Medical equipment in a hospital

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

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Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

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UCAS Code

H780

Course Code

BMDEGRUB

BEng (Hons) Biomedical Engineering

Students on this course can benefit from regular visits from professional engineers and industry experts, offering an insight into the needs of employers.

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

View

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

H780

Course Code

BMDEGRUB

Welcome to BEng (Hons) Biomedical Engineering

Biomedical engineering is a multidisciplinary field that combines biology and engineering, applying engineering principles and materials to medicine and healthcare. From developing and improving new machinery, such as robotic surgery equipment, to creating better and more reliable replacement limbs, the work of biomedical engineers is helping to pave the way for new methods of treating injuries and diseases.

This research-informed programme aims to develop industry-ready graduates with product design and innovative sense who are highly skilled and creative biomedical engineers, able to adapt to new challenges and deliver sustainable solutions for modern society.

Project-based learning is a key feature of the programme and students can undertake group product design and development projects in the first and second years. Students will also have the opportunity to design and develop a working medical device.

How You Study

In the first year, students can study the common foundations of engineering principles, human anatomy, and the physiology of the human body. In the second year the focus moves to specialised biomedical engineering topics, while the third year offers career focused modules designed to support students in meeting the needs of future employers.

Topics include digital prosthetics, biomedical robots for personal care, medical implants, medical imaging, medical ethics, clinical trials, and regulations. Extra-curricular activities are also available through Lincoln Innovation Hub to help students think, innovate, and build while stimulating their innovation and entrepreneurship skills. Students can access a range of support to help develop their skills, ideas, and ventures at any stage of development and across a wide range of disciplines.

The course is delivered through a combination of classroom and lab-based sessions, design challenges, and business innovation and entrepreneurship activities, to help develop the core skills that students will require as future engineers. Students can also benefit from regular visits from professional engineering and industrial experts, offering an insight into the needs of industry.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

An Introduction to Your Modules


† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Anatomy and Physiology 2023-24BME1003MLevel 42023-24This module aims to provide an overview of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The module is designed to help students to identify and understand the function of human bones, muscles, and joints. It will also provide an overview of the anatomical structure and physiology of the heart, lung, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems.CoreBiomedical Engineering Project 2023-24BME1002MLevel 42023-24All engineers must be familiar with design strategies, methods of assessing design proposals, approaches to reducing uncertainty, formal communication techniques, and the industrial and legal standards in which they fit. This module will encapsulate the design process for students working in groups to produce a design solution which meets a practical objective and considers the commercial, economic, social, and environmental implications via a broad critique of the state of the art.CoreComputing and Programming for Engineers 2023-24EGR1013MLevel 42023-24Many sectors of engineering require high levels of computer literacy and the ability to write computer programs for problem solving is highly desirable. In learning the fundamentals of computer programming, logical thinking and problem solving, skills can be developed and coding techniques learnt, that can support the study of modules in forthcoming years. This course delivers the concepts of structured computer programming and lab time is allocated for implementing these concepts. Students are provided with opportunities to plan, write, and debug their own computer programs.CoreElectrical and Electronic Technology 2023-24ELE1004MLevel 42023-24An understanding of the basic principles and many of the important practical applications of electronic and electrical engineering is now essential to practitioners of other disciplines, especially Mechanical Engineers. The aim of this module is to provide a foundation in Electrical Engineering and Electronics for students, of sufficient depth to be useful, and without being over complicated or cluttered with too-rigorous and exhaustive mathematical treatment.CoreEngineering Mechanics 2023-24EGR1016MLevel 42023-24The module can be divided into two topics: Statics and Mechanics: The primary aim of the study of engineering mechanics is to develop students' capacity to predict the effects of force and deformation in the course of carrying out the creative design function of engineering. As students' undertake the study of solids and forces (first statics, mechanics, then dynamics) they can build a foundation of analytical capability for the solution of a great variety of engineering problems. Modern engineering practice demands a high level of analytical capability, and the study of mechanics can help in developing this. Dynamics: The study of dynamics gives students the opportunity to analyse and predict the motion of particles and bodies with and without reference to the forces that cause this motion. Successful prediction requires the ability of visualise physical configurations in terms of real machines ( in addition to knowledge of physical and mathematical principles of mechanics) and actual constraints and the practical limitations which govern the behaviour of machines.CoreMaterials and Methods of Manufacture 2023-24EGR1004MLevel 42023-24The selection of materials and manufacturing method is an integral part of the engineering design procedure. The purpose of this module is to introduce the fundamental properties of engineering materials through an understanding of the atomic and molecular interactions within the material. Students are introduced to the technology of manufacturing processes and how the selection of manufacturing processes are influenced by, and subsequently affect, material properties.CoreMathematical Skills for Engineers 2023-24EGR1014MLevel 42023-24A good mathematical grounding is essential for all engineers. The theory developed in this module aims to underpin the other engineering modules studied at level one. Wherever possible, mathematical theory is taught by considering a real example, to present students the mathematical tools they might need for the science they follow. Solutions are considered by both analytical and numerical techniques.CoreMatter and Interactions 2023-24ELE1001MLevel 42023-24The aim of this module is to establish an understanding of electrostatics, electromagnetics, and electroconductive fields - more commonly referred to as field theory. Students are introduced to the fundamental topics in electrostatics, magnetostatics, and electromagnetics leading to an introduction to Maxwells equations which will support subsequent modules on devices, electricity, and magnetism and optoelectronics. As well as providing a basic foundation in field theory the behaviours of materials under electric and magnetic fields are also explained along with more practical aspects of field theory that are pertinent to the modern day electrical engineer such as EMC.CoreAdvanced Biomedical Engineering Project 2024-25BME2001MLevel 52024-25This module aims to deepen students understanding of engineering in practical applications. Students investigate the design process for biomedical components/systems and undertake analysis of them. The design project undertaken will be industry-focussed. This major project will allow students to extend their creative design skills and obtain practical experience of the process of creating sound conceptual solutions through to real design problems within an industrial context. Students can build confidence and gain experience through working within a team.CoreApplied Thermofluids 2024-25EGR2014MLevel 52024-25This module can be divided into two topics: Thermodynamics: Thermodynamics is an essential part of engineering all over the world. It is a basic science that deals with energy interactions in physical systems, and the purpose of this module is to study the relationships between heat (thermos) and work (dynamics). This module presents a range of real-world engineering applications to give students a feel for engineering practice and an intuitive understanding of the subject matter. Fluid Mechanics: Fluid Mechanics is the branch of applied mechanics that is concerned with the statics and dynamics of liquids and gases. The analysis of the behaviour of fluids is based upon the fundamental laws of applied mechanics, which relate to the conservation of mass-energy and the force-momentum equation. However, instead of dealing with the behaviour of individual bodies of known mass, Fluid Mechanics is concerned with the behaviour of a continuous stream of fluid. For this reason, Fluid Mechanics is studied separately to other mechanics modules. Due to the similarity of the mathematical techniques, Fluid Mechanics are studied with Thermodynamics.CoreBiomaterials 2024-25BME2002MLevel 52024-25This module aims to introduce students to biomaterials, including the properties of natural materials and the behaviour of artificial materials when implanted on or in contact with the human body. Students are also introduced to the reaction of materials to implantation in the body; the reaction of the body to the presence of implanted materials; the uses of polymers, ceramics, metals and composites as biomaterials; concepts of biocompatibility and bioacitve methods of assessing these; and basic applications of biomaterials in the body and the resultant interactions.CoreData Modelling and Simulation 2024-25EGR2010MLevel 52024-25The purpose of this programme of mathematical study is to give students the opportunity to become more competent in calculations using a range of mathematical tools. The content builds upon that delivered in the first year, and gives students the opportunity to extend their analytical skills by introducing more advanced topics that may form part of the modern engineers skill set.CoreDigital Systems And Analog Electronics 2024-25BME2003MLevel 52024-25This modules introduces the basic knowledge required to understand, design, and work with basic electronic circuits and the basic principles underlying the process of electronic engineering. No previous electronics experience is assumed and the module proceeds via a sequence of lectures supported by labs designed to introduce practical electronics.CoreKinematics and Biomechanics 2024-25BME2004MLevel 52024-25This module provides an understanding of the core concepts of mechanics such as mass, force, velocity, acceleration, work, energy, and power. Students can develop the necessary skills to apply the fundamental laws of mechanics such as Newtons laws and conservation of energy to perform quantitative analysis of human body motion and equilibrium.CoreMechatronics Systems 2024-25ELE2003MLevel 52024-25The term mechatronics integrates mechanical engineering with electronics and intelligent computer control in the design and manufacture of products and processes. As a result, many products which used to have mechanical functions have had many replaced with ones involving microprocessors. This has resulted in much flexibility, easier redesign and reprogramming, and the ability to carry out automated data collection and reporting. A consequence of this approach is the need for engineers to adopt an interdisciplinary and integrated approach to engineering. The overall aim of this module is to give a comprehensive coverage of topics, such as analogue and digital signals, digital logic, sensors and signal conditioning, data acquisition systems, data presentation systems, mechanical and electrical actuation systems, microcontroller programming and interfacing, system response and modelling, and feedback control. Students may make extensive use of Simulink and a MATLAB support packages based an Arduino board, which allow for graphical simulation and programming of real-time control systems. The module serves as an introductory course to more advanced courses such as Measurement and Testing, Sensors, Actuators and Controllers, and Embedded Systems.CoreSolid Body Mechanics 2024-25EGR2012MLevel 52024-25This programme of study will extend the ideas and skills introduced at Level 1. Students have the opportunity to learn how to carry out strength and deflection analyses for a variety of simple load cases and structures. Students have the opportunity to understand the simplifications used in such analyses. This course demonstrates the role of stress analysis and failure prediction in the design environment.CoreEngineering Year in Industry 2024-25EGR2015XLevel 52024-25The Placement Year constitutes a work placement during an academic year, typically between Levels 2 and Level 3, though it may take place between levels 3 and 4 of an MEng programme. Students wishing to undertake the work placement year must successfully complete Level 2 (and 3 if applicable) of their programme. The Placement Year aims to give students a continuous experience of full-time work within an organisation. It should be a three-way co-operative activity between employer, student, and University. Work placements enable students to experience at first hand the daily workings of an organisation while setting that experience in the broader context of their studies.OptionalBiomedical Imaging and Signal Processing 2025-26BME3002MLevel 62025-26In this module students study a range of signal and image processing techniques and learn how they can be used to analyse a range of biomedical signals and images. Whilst learning general and specific analysis techniques, students can also gain insight into relevant biomedical background and many of the engineering principles that underlie the operation of key devices that are used to record biomedical signals or generate biomedical images. The module will also discuss engineering issues in the wider context of exploiting engineering for health-care, including relevant ethical and economic issues and multidisciplinary collaboration and communication.CoreComputational Fluid Dynamics 2025-26EGR3005MLevel 62025-26The purpose of this module is to introduce the full Navier-Stokes equations and give the physical significance of each term in the equations. Students are introduced to CFD techniques appropriate for practical engineering applications, (the finite volume method), and they have the opportunity to gain practical, hands-on experience of commercial CFD packages. This module offers students the opportunity to model industrial fluid dynamics and heat transfer problems.CoreIndividual Project (Bachelors) 2025-26EGR3024MLevel 62025-26The individual project aims to provide students with a learning experience that enables them to carry out independent research, and to integrate many of the subjects they have studied throughout their degree. Students are expected to plan, research and execute their task while developing skills in critical judgement, independent work and engineering competence. Students have the opportunity to gain experience in presenting and reporting a major piece of engineering work, of immediate engineering value, at a level appropriate for an honours degree student.CoreBioinformatics and Data Management 2025-26BME3001MLevel 62025-26The aim of this module is to introduce a range of computational methodologies to analyse biological data, make new predictions, and support the understanding of biological mechanisms. The module content will include an introduction to data types and databases and relevant methods of bioinformatics. The overall aim is to support a comprehensive understanding of computational applications for data analysis and simulation providing multiple examples.OptionalBiomedical Business, Innovation and Entrepreneurship 2025-26BME3003MLevel 62025-26The Biomedical Business, Innovation and Entrepreneurship module has been designed so that upon completion of the module students will be able to use entrepreneurial skills gained through the study of theory and practice and as a result be able to pursue careers in a range of industries related to biomedical engineering. The module aims to equip students with a depth of innovation and entrepreneurial theory which forms a foundation of knowledge. Students study the various theoretical aspects of both foundation and contemporary aspects of entrepreneurship and enterprise in order to self-appraise their own personal environment. The module examines modern day success stories of contemporary businesses in engineering and manufacturing and traces their origins and reasons for successful accomplishments. It aims to reflect the entrepreneurial learning process which informs how entrepreneurs learn from previous mistakes. The module offers a generic examination of the principles of business studies, entrepreneurship, and entrepreneurial activity, within a variety of settings of SMEs and regional and rural settings. The main aim of this module is to highlight the main competences that future biomedical engineers should have to act successfully in the field of innovation.OptionalFinite Element Analysis 2025-26EGR3006MLevel 62025-26The purpose of this module is to introduce students to the theory and practice of the finite element method, with applications in stress analysis, heat transfer and general field problems in order to complement other modules in these subjects. Students have the opportunity to learn of the capabilities and limitations of the finite element method and the practical problems involved in successfully modelling engineering structures and components.OptionalInternet of Things and Smart Electronics 2025-26ELE3006MLevel 62025-26This module is intended to introduce students with the fast growing area of consumer electronics design. Apart from interface and size issues, portable consumer electronics present some of the toughest design and engineering challenges in all of technology. This module breaks the complex design process down into its component parts, detailing every crucial issue from interface design to chip packaging, focusing upon the key design parameters of convenience, utility and size.OptionalOrthotics and Prosthetics 2025-26BME3004MLevel 62025-26This is an introductory module in the designing and evaluation of prosthetics (artificial limbs), and orthotics (braces and splints). The module provides a basic grounding in the theory and application of the broad engineering sciences that underpin prosthetic and orthotic practice. The module aims to help students to develop a patient-centred approach to the clinical practice of prosthetics and orthotics. The module aims to develop knowledge and understanding of lower limb prosthetic and orthotic rehabilitation and management based on a patient-centred approach. It will also seek to develop students skills in recognising and responding to the trends that shape prosthetics and orthotics. Emphasis will be placed on practical applications in a variety of amputations and malfunctions in humans. Design, safety consideration, and control strategies will be considered for various prosthetics and orthotics.Optional

Placements

A sandwich option is available on the programme, providing students with the opportunity to spend a year in industry. Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process. Students undertaking placements are responsible for their own travel, living, and accommodation costs.

How you are assessed

Assessment on the Biomedical Engineering programme focuses on measuring and assessing engineering technical and analytical skills as well as professional soft skills including oral and written communication, team working, lifelong learning, problem-solving, project management, and planning and organisation.

Students are continuously assessed throughout the course through a wide range of assessments methods including examinations, practical reports, project portfolios, individual and group presentations, individual group project work, and computer based assessment.

Entry Requirements 2023-24

United Kingdom


A Level: BBC, to include a minimum grade B in Maths (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A Levels or equivalent qualifications).

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall to include Higher Level grade 5 in Maths.

BTEC Extended Diploma in Engineering: Distinction, Merit, Merit or equivalent.

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points, including 40 points from 15 credits in Maths.

A combination of qualifications which may include A Levels, BTEC, EPQ, etc.

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English and Maths. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry. We will also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.

International


Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages for information on equivalent qualifications.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/pre-sessionalenglishandacademicstudyskills/


If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Fees and Scholarships

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Career Opportunities

Biomedical engineering represents a new area of medical research and product development, with biomedical engineers working to pave the way for new methods of helping to treat injuries and diseases. As medicine is a field with vast numbers of specific disciplines, there are many different sub-fields in which biomedical engineers may work.

Some work to improve and develop new machinery, such as robotic surgery equipment, while others endeavour to create better, more reliable replacement limbs (or parts which help existing limbs function better, such as joint replacements).

This course is designed to develop the knowledge and skills needed to maximise students' career prospects across the field. This includes key transferable skills in research, working to deadlines, project development, critical analysis, communication, team working, and problem-solving.

Biomedical engineers may become involved in a multitude of different roles including the design of medical devices, modelling and simulation of human physiology and anatomy, supporting hospitals in clinical and financial governance of existing medical equipment, development of artificial organs, computer-simulated or image-guided surgery, robot-assisted surgery, development of orthopaedic implants, medical imaging, assistive technologies, and mobile and e-health.

Visit Us in Person

The best way to find out what it is really like to live and learn at Lincoln is to join us for one of our Open Days. Visiting us in person is important and will help you to get a real feel for what it might be like to study here.

Book Your Place

Prioritising Face-to-Face Teaching

At the University of Lincoln, we strive to ensure our students’ experience is engaging, supportive, and academically challenging. Throughout the Coronavirus pandemic, we have adapted to Government guidance to keep our students, staff, and community safe. All remaining Covid-19 legal restrictions in England were lifted in February 2022 under the Government’s Plan for Living with Covid-19, and we have embraced a safe return to in-person teaching on campus. Where appropriate, face-to-face teaching is enhanced by the use of digital tools and technology and may be complemented by online opportunities where these support learning outcomes.

We are fully prepared to adapt our plans if changes in Government guidance make this necessary, and we will endeavour to keep current and prospective students informed. For more information about how we are working to keep our community safe, please visit our coronavirus web pages.

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.