we aim to utilise this mix of face-to-face and online teaching to deliver these. Students benefit from and enjoy fieldtrips and placements and, whilst it is currently hard to predict the availability of these, we are working hard and with partners and will aspire to offer these wherever possible - obviously in compliance with whatever government guidance is in place at the time.

We are utilising a range of different digital tools for teaching including our dedicated online managed learning environment. All lectures for larger groups will be delivered online using interactive software and a range of different formats. We aim to make every contact count and seminars and small group sessions will maximise face-to-face interaction. Practicals, workshops, studio sessions and performance-based sessions are planned to be delivered face-to-face, in a socially distanced way with appropriate PPE.

The University of Lincoln is a top 20 TEF Gold University and we have won awards for our approach to teaching and learning, our partnerships and industry links, and the opportunities these provide for our students. Our aim is that our online and socially distanced delivery during this COVID-19 pandemic is engaging and that students can interact with their tutors and each other and contribute to our academic community.

As and when restrictions start to lift, we aim to deliver an increasing amount of face-to-face teaching and external engagements, depending on each course. Safety will continue to be our primary focus and we will respond to any changing circumstances as they arise to ensure our community is supported. More information about the specific approaches for each course will be shared when teaching starts.

Of course as you start a new academic year it will be challenging but we will be working with you every step of the way. For all our students new and established, we look forward to welcoming you to our vibrant community this Autumn. If you have any questions please visit our FAQs or contact us on 01522 886644.

Dr Jim Cheshire - Programme Leader

Dr Jim Cheshire - Programme Leader

Dr Jim Cheshire's research examines the literary and visual culture of the nineteenth century and thematically is centred on Victorian medievalism. He has worked on stained glass, the Gothic Revival, and publishing history especially the literary and material culture surrounding the career of Alfred Tennyson. He works closely with colleagues in the Conservation subject area on object analysis and interpretation, and acts as Historical Consultant to Lincoln Conservation.

School Staff List Make an Enquiry

Welcome to MPhil/PhD Conservation of Cultural Heritage

These programmes of study are designed for students who have a passion to pursue a conservation or heritage-based research project defined by themselves, but with the support of an academic environment and supervisors.

Research students will be able to access support and training designed to develop the practical and critical skills necessary for investigation and study at doctoral level. Direction will be available from a supervisory team, and students will can benefit from the School’s research expertise spanning a broad range of conservation and cultural heritage specialisms.

Strong links exist within the College of Arts and with the College of Science, and there is an interdisciplinary research culture that facilitates collaboration with colleagues across a wide range of topics. Current research areas include archaeological conservation, paint and pigment analysis, and preventative conservation.

How You Study

Study at MPhil/PhD level takes the form of supervised individual research. Students are expected to work on one topic of their choice for the duration of the study period. Students are expected to produce appropriate written work on a regular basis for submission to their supervisors, who can then provide feedback and agree the next stage of work.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the majority of time is spent in independent study and research. Students will have meetings with their academic supervisor, but the frequency of these will vary depending on individual requirements, subject area, staff availability, and stage of programme.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs. For research programmes this includes research fees and research support fees.

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How you are assessed

The assessment at PhD level takes the form of an approximately 80,000 word thesis.

A PhD is usually awarded based on the quality of the student’s thesis and ability to present and successfully defend their chosen research topic in an oral examination (viva voce). They are also expected to demonstrate how their research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

Fees and Scholarships

Postgraduate study is an investment in yourself and your future, and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

There are more ways than ever before to fund your postgraduate study, whether you want to do a taught or research course. For those wishing to undertake a Master's course, you can apply for a loan as a contribution towards the course and living costs. Loans are also available to those who wish to undertake doctoral study. The University offers a number of scholarships and funded studentships for those interested in postgraduate study. Learn how Master's and PhD loans, scholarships, and studentships can help you fund your studies on our Postgraduate Fees and Funding pages.

Entry Requirements 2020-21

Master’s degree in conservation or related subject. A first or upper second class honours degree with significant experience may be considered.

You will need to submit a research proposal along with your application form. The research proposal will allow us to judge the quality of the application and to decide whether we are able to supervise your project.

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.5 overall, with a minimum of 6.0 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-session English and Academic Study Skills courses. https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/pre-sessionalenglishandacademicstudyskills/ . These specialist courses are designed to help students meet the English language requirements for their intended programme of study.


Please take note of the following guidance:

  • A research proposal will only be considered if there are academics in the subject with an interest in your field. Please study the staff profiles closely to make sure there is at least one member of staff whose interests intersect broadly with your own.
  • The research proposal should be 1,000–2,000 words in length.
  • Clearly define the topic you are interested in and demonstrate understanding of your research area.
  • Include two or three research questions that you will explore in your research.
  • Outline the range of research methodologies you will use to undertake the research.
  • Include a provisional bibliography of primary and secondary sources.
  • You might include a brief literature review of the key works that relate to your topic, particularly if this helps to exemplify the point below.
  • Explain clearly how your research contributes to existing scholarship in the area; what gaps will it fill? How will it further knowledge of the area?
  • Sketch out a provisional plan of work that includes research plans/study visits, and a timetable for the writing of chapters.
  • Make sure the proposal is well presented with sections and subheadings and is free of errors.

Research Areas and Topics

Research areas covered within the School include:

  • Archaeological conservation
  • Architectural paint research
  • Collections management
  • Conservation of a broad range of objects and material types
  • Cultural heritage and climate change
  • Material culture
  • Paint and pigment analysis
  • Preventive conservation

Current PhD topics include:

  • Architectural Paint Research: Examining the theoretical and practice-based contributions to the conservation of built heritage
  • Curating C18 culture: conservation, interpretation, and presentation of the Doddington Hall tapestries
  • Ince and Mayhew and their place in Eighteenth-Century Furniture History

Features

The University is home to Lincoln Conservation, a company that combines research, teaching, and commercial expertise http://www.lincolnconservation.co.uk

When opportunities arise, students may apply to work on live projects, providing the chance to gain professional experience.

Facilities

How to Apply

Enrolment Dates

To support your experience within the postgraduate research community, new students are encouraged to enrol in October, February or May.

In addition to meeting peers across the University who are starting their research programme at the same time, there is access to a central training programme designed around the first three months of study, and targeted support aligned to each stage of the postgraduate research journey. Alternative enrolment dates may be agreed with your supervisor on an individual basis.

Postgraduate Events

Find out more about how postgraduate study can help further your career, develop your knowledge, or even prepare you to start your own business at one of our postgraduate events.

Find out More

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The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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