Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

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Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

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UCAS Code

W220

Course Code

ILLILLUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

View

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

W220

Course Code

ILLILLUB

BA (Hons) Illustration BA (Hons) Illustration

The course is delivered by academics who have professional backgrounds in illustration and other related visual communication disciplines.

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

W220

Course Code

ILLILLUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

W220

Course Code

ILLILLUB

Select Year of Entry

Dr Rowan Gatfield and Jamie Oliver - Joint Programme Leaders

Dr Rowan Gatfield and Jamie Oliver - Joint Programme Leaders

Dr Rowan Gatfield is a Senior Lecturer, teaching on the Illustration programme. He has more than 30 years’ experience within the print, publication, design, and advertising industry, having served as a Junior Art Director at Matthews and Charter/Olgilvy and Mather, as a partner at Gatfield and De Freitas/Polyhedron Advertising, and then owner of Bright Green Tomato Advertising. Jamie Oliver is an illustrator, painter, photographer and a senior lecturer on the Illustration programme at the University of Lincoln. He has worked as an illustrator since 1993 including four years at Elsevier in London. His illustration work has appeared in newspapers, magazines, books and journals, and continues to undertake illustration commissions.

School Staff List

Welcome to BA (Hons) Illustration

BA Hons Illustration at Lincoln not only explores the contemporary, professional aspects of illustration, but is also focused on developing students' confidence to discover their creative voice and problem-solving resolve.

The course aims to create highly sophisticated visual communicators, whose work demonstrates a high level of craft and an aesthetic flare, across both digital and analogue media, platforms and projects.

Students can benefit from a dedicated studio space, specialist art and design facilities, and digital equipment. They may also have opportunities to:

- meet with established illustrators, publishers, and industry experts.
- engage with live projects, and national and international competitions and collaborations.
- exhibit and publish their own work, most notably, in a final year Graduate Show, physically or online.
- gain advice about pursuing a freelance career, employment, entrepreneurship, and learn about handling commissions and negotiating with clients.

Please check out the programme's blog site : https://illustration.blogs.lincoln.ac.uk

Students can also visit our 'Show 20' Final Year Degree Show:
https://designlincoln.co.uk/show2020/illustration

You can find out more about the work of staff and students by following the Instagram account at https://www.instagram.com/unilincolndesign/

Welcome to BA (Hons) Illustration

Illustration continues to evolve, led by practitioners who aren't afraid to take creative risks. As such, students will be encouraged to be inquisitive, embrace mistakes, and challenge what Illustration can be.

Students are expected to develop visual problem-solving skills, ideation, and critical thinking to help develop their own unique creative voice. The course will encourage them to prepare for the competitive world of professional illustration, which continues to grow broader in its context through emerging media and technology.

The course is delivered by academics who have professional backgrounds in illustration and other related visual communication disciplines. They maintain active industry links and offer a practical first-hand insight into the professional world of illustration and visual communication.

Students have the opportunity to develop a large portfolio of work designed to showcase creative skills and demonstrate an ability to engage with current illustration practice.

How You Study

This BA (Hons) Illustration degree aims to help students to explore their personal direction, as an illustrator in preparation for a career in industry. By delving into both traditional and contemporary approaches to illustration, this course deals not just with what it is, but also what you think it should be.

Tutors place an emphasis on experimentation, and on developing an ability to visually communicate with audiences by seeing relationships between image and text, or the spoken word. The course is also focused on helping students to contextualise the profession of illustration in relation to society.

Students are able to develop a professional portfolio of work by engaging with independent, collaborative, and industry-led briefs and projects, and by developing a range of professional skills that will serve them throughout your career.

The first year of study focuses on helping students develop visual and conceptual skills through drawing, painting, printmaking, collage, and associated digital, design, illustration, and thinking processes.

This is followed, in the second year, by the study of editorial and book illustration aimed at selected clients and audiences. During this year, ethically and culturally orientated issues and debates are explored.

In the final year, students may have the opportunity to respond to contemporary illustration briefs, including live competitions. The focus is on enabling students to produce a portfolio that showcases their unique, individual abilities and a bespoke approach to illustration.

Studio practice is a key element of this course, and students will have the opportunity to spend a lot time in a creative studio environment. Teaching and learning experiences may include studio activities, peer groups, lectures, workshops, seminars, and group tutorials. Students can also benefit from face to face consultation with your tutor during portfolio reviews and around self-directed projects.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

How You Study

The BA (Hons) Illustration degree values analogue methods of image production alongside contemporary digital methods. In addition to traditional picture-making, the course introduces the conceptual and technical skills appropriate to a career in illustration and the broader creative industries. There is a balance of focus on creative freedom, target audiences, and professional practice development.

The first year focuses on enabling students to develop visual and conceptual skills through drawing, painting, printmaking, collage, and the application of a range of associated processes.

This is followed in the second year with the study of editorial and book illustration aimed at a range of clients and audiences. Ethical issues and other cultural debates are explored through research and the production of an extensive body of work.

In the third and final year, students have opportunities to respond to contemporary illustration briefs, including live competitions. The focus is on enabling students to produce a portfolio that showcases their unique individual abilities and personal style.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

Teaching and Learning During Covid-19

Information for Offer Holders Joining Us in Autumn 2021

Letter from Head of Lincoln School of Design

We are delighted you are interested in joining us at the University of Lincoln and I am writing to let you know about our planning for the new academic year. You currently have an offer of a place at the University and we want to keep you updated so you can start preparing for your future, should you be successful in meeting any outstanding conditions of your offer.

We fully intend your experience with us at Lincoln will be engaging, supportive and academically challenging. We are determined to provide our students with a safe and exciting campus experience, ensuring you benefit from the best that both face-to-face and online teaching offer. We have kept our focus on friendliness and community spirit at Lincoln and we look forward to your participation in that community.

As you know, the UK Government has published its roadmap for the easing of Coronavirus lockdown restrictions in England. There are still some uncertainties for universities around possible restrictions for the next academic year, particularly in relation to social distancing in large group teaching. We are planning in line with government guidance for both face-to-face and online teaching to ensure you have a good campus experience and can complete all the requirements for your programme. We are fully prepared to adapt and flex our plans if changes in government regulations make this necessary during the year.

Face-to-face teaching and interaction with tutors and course mates are key to students’ learning and the broader student experience. Face-to-face sessions will be prioritised where it is most valuable, particularly for seminars, tutorials, workshops, studio and practical sessions. Students tell us that there are real benefits to some elements of online learning within a blended approach, such as revisiting recorded materials and developing new digital skills and confidence. At Lincoln we aim to take forward the best aspects of both.

This letter sets out in detail various aspects of the planned experience at Lincoln for your chosen subject area, and we hope the information is helpful as you plan for your future.

Teaching and Learning

Your programme will follow an on-campus, blended-learning model. This will involve a range of different learning styles where you will be able to engage with your tutors and peers in physical and virtual environments.

We are planning the majority of your teaching to be delivered face to face. This means that you will be on campus for sessions like seminars, tutorials, workshops, practical and studio classes. We will also be using the benefits of online learning and teaching, particularly for large lectures, which may be delivered as live sessions in which you can interact with others, and/or recorded sessions that you can access whenever you want.

Our efforts to develop your employability within and outside of the curriculum will remain a key focus during your time at Lincoln. As your course progresses, you will be assessed in various ways, including coursework and examinations which may be online.

The spaces on campus where your teaching will take place (including our creative studios which simulate the design agency environment) will be managed in ways that maximise your learning experience while also safeguarding your health and wellbeing in line with the latest Government guidance.

Should a change in Government guidance require a return to lockdown, we are ready to move fully online for the required period. We did this twice last year and managed to successfully deliver our curriculum and maintain our sense of community. Any changes of this kind will be communicated by email from myself and/or the university.

To complete your assignments, you will need a laptop or desktop computer capable of running certain software, details of which will be provided by your programme team as part of your Welcome Pack. We will provide an Adobe Creative Cloud license so that you can access this software at the start of your studies. All students will be provided with full access to Microsoft Office 365.

To support you in your studies, you will be assigned a Personal Tutor – a member of academic staff who is your designated ‘go to’ person for advice and support, both pastoral and academic. You will meet with them regularly in person and/or online. It is important to remember that independent learning is an essential aspect of your programme. Guided reading and other independent engagement remain key to performing well in your studies.

We are very much looking forward to welcoming you on campus in October for your induction events and supporting you as you embark on this new and exciting chapter in your life.  

The University Campus

We are very proud of our beautiful and vibrant campuses at the University of Lincoln and we have used our extensive indoor and outdoor spaces to provide students with access to study and social areas as well as learning resources and facilities, adapting them where necessary in line with government guidance. All the mitigations and safety measures you would expect are in place on our campuses (at Lincoln, Riseholme and Holbeach), such as hand sanitisers, one-way systems, and other social distancing measures where these are required.

Student Wellbeing and Support

The University’s Student Wellbeing Centre and Student Support Centre are fully open for face-to-face and online support. Should you, as one of our applicants, have any questions about coming to Lincoln in October or any other concerns, these specialist teams are here for you. You can contact Student Wellbeing and the Student Support Centre by visiting https://studentservices.lincoln.ac.uk where service details and contact information are available, or if you are in Lincoln you can make an appointment to meet a member of the team.

To enable you to make the most out of your experience in Lincoln and to help you access course materials and other services, we recommend that you have a desktop, laptop or tablet device available during your studies. This will enable you to engage easily with our online learning platforms from your student accommodation or from home. Students can use IT equipment on campus in the Library, our learning lounges, and specialist academic areas; however, there may not always be a space free when you have a timetabled session or an assessment to complete which is why we recommend you have your own device too, if possible. If you are struggling to access IT equipment or reliable internet services, please contact ICT for technical support and Student Support who can assist you with further advice and information.

We are committed to providing you with the best possible start to university life and to helping you to prepare for your time with us. As part of this commitment, you can access our Student Life pre-arrival online support package. This collection of digital resources, advice and helpful tips created by current students is designed to help you prepare for the all-important first steps into higher education, enabling you to learn within a supportive community and to make the most of the new opportunities that the University of Lincoln provides. When you are ready, you can begin by going to studentlife.lincoln.ac.uk/starting.

Students’ Union

Your Students’ Union is here to make sure that you get the most from every aspect of your student experience. They will be providing a huge range of in-person and virtual events and opportunities - you are sure to find something perfect for you! Meet people and find a new hobby by joining one of their 150 sports teams and societies. Grab lunch between teaching or a drink with friends in The Swan, Towers or The Barge. Learn new skills and boost your CV by taking part in training courses and volunteering opportunities in your spare time. Grab a bike from the Cycle Hire and explore the city you will be calling home.

To start off the new academic year, your Students’ Union will be bringing you The Official Lincoln Freshers Week 2021, with a huge line-up of social events, club nights, fayres and activities for you enjoy (restrictions permitting). Keep an eye on www.facebook.com/lincolnfreshers21 for line-up and ticket updates, so you don’t miss out.

Most importantly, your Students’ Union will always be there for you when you need it most; making sure that your voice as a student is always heard. The SU Advice Centre can provide independent advice and support on housing, finance, welfare and academic issues. As well as this, your Course Representatives are always on hand to make sure that you are getting the best from your academic experience. To find out more about the Students’ Union’s events, opportunities, support and how to get in contact go to: www.lincolnsu.com.

Student Accommodation

Many applicants will choose to live in dedicated student accommodation on, or close to, campus and you may well have already booked your student residence for the upcoming year. All University-managed student accommodation will have our Residential Wardens in place. Residential Wardens are here to help you settle into your new accommodation and will be offering flatmate and residential support activities throughout the year. If you have booked University accommodation, you will have already heard from us with further details on where you will be living to help you prepare. If you have not yet booked your accommodation, we still have plenty of options available. In the meantime, lots of advice and information can be found on the accommodation pages of our website.

The information detailed in this letter will form part of your agreement with the University of Lincoln. If we do not hear from you to the contrary prior to enrolment, we will assume that you acknowledge and accept the information contained in this letter. Adaptations to how we work may have to be made in line with any future changes in government guidance, and we will communicate these with you as necessary. Please do review the University’s Admissions Terms and Conditions (in particular sections 8 and 9) and Student Complaints Procedure so you understand your rights and the agreement between the University and its students.

We very much hope this information is useful to help you plan for the next step in your academic journey, and we look forward to welcoming you here at Lincoln this Autumn. This is the start of a new phase and will be an exciting time for all of us. If you have any questions, please do email me at achick@lincoln.ac.uk.

Professor Anne Chick

Head of Lincoln School of Design

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Contextual Studies 1 2022-23DES1001MLevel 42022-23This module is designed to introduce students to relevant concepts, debates and case study examples concerning creativity and the creative process, as the basis for the development of a reflective creative practice. This aims to compliment and underpin the studio work students carry out with the programme-specific team during the rest of their programme of study.CoreDigital and Sequential Illustration 2022-23ILL1083MLevel 42022-23This module is designed to introduce students to a range of methodologies employed by illustrators when working with images in sequence. It explores the potential of using sequential imagery to communicate ideas and visual narrative. Students are exposed to examples of both the historical context and contemporary practice of visual sequences, pictorial progression and animation, across a range of genres. The module aims to provide students with an understanding of the way illustrators explore a range of visual solutions to a creative brief. Skills and understanding are developed through the creation of still and moving imagery using a range of media, materials, and technology. Students are encouraged to broaden their understanding of the ways that contemporary illustrators can use combinations of digital and analogue media and methods in the production of work. Fundamental issues concerning the production of still and moving digital imagery, animation, and sequential illustration are explored via project briefs. In addition, formal considerations such as composition, layout, structure, and presentation are also explored to enable informed decision making in the production of sequential illustrations.CoreDrawing and Process 2022-23ILL1084MLevel 42022-23The primary focus of this module is the development of essential drawing and making skills fundamental to the study and practice of illustration. The importance of observational drawing in image making cannot be overestimated and continues to underpin picture-making even when source imagery or imagined scenarios are utilised. Essential in understanding size, scale, perspective, and overall composition observational skills should be maintained throughout the programme of study and continue to inform practice in an established career in illustration. Throughout the module, students are required to focus on the language of visual representation via the study of the fundamentals of looking and recording visual phenomena. The module also examines accepted methods of figuration, visual codes, pictorial composition, and exploration of ideas associated with representation.CoreIntroduction to Illustration 2022-23ILL1085MLevel 42022-23This module is designed to allow students to explore and develop their practical skills while also developing an understanding of the process of illustration from idea generation to project realisation. Students are required to create illustrations using a range of appropriate media and approaches to convey content, messages, and narratives to specific audiences in a variety of contexts. Students are encouraged to develop and apply their awareness of the principals of picture making, pictorial language, semiotics, aesthetics, and visual narrative via project briefs that reveal the scope and reach of illustration practice.CoreAudience and Message 2023-24ILL2084MLevel 52023-24This module extends and challenges the framework of technical and creative skills that have been acquired in the exploration of narrative picture-making in previous and adjacent modules. It encourages students to creatively and practically employ divergent thinking, in addition to convergent thinking, in the manufacture of design solutions - specifically illustrative outcomes. The aim of this module is to facilitate an awareness of demographics, visual codes, and communication theory, in combination with the refinement of the practical skills. This understanding will be beneficial for students developing their own distinct visual signature in a competitive market place.CoreBooks and Storytelling 2023-24ILL2085MLevel 52023-24This module is designed to provide students with the opportunity to further develop their experiential understanding of the key principles underlying the creation and production of illustrated narrative structures. The module explores the fundamentals of professional illustration practice with primary focus on book illustration. It encourages the continuation of an exploration of materials, media, processes, techniques, and technologies appropriate to the execution of practical work. The overall aim is to establish knowledge and understanding of the principles of narrative structure and storytelling in illustrated books. Students are afforded the opportunity to build on prior knowledge and practice through intellectual examination and practical investigation into a range of genre, the further development and application of sequential illustration, the role of a character in a narrative structure, and formal continuity. Students will be encouraged to work creatively, employing a range of skills in order to make informed decisions in the materialisation of project briefs.CoreContextual Studies 2 2023-24DES2001MLevel 52023-24Building upon issues concerning the development of a reflective creative practice, Contextual Studies 2 introduces students to relevant concepts, debates, and case study examples concerning the professional, economic, and socio-cultural contexts of design within the creative industries. It will also discuss ethical issues as they relate to this professional context of the creative industries and shape the creative motivations of areas such as design activism, ecological orientations, and socially engaged creative practices. These themes and debates will form an overarching discussion of professional design practice.CoreThinking and Making 2023-24ILL2086MLevel 52023-24This module aims to further develop students' skills and understanding of the intellectual, creative, and practical processes necessary for the creation of content-centred imagery appropriate to the evolving illustration industry. The relationship between words and pictures is further explored through projects that encourage the development of playful and engaging word and image association techniques. Acknowledgement and appreciation of historical and contemporary illustration practice is further established and reinforced through lectures, seminars, group critiques and tutorials. Experimentation with a range of media, materials and processes beyond orthodox painting and drawing, is actively encouraged to extend and enhance the presentation of finished artwork.CoreContemporary Illustration 2024-25ILL3081MLevel 62024-25This module confirms and extends the multitude of working strategies applicable within contemporary illustration practice. A range of projects reflecting the breadth of contemporary illustration provides students the opportunity to apply their analytical and practical skills to visually interpret and communicate a multiplicity of complex themes, texts, and ideas within their artwork. Independent learning is encouraged to develop the necessary confidence required to produce engaging, individual solutions to set briefs.CoreContextual Studies 3 2024-25DES3001MLevel 62024-25Contextual Studies 3 is an independent research study module which takes the form either of a dissertation and/or a number of other options. The module offers students an opportunity to explore in depth a topic of their own choice, chosen generally, but not exclusively in relation to the practice and/or context of their programme-specific studies and studio practice.CoreNegotiated Illustration 2024-25ILL3082MLevel 62024-25This modules enables students to shape their learning according to their career aspirations, and academic and personal goals. Students elect an individual and personalised programme of study, establishing their own criteria outcomes with practical briefs. Emphasis is upon self-managed, confident, independent learning and the production of a portfolio of high-quality illustrations.CoreProfessionalism and Commissions 2024-25ILL3083MLevel 62024-25This module confirms understanding of the professional environment of illustration and empowers students to focus upon their own individual creative and professional development. Research based acquisition of information and knowledge, combined with refined, industry standard practical skills underpins the production of accomplished, complex and content centred illustrations. Students are expected to demonstrate competence in developing ideas and practical outcomes appropriate to the requirements of a client brief. The module is designed to outline the role of the client, the agent, the publisher, the audience and/or consumer. In addition, understanding, exploration and application of copyright, the Intellectual property framework, self-promotion, and a range of business practices involved in the illustration industry provide business and self-development skills that are essential to professional practice.Core

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Contextual Studies 1 2021-22DES1001MLevel 42021-22This module is designed to introduce students to relevant concepts, debates, and case studies relating to the nature creativity and the creative process, as the basis for the development of a reflective creative practice. This aims to compliment and underpin the studio work students carry out with the programme-specific team during the rest of their programme of study.CoreDigital and Sequential Illustration 2021-22ILL1083MLevel 42021-22This module is designed to introduce students to a range of methodologies employed by illustrators when working with images in sequence. It explores the potential of using sequential imagery to communicate ideas and visual narrative. Students are exposed to examples of both the historical context and contemporary practice of visual sequences, pictorial progression and animation, across a range of genres. The module aims to provide students with an understanding of the way illustrators explore a range of visual solutions to a creative brief. Skills and understanding are developed through the creation of still and moving imagery using a range of media, materials, and technology. Students are encouraged to broaden their understanding of the ways that contemporary illustrators can use combinations of digital and analogue media and methods in the production of work. Fundamental issues concerning the production of still and moving digital imagery, animation, and sequential illustration are explored via project briefs. In addition, formal considerations such as composition, layout, structure, and presentation are also explored to enable informed decision making in the production of sequential illustrations.CoreDrawing and Process 2021-22ILL1084MLevel 42021-22The primary focus of this module is the development of essential drawing and making skills fundamental to the study and practice of illustration. The importance of observational drawing in image making cannot be overestimated and continues to underpin picture-making even when source imagery or imagined scenarios are utilised. Essential in understanding size, scale, perspective, and overall composition observational skills should be maintained throughout the programme of study and continue to inform practice in an established career in illustration. Throughout the module, students are required to focus on the language of visual representation via the study of the fundamentals of looking and recording visual phenomena. The module also examines accepted methods of figuration, visual codes, pictorial composition, and exploration of ideas associated with representation.CoreIntroduction to Illustration 2021-22ILL1085MLevel 42021-22This module is designed to allow students to explore and develop their practical skills while also developing an understanding of the process of illustration from idea generation to project realisation. Students are required to create illustrations using a range of appropriate media and approaches to convey content, messages, and narratives to specific audiences in a variety of contexts. Students are encouraged to develop and apply their awareness of the principals of picture making, pictorial language, semiotics, aesthetics, and visual narrative via project briefs that reveal the scope and reach of illustration practice.CoreAudience and Message 2022-23ILL2084MLevel 52022-23This module extends and challenges the framework of technical and creative skills that have been acquired in the exploration of narrative picture-making in previous and adjacent modules. It encourages students to creatively and practically employ divergent thinking, in addition to convergent thinking, in the manufacture of design solutions - specifically illustrative outcomes. The aim of this module is to facilitate an awareness of demographics, visual codes, and communication theory, in combination with the refinement of the practical skills. This understanding will be beneficial for students developing their own distinct visual signature in a competitive market place.CoreBooks and Storytelling 2022-23ILL2085MLevel 52022-23This module is designed to provide students with the opportunity to further develop their experiential understanding of the key principles underlying the creation and production of illustrated narrative structures. The module explores the fundamentals of professional illustration practice with primary focus on book illustration. It encourages the continuation of an exploration of materials, media, processes, techniques, and technologies appropriate to the execution of practical work. The overall aim is to establish knowledge and understanding of the principles of narrative structure and storytelling in illustrated books. Students are afforded the opportunity to build on prior knowledge and practice through intellectual examination and practical investigation into a range of genre, the further development and application of sequential illustration, the role of a character in a narrative structure, and formal continuity. Students will be encouraged to work creatively, employing a range of skills in order to make informed decisions in the materialisation of project briefs.CoreContextual Studies 2 2022-23DES2001MLevel 52022-23Building upon issues concerning the development of a reflective creative practice, Contextual Studies 2 introduces students to relevant concepts, debates, and case study examples concerning the professional, economic, and socio-cultural contexts of design within the creative industries. It will also discuss ethical issues as they relate to this professional context of the creative industries and shape the creative motivations of areas such as design activism, ecological orientations, and socially engaged creative practices. These themes and debates will form an overarching discussion of professional design practice.CoreThinking and Making 2022-23ILL2086MLevel 52022-23This module aims to further develop students' skills and understanding of the intellectual, creative, and practical processes necessary for the creation of content-centred imagery appropriate to the evolving illustration industry. The relationship between words and pictures is further explored through projects that encourage the development of playful and engaging word and image association techniques. Acknowledgement and appreciation of historical and contemporary illustration practice is further established and reinforced through lectures, seminars, group critiques and tutorials. Experimentation with a range of media, materials and processes beyond orthodox painting and drawing, is actively encouraged to extend and enhance the presentation of finished artwork.CoreContemporary Illustration 2023-24ILL3081MLevel 62023-24This module confirms and extends the multitude of working strategies applicable within contemporary illustration practice. A range of projects reflecting the breadth of contemporary illustration provides students the opportunity to apply their analytical and practical skills to visually interpret and communicate a multiplicity of complex themes, texts, and ideas within their artwork. Independent learning is encouraged to develop the necessary confidence required to produce engaging, individual solutions to set briefs.CoreContextual Studies 3 2023-24DES3001MLevel 62023-24Contextual Studies 3 is an independent research study module which takes the form either of a dissertation and/or a number of other options. The module offers students an opportunity to explore in depth a topic of their own choice, chosen generally, but not exclusively in relation to the practice and/or context of their programme-specific studies and studio practice.CoreNegotiated Illustration 2023-24ILL3082MLevel 62023-24This modules enables students to shape their learning according to their career aspirations, and academic and personal goals. Students elect an individual and personalised programme of study, establishing their own criteria outcomes with practical briefs. Emphasis is upon self-managed, confident, independent learning and the production of a portfolio of high-quality illustrations.CoreProfessionalism and Commissions 2023-24ILL3083MLevel 62023-24This module confirms understanding of the professional environment of illustration and empowers students to focus upon their own individual creative and professional development. Research based acquisition of information and knowledge, combined with refined, industry standard practical skills underpins the production of accomplished, complex and content centred illustrations. Students are expected to demonstrate competence in developing ideas and practical outcomes appropriate to the requirements of a client brief. The module is designed to outline the role of the client, the agent, the publisher, the audience and/or consumer. In addition, understanding, exploration and application of copyright, the Intellectual property framework, self-promotion, and a range of business practices involved in the illustration industry provide business and self-development skills that are essential to professional practice.Core

How you are assessed

As this course aims to develop a wide range of practical and intellectual skills, assessment is varied and includes presentations, written projects, individual and group practical work, projects, and portfolios, in addition to academic essays.

There are no formal end-of-year examinations. Throughout the degree, students are assessed through their production of practical and written work.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework for example including design project work and presentations; and written assignments. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Assessment on the Illustration programme falls into two main categories; formal and informal.

Formal

At formal formative assessment points students can expect to receive written feedback on submitted work. All feedback will be given in line with the module assessment criteria. Students will then have the opportunity to act upon this feedback before a final, summative submission point, which is used to certify that students have achieved an appropriate level of performance, and it will indicate how far a student has met the assessment criteria used to judge the intended learning outcomes of a module or programme.

Informal

Informal feedback takes many forms; both peer- peer and staff -student. It will usually be provided verbally throughout a project and will focus on the extent to which your work is fulfilling the learning outcome.

As well as these assessment opportunities you will be given ample opportunity to engage in professional creative discussions with staff and peers to help move your work in new and interesting directions.

Fees and Scholarships

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

Materials

Students on the illustration programme are likely to incur some additional costs for specialist art materials throughout the duration of their three years of study.

Equipment and some specialist materials are supplied by the School, especially in respect to printmaking, 3D modelling, and Adobe Creative software suite, which enables the production of digital material. However, students will have to provide their own drawing materials, paper, pencils, sketchbooks etc. A materials list is provided at the beginning of the academic year. Students are not expected to buy everything immediately but build up an individual resource of materials suited to their interests and their project work.

Students can purchase art materials from the art shop located nearby in the Nicola de la Haye building. The course has recently increased its digital resources for students within the studio. However, blended learning approaches (a mixture of online and studio learning) allow students (where applicable) greater freedom to learn where and when they wish. In this way, students may wish to purchase a laptop, tablet and stylus, prior to or during their study depending on their personal approach to illustration production.

Study Visits

Students on this course may have the option to take part in international study visits. The University covers the costs of mandatory field trips , but students who choose to participate in optional study visits are expected to cover their own travel, accommodation, and general living costs.

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

Materials

Students on the illustration programme are likely to incur some additional costs for specialist art materials throughout the duration of their three years of study.

Equipment and some specialist materials are supplied by the School, especially in respect to printmaking, 3D modelling, and Adobe Creative suite which enables the production of digital material. Students will have to provide their own drawing materials, paper, pencils, sketchbooks etc. A materials list is provided at the beginning of the academic year. Students are not expected to buy everything immediately but build up an individual reserve of the sort of materials they will increasingly tend to use. Students can purchase art materials from the art shop located in the Nicola de la Haye building.

Study Visits

Students on this course may have the option to take part in international study visits. The University covers the costs of mandatory field trips, but students who choose to participate in optional study visits are expected to cover their own travel, accommodation, and general living costs.

Entry Requirements 2022-23

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

For applicants who do not meet our standard entry requirements, our Arts Foundation Year can provide an alternative route of entry onto our full degree programmes:https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/course/afyafyub/

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Entry Requirements 2021-22

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

For applicants who do not meet our standard entry requirements, our Arts Foundation Year can provide an alternative route of entry onto our full degree programmes:https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/course/afyafyub/

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Design Showcase 2020

Explore the creative talents of our final-year students in the Lincoln School of Design Digital Showcase 2020, as part of our Festival of Creativity.

Find out More

Features

Industry Visits

The course regularly invites a variety of guest speakers to enhance students' understanding of the wider Illustration community. In the past these have included Graham Rawle, Jonny Hannah, Lydia Monks, Derek Brazell, Gareth Brooks, Scott Garrett, Tom Gauld, and Jade Sarson to name a few.

Innovation, Professionalism and Entrepreneurship

There is a module dedicated to preparing students for life in the creative industry. It establishes the professional responsibilities of the illustrator and his/her role within the visual communication industry and society as a whole. This pedagogic philosophy aims to empower students to further their visual and professional development holistically. Business, research, self-promotion, and presentation skills are fundamental areas of learning in this approach. Students are introduced to various aspects of the illustration business and emphasis is placed on self-employment and the development of professional integrity. This focus on business also provides the opportunity for students to evaluate and distil project briefs.

Software

Students are provided with access to the Adobe Creative Cloud suite of software which includes Photoshop and Illustrator, Linked-In Learning as well as the Microsoft Office suite of software.

Study Visits

Students on this course may have the option to take part in national and international study visits. Students who choose to participate in optional study visits are expected to cover their own travel, accommodation, and general living costs. These optional study trips may include the Book Fair in Bolgona, the International Comic Strip Festival in Angouleme, and a range of museums and specialist exhibitions internationally.

 

Specialist Facilities

Through instilling in our design students a thoughtful and critical approach to the way they think about design and apply their creative skills, we aim to prepare them to be leaders in the creative industries.

The University of Lincoln has a comprehensive range of facilities designed to provide a supportive environment for creative practitioners. Students have regular access to workshops, labs, studios, and industry-standard equipment, as well as highly knowledgeable technicians. This environment can help students to develop their knowledge and skills, and complements our purpose-built design studios.

Explore Our Facilities

Student Design Awards

Lincoln School of Design students have a long history of winning and being shortlisted for international and national student design competitions, and the last few years have been no exception.

Find out More

Student Award winners with their certificates

Portfolios

Applicants will be invited to submit a digital portfolio of work. Portfolios should include plenty of observational drawings as well as evidence of creative exploration, visual problem solving, ideation, and experimentation with a range of different media and materials. Please also include some of your sketchbook pages so that we can see evidence of your developmental work. Work should demonstrate a good contextual knowledge of illustration and how it differs from fine art and graphic design. You may also wish to include evidence of written work, such as a recent essay.

Portfolio tips

  • Label your work and order it in a logical way
  • Feel free to include anything that isn't quite finished or is work in progress, if you feel it showcases your creative style and interests.
  • Portfolios should be in PDF format and no longer than 30 pages.
  • Please title your work with your full name and UCAS number

"One of the key ways the course prepared me for freelance life is the way they let us manage our own time and work independently, as time management and independence are key skills for freelancers."

Ellie Roe, Illustration graduate

Career Opportunities

Illustration graduates have gone on to develop successful international careers in illustration and art direction for advertising agencies, publishing houses, in graphic novels, zines, comics, as well as book illustration. They have gone on to work in games design, storyboarding for cinema, graphic design, and animation. An increasing number of entrepreneurial graduates have launched their own businesses and pursued careers in the broader creative industries.

Visit Us in Person

The best way to find out what it is really like to live and learn at Lincoln is to join us for one of our Open Days. Visiting us in person is important and will help you to get a real feel for what it might be like to study here.

Book Your Place

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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