Key Information

Full-time

4 years

Typical Offer

BBB (120 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

H300

Course Code

EGREGRUM

Key Information

Full-time

4 years

Typical Offer

BBB (120 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

H300

Course Code

EGREGRUM

MEng (Hons) Mechanical Engineering MEng (Hons) Mechanical Engineering

The University’s status as a Siemens Global Principal Partner offers Lincoln graduates opportunities for placements, mentoring, and recruitment at Siemens.

Key Information

Full-time

4 years

Typical Offer

BBB (120 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

H300

Course Code

EGREGRUM

Key Information

Full-time

4 years

Typical Offer

BBB (120 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

H300

Course Code

EGREGRUM

Dr Khaled Goher - Programme Leader

Dr Khaled Goher - Programme Leader

Dr Goher is committed to developing career-focused programmes which aim to prepare graduates with the industry relevant skills they need to support businesses and organisations. He has expertise in work-related learning, which aims to narrow the gap between employer requirements and students' skills, to enhance graduate employability and to facilitate the transition from higher education to work. His research interests include healthcare technologies, personal care, and medical robotics and prosthetics.

School Staff List

Welcome to MEng (Hons) Mechanical Engineering

The MEng (Hons) Mechanical Engineering degree at Lincoln aims to produce industry-ready graduates with product design and innovative sense who are highly-skilled, creative engineers able to adapt to new challenges and deliver sustainable solutions for modern society. The curriculum aims to support students in bridging the gap between the University and professional work by developing skills that are required by industry. The programme offers condensed yet impactful modules that are designed to arm our students with knowledge, skills, and tools to maximise their opportunity to secure a great career.

Founded in collaboration with Siemens, the University of Lincoln’s School of Engineering has a core philosophy of research-led teaching. Our innovative industrial collaborations have led to a range of workplace experience opportunities. The University is also one of a select group of Siemens' Global Principal Partners.

Strong links exist between our Mechanical and Electrical programmes, enabling our students to develop the strong cross-disciplinary focus necessary for the modern engineer, and an understanding of industry perspectives.

Welcome to MEng (Hons) Mechanical Engineering

The MEng (Hons) Mechanical Engineering degree at Lincoln aims to produce industry-ready graduates with product design and innovative sense who are highly-skilled, creative engineers able to adapt to new challenges and deliver sustainable solutions for modern society. The curriculum aims to support students in bridging the gap between the University and professional work by developing skills that are required by industry. The programme offers condensed yet impactful modules that are designed to arm our students with knowledge, skills, and tools to maximise their opportunity to secure a great career.

Founded in collaboration with Siemens, the University of Lincoln’s School of Engineering has a core philosophy of research-led teaching. Our innovative industrial collaborations have led to a generous programme of bursaries and workplace experience opportunities. The University is also one of a select group of Siemens' Global Principal Partners.

Strong links exist between our Mechanical and Electrical programmes, enabling our students to develop the strong cross-disciplinary focus necessary for the modern engineer, and an understanding of industry perspectives.

How You Study

The Mechanical Engineering programme utilises problem- and project-based learning. We aim to narrow the gap between employers’ requirements and our graduates’ skills to improve employability and help facilitate their transition from higher education to work.

The first year of the degree is designed to provide a foundation in engineering theory and practice. Students are supported in their development of important technical skills, such as computer-aided design and workshop skills. The second and third years offer a range of specialist modules. At each stage of the course, there are opportunities to practise and develop engineering skills on real-life problems through project work.

Students on the MEng course can go on to study more advanced modules and learn about project management, teamwork, and leadership, as well as completing an extended group project.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

How You Study

The Mechanical Engineering programme utilises problem- and project-based learning. We aim to narrow the gap between employers’ requirements and our graduates’ skills to improve employability and help facilitate their transition from higher education to work.

The first year of the degree is designed to provide a foundation in engineering theory and practice. Students are supported in their development of important technical skills, such as computer-aided design and workshop skills. The second and third years offer a range of specialist modules. At each stage of the course, there are opportunities to practise and develop engineering skills on real-life problems through project work.

Students on the MEng course can go on to study more advanced modules and learn about project management, teamwork, and leadership, as well as completing an extended group project.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

Many sectors of engineering require high levels of computer literacy and the ability to write computer programs for problem solving is highly desirable. In learning the fundamentals of computer programming, logical thinking and problem solving, skills can be developed and coding techniques learnt, that can support the study of modules in upcoming years. This course delivers the concepts of structured computer programming and lab time is allocated for implementing these concepts. Students are provided with opportunities to plan, write, and debug their own computer programs.

Module Overview

All engineers must be familiar with design strategies, methods of assessing design proposals, approaches to reducing uncertainty, formal communication techniques, and the industrial and legal standards in which they fit. Mechanical Engineering tudents can independently learn and demonstrate the fundamentals of mechanical technical drawing and computer aided design (CAD) while Electrical Engineers can independently learn and demonstrate the fundamentals of electrical drawing and CAD. Students will then come together to form interdisciplinary groups who will produce an electro-mechanical design solution which meets a practical objective and considers the commercial, economic, social and environmental implications via a broad critique of the state of the art.

Module Overview

An understanding of the basic principles and many of the important practical applications of electronic and electrical engineering is now essential to practitioners of other disciplines, especially mechanical engineers. The aim of this module is to provide students with a foundation in electrical engineering and electronics.

Module Overview

This module can into two topics: Statics and Mechanics: The primary aim of the study of engineering mechanics is to develop students' capacity to predict the effects of force and deformation in the course of carrying out the creative design function of engineering. As students undertakes the study of solids and forces (first statics, mechanics, then dynamics) they can build a foundation of analytical capability for the solution of a great variety of engineering problems. Modern engineering practice demands a high level of analytical capability, and the study of mechanics can help in developing this. Dynamics: The study of dynamics gives students the opportunity to analyse and predict the motion of particles and bodies with and without reference to the forces that cause this motion. Successful prediction requires the ability of visualise physical configurations in terms of real machines (in addition to knowledge of physical and mathematical principles of mechanics), actual constraints, and the practical limitations which govern the behaviour of machines.

Module Overview

The selection of materials and manufacturing method is an integral part of the engineering design procedure. The purpose of this module is to introduce the fundamental properties of engineering materials through an understanding of the atomic and molecular interactions within the material. Students are introduced to the technology of manufacturing processes and how the selection of manufacturing processes are influenced by, and subsequently affect, material properties.

Module Overview

A good mathematical grounding is essential for all engineers. The theory developed in this module aims to underpin the other engineering modules. Wherever possible, mathematical theory is taught by considering a real example, to present students the mathematical tools they might need for the science they follow. Solutions are considered by both analytical and numerical techniques.

Module Overview

The syllabus for this module can be divided into two topics: Thermodynamics: Thermodynamics is an essential part of engineering curricula all over the world. It is a basic science that deals with energy interactions in physical systems, and the purpose of this module is to study the relationships between heat (thermos) and work (dynamics). This module presents a range of real-world engineering applications to give students a feel for engineering practice and an intuitive understanding of the subject matter. Fluid Mechanics: Fluid Mechanics is the branch of applied mechanics that is concerned with the statics and dynamics of liquids and gases. The analysis of the behaviour of fluids is based upon the fundamental laws of applied mechanics, which relate to the conservation of mass-energy and the force-momentum equation. However, instead of dealing with the behaviour of individual bodies of known mass, Fluid Mechanics is concerned with the behaviour of a continuous stream of fluid. For this reason, Fluid Mechanics is studied separately to other mechanics modules. Due to the similarity of the mathematical techniques, Fluid Mechanics are studied with Thermodynamics.

Module Overview

Applied Thermodynamics: Thermodynamics is the science that deals with energy interactions in physical systems. The purpose of this module is to build upon the basic principles that were introduced in Thermofluid 1: Fundamental, and then apply this knowledge to real engineering problems. Heat Transfer: Almost every branch of science and engineering includes some kind of heat transfer problem, and there is a need for engineers to have some background in this area. The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to the basic principles and practical applications of conduction, convection and radiation heat transfer. The process of heat transfer is often accomplished by a flowing fluid, and so this module seeks to develop further the Fluid Mechanics covered in Thermofluids at level 1, in order that students can develop their understanding to the point that real world problems can be addressed.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to consolidate and build on the ideas and skills introduced in level one. Students have the opportunity to develop their ability to model dynamic systems with particular reference to vibration analysis in practical engineering applications.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to provide students with a firm grounding in Classical Control methods, which will enable them to work with systems and control engineers, and prepare students on the control stream for advanced topics in later module. Students will be introduced to Control in relation to engineering systems, and in particular to develop methods of modelling the control of processes. Techniques are explored with particular reference to common practical engineering problems and their solutions, and the application of SIMULINK in this process.

Module Overview

The purpose of this programme of mathematical study is to give students the opportunity to become more competent in calculations using a range of mathematical tools. The content builds upon that delivered at Level 1, and gives students the opportunity to extend their analytical skills by introducing more advanced topics that may form part of the modern engineers skill set.

Module Overview

Students will be introduced to electrical machines and power systems and their practical applications, supported by practical analysis/synthesis methods. This ability is fundamental for the students with mechanical engineering background, if they are to be able to handle electromechanical problems encountered in real life situations. Students will further have the opportunity to explore a general methodology for the calculation of electromechanical energy conversion. Students can obtain an appreciation of the features and characteristics of different types of electromechanical machines and drives and their applications.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide an introduction to the subject of industrial engineering. Industrial engineering is a branch of engineering dealing with the optimisation of complex processes or systems. It is concerned with the development, improvement, implementation and evaluation of integrated systems of people, economic resources, knowledge, information, equipment, energy, materials, analysis and synthesis, as well as the mathematical, physical and social sciences together with the principles and methods of engineering design to specify, predict, and evaluate the results to be obtained from such systems or processes. The various topics include management science, cost and value engineering, business economics and finance, engineering management, supply chain management, operations research, health and safety engineering, operation management.

Module Overview

The content of this module aims to deepen a students’ understanding of engineering in practical applications. Students will have the opportunity to investigate the design process for mechanical, electrical or control components/systems, and undertake analysis. These two strands of the module are brought together in a design project, which will be set by a professional engineering organisation. This major project will give students the opportunity to extend their creative design skills and obtain practical experience of the process of creating sound conceptual solutions through to real design problems within an industrial context. Students can build confidence and gain experience through working within a team with practicing engineers from industry.

Module Overview

This programme of study will extend the ideas and skills introduced at Level 1. Students have the opportunity to learn how to carry out strength and deflection analyses for a variety of simple load cases and structures. Students have the opportunity to understand the simplifications used in such analyses. This course demonstrates the role of stress analysis and failure prediction in the design environment.

Module Overview

The selection of materials and manufacturing method is an integral part of the design and manufacturing procedure for producing parts and products. The purpose of this module is to provide students with the opportunity to learn how to select appropriate materials, processing methods and manufacturing systems to produce components and products, both existing and novel. The student is introduced to contemporary manufacturing processes and systems in an effort to select effective and efficient manufacturing processes and systems.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to provide students with the opportunity to learn the background ito combustion theory. Students will be introduced to traditional and renewable fuels, their combustion and utilisation and the resulting environmental impacts. Combustion applications for energy production will be introduced along with the politics revolving around these energy applications. The module will also consider energy policy in terms of usage.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to provide students with an understanding of the machines used in power generation applications, with a main focus on the principles of operation of machines used in base load power generation (gas turbines), but all rotating machines in power generation are considered. Students may then develop a methodology for measuring the impact of machines from energy and materials usage, standpoints, and to better understand where opportunities exist to increase the efficiency of energy machines, systems and devices. Students will have the opportunity to build models of mass and energy flow through existing and proposed machines. These models are then used to pinpoint the most efficient and least efficient steps of device operation. This syllabus can be divided into two topics — Fundamentals of Machines in Power and Energy: The module begins with the theory of gas turbines, based on fundamental thermodynamic and fluid mechanic analyses and introduces methods for improving efficiencies and increasing specific work outputs. Energy Systems Analysis: Students may strengthen and expand their fundamental knowledge of thermodynamics, and apply this to develop a better understanding of energy systems and machine systems.

Module Overview

The individual project aims to provide students with a learning experience that enables them to carry out independent research, and to integrate many of the subjects they have studied throughout their degree. Students are expected to plan, research and execute their task while developing skills in critical judgement, independent work and engineering competence. Students have the opportunity to gain experience in presenting and reporting a major piece of engineering work, of immediate engineering value, at a level appropriate for an honours degree student.

Module Overview

The purpose of this module is to enable students to deepen their understanding of the key engineering materials with respect to material characteristics, their internal aspects, mechanical as well as the physical properties. This module aims to consolidate students' learning from other modules within the areas of engineering science, materials, manufacturing technology and manufacturing processes.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to give students the opportunity to experience a real engineering design situation as part of a group. Students have the opportunity to gain an understanding of strategic, operational, environmental and ethical issues related to new product design and development through a series of lectures covering an appreciation of market and societal dynamics and its effect on the design of new products. This module provides students with the opportunity to understand the tools and techniques available to facilitate sustainable product design and provide knowledge of the product design processes that can reduce environmental impacts and promote sustainable practices.

Module Overview

The purpose of this module is to introduce the full Navier-Stokes equations and give the physical significance of each term in the equations. Students are introduced to CFD techniques appropriate for practical engineering applications, (the finite volume method), and they have the opportunity to gain practical, hands-on experience of commercial CFD packages. This module offers students the opportunity to model industrial fluid dynamics and heat transfer problems.

Module Overview

The purpose of this module is to introduce students to the theory and practice of the finite element method, with applications in stress analysis, heat transfer and general field problems in order to complement other modules in these subjects. Students have the opportunity to learn of the capabilities and limitations of the finite element method and the practical problems involved in successfully modelling engineering structures and components.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to introduce students to theory and methodology of advanced techniques relevant to engineering systems, in order to design and implement filters and systems. System identification is a general term to describe mathematical tools and algorithms that build dynamic models from measured data. A dynamic model in this context is a mathematical description of the dynamic behaviour of a system or process in either the time or frequency domain. Students are given the opportunity to investigate methods by which they can perform useful operations on signals in either discrete or time-varying measurement.

Module Overview

In control engineering, a state-space representation is a mathematical model of a physical system as a set of input, output and state variables. Students have the opportunity to explore different methods of resolving the control variables in order to analyse systems in a compact and relevant way.

Module Overview

In this module, students have the opportunity to create design concepts relating to an engineering artefact or topic. This module provides a learning experience that aims to enable students to apply their engineering and scientific knowledge within a realistic and substantial team project, and gain experience of working in a research or industry based design environment. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate their creativity and initiative in carrying out a demanding investigation or design project. As teams, students can negotiate with their ‘client’, be it an academic supervisor or an external sponsor, develop team working skills, plan their project, and present their work through meetings, reports and oral presentation. Teams will be comprised of students following different specialist streams, representing different areas of expertise.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to provide an overview of the management of projects throughout the project life-cycle, from concept to beneficial operation. Business has long recognised the imperative for good, integrated processes in order to extract best value from capital investments; this course explores the benefits and imperatives for adopting a Capital Value Process for selecting the right projects to deliver required business goals, and for establishing robust Project Execution Plans for delivering world class results, as well as facilitating executive control at all stages throughout the project lifecycle. The student will compare and contrast the differing emphases and approaches to project delivery for several professional bodies and will be introduced to ten key project principles which underpin world class project performance across a broad range of industry sectors. They will also practise using several strategic planning tools to aid objective decision making and option screening. Importantly, the course will establish the imperative of good health, safety and environmental performance as a business value. It is not the intention of this module to teach project technical skills, such as planning, estimating or contract administration, but more to equip future project managers with a broad range of skills and competences so that, armed with the core project principles they might harness the skills of a diverse team of project professionals in developing and executing major projects, programmes and portfolios of the future.

Module Overview

This module deals with current and potential future energy systems, covering resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. The course includes the review of various renewable and conventional energy production technologies, energy end-use practices and alternatives, and consumption practices in different countries. Students are given the opportunity to learn a quali-quantitative framework to aid in evaluation and analysis of energy technology system proposals in the context of engineering, political, social, economic, and environmental goals.

Module Overview

Students are given the opportunity to develop an analytical understanding of complex vibrating systems, with particular reference to rotating machines such as gas turbines and wind turbines. Students are introduced to the quantitative aspects of noise control.

Module Overview

The purpose of this module is to introduce students to the theory and practice of the finite element method, with applications in stress analysis, heat transfer and general field problems in order to complement other modules in these subjects. Students have the opportunity to become aware of the capabilities and limitations of the finite element method and the practical problems involved in successfully modelling engineering structures and components.

Module Overview

The last decade has seen an upsurge in the development of intelligent modelling and control structures over their counterpart mathematical model-based structures due to their success in dealing with complex multivariable uncertain systems without the need for extensive dynamic modelling. At the forefront of intelligent systems strategies are Rule-based Expert Systems, Fuzzy Logic Systems, Artificial Neural Networks, Probabilistic and Evolutionary Algorithms, Hybrid Intelligent Systems, and Intelligent Control Systems, which have all proved to be serious contenders for many other conventional modelling and control methods. In the light of these considerations, this module aims to: - Introduce the various ideas behind these theories - Draw a parallel with other conventional modelling and control techniques. This module provides an introduction to the theories and practices of machine learning and data modelling, and to fuzzy logic within a control and systems engineering context - Describe how these techniques can be applied to solve real world problems. The module looks at the underlying principles of machine learning, data modelling and fuzzy logic, the advantages and limitations of the various approaches and effective ways of applying them in systems and control engineering, with the aim of making students appreciate the merits of the various technologies hence introduced.

Module Overview

The purpose of this module is to explore the details behind the equipment required to support and facilitate usable energy provision through applied turbomachinery. A whole systems approach is used in the evaluation of turbomachinery equipment so that opportunities for intensive exploitation of resources and efficiency savings can be identified. Maintenance and availability will feature significantly to cover the lifecycle of the described systems.

Module Overview

The syllabus for this module can be divided into four topics: Fundamentals An understanding of the theory, principles and techniques used in Laser-materials Processing (LMP) are required before more advanced understanding can be achieved. This includes knowledge of the stimulated emission phenomenon, techniques used to generate laser light, laser delivery methods and a detailed understanding of optics, including thin lens theory and the ability to identify the range of optics needed for laser beam transmission and manipulation. Safety Students are introduced to the principles of safe use of laser sources; covering the risk classification system, the relevance of wavelength, prevention and mitigation techniques as well as a wide range of associated considerations. Processes Students are introduced to the importance of wavelength in laser interactions with materials. Industrial processes are classified by wavelength and detailed description of each process including modelling techniques are covered. These principles are reinforced by two laboratory sessions: one for short (UV) wavelength radiation and another for long (NIR, IR) wavelength radiation. Novel Laser Applications Students have the opportunity to learn how to identify and describe the potential benefits to manufacturing processes offered by the application of lasers as a result of their unique characteristics. This knowledge requires advanced application of the multidisciplinary content of a mechanical engineering degree in areas such as materials science, dynamics, thermodynamics, fluid dynamics and electronics.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide a thorough introduction to key concepts underlying the options available and the issues related to selection of sensors and actuators for control. Emphasis will be placed on systems of electro-mechanical nature but reference will be made to the much wider applicability of the techniques.

Module Overview

This module builds on earlier control theory to apply and extend the previously studied controller design methods. The focus is primarily on passenger cars and considers the primary dynamic systems such as driveline, suspension and braking systems. The module starts with the underlying vehicle system dynamics and the corresponding reduced-order system models, including as the quarter-car suspension model and the bicycle handling model. Then a number of linear and nonlinear control methods are reviewed and developed in the context of particular control objectives. For longitudinal motion, control action is centred on the engine, driveline, and brakes. For vertical motion (ride) the focus is on suspension control, including active and semi-active suspensions. Finally, handling control is based on active steering and brake-based electronic stability control.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

Many sectors of engineering require high levels of computer literacy and the ability to write computer programs for problem solving is highly desirable. In learning the fundamentals of computer programming, logical thinking and problem solving, skills can be developed and coding techniques learnt, that can support the study of modules in forthcoming years. This course delivers the concepts of structured computer programming and lab time is allocated for implementing these concepts. Students are provided with opportunities to plan, write, and debug their own computer programs.

Module Overview

All engineers must be familiar with design strategies, methods of assessing design proposals, approaches to reducing uncertainty, formal communication techniques and the industrial and legal standards in which they fit. Mechanical Engineering students will independently learn and demonstrate the fundamentals of mechanical technical drawing and computer aided design (CAD); Electrical Engineers will independently learn and demonstrate the fundamentals of electrical drawing and CAD. Electrical and Mechanical engineers will then coalesce to form interdisciplinary groups who will produce an electro-mechanical design solution which meets a practical objective and considers the commercial, economic, social and environmental implications via a broad critique of the state of the art.

Module Overview

An understanding of the basic principles and many of the important practical applications of electronic and electrical engineering is now essential to practitioners of other disciplines, especially Mechanical Engineers. The aim of this module is to provide a foundation in Electrical Engineering and Electronics for students, of sufficient depth to be useful, and without being over complicated or cluttered with too-rigorous and exhaustive mathematical treatment.

Module Overview

The syllabus for this module can be divided into two topics: Statics and Mechanics: The primary aim of the study of engineering mechanics is to develop students' capacity to predict the effects of force and deformation in the course of carrying out the creative design function of engineering. As the student undertakes the study of solids and forces (first statics, mechanics, then dynamics) they can build a foundation of analytical capability for the solution of a great variety of engineering problems. Modern engineering practice demands a high level of analytical capability, and the study of mechanics can help in developing this. Dynamics: The study of dynamics gives students the opportunity to analyse and predict the motion of particles and bodies with and without reference to the forces that cause this motion. Successful prediction requires the ability of visualize physical configurations in terms of real machines ( in addition to knowledge of physical and mathematical principles of mechanics), actual constraints and the practical limitations which govern the behaviour of machines.

Module Overview

The selection of materials and manufacturing method is an integral part of the engineering design procedure. The purpose of this module is to introduce the fundamental properties of engineering materials through an understanding of the atomic and molecular interactions within the material. Students are introduced to the technology of manufacturing processes and how the selection of manufacturing processes are influenced by, and subsequently affect, material properties.

Module Overview

A good mathematical grounding is essential for all engineers. The theory developed in this module aims to underpin the other engineering modules studied at level one. Wherever possible, mathematical theory is taught by considering a real example, to present students the mathematical tools they might need for the science they follow. Solutions are considered by both analytical and numerical techniques. Where basic principles are involved, some proofs will also be taught.

Module Overview

The syllabus for this module can be divided into two topics: Thermodynamics: Thermodynamics is an essential part of engineering curricula all over the world. It is a basic science that deals with energy interactions in physical systems, and the purpose of this module is to study the relationships between heat (thermos) and work (dynamics). This module presents a range of real-world engineering applications to give students a feel for engineering practice and an intuitive understanding of the subject matter. Fluid Mechanics: Fluid Mechanics is the branch of applied mechanics that is concerned with the statics and dynamics of liquids and gases. The analysis of the behaviour of fluids is based upon the fundamental laws of applied mechanics, which relate to the conservation of mass-energy and the force-momentum equation. However, instead of dealing with the behaviour of individual bodies of known mass, Fluid Mechanics is concerned with the behaviour of a continuous stream of fluid. For this reason, Fluid Mechanics is studied separately to other mechanics modules. Due to the similarity of the mathematical techniques, Fluid Mechanics are studied with Thermodynamics.

Module Overview

Applied Thermodynamics: Thermodynamics is the science that deals with energy interactions in physical systems. The purpose of this module is to build upon the basic principles that were introduced in Thermofluid 1: Fundamental, and then apply this knowledge to real engineering problems. Heat Transfer: Almost every branch of science and engineering includes some kind of heat transfer problem, and there is a need for engineers to have some background in this area. The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to the basic principles and practical applications of conduction, convection and radiation heat transfer. The process of heat transfer is often accomplished by a flowing fluid, and so this module seeks to develop further the Fluid Mechanics covered in Thermofluids at level 1, in order that students can develop their understanding to the point that real world problems can be addressed.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to consolidate and build on the ideas and skills introduced in level one. Students have the opportunity to develop their ability to model dynamic systems with particular reference to vibration analysis in practical engineering applications.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to provide students with a firm grounding in Classical Control methods, which will enable them to work with systems and control engineers, and prepare students on the control stream for advanced topics in the level three and four modules. Students will be introduced to Control in relation to engineering systems, and in particular to develop methods of modelling the control of processes. Techniques are explored with particular reference to common practical engineering problems and their solutions, and the application of SIMULINK in this process.

Module Overview

The purpose of this programme of mathematical study is to give students the opportunity to become more competent in calculations using a range of mathematical tools. The content builds upon that delivered at Level 1, and gives students the opportunity to extend their analytical skills by introducing more advanced topics that may form part of the modern engineers skill set.

Module Overview

Students will be introduced to electrical machines and power systems and their practical applications, supported by practical analysis/synthesis methods. This ability is fundamental for the students with mechanical engineering background, if they are to be able to handle electromechanical problems encountered in real life situations. Students will further have the opportunity to explore a general methodology for the calculation of electromechanical energy conversion. Students can obtain an appreciation of the features and characteristics of different types of electromechanical machines and drives and their applications.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide an introduction to the subject of industrial engineering. Industrial engineering is a branch of engineering dealing with the optimisation of complex processes or systems. It is concerned with the development, improvement, implementation and evaluation of integrated systems of people, economic resources, knowledge, information, equipment, energy, materials, analysis and synthesis, as well as the mathematical, physical and social sciences together with the principles and methods of engineering design to specify, predict, and evaluate the results to be obtained from such systems or processes. The various topics include management science, cost and value engineering, business economics and finance, engineering management, supply chain management, operations research, health and safety engineering, operation management.

Module Overview

The content of this module aims to deepen a students’ understanding of engineering in practical applications. Students will have the opportunity to investigate the design process for mechanical, electrical or control components/systems and undertake analysis of the same. These two strands of the module are brought together in a design project, which will be set by a professional engineering organisation. This major project will give students the opportunity to extend their creative design skills and obtain practical experience of the process of creating sound conceptual solutions through to real design problems within an industrial context. Students can build confidence and gain experience through working within a team with practicing engineers from industry.

Module Overview

This programme of study will extend the ideas and skills introduced at Level 1. Students have the opportunity to learn how to carry out strength and deflection analyses for a variety of simple load cases and structures. Students have the opportunity to understand the simplifications used in such analyses. This course demonstrates the role of stress analysis and failure prediction in the design environment.

Module Overview

The selection of materials and manufacturing method is an integral part of the design and manufacturing procedure for producing parts and products. The purpose of this module is to provide students with the opportunity to learn how to select appropriate materials, processing methods and manufacturing systems to produce components and products, both existing and novel. The student is introduced to contemporary manufacturing processes and systems in an effort to select effective and efficient manufacturing processes and systems.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to provide students with the opportunity to learn the background ito combustion theory. Students will be introduced to traditional and renewable fuels, their combustion and utilisation and the resulting environmental impacts. Combustion applications for energy production will be introduced along with the politics revolving around these energy applications. The module will also consider energy policy in terms of usage.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to provide students with an understanding of the machines used in power generation applications, with a main focus on the principles of operation of machines used in base load power generation (gas turbines), but all rotating machines in power generation are considered. Students may then develop a methodology for measuring the impact of machines from energy and materials usage, standpoints, and to better understand where opportunities exist to increase the efficiency of energy machines, systems and devices. Students will have the opportunity to build models of mass and energy flow through existing and proposed machines. These models are then used to pinpoint the most efficient and least efficient steps of device operation. This syllabus can be divided into two topics — Fundamentals of Machines in Power and Energy: The module begins with the theory of gas turbines, based on fundamental thermodynamic and fluid mechanic analyses and introduces methods for improving efficiencies and increasing specific work outputs. Energy Systems Analysis: Students may strengthen and expand their fundamental knowledge of thermodynamics, and apply this to develop a better understanding of energy systems and machine systems.

Module Overview

The individual project aims to provide students with a learning experience that enables them to carry out independent research, and to integrate many of the subjects they have studied throughout their degree. Students are expected to plan, research and execute their task while developing skills in critical judgement, independent work and engineering competence. Students have the opportunity to gain experience in presenting and reporting a major piece of engineering work, of immediate engineering value, at a level appropriate for an honours degree student.

Module Overview

The purpose of this module is to enable students to deepen their understanding of the key engineering materials with respect to material characteristics, their internal aspects, mechanical as well as the physical properties. This module aims to consolidate students' learning from other modules within the areas of engineering science, materials, manufacturing technology and manufacturing processes.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to give students the opportunity to experience a real engineering design situation as part of a group. Students have the opportunity to gain an understanding of strategic, operational, environmental and ethical issues related to new product design and development through a series of lectures covering an appreciation of market and societal dynamics and its effect on the design of new products. This module provides students with the opportunity to understand the tools and techniques available to facilitate sustainable product design and provide knowledge of the product design processes that can reduce environmental impacts and promote sustainable practices.

Module Overview

The purpose of this module is to introduce the full Navier-Stokes equations and give the physical significance of each term in the equations. Students are introduced to CFD techniques appropriate for practical engineering applications, (the finite volume method), and they have the opportunity to gain practical, hands-on experience of commercial CFD packages. This module offers students the opportunity to model industrial fluid dynamics and heat transfer problems.

Module Overview

The purpose of this module is to introduce students to the theory and practice of the finite element method, with applications in stress analysis, heat transfer and general field problems in order to complement other modules in these subjects. Students have the opportunity to learn of the capabilities and limitations of the finite element method and the practical problems involved in successfully modelling engineering structures and components.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to introduce students to theory and methodology of advanced techniques relevant to engineering systems, in order to design and implement filters and systems. System identification is a general term to describe mathematical tools and algorithms that build dynamic models from measured data. A dynamic model in this context is a mathematical description of the dynamic behaviour of a system or process in either the time or frequency domain. Students are given the opportunity to investigate methods by which they can perform useful operations on signals in either discrete or time-varying measurement.

Module Overview

In control engineering, a state-space representation is a mathematical model of a physical system as a set of input, output and state variables. Students have the opportunity to explore different methods of resolving the control variables in order to analyse systems in a compact and relevant way.

Module Overview

In this module, students have the opportunity to create design concepts relating to an engineering artefact or topic. This module provides a learning experience that aims to enable students to apply their engineering and scientific knowledge within a realistic and substantial team project, and gain experience of working in a research or industry based design environment. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate their creativity and initiative in carrying out a demanding investigation or design project. As teams, students can negotiate with their ‘client’, be it an academic supervisor or an external sponsor, develop team working skills, plan their project, and present their work through meetings, reports and oral presentation. Teams will be comprised of students following different specialist streams, representing different areas of expertise.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to provide an overview of the management of projects throughout the project life-cycle, from concept to beneficial operation. Business has long recognised the imperative for good, integrated processes in order to extract best value from capital investments; this course explores the benefits and imperatives for adopting a Capital Value Process for selecting the right projects to deliver required business goals, and for establishing robust Project Execution Plans for delivering world class results, as well as facilitating executive control at all stages throughout the project lifecycle. The student will compare and contrast the differing emphases and approaches to project delivery for several professional bodies and will be introduced to ten key project principles which underpin world class project performance across a broad range of industry sectors. They will also practise using several strategic planning tools to aid objective decision making and option screening. Importantly, the course will establish the imperative of good health, safety and environmental performance as a business value. It is not the intention of this module to teach project technical skills, such as planning, estimating or contract administration, but more to equip future project managers with a broad range of skills and competences so that, armed with the core project principles they might harness the skills of a diverse team of project professionals in developing and executing major projects, programmes and portfolios of the future.

Module Overview

This module deals with current and potential future energy systems, covering resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. The course includes the review of various renewable and conventional energy production technologies, energy end-use practices and alternatives, and consumption practices in different countries. Students are given the opportunity to learn a quali-quantitative framework to aid in evaluation and analysis of energy technology system proposals in the context of engineering, political, social, economic, and environmental goals.

Module Overview

Students are given the opportunity to develop an analytical understanding of complex vibrating systems, with particular reference to rotating machines such as gas turbines and wind turbines. Students are introduced to the quantitative aspects of noise control.

Module Overview

The purpose of this module is to introduce students to the theory and practice of the finite element method, with applications in stress analysis, heat transfer and general field problems in order to complement other modules in these subjects. Students have the opportunity to become aware of the capabilities and limitations of the finite element method and the practical problems involved in successfully modelling engineering structures and components.

Module Overview

The last decade has seen an upsurge in the development of intelligent modelling and control structures over their counterpart mathematical model-based structures due to their success in dealing with complex multivariable uncertain systems without the need for extensive dynamic modelling. At the forefront of intelligent systems strategies are Rule-based Expert Systems, Fuzzy Logic Systems, Artificial Neural Networks, Probabilistic and Evolutionary Algorithms, Hybrid Intelligent Systems, and Intelligent Control Systems, which have all proved to be serious contenders for many other conventional modelling and control methods. In the light of these considerations, this module aims to: - Introduce the various ideas behind these theories - Draw a parallel with other conventional modelling and control techniques. This module provides an introduction to the theories and practices of machine learning and data modelling, and to fuzzy logic within a control and systems engineering context - Describe how these techniques can be applied to solve real world problems. The module looks at the underlying principles of machine learning, data modelling and fuzzy logic, the advantages and limitations of the various approaches and effective ways of applying them in systems and control engineering, with the aim of making students appreciate the merits of the various technologies hence introduced.

Module Overview

The purpose of this module is to explore the details behind the equipment required to support and facilitate usable energy provision through applied turbomachinery. A whole systems approach is used in the evaluation of turbomachinery equipment so that opportunities for intensive exploitation of resources and efficiency savings can be identified. Maintenance and availability will feature significantly to cover the lifecycle of the described systems.

Module Overview

The syllabus for this module can be divided into four topics: Fundamentals An understanding of the theory, principles and techniques used in Laser-materials Processing (LMP) are required before more advanced understanding can be achieved. This includes knowledge of the stimulated emission phenomenon, techniques used to generate laser light, laser delivery methods and a detailed understanding of optics, including thin lens theory and the ability to identify the range of optics needed for laser beam transmission and manipulation. Safety Students are introduced to the principles of safe use of laser sources; covering the risk classification system, the relevance of wavelength, prevention and mitigation techniques as well as a wide range of associated considerations. Processes Students are introduced to the importance of wavelength in laser interactions with materials. Industrial processes are classified by wavelength and detailed description of each process including modelling techniques are covered. These principles are reinforced by two laboratory sessions: one for short (UV) wavelength radiation and another for long (NIR, IR) wavelength radiation. Novel Laser Applications Students have the opportunity to learn how to identify and describe the potential benefits to manufacturing processes offered by the application of lasers as a result of their unique characteristics. This knowledge requires advanced application of the multidisciplinary content of a mechanical engineering degree in areas such as materials science, dynamics, thermodynamics, fluid dynamics and electronics.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide a thorough introduction to key concepts underlying the options available and the issues related to selection of sensors and actuators for control. Emphasis will be placed on systems of electro-mechanical nature but reference will be made to the much wider applicability of the techniques.

Module Overview

This module builds on earlier control theory to apply and extend the previously studied controller design methods. The focus is primarily on passenger cars and considers the primary dynamic systems such as driveline, suspension and braking systems. The module starts with the underlying vehicle system dynamics and the corresponding reduced-order system models, including as the quarter-car suspension model and the bicycle handling model. Then a number of linear and nonlinear control methods are reviewed and developed in the context of particular control objectives. For longitudinal motion, control action is centred on the engine, driveline, and brakes. For vertical motion (ride) the focus is on suspension control, including active and semi-active suspensions. Finally, handling control is based on active steering and brake-based electronic stability control.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

How you are assessed

Assessment on the programme is designed to measure and assess engineering technical and analytical skills as well as professional soft skills including oral and written communication, team working, long-life learning, problem-solving, project management, and planning and organisation.

In addition to traditional exams, coursework assignments are used in a number of modules where students are required to work on their own or in small groups. They are designed to enable students to develop and show their understanding of the module content. Oral presentations are often included as part of coursework to provide opportunities for developing essential communication skills.

Students are expected to complete an individual project in their third year of the degree course, providing an excellent opportunity to pull together every aspect of their development during the course.

Recorded lectures are also made available for part-time and distance based learning students. These can also be accessed by full-time students.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Assessment on the programme is designed to measure and assess engineering technical and analytical skills as well as professional soft skills including oral and written communication, team working, long-life learning, problem-solving, project management, and planning and organisation.

In addition to traditional exams, coursework assignments are used in a number of modules where students are required to work on their own or in small groups. They are designed to enable students to develop and show their understanding of the module content. Oral presentations are often included as part of coursework to provide opportunities for developing essential communication skills.

Students are expected to complete an individual project in their third year of the degree course, providing an excellent opportunity to pull together every aspect of their development during the course.

Recorded lectures are also made available for part-time and distance based learning students. These can also be accessed by full-time students.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Fees and Scholarships

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Entry Requirements 2020-21

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBB, including grade B A Level Maths.

International Baccalaureate: 30 points overall, with higher level grade 5 in maths.

BTEC Extended Diploma in Engineering accepted: Distinction, Distinction, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 120 UCAS Tariff points, including 40 points from 15 credits in Maths

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English and Maths. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry and will consider applicants who have a mix of qualifications.

We also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.

For applicants who do not meet our standard entry requirements, our Science Foundation Year can provide an alternative route of entry onto our full degree programmes:
https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/course/sfysfyub/engineering/

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

University preparation courses for International students:

The University of Lincoln International Study Centre offers university preparation courses for international students who do not meet the direct entry requirements for their chosen degree course. Upon successful completion, students can progress to degree level study at the University of Lincoln.

Please visit http://www.lincolnisc.com/ for more information.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Entry Requirements 2021-22

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBB, including grade B A Level Maths.

International Baccalaureate: 30 points overall, with higher level grade 5 in maths.

BTEC Extended Diploma in Engineering accepted: Distinction, Distinction, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 120 UCAS Tariff points, including 40 points from 15 credits in Maths

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English and Maths. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry and will consider applicants who have a mix of qualifications.

We also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.

For applicants who do not meet our standard entry requirements, our Science Foundation Year can provide an alternative route of entry onto our full degree programmes:
https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/course/sfysfyub/engineering/

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

University preparation courses for International students:

The University of Lincoln International Study Centre offers university preparation courses for international students who do not meet the direct entry requirements for their chosen degree course. Upon successful completion, students can progress to degree level study at the University of Lincoln.

Please visit http://www.lincolnisc.com/ for more information.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Teaching and Learning During Covid-19

At Lincoln, Covid-19 has encouraged us to review our practices and, as a result, to take the opportunity to find new ways to enhance the student experience. We have made changes to our teaching and learning approach and to our campus, to ensure that students and staff can enjoy a safe and positive learning experience. We will continue to follow Government guidance and work closely with the local Public Health experts as the situation progresses, and adapt our teaching and learning accordingly to keep our campus as safe as possible.

Special Features

Our academic team brings together a rich array of research experience, including staff with specialisms in diagnostics and prognostics, renewables, modelling of dynamic systems, nanomaterials, and applications of lasers. They secure grants for major UK and European research funders and deliver research, development, and consultancy for industrial partners, as well as being part of international research collaborations. Students have the opportunity to engage in this research through research-led teaching and project work.

The School of Engineering’s award-winning collaboration with industry delivers numerous benefits for students, including a number of internship opportunities at Siemens. Our collaboration with Siemens has won a prestigious Lord Stafford Award and a Times Higher Education Award.

Accreditations and Memberships

This programme is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) for the intake in 2020 and will shortly be going through the process of re-accreditation for the intakes of 2021 onwards.

Placements

A sandwich option is available on the programme, providing students with the opportunity to spend a year in industry. Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process. Students undertaking placements are responsible for their own travel, living, and accommodation costs.

Career Opportunities

Professional engineers are in demand in the UK and overseas. Graduates may pursue a variety of career paths in areas such as control systems, power and energy, and mechanical and materials engineering.

The University’s status as a Siemens Global Principal Partner gives Lincoln graduates enhanced opportunities for placements, mentoring and recruitment at Siemens. Other graduate destinations include Rolls-Royce, Qinetiq, JCB, and Jaguar Landrover.

"University was a key stepping stone in doing the job I really enjoy. It allowed me to become highly skilled in the engineering domain whilst building my network and finding the niche of engineering that I wanted to work in."

Jan van der Lubbe, Software Implementation Engineer, eQ Technologic

Virtual Open Days

While you may not be able to visit us in person at the moment, you can still find out more about the University of Lincoln and what it is like to live and study here at one of our live Virtual Open Days.

Book Your Place

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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