Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

T700

Course Code

AMEAMEUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

T700

Course Code

AMEAMEUB

BA (Hons) American Studies BA (Hons) American Studies

“American history is longer, larger, more various, more beautiful, and more terrible than anything anyone has ever said about it.” James Baldwin, American novelist and civil rights activist

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

T700

Course Code

AMEAMEUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

T700

Course Code

AMEAMEUB

Teaching and Learning During COVID-19

The current COVID-19 pandemic has meant that at Lincoln we are making changes to our teaching and learning approach and to our campus, to ensure that students and staff can enjoy a safe and positive learning experience here at Lincoln.

From autumn 2020 our aim is to provide an on-campus learning experience. Our intention is that teaching will be delivered through a mixture of face-to-face and online sessions. There will be social activities in place for students - all in line with appropriate social distancing and fully adhering to any changes in government guidance as our students' safety is our primary concern.

We want to ensure that your Lincoln experience is as positive, exciting and enjoyable as possible as you embark on the next phase of your life. COVID-19 has encouraged us to review our practices and, as a result, to take the opportunity to find new ways to enhance the Lincoln experience. It has challenged us to find innovative new approaches to supporting students' learning and social interactions. These learning experiences, which blend digital and face-to-face, will be vital in helping to prepare our students for a 21st Century workplace.

Of course at Lincoln, personal tutoring is key to our delivery, providing every student with a dedicated tutor to support them throughout their time here at the University. Smaller class sizes mean our academic staff can engage with each student as an individual, and work with them to enhance their strengths. In this environment we hope that students have more opportunities for discussion and engagement and get to know each other better.

Course learning outcomes are vital to prepare you for your future and we aim to utilise this mix of face-to-face and online teaching to deliver these. Students benefit from and enjoy fieldtrips and placements and, whilst it is currently hard to predict the availability of these, we are working hard and with partners and will aspire to offer these wherever possible - obviously in compliance with whatever government guidance is in place at the time.

We are utilising a range of different digital tools for teaching including our dedicated online managed learning environment. All lectures for larger groups will be delivered online using interactive software and a range of different formats. We aim to make every contact count and seminars and small group sessions will maximise face-to-face interaction. Practicals, workshops, studio sessions and performance-based sessions are planned to be delivered face-to-face, in a socially distanced way with appropriate PPE.

The University of Lincoln is a top 20 TEF Gold University and we have won awards for our approach to teaching and learning, our partnerships and industry links, and the opportunities these provide for our students. Our aim is that our online and socially distanced delivery during this COVID-19 pandemic is engaging and that students can interact with their tutors and each other and contribute to our academic community.

As and when restrictions start to lift, we aim to deliver an increasing amount of face-to-face teaching and external engagements, depending on each course. Safety will continue to be our primary focus and we will respond to any changing circumstances as they arise to ensure our community is supported. More information about the specific approaches for each course will be shared when teaching starts.

Of course as you start a new academic year it will be challenging but we will be working with you every step of the way. For all our students new and established, we look forward to welcoming you to our vibrant community this Autumn. If you have any questions please visit our FAQs or contact us on 01522 886644.

Dr Thomas Bishop  - Programme Leader

Dr Thomas Bishop - Programme Leader

Dr Tom Bishop's research examines how the development of nuclear weapons shaped American society during the height of the Cold War, and has been funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, The Library of Congress, the European Association for American Studies, and the Historians of the Twentieth Century United States. In 2016, he was recipient of the Marcus Cunliffe Prize for American Studies from the British Association for American Studies. Tom's first book, Every Home a Fortress: Fatherhood and the Family Fallout Shelter will be published in summer 2020.

School Staff List

Welcome to BA (Hons) American Studies

Explore the past, present, and potential future of America in this distinctive degree which draws on expertise from across the University of Lincoln in American history, literature, film, music, theatre, visual arts, foreign policy, and politics.

Students have the opportunity to study topics ranging from the cities of the colonial Americas and the American Revolution to the Broadway musical, Hollywood cinema, the battle for civil rights, and the Vietnam War. This course seeks to emphasise the critical examination and interpretation of primary source materials, including novels, films, newspapers, songs, oral histories, protest movements, and political documents.

Students may have the opportunity to deepen their knowledge and broaden their horizons by taking part in a period of study abroad at a partner institution in North America during their third year. Doing so can help develop a greater cultural awareness and resourcefulness. For students who take the optional Spanish language modules as part of their first and second-year studies, the year abroad also provides opportunities for examining Hispanic arts, histories, and cultures.

Welcome to BA (Hons) American Studies

Explore the past, present, and potential future of America in this distinctive degree which draws on expertise from across the University of Lincoln in American history, literature, film, music, theatre, visual arts, foreign policy, and politics.

Students have the opportunity to study topics spanning the cities of the colonial Americas, the American Revolution, the history of the Broadway musical, Hollywood cinema, the battle for civil rights, the Vietnam War, and Chinese-American relations.

This course focuses on the critical examination and interpretation of primary source materials, including novels, films, newspapers, songs, oral histories, protest movements, and political documents.

Students may have the opportunity to deepen their knowledge and broaden their horizons by taking part in a period of study abroad at a partner institution in North America during their third year. Doing so can help develop a greater cultural awareness and resourcefulness. For students who take the optional Spanish language modules as part of their first and second-year studies, the year abroad also provides opportunities for examining Hispanic arts, histories, and cultures.

How You Study

The first year offers introductory modules designed to give students an understanding of American history, arts, politics, and culture. Through lectures, seminars, film screenings, and reading groups students, are introduced to the core questions and themes that drive our understanding of America.

This knowledge is built upon in the following two years, where a range of optional modules are available based on the research specialisms of our academic team.

Students have the opportunity to enrol at a partner institution in North America during their third year. Students can then return to the University of Lincoln to complete the final year of their degree. Students are responsible for their own travel and accommodation costs in addition to their normal living costs throughout the year.

Where applicable, students will also be expected to cover their visa costs. For students who opt to take Spanish as part of their first and second year studies, the year abroad aims to open up opportunities for understanding Hispanic arts, histories, and cultures. By spending a year abroad, students can develop greater cultural awareness and resourcefulness, initiative, and independence in responding to new situations.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

How You Study

The first year offers introductory modules designed to give students an understanding of American history, arts, politics, and culture. Through lectures, seminars, film screenings, and reading groups, students are introduced to the core questions and themes that drive our understanding of America.

This knowledge is built upon in the second and third years, where a range of optional modules are available based on the research specialisms of our academic team.

Students have the opportunity to enrol at a partner institution in North America during their third year. Students can then return to the University of Lincoln to complete the final year of their degree. Students are responsible for their own travel and accommodation costs in addition to their normal living costs throughout the year.

Where applicable, students will also be expected to cover their visa costs. For students who opt to take Spanish as part of their first and second year studies, the year abroad aims to open up opportunities for understanding Hispanic arts, histories, and cultures. By spending a year abroad, students can develop greater cultural awareness and resourcefulness, initiative, and independence in responding to new situations.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

This module charts and explores the history of popular music in the US and UK over the last one hundred years. It will introduce students to critical ways of understanding popular music through theoretical frameworks. Further consideration will be given to the cultural development of popular music and its associated industries from a variety of perspectives relating to identity (such as race, class, gender, ethnicity, and youth).

Module Overview

Film and TV History 2 is a survey of European film movements in context. It charts, analyses and reassesses the significance and novelty of, and the role of TV in the emergence of the various European new waves from Italian Neorealism through the French New Wave to the British New Wave and Free Cinema and New German Cinema.

Module Overview

This module provides a thematic survey of European and Atlantic history from the mid-eighteenth century to the final decades of the twentieth century, structured around the research interests of members of the module teaching team. This survey provides an overview of key moments in modern history from 1750-1979, and addresses the complex development of states primarily in western Europe but with attention to the growing influence of the United States and Russia.

Module Overview

This module is the first half of a year long introduction to the study of the United States through the thematic and disciplinary perspectives central to the rest of the degree (it continues with Introduction to American Studies 2). Through a series of themes and types of source (for example film, fiction, symbols) students will encounter key debates over issues including race, gender, representations, and the US and the world.

Module Overview

This module is the second half of a year long introduction to the study of the United States (its counterpart, Introduction to American Studies 1, is taken in term 1). Students are introduced to the thematic and disciplinary perspectives central to the rest of the degree. Through a series of themes and types of source (for example music, places, events) students will continue to explore key debates over issues including race, gender, and representations. Via the assessment strategy, the module provides a crucial step towards the skills requirements of Level 2 by supporting students to work on a more sustained, individually developed piece of work than was the case in Introduction to American Studies 1.

Module Overview

For more than a century, film has been understood variously as a technology, an art form, an industry, a means of communicating ideas, and as source of popular entertainment. In this module, students can consider the many ways in which films have been made and experienced, and have the opportunity to learn about different approaches to studying the history of film, looking at case studies from Hollywood, Europe, and beyond.

Module Overview

This module is designed to introduce students to the three areas of discussion in contemporary moral philosophy. Metaethics is concerned with the nature of morality itself and questions such as ‘Are there moral facts?’, ‘If there are moral facts, what is their origin?’. Normative ethics is the attempt to provide a general theory that tells us how to live and enables us to determine what is morally right and wrong. Applied ethics involves the application of ethical principles to specific moral issues (e.g., abortion, euthanasia, animal rights) and the evaluation of the answers arrived at through this application. This module aims to introduce students to all three of these branches of ethics.

Module Overview

This module looks at what makes poetic language different from 'normal' language, at how poets use the sounds and meanings of words, and at how poetry can be used to refresh, change or question our understanding of the world. We look at a range of poetry in English from nursery rhymes to rap and from the 14th century to the 21st. Our aim is to enable students to discuss poetry with confidence, accuracy and clarity, and, we hope, to enjoy more fully “the only art form that you can carry around in your head in its original form”.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide students with a critical and theoretical vocabulary that will enable them to explore a range of twentieth century cultural activities. Students will be encouraged to read not only traditionally marginalised literary genres such as romance, crime fiction, science fiction and the comic book but also ‘texts’ from other cultural realms such as film, television, news, fashion, advertising, music TV, radio and magazines.

Module Overview

An introduction to the study of American culture, this module is concerned with fiction, drama and poetry, together with examples of film, television and historical documents. It looks at constructions of American identity through a series of interlinked studies, including ‘the Frontier’, ‘African American Experiences’, ‘Migrations’, ‘Gender Issues’ and ‘Horror Genres’.

Module Overview

This module is a chronological survey of US history from the first colonial settlements to the Civil War. It aims to develop basic knowledge to prepare students for more specialist American history options at Levels 2 and 3. Within the chronological framework the module will explore a number of themes including Native American-European relations, colony-mother country relations, the formation of the American republic, the debate over slavery and Civil War.

Module Overview

This module is a chronological survey of US history from Reconstruction to the present. It aims to develop basic knowledge to prepare students for more specialist American history options at Levels 2 and 3. In particular it introduces key themes including the struggle for equality, the character and scope of the US government and the role of the US in the world.

Module Overview

he aim of this module is to develop independent learning skills by giving students the opportunity to research in more detail any appropriate topic from any level of the course.

Working with an individual tutor, students will choose a subject at the and present a project proposal. A tutor will guide each student through the research process, from the initial literature search through to the assessed essay and annotated bibliography.

The module will enable students to consider their chosen theme in some depth, and the process will be an excellent preparation for the Independent Study, which is an important compulsory module at Level Three.

Module Overview

This module explores apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic texts using a range of novels, short stories, poems and films. Lectures will establish cultural and historical contexts and address issues such as form and genre. The module will explore a range of significant periods from early Judeo-Christian fears regarding the purging moral apocalypse, through Romantic preoccupations with nature and industrialisation, postmodernism and more contemporary concerns about viral or cybernetic apocalypse. We will draw from a range of disciplines including literary theory, psychoanalysis, cultural theory, philosophy and trauma theory.

Module Overview

This module explores the nineteenth-century literature of the USA, chiefly focusing on fiction and poetry. Authors covered include Herman Melville, Emily Dickinson, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Walt Whitman and Willa Cather, among others.

Module Overview

This module covers a broad range of twentieth-century American fiction and poetry. Beginning with Fitzgerald, other authors studied include Ernest Hemingway, Jack Kerouac, Toni Morrison, Thomas Pynchon and David Foster Wallace.

Module Overview

The module will explore and analyse the cultural and social history of broadcasting in the United States of America. It places broadcasting within the context of immigration and urbanisation, racial tensions, the rise of mass consumer culture and globalisation. It will explore and analyse the development of the radio and television networks in terms of the commercial and fledgling public service (PBS) models; the development and export of broadcast formats, practices, and American popular culture. It will also examine the use of the media in presidential campaigns, the development of music radio and ‘teen culture’, soap opera, comedy and the ‘fire side chats', shock jocks and right wing talk radio shows.

Module Overview

This module gives students the opportunity to read one text (in translation) closely and discuss sections each week with a tutor. It offers the opportunity to develop skills in textual analysis, including researching an author; assessing the intended audience; and considering the social/political context, the significance of genre and style, and other factors in how we interpret and understand a text. Students also compare and critique research that has used the text and explore the possibilities it has to serve as primary evidence for the study of the ancient world.

Module Overview

Beginning with the Royal Historical Society’s “Race, Ethnicity and Equality Report” (published in 2018), which raises urgent questions on the diversity of staff, students and curricula at History departments in UK universities, the module analyses live debates on “Decolonising the Curriculum” in higher education. We critique how histories of Empire, colonialism and slavery have been taught in Anglo-American settings, and introduce postcolonial analysis on archives, as well as the “Global South” and “indigenous knowledge” that have often been marginalised in Eurocentric historiographies.

Turning towards the University as a key apparatus of power in the contemporary world, the module then reveals the complex legacies of slavery in the making of a number of UK and US institutions including Liverpool, Bristol, Oxford (#RhodesMustFall), SOAS, University of Virginia and others. Introducing the new field of “Critical University Studies” (CUS), students will learn about the emergence of universities in former colonies including India and South Africa, as well as the phenomenon of “transnational education” that entails the establishment, by prestigious European and American institutions, of satellite campuses around the world. The module then unpacks public understandings of colonial history via recent scholarship on nationalism, patriotism, museums and memories, and ends with a hopeful reflection on pedagogies that will be more inclusive and intersectional in terms of race, class, gender, and sexual orientation. This module will be particularly suited to students who intend to develop careers in education.

Module Overview

This module serves several developmental functions. It provides a framework for career planning and preparing for the world of work (sharing some lectures with the sister module of the same name on the BA History programme). It also provides the opportunity for students to develop the management skills needed for the independent study which is a compulsory part of level 3 and to begin to form a research strategy to enable completion of the independent study.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to give students a thorough understanding of two intimately related philosophical traditions that came to prominence in the 19th and 20th centuries: existentialism and phenomenology. Each attempts to address the nature and meaning of human existence from the perspective of individual, first-person experience, focusing in particular on fundamental questions of being, meaning, death, nihilism, freedom, responsibility, value, human relations, and religious faith.

The module will examine selected existential themes through the writings of thinkers such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, De Beauvoir, and Camus. Since existentialism is as much a artistic phenomenon as a philosophical one, students will also be given the opportunity to explore existentialist ideas in the works of various literary figures, such as Shakespeare, Dostoyevsky, Kafka, and Milan Kundera.

Module Overview

The United States emerged from the Second World War a superpower, with, to an extent, a belief that it could remake the world. The challenges of the Cold War years were to demonstrate how limited was that power. This module explores the key social, political, economic and cultural developments in the United States between 1945 and 1990.

Module Overview

•\tThis module will investigate the Hollywood musical as one of Hollywood’s most popular and important film genres, from its beginnings in the early sound era to the integrated musicals of the 1940s and 1950s, from critically acclaimed box office successes such as West Side Story (1961) and cultural phenomena such as Saturday Night Fever (1977) and Dirty Dancing (1987) to more recent musicals such as Moulin Rouge! (2001), Dreamgirls (2006), La La Land (2016), and Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again (2018).

A close study of a number of significant films and associated scholarly literature will support discussion of structural, stylistic and thematic issues. Stardom and the function of the star performance will be considered and ethnicity, race, sexuality, class and gender as constructed through the musical will be analysed.

Module Overview

This module explores the history of media controversy and ‘moral panic’ during the twentieth century. It is designed to introduce students to media texts (especially films and television programmes) that have sparked debate and extreme differences of opinion among audiences in Britain and America. Students will be expected to engage with a range of films, television programmes and primary source material, which may include newspapers and television news broadcasts from the Media Archive of Central England (MACE).

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to the different approaches to the study of history which have developed, with a particular focus on twentieth-century ideas and innovations, such as ‘history from below’, women’s and gender history, history of sexuality, cultural history, post-colonial approaches, and recent developments in the field. Students will be encouraged to think critically and creatively about how history has developed within the academy, as a particular branch of knowledge and as a discipline with its own rules and procedures.

Module Overview

This module explores a range of philosophical questions relating to the nature of science. How are scientific theories developed? Are scientific theories discovered through a ‘flash of genius’ or is something more methodical involved? How much of scientific discovery is down to careful observation? Do scientific theories tell us how the world really is? Do the entities scientific theories postulate – atoms, electromagnetic waves, and so on – really exist? Or are scientific theories merely useful models of reality? Is science independent of its social context? To what extent is scientific inquiry affected by gender, race or politics? Is there such a thing as truth that is not relative to a particular culture, social class or historical era? Drawing on accessible examples from a variety of scientific fields and by answering these and related questions, we shall try to reach an understanding of how science works.

Module Overview

This module introduces students to history of the US presidency by investigating selected past presidents from Washington to Trump. By reading and analysing the biographies of various presidents, key historical discussions as well as primary sources, including presidential addresses, campaign speeches, policy documents, and internal White House documents, and media accounts, students will be able to discuss and evaluate the major themes associated with the Office of the President.

The main question students will be asked to engage with through this course is “what makes an effective president?” In answering this question students will discuss themes ranging from the establishment of the office during the American Revolution, the ability of presidents to pass civil rights reform, the rise and fall of the imperial presidency, the decline and restoration of presidential influence, hidden illness in the oval office, the growth of partisanship, the impact of the media and presidential communication strategies, and the changing presidential electorate. By exploring these themes as well as the achievements, scandals and the legacies of various presidents, students will be able to determine how individual presidents have coped with the pressures of the office and what influence they have exerted on the office.

Module Overview

This module builds on the Level 1 Introduction to American Studies 1 and 2, exploring themes central to American culture and identity through a sequence of representative Americans who left personal testimonies of their experiences. The module will consider how we use autobiography and memoir as a source for understanding the American experience. It will explore key themes within the American experience, including race, class, gender and place. It will consider what the idea of a representative American means.

Module Overview

This module is concerned with the cultural construction of womanhood, the 'female' and notions of femininity: the economic and cultural value of the female film star to Hollywood, the development of female film genres or the feminization of certain genres, how debates about female identity inform models of spectatorship, with respect to both psychoanalysis and ethnography.

Module Overview

The period from 1700 to 1850 was one of transition and change in the British Isles and North America, marking an ideological and material shift away from the legacy of medieval Europe and the period of initial colonial contact. This module challenges students to engage with historical, cartographical, and material evidence. Students are introduced to the landscapes, streetscapes, and social make-up of the long eighteenth century, and can discuss in seminars how broad events impacted everyday lives, the urban, and rural landscape.

Module Overview

This module provides a survey of the history and archaeology of the eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East between the reign of Alexander the Great and the death of Cleopatra VII after the Roman victory at the Battle of Actium in 30 BC. Students will have the opportunity to explore the political histories, power structures, cultural developments, economic processes and shifting ideologies associated with the major Hellenistic kingdoms and ending with the Roman conquest of the eastern Mediterranean region. Teaching also considers how the Hellenistic period was a time of innovation, cultural connectivity, even globalisation, laying the foundations of a Hellenized world of city-states which endured into and defined the Roman construction of a world empire in its aftermath.

Module Overview

Why have detective narratives proved so enduringly popular? This module will interrogate the iconic figure of the private eye in American popular culture, through the fiction and film of the twentieth and twenty-first century.

Module Overview

The term ‘American exceptionalism’ – or, more precisely, ‘US exceptionalism’ (since the United States does not represent all of America) – has gone viral in recent years. Previously only used by a coterie of American Studies scholars and historians, the term was first propelled into public discourse by the Republican Party during the failed presidential campaigns of John McCain (2008) and Mitt Romney (2012). Since then it has become a ‘hegemonic’ concept. President Barack Obama found himself compelled to assert in 2013, ‘I believe in American exceptionalism with every fibre of my being’, and in academic scholarship publications on the subject have mushroomed. Nevertheless, the scholarly understanding of US exceptionalism remains underdeveloped and highly problematic for a number of reasons (Hughes 2015).

This module, based on the research expertise of its coordinator, aims to provide Level 3 students with a highly advanced knowledge and critical understanding of US exceptionalism. The aim is to encourage students to think holistically and critically about the discourse of US exceptionalism so as to understand its roots in contemporary power relations and be able to challenge it.

Module Overview

At final level, every student on the BA (Hons) American Studies degree programme at the University of Lincoln is expected to produce an independent study. This is an extended piece of writing that gives students the opportunity to demonstrate they have acquired the skills to undertake in depth research, analysis, and can communicate their learning effectively in writing.

Module Overview

This module examines how and why the culture of Britain changed in the period of increasing contact with, and eventual incorporation into, the Roman Empire. Examining the key material, behavioural, ideological and structural changes to society in the period c. 100 BC to AD 450, it will question to what degree each aspect was a wholesale incorporation of ‘foreign’ ideas, technologies and goods, a local interpretation and adoption of these importations into an existing social system, or a local creation that was distinctly Romano-British, if often termed ‘Roman’.

Module Overview

This module gives students the opportunity to analyse one text or author; object, assemblage or collection; structure or site, according to their own research interests (the evidence chosen will be agreed at the start of the term). Paired with a tutor, each student can examine the evidence closely, find and read related research publications, and discuss each week. This builds on the skills developed at Level 2 and provides students with the opportunity to direct their own learning, engage closely with primary sources, develop skills in analysis and critical thinking, and broaden their knowledge of the evidence and methods of studying the ancient world.

Module Overview

Clio, the muse of History, had many and diverse children. This module examines both the birth and development of historiography in Ancient Greek Literature. Students will use a wide range of primary sources together with secondary sources and engage with diverse types of writing, ranging from military historians to ethnographers, biographers, geographers, and female historians.

Module Overview

This module will enable students to engage in the research and development of displays through the process of curating an exhibition for the museum or heritage sector. Students will select objects and structure this selection through an appropriate narrative. They will propose modes and examples of interpretation such as gallery text, audio or visual aids. The emphasis will be on developing knowledge and understanding of the role and responsibilities of the curator, and the project will enable students to evidence a focused and critically rigorous curatorial rationale.

Module Overview

This module considers early modern imperialism and its impact on artistic production at a global scale. Students will have the opportunity to examine Iberia and its world as a point for cultural encounter and cross-fertilization. The module aims to explore how local communities conflated their symbols of identity within transnational artistic trends and through a number of carefully selected case studies, will analyse the way in which communities – artists, patrons, collectors and audiences – negotiated these cultural encounters in the production and assimilation of the arts.

Module Overview

Examines the cultural significance of so-called exploitation films, which can reveal (and revel in) themes, images and narratives suppressed from the mainstream, dealing with lurid, scandalous subjects in a seemingly excessive, gratuitous manner. Some theorists argue that perceived ‘excess’ is a foundation for developing new critical methods, providing a fascinating alternative to approaches more comfortably contained within ‘classical’ systems.

Module Overview

This module explores the transformation of the United States from a set of thirteen colonies to an independent republic. Topics considered include: the causes of the Revolution, the governance of the new republic, the place of the new republic in the world, the experiences of excluded groups (loyalists, native Americans, African Americans).

Module Overview

Cinema is an integral part of our culture and tells us about society; like any cultural product, cinema does not exist in a vacuum. It communicates ideas, value systems and cultural beliefs, desires, dreams, anxieties, fears and needs of a given society at a given time, and it does so through different constructions of gender, sexualities, whiteness, ethnicity, race, age, social class and cultures. Taking into account a broad range of films and genres (from rom-com, drama and erotic thriller, to animation, musical, neo-noir, action and sci-fi), as well as a variety of theoretical approaches from (but not limited to) feminist film theory, philosophy, post-feminism, psychoanalysis, stardom and cultural studies; and combining textual analysis with background reading, this module will examine and critically evaluate a range of Hollywood films produced and released in the 1980s addressing the relations between their textual form and their cultural context.

Module Overview

One of the ways in which early modern monarchs and rulers legitimised their authority and projected their power was through architecture and urban design. In this period capital cities across Europe, America and Asia were embellished with architecture and urban design inspired by Renaissance ideals of social order. This module examines the ways rulers imagined and built a number of imperial capital cities across Europe, America and Asia.

Module Overview

This module will explore the significance of time (the past, present, and future), belief, and power in landscapes of early historical Britain (c. 200 BC to c. AD 800). Landscape was the largest and most visible medium that people could use to communicate who they were and to negotiate their place in the world. Landscape will be discussed as material culture writ large whereby the features and meanings of the past confront and constitute the creation of landscape in any given present. The significance of, for example, Neolithic cursus monuments, Bronze Age barrows, Iron Age 'hillforts', and Romano-Celtic temples will be examined in how they endured and were (re)interpreted in later periods to create complex significances and communicate aspects of group identities. The module will challenge boundaries by encouraging students to consider the complexity of relationship between past, present, and future, as well as between different 'site types', periods, and types of material.

Module Overview

This module analyses the range and diversity of a genre encompassing many highly popular texts. Metaphor and allegory are explored to understand how science fiction has been appreciated and has developed from cult to mainstream acceptance and popularity. Innovation and cross-fertilisation of generic forms are also be considered.

Module Overview

This module introduces some of the major themes in the British and European history of sexuality. It employs comparative and transnational history to explore how, for example, Continental European sexual policies impacted Britain and the extent to which some attitudes to sexual behaviors were unique of specific national contexts.
It explores how sexuality became central to British and European identities, culture and politics. It also considers official and unofficial discourses about sexuality and gender in law, the human sciences and culture, paying particular attention to the geographical contexts in which these discourses emerged and how they moved across countries.

Module Overview

This optional module explores representations of the southern states of America in prose fiction, film, drama and music. In the first section southern stereotypes and ‘resistant’ representations, produced by southerners and others, are examined in relation to social, political and historical contexts. This is followed by a section on African American representations of the south. Finally, a section on music and vernacular traditions explores the influence of the south on American popular music. Students are encouraged to adopt an interdisciplinary approach to examine questions of regional identity in a wide range of texts.

Module Overview

This module surveys the history of the Roman Empire not as a succession of emperors and achievements, victories and defeats, but as a complex of experiments in government and of attitudes to governance. Beginning with the transition from representative republican rule to the domination of an imperial dynasty and its network of élite dependants in the early first century, and concluding with the incipient takeover of this system by a newly Christianised ruling class in the early fourth century, students can explore the role of the emperor in the Roman world and the patterns of communication between him and his subjects.

Module Overview

This module surveys and assesses a period that represents a break with a range of ideological, aesthetic and commercial traditions together with a process of retrenchment and recuperation. Post-classical Hollywood saw both films and the industry experience ideological and socio-cultural upheaval, demonstrated through cinematic modes of representation, industrial re-structuring and artistic transformations.

Module Overview

This module aims to develop students' understanding of the political, social and cultural history of Late Antiquity (150-750), with a particular focus on two world-changing religious developments: the rise of Christianity and Islam. Although the geographical focus of our studies will be on eastern Mediterranean lands of an empire ruled from Constantinople, known to later scholars as the Byzantine Empire, the geographical range of the module will be wide and include western Europe, including the western Mediterranean, Persia, Arabia, and ‘barbarian’ territories beyond the Roman frontiers on the Rhine and Danube.

Module Overview

The module aims to give students practical experience of the workplace. It is expected that students will define, plan, and undertake a specific project. In addition students may gain experience of a range of tasks appropriate to sector-specific professional skills. Students will usually undertake placements over the summer, outside normal teaching periods.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

This module charts and explores the history of popular music in the US and UK over the last one hundred years. It will introduce students to critical ways of understanding popular music through theoretical frameworks. Further consideration will be given to the cultural development of popular music and its associated industries from a variety of perspectives relating to identity (such as race, class, gender, ethnicity, and youth).

Module Overview

Film and TV History 2 is a survey of European film movements in context. It charts, analyses and reassesses the significance and novelty of, and the role of TV in the emergence of the various European new waves from Italian Neorealism through the French New Wave to the British New Wave and Free Cinema and New German Cinema.

Module Overview

This module provides a thematic survey of European and Atlantic history from the mid-eighteenth century to the final decades of the twentieth century, structured around the research interests of members of the module teaching team. This survey provides an overview of key moments in modern history from 1750-1979, and addresses the complex development of states primarily in western Europe but with attention to the growing influence of the United States and Russia.

Module Overview

This module is the first half of a year long introduction to the study of the United States through the thematic and disciplinary perspectives central to the rest of the degree (it continues with Introduction to American Studies 2). Through a series of themes and types of source (for example film, fiction, symbols) students will encounter key debates over issues including race, gender, representations, and the US and the world.

Module Overview

This module is the second half of a year long introduction to the study of the United States (its counterpart, Introduction to American Studies 1, is taken in term 1). Students are introduced to the thematic and disciplinary perspectives central to the rest of the degree. Through a series of themes and types of source (for example music, places, events) students will continue to explore key debates over issues including race, gender, and representations. Via the assessment strategy, the module provides a crucial step towards the skills requirements of Level 2 by supporting students to work on a more sustained, individually developed piece of work than was the case in Introduction to American Studies 1.

Module Overview

For more than a century, film has been understood variously as a technology, an art form, an industry, a means of communicating ideas, and as source of popular entertainment. In this module, students can consider the many ways in which films have been made and experienced, and have the opportunity to learn about different approaches to studying the history of film, looking at case studies from Hollywood, Europe, and beyond.

Module Overview

This module is designed to introduce students to the three areas of discussion in contemporary moral philosophy. Metaethics is concerned with the nature of morality itself and questions such as ‘Are there moral facts?’, ‘If there are moral facts, what is their origin?’. Normative ethics is the attempt to provide a general theory that tells us how to live and enables us to determine what is morally right and wrong. Applied ethics involves the application of ethical principles to specific moral issues (e.g., abortion, euthanasia, animal rights) and the evaluation of the answers arrived at through this application. This module aims to introduce students to all three of these branches of ethics.

Module Overview

This module looks at what makes poetic language different from 'normal' language, at how poets use the sounds and meanings of words, and at how poetry can be used to refresh, change or question our understanding of the world. We look at a range of poetry in English from nursery rhymes to rap and from the 14th century to the 21st. Our aim is to enable students to discuss poetry with confidence, accuracy and clarity, and, we hope, to enjoy more fully “the only art form that you can carry around in your head in its original form”.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide students with a critical and theoretical vocabulary that will enable them to explore a range of twentieth century cultural activities. Students will be encouraged to read not only traditionally marginalised literary genres such as romance, crime fiction, science fiction and the comic book but also ‘texts’ from other cultural realms such as film, television, news, fashion, advertising, music TV, radio and magazines.

Module Overview

An introduction to the study of American culture, this module is concerned with fiction, drama and poetry, together with examples of film, television and historical documents. It looks at constructions of American identity through a series of interlinked studies, including ‘the Frontier’, ‘African American Experiences’, ‘Migrations’, ‘Gender Issues’ and ‘Horror Genres’.

Module Overview

This module is a chronological survey of US history from the first colonial settlements to the Civil War. It aims to develop basic knowledge to prepare students for more specialist American history options at Levels 2 and 3. Within the chronological framework the module will explore a number of themes including Native American-European relations, colony-mother country relations, the formation of the American republic, the debate over slavery and Civil War.

Module Overview

This module is a chronological survey of US history from Reconstruction to the present. It aims to develop basic knowledge to prepare students for more specialist American history options at Levels 2 and 3. In particular it introduces key themes including the struggle for equality, the character and scope of the US government and the role of the US in the world.

Module Overview

he aim of this module is to develop independent learning skills by giving students the opportunity to research in more detail any appropriate topic from any level of the course.

Working with an individual tutor, students will choose a subject at the and present a project proposal. A tutor will guide each student through the research process, from the initial literature search through to the assessed essay and annotated bibliography.

The module will enable students to consider their chosen theme in some depth, and the process will be an excellent preparation for the Independent Study, which is an important compulsory module at Level Three.

Module Overview

This module explores apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic texts using a range of novels, short stories, poems and films. Lectures will establish cultural and historical contexts and address issues such as form and genre. The module will explore a range of significant periods from early Judeo-Christian fears regarding the purging moral apocalypse, through Romantic preoccupations with nature and industrialisation, postmodernism and more contemporary concerns about viral or cybernetic apocalypse. We will draw from a range of disciplines including literary theory, psychoanalysis, cultural theory, philosophy and trauma theory.

Module Overview

This module explores the nineteenth-century literature of the USA, chiefly focusing on fiction and poetry. Authors covered include Herman Melville, Emily Dickinson, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Walt Whitman and Willa Cather, among others.

Module Overview

This module covers a broad range of twentieth-century American fiction and poetry. Beginning with Fitzgerald, other authors studied include Ernest Hemingway, Jack Kerouac, Toni Morrison, Thomas Pynchon and David Foster Wallace.

Module Overview

The module will explore and analyse the cultural and social history of broadcasting in the United States of America. It places broadcasting within the context of immigration and urbanisation, racial tensions, the rise of mass consumer culture and globalisation. It will explore and analyse the development of the radio and television networks in terms of the commercial and fledgling public service (PBS) models; the development and export of broadcast formats, practices, and American popular culture. It will also examine the use of the media in presidential campaigns, the development of music radio and ‘teen culture’, soap opera, comedy and the ‘fire side chats', shock jocks and right wing talk radio shows.

Module Overview

This module gives students the opportunity to read one text (in translation) closely and discuss sections each week with a tutor. It offers the opportunity to develop skills in textual analysis, including researching an author; assessing the intended audience; and considering the social/political context, the significance of genre and style, and other factors in how we interpret and understand a text. Students also compare and critique research that has used the text and explore the possibilities it has to serve as primary evidence for the study of the ancient world.

Module Overview

Beginning with the Royal Historical Society’s “Race, Ethnicity and Equality Report” (published in 2018), which raises urgent questions on the diversity of staff, students and curricula at History departments in UK universities, the module analyses live debates on “Decolonising the Curriculum” in higher education. We critique how histories of Empire, colonialism and slavery have been taught in Anglo-American settings, and introduce postcolonial analysis on archives, as well as the “Global South” and “indigenous knowledge” that have often been marginalised in Eurocentric historiographies.

Turning towards the University as a key apparatus of power in the contemporary world, the module then reveals the complex legacies of slavery in the making of a number of UK and US institutions including Liverpool, Bristol, Oxford (#RhodesMustFall), SOAS, University of Virginia and others. Introducing the new field of “Critical University Studies” (CUS), students will learn about the emergence of universities in former colonies including India and South Africa, as well as the phenomenon of “transnational education” that entails the establishment, by prestigious European and American institutions, of satellite campuses around the world. The module then unpacks public understandings of colonial history via recent scholarship on nationalism, patriotism, museums and memories, and ends with a hopeful reflection on pedagogies that will be more inclusive and intersectional in terms of race, class, gender, and sexual orientation. This module will be particularly suited to students who intend to develop careers in education.

Module Overview

This module serves several developmental functions. It provides a framework for career planning and preparing for the world of work (sharing some lectures with the sister module of the same name on the BA History programme). It also provides the opportunity for students to develop the management skills needed for the independent study which is a compulsory part of level 3 and to begin to form a research strategy to enable completion of the independent study.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to give students a thorough understanding of two intimately related philosophical traditions that came to prominence in the 19th and 20th centuries: existentialism and phenomenology. Each attempts to address the nature and meaning of human existence from the perspective of individual, first-person experience, focusing in particular on fundamental questions of being, meaning, death, nihilism, freedom, responsibility, value, human relations, and religious faith.

The module will examine selected existential themes through the writings of thinkers such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, De Beauvoir, and Camus. Since existentialism is as much a artistic phenomenon as a philosophical one, students will also be given the opportunity to explore existentialist ideas in the works of various literary figures, such as Shakespeare, Dostoyevsky, Kafka, and Milan Kundera.

Module Overview

The United States emerged from the Second World War a superpower, with, to an extent, a belief that it could remake the world. The challenges of the Cold War years were to demonstrate how limited was that power. This module explores the key social, political, economic and cultural developments in the United States between 1945 and 1990.

Module Overview

•\tThis module will investigate the Hollywood musical as one of Hollywood’s most popular and important film genres, from its beginnings in the early sound era to the integrated musicals of the 1940s and 1950s, from critically acclaimed box office successes such as West Side Story (1961) and cultural phenomena such as Saturday Night Fever (1977) and Dirty Dancing (1987) to more recent musicals such as Moulin Rouge! (2001), Dreamgirls (2006), La La Land (2016), and Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again (2018).

A close study of a number of significant films and associated scholarly literature will support discussion of structural, stylistic and thematic issues. Stardom and the function of the star performance will be considered and ethnicity, race, sexuality, class and gender as constructed through the musical will be analysed.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to the different approaches to the study of history which have developed, with a particular focus on twentieth-century ideas and innovations, such as ‘history from below’, women’s and gender history, history of sexuality, cultural history, post-colonial approaches, and recent developments in the field. Students will be encouraged to think critically and creatively about how history has developed within the academy, as a particular branch of knowledge and as a discipline with its own rules and procedures.

Module Overview

This module explores a range of philosophical questions relating to the nature of science. How are scientific theories developed? Are scientific theories discovered through a ‘flash of genius’ or is something more methodical involved? How much of scientific discovery is down to careful observation? Do scientific theories tell us how the world really is? Do the entities scientific theories postulate – atoms, electromagnetic waves, and so on – really exist? Or are scientific theories merely useful models of reality? Is science independent of its social context? To what extent is scientific inquiry affected by gender, race or politics? Is there such a thing as truth that is not relative to a particular culture, social class or historical era? Drawing on accessible examples from a variety of scientific fields and by answering these and related questions, we shall try to reach an understanding of how science works.

Module Overview

This module introduces students to history of the US presidency by investigating selected past presidents from Washington to Trump. By reading and analysing the biographies of various presidents, key historical discussions as well as primary sources, including presidential addresses, campaign speeches, policy documents, and internal White House documents, and media accounts, students will be able to discuss and evaluate the major themes associated with the Office of the President.

The main question students will be asked to engage with through this course is “what makes an effective president?” In answering this question students will discuss themes ranging from the establishment of the office during the American Revolution, the ability of presidents to pass civil rights reform, the rise and fall of the imperial presidency, the decline and restoration of presidential influence, hidden illness in the oval office, the growth of partisanship, the impact of the media and presidential communication strategies, and the changing presidential electorate. By exploring these themes as well as the achievements, scandals and the legacies of various presidents, students will be able to determine how individual presidents have coped with the pressures of the office and what influence they have exerted on the office.

Module Overview

This module builds on the Level 1 Introduction to American Studies 1 and 2, exploring themes central to American culture and identity through a sequence of representative Americans who left personal testimonies of their experiences. The module will consider how we use autobiography and memoir as a source for understanding the American experience. It will explore key themes within the American experience, including race, class, gender and place. It will consider what the idea of a representative American means.

Module Overview

This module is concerned with the cultural construction of womanhood, the 'female' and notions of femininity: the economic and cultural value of the female film star to Hollywood, the development of female film genres or the feminization of certain genres, how debates about female identity inform models of spectatorship, with respect to both psychoanalysis and ethnography.

Module Overview

The period from 1700 to 1850 was one of transition and change in the British Isles and North America, marking an ideological and material shift away from the legacy of medieval Europe and the period of initial colonial contact. This module challenges students to engage with historical, cartographical, and material evidence. Students are introduced to the landscapes, streetscapes, and social make-up of the long eighteenth century, and can discuss in seminars how broad events impacted everyday lives, the urban, and rural landscape.

Module Overview

This module provides a survey of the history and archaeology of the eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East between the reign of Alexander the Great and the death of Cleopatra VII after the Roman victory at the Battle of Actium in 30 BC. Students will have the opportunity to explore the political histories, power structures, cultural developments, economic processes and shifting ideologies associated with the major Hellenistic kingdoms and ending with the Roman conquest of the eastern Mediterranean region. Teaching also considers how the Hellenistic period was a time of innovation, cultural connectivity, even globalisation, laying the foundations of a Hellenized world of city-states which endured into and defined the Roman construction of a world empire in its aftermath.

Module Overview

Why have detective narratives proved so enduringly popular? This module will interrogate the iconic figure of the private eye in American popular culture, through the fiction and film of the twentieth and twenty-first century.

Module Overview

The term ‘American exceptionalism’ – or, more precisely, ‘US exceptionalism’ (since the United States does not represent all of America) – has gone viral in recent years. Previously only used by a coterie of American Studies scholars and historians, the term was first propelled into public discourse by the Republican Party during the failed presidential campaigns of John McCain (2008) and Mitt Romney (2012). Since then it has become a ‘hegemonic’ concept. President Barack Obama found himself compelled to assert in 2013, ‘I believe in American exceptionalism with every fibre of my being’, and in academic scholarship publications on the subject have mushroomed. Nevertheless, the scholarly understanding of US exceptionalism remains underdeveloped and highly problematic for a number of reasons (Hughes 2015).

This module, based on the research expertise of its coordinator, aims to provide Level 3 students with a highly advanced knowledge and critical understanding of US exceptionalism. The aim is to encourage students to think holistically and critically about the discourse of US exceptionalism so as to understand its roots in contemporary power relations and be able to challenge it.

Module Overview

At final level, every student on the BA (Hons) American Studies degree programme at the University of Lincoln is expected to produce an independent study. This is an extended piece of writing that gives students the opportunity to demonstrate they have acquired the skills to undertake in depth research, analysis, and can communicate their learning effectively in writing.

Module Overview

This module examines how and why the culture of Britain changed in the period of increasing contact with, and eventual incorporation into, the Roman Empire. Examining the key material, behavioural, ideological and structural changes to society in the period c. 100 BC to AD 450, it will question to what degree each aspect was a wholesale incorporation of ‘foreign’ ideas, technologies and goods, a local interpretation and adoption of these importations into an existing social system, or a local creation that was distinctly Romano-British, if often termed ‘Roman’.

Module Overview

This module gives students the opportunity to analyse one text or author; object, assemblage or collection; structure or site, according to their own research interests (the evidence chosen will be agreed at the start of the term). Paired with a tutor, each student can examine the evidence closely, find and read related research publications, and discuss each week. This builds on the skills developed at Level 2 and provides students with the opportunity to direct their own learning, engage closely with primary sources, develop skills in analysis and critical thinking, and broaden their knowledge of the evidence and methods of studying the ancient world.

Module Overview

Clio, the muse of History, had many and diverse children. This module examines both the birth and development of historiography in Ancient Greek Literature. Students will use a wide range of primary sources together with secondary sources and engage with diverse types of writing, ranging from military historians to ethnographers, biographers, geographers, and female historians.

Module Overview

This module will enable students to engage in the research and development of displays through the process of curating an exhibition for the museum or heritage sector. Students will select objects and structure this selection through an appropriate narrative. They will propose modes and examples of interpretation such as gallery text, audio or visual aids. The emphasis will be on developing knowledge and understanding of the role and responsibilities of the curator, and the project will enable students to evidence a focused and critically rigorous curatorial rationale.

Module Overview

This module considers early modern imperialism and its impact on artistic production at a global scale. Students will have the opportunity to examine Iberia and its world as a point for cultural encounter and cross-fertilization. The module aims to explore how local communities conflated their symbols of identity within transnational artistic trends and through a number of carefully selected case studies, will analyse the way in which communities – artists, patrons, collectors and audiences – negotiated these cultural encounters in the production and assimilation of the arts.

Module Overview

Examines the cultural significance of so-called exploitation films, which can reveal (and revel in) themes, images and narratives suppressed from the mainstream, dealing with lurid, scandalous subjects in a seemingly excessive, gratuitous manner. Some theorists argue that perceived ‘excess’ is a foundation for developing new critical methods, providing a fascinating alternative to approaches more comfortably contained within ‘classical’ systems.

Module Overview

This module explores the transformation of the United States from a set of thirteen colonies to an independent republic. Topics considered include: the causes of the Revolution, the governance of the new republic, the place of the new republic in the world, the experiences of excluded groups (loyalists, native Americans, African Americans).

Module Overview

Cinema is an integral part of our culture and tells us about society; like any cultural product, cinema does not exist in a vacuum. It communicates ideas, value systems and cultural beliefs, desires, dreams, anxieties, fears and needs of a given society at a given time, and it does so through different constructions of gender, sexualities, whiteness, ethnicity, race, age, social class and cultures. Taking into account a broad range of films and genres (from rom-com, drama and erotic thriller, to animation, musical, neo-noir, action and sci-fi), as well as a variety of theoretical approaches from (but not limited to) feminist film theory, philosophy, post-feminism, psychoanalysis, stardom and cultural studies; and combining textual analysis with background reading, this module will examine and critically evaluate a range of Hollywood films produced and released in the 1980s addressing the relations between their textual form and their cultural context.

Module Overview

One of the ways in which early modern monarchs and rulers legitimised their authority and projected their power was through architecture and urban design. In this period capital cities across Europe, America and Asia were embellished with architecture and urban design inspired by Renaissance ideals of social order. This module examines the ways rulers imagined and built a number of imperial capital cities across Europe, America and Asia.

Module Overview

This module will explore the significance of time (the past, present, and future), belief, and power in landscapes of early historical Britain (c. 200 BC to c. AD 800). Landscape was the largest and most visible medium that people could use to communicate who they were and to negotiate their place in the world. Landscape will be discussed as material culture writ large whereby the features and meanings of the past confront and constitute the creation of landscape in any given present. The significance of, for example, Neolithic cursus monuments, Bronze Age barrows, Iron Age 'hillforts', and Romano-Celtic temples will be examined in how they endured and were (re)interpreted in later periods to create complex significances and communicate aspects of group identities. The module will challenge boundaries by encouraging students to consider the complexity of relationship between past, present, and future, as well as between different 'site types', periods, and types of material.

Module Overview

This module analyses the range and diversity of a genre encompassing many highly popular texts. Metaphor and allegory are explored to understand how science fiction has been appreciated and has developed from cult to mainstream acceptance and popularity. Innovation and cross-fertilisation of generic forms are also be considered.

Module Overview

This module introduces some of the major themes in the British and European history of sexuality. It employs comparative and transnational history to explore how, for example, Continental European sexual policies impacted Britain and the extent to which some attitudes to sexual behaviors were unique of specific national contexts.
It explores how sexuality became central to British and European identities, culture and politics. It also considers official and unofficial discourses about sexuality and gender in law, the human sciences and culture, paying particular attention to the geographical contexts in which these discourses emerged and how they moved across countries.

Module Overview

This optional module explores representations of the southern states of America in prose fiction, film, drama and music. In the first section southern stereotypes and ‘resistant’ representations, produced by southerners and others, are examined in relation to social, political and historical contexts. This is followed by a section on African American representations of the south. Finally, a section on music and vernacular traditions explores the influence of the south on American popular music. Students are encouraged to adopt an interdisciplinary approach to examine questions of regional identity in a wide range of texts.

Module Overview

This module surveys the history of the Roman Empire not as a succession of emperors and achievements, victories and defeats, but as a complex of experiments in government and of attitudes to governance. Beginning with the transition from representative republican rule to the domination of an imperial dynasty and its network of élite dependants in the early first century, and concluding with the incipient takeover of this system by a newly Christianised ruling class in the early fourth century, students can explore the role of the emperor in the Roman world and the patterns of communication between him and his subjects.

Module Overview

This module surveys and assesses a period that represents a break with a range of ideological, aesthetic and commercial traditions together with a process of retrenchment and recuperation. Post-classical Hollywood saw both films and the industry experience ideological and socio-cultural upheaval, demonstrated through cinematic modes of representation, industrial re-structuring and artistic transformations.

Module Overview

This module aims to develop students' understanding of the political, social and cultural history of Late Antiquity (150-750), with a particular focus on two world-changing religious developments: the rise of Christianity and Islam. Although the geographical focus of our studies will be on eastern Mediterranean lands of an empire ruled from Constantinople, known to later scholars as the Byzantine Empire, the geographical range of the module will be wide and include western Europe, including the western Mediterranean, Persia, Arabia, and ‘barbarian’ territories beyond the Roman frontiers on the Rhine and Danube.

Module Overview

The module aims to give students practical experience of the workplace. It is expected that students will define, plan, and undertake a specific project. In addition students may gain experience of a range of tasks appropriate to sector-specific professional skills. Students will usually undertake placements over the summer, outside normal teaching periods.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

How you are assessed

This programme will use a variety of assessment forms – from traditional essays and examinations to presentations, analyses of individual artefacts and longer research projects.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

This programme will use a variety of assessment forms – from traditional essays and examinations to presentations, analyses of individual artefacts and longer research projects.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Fees and Scholarships

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

Students have the option of studying abroad during the third year of their degree at one of our partner institutions in North America. Studying abroad provides the opportunity to develop greater cultural awareness and resourcefulness, initiative and independence in responding to new situations.

Students will be responsible for their travel and accommodation costs in addition to their normal living costs throughout the year. Where applicable, visa costs will also need to be covered by the student. Students can then return to the University of Lincoln to complete the final year of their degree.

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

Students have the option of studying abroad during the third year of their degree at one of our partner institutions in North America. Studying abroad provides the opportunity to develop greater cultural awareness and resourcefulness, initiative and independence in responding to new situations.

Students will be responsible for their travel and accommodation costs in addition to their normal living costs throughout the year. Where applicable, visa costs will also need to be covered by the student. Students can then return to the University of Lincoln to complete the final year of their degree.

Entry Requirements 2020-21

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may be considered.

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry and will consider applicants who have a mix of qualifications.

We also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Entry Requirements 2021-22

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may be considered.

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry and will consider applicants who have a mix of qualifications.

We also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Placements

Students have the option of studying abroad during the third year of their degree at one of our partner institutions in North America. Studying abroad provides the opportunity to develop greater cultural awareness and resourcefulness, initiative, and independence in responding to new situations.

Students will be responsible for their travel and accommodation costs in addition to their normal living costs throughout the year. Where applicable, visa costs will also need to be covered by the student. Students can then return to the University of Lincoln to complete the final year of their degree.

Research

Research on the Americas in our College of Arts is wide-ranging and currently includes fatherhood in Cold War America, early modern Iberian imperial architecture, the mapping of New York City through Broadway song, and homelessness in American fiction.

Career Opportunities

This course aims to equip students with an in-depth and wide-ranging knowledge of key periods, movements, and developments within American arts, history, and cultures. Previous graduates of our College of Arts have gone into a range of careers, including roles in teaching, broadcasting, screenwriting, journalism, finance, PR, marketing, law, politics, the charity sector, and publishing.

Virtual Open Days

While you may not be able to visit us in person at the moment, you can still find out more about the University of Lincoln and what it is like to live and study here at one of our live Virtual Open Days.

Book Your Place

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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