Forensic scientist working in a laboratory

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

View

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

F410

Course Code

FRSFRSUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

View

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

F410

Course Code

FRSFRSUB

BSc (Hons) Forensic Science BSc (Hons) Forensic Science

Forensic Science at Lincoln is ranked 3rd in the UK for student satisfaction and 5th for graduate prospects in the Complete University Guide 2022 (out of 34 rankings institutions).

Peace of mind guaranteed. Find out more about our Guaranteed Place Scheme.

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

View

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

F410

Course Code

FRSFRSUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

View

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

F410

Course Code

FRSFRSUB

Select Year of Entry

Dr Tasnim Munshi - Academic Contact

Dr Tasnim Munshi - Academic Contact

Tasnim has full responsibility for the management of all teaching provision within the School of Chemistry. Tasnim's specialisms are co-ordination chemistry, spectroscopy, and inorganic chemistry.

Academic Staff List

Welcome to BSc (Hons) Forensic Science

Forensic scientists provide impartial evidence in criminal investigations through their scientific expertise. They work in laboratories, at crime scenes, and in courtrooms, utilising their highly developed biology and chemistry skills. Their highly detailed work encompasses elements of chemistry and biology applied in areas such as toxicology, DNA analysis, and trace evidence.

The BSc (Hons) Forensic Science degree is designed to help students develop the skills and knowledge required by forensic scientists in order to apply scientific expertise in criminal investigations. The degree aims to develop skills and knowledge in a range of forensic science tasks, including crime scene investigation, physical evidence collection, sample analysis, and defence of testimony. This academically challenging course combines a broad spectrum of subjects, including advanced chemical and biological analysis, forensic toxicology, and crime scene management.

Welcome to BSc (Hons) Forensic Science

Forensic scientists provide impartial evidence in criminal investigations through their scientific expertise. They work in laboratories, at crime scenes, and in courtrooms, utilising their highly developed biology and chemistry skills. Their highly detailed work encompasses elements of chemistry and biology applied in areas such as toxicology, DNA analysis, and trace evidence.

The BSc (Hons) Forensic Science degree is designed to help students develop the skills and knowledge required by forensic scientists in order to apply scientific expertise in criminal investigations. The degree aims to develop skills and knowledge in a range of forensic science tasks, including crime scene investigation, physical evidence collection, sample analysis, and defence of testimony. This academically challenging course combines a broad spectrum of subjects, including advanced chemical and biological analysis, forensic toxicology, and crime scene management.

How You Study

In years one and two, students are introduced to the principles of forensic science and crime scene investigation alongside key aspects of biology and analytical sciences. The final year offers students the chance to study specialist areas of forensic science and to develop their skills in the presentation of evidence.

The third year also offers students the opportunity to take part in an optional overseas field trip. Previous destinations have included Guatemala, New York, and Toronto. Students who choose to participate in the optional overseas field trip must pay for their own flights and some general living costs. Accommodation is provided by the University.

Teaching methods include conventional lectures (which cover the core subject material), practical classes, and field visits (which cover the technical and vocational skills of forensic science). These are supported by tutorials and seminars.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

How You Study

In years one and two, students are introduced to the principles of forensic science and crime scene investigation alongside key aspects of biology and analytical sciences. The final year offers students the chance to study specialist areas of forensic science and to develop their skills in the presentation of evidence.

The third year also offers students the opportunity to take part in an optional overseas field trip. Previous destinations have included Guatemala, New York, and Toronto. Students who choose to participate in the optional overseas field trip must pay for their own flights and some general living costs. Accommodation is provided by the University.

Teaching methods include conventional lectures (which cover the core subject material), practical classes, and field visits (which cover the technical and vocational skills of forensic science). These are supported by tutorials and seminars.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

An Introduction to Your Modules

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Analytical Chemistry 1: Molecular Techniques 2023-24FRS1053MLevel 42023-24This module provides students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the necessary basic theoretical and conceptual principles required in analytical chemistry. It offers a platform upon which students can build as they develop their analytical skills and understanding in later stages of their programme. Furthermore, students are encouraged to develop the practical skills necessary for all future analytical practical applications.CoreCrime Scene Investigation 2023-24FRS1051MLevel 42023-24This module is concerned with the skills required to protect, record, process and interpret a crime scene. Emphasis is placed on the role of crime scene investigation in the forensic process. The process of crime scene investigation is examined from scene preservation and recording (e.g. sketches and photography) to evidence recovery, packaging and documentation. The need for avoidance of contamination of the crime scene and for the subsequent continuity and integrity of the recovered evidence form an integral component of the module.CoreHuman Anatomy and Physiology 2023-24BMS1073MLevel 42023-24Human Anatomy and Physiology provides an overview of the anatomical structure and physiology of the human body. It is intended to explore the role of the nervous and endocrine systems in the physiology of stress its role in homeostasis. The module is also designed to enable students to identify and understand the function of human bones, muscles, and joints and provides an overview of the anatomical structure and physiology of the heart, lung, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems. It is intended to explore the components of the blood and immune system and their various functions, as well as enabling students to identify the anatomy and understand the physiology of the kidney, urogenital, and digestive systems.CoreIntroduction to Life Sciences 2023-24BIO1043MLevel 42023-24Introduction to the Life Sciences is designed to provide a foundation for students to develop their knowledge and understanding of fundamental cell biology, biochemistry and genetics in the context of life sciences.CoreProfessional Practice 1.1: Crime Scene to Court 2023-24FRS1055MLevel 42023-24This module introduces students to the forensic process (crime scene to court) and professional practice in forensic science. This is put into the context of the legal system of England and Wales and the requirements and expectations of forensic science, those that work in the field and the expert witness. The module aims to develop fundamental skills in mathematics and IT which will underpin other modules within the programme. The module will also look to develop transferable skills including knowledge of health and safety.CoreProfessional Practice 1.2: Forensic Laboratory Analysis 2023-24FRS1056MLevel 42023-24This module will explain the process of forensic practice within the laboratory, including areas such as chain of custody, contemporaneous note taking, standard operating procedures and quality control. The module is therefore built around the principle that high quality forensic scientific evidence is not only about employing sound scientific methodology but is also dependent on the rigour of the procedures employed and the accurate reporting of results. It will also look to develop a range of transferable skills relating to scientific literature retrieval, understanding, and presentation, and allow students to further develop their mathematical and statistical skills.CoreAdvanced Crime Scene Investigation 2024-25FRS2006MLevel 52024-25This module builds on the Crime Scene Investigation module and focuses on the application of advanced techniques for the detection, recovery, analysis and interpretation of a wide range of evidence found at a crime scene. Students can further develop their understanding of the role and responsibilities of the crime scene manager and the investigation of complex crime scenes, including key specialists and agencies to be involved. Within this context students will look at the need to follow ISO accredited procedures and the latest up to date working practices within crime scene investigation. As part of the module students are expected to undertake the examination of a complex crime scene.CoreAnalytical Chemistry 2.1: Separation Techniques 2024-25FRS2022MLevel 52024-25This module is designed to provide students with the underpinning knowledge related to the analytical process, which is later applied to further modules in the programme. Secondly, it introduces the theoretical principles, instrumentation, automation, and application of the principal separation techniques. Thirdly, it presents an essential suite of analytical tools utilised for inorganic analyses and speciation.CoreAnalytical Chemistry 2.2: Structural Techniques 2024-25FRS2023MLevel 52024-25This module covers the most advanced techniques in analytical chemistry and their use, focusing on category A techniques providing structural information and as such utilised for unequivocable identification. To emphasise this analytical aspect, the module also introduces students to Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) development and associated experimental planning as well as advanced validation strategies. The aim of the module is to provide students with the opportunity to develop the advanced knowledge required to support level 3 modules, and to develop the practical skills and independent thinking necessary for all future practical applications.CoreHuman Identification 2024-25FRS2024MLevel 52024-25This module is designed to introduce students to the methods used in Human Identification. Students will be introduced to forensic anthropology before embarking on an intense series of lectures and practical sessions covering the methods used to estimate a biological profile; sex, ancestry, age and stature estimation. Investigative procedures in a case of a missing person will also be discussed and the role of various experts involved including Forensic Pathology and Odontology. Other considerations will be given to human remains exposed to fire and how this affects human identification. This module will also introduce students to the use of DNA in a human identification context. This module will culminate in students producing their own biological profile of a human skeleton for identification purposesCoreMolecular Biology 2024-25BGY2003MLevel 52024-25Molecular biology is of critical importance when understanding biological systems. This module is designed to provide students with an insight into the techniques used and applied by molecular biologists in a number of specific contexts. The module will explore the origins of molecular life on Earth, before examining the molecular control of eukaryotic replication, transcription and translation. The focus will then move to in vitro experimentation including DNA isolation, amplification, sequencing and manipulation; before looking at applications of molecular biology and how they can be applied to our understanding of population genetics and health and diseaseCoreProfessional Practice 2.1: Scientific Experimental Design 2024-25FRS2025MLevel 52024-25This module aims to provide students with an appreciation of scientific method, the principles of experimental design and methods of collection of quantitative and qualitative data. The module will allow students the opportunity to critically assess published work with regard to design of experiment and analysis of data. Continuing from level 1 professional practice modules, students mathematics, statistics and IT skills can be further developed.CoreProfessional Practice 2.2: Quality Assurance and Regulation 2024-25FRS2026MLevel 52024-25This module aims to provide students with an appreciation of regulation and quality assurance in forensic science and the role of the Forensic Science Regulator in this key concepts in modern forensic science. Students will apply the method validation tools from previous modules to evaluate forensic data within a quality context. Students will also develop skills in the retrieval, critical review and communication of scientific literature and other published work.CoreTrace Evidence 2024-25FRS2018MLevel 52024-25This module is designed to develop an understanding of the importance of trace materials, such as hair, fibres, glass and latent fingermarks, as evidence, their detection, recovery, analysis and the interpretation of results gained from these. The issues of transfer and persistence of such materials is also highlighted and the need to consider this throughout the above processes. Students will have the opportunity to be introduced to microscopy and analytical procedures and techniques relevant to the analysis of trace evidence.CoreDrugs of Abuse and Forensic Toxicology 2025-26FRS3053MLevel 62025-26This module provides a context for the chemical, physiological and analytical content introduced at levels 1 and 2. It deciphers the complex and dynamic world context of Drugs of Abuse and intrinsic challenges faced by analytical chemists. It also covers the legislation of controlled substances and chemical precursors as well as the different classes of drugs. Additionally, the synthesis of illicit drugs will be explored to gain an understanding of how this knowledge can be used in drug profiling. The module also covers the ante and post-mortem toxicology of drugs, relates dose to physiological effect as well as consider appropriate samples and analytical strategies used in forensic toxicology. Supporting and illustrating these concepts, students can undertake the role of an analytical chemist in investigative practical activities which will cover best practice in Drug of Abuse and Toxicology laboratory analyses.CoreFire, Explosives and Nuclear Forensics 2025-26FRS3054MLevel 62025-26This module introduces the chemistry and physics of fire and explosives and considers the investigation of fire and explosion scenes with an emphasis on arson and the use of improvised explosive devices. The challenges of evidence recovery, laboratory examination and chemical analysis are covered. This module also considers the various aspects of nuclear terrorism, in the context of global security. The underpinning science and the forensic investigation of nuclear materials for intelligence building is discussed.CoreForensic Application of Biological Specialisms 2025-26FRS3055MLevel 62025-26This module aims to apply the knowledge gained in previous modules to the forensic analysis of biological materials and molecules of biological origin. Particular specialised fields of application will be treated in depth to allow understanding of how biological expertise may be used in the forensic arena. Research relevant to the development of these applications will be considered. The module aims specifically to develop an understanding in three major areas: advanced DNA analysis and presentation of DNA evidence, forensic microbiology and bioterrorism, and mass disasters and the identification of individuals.CoreProfessional Practice 3: Presentation of Evidence 2025-26FRS3059MLevel 62025-26This module looks at the final stage of the forensic process and the presentation of evidence. The module will consider best practice in presenting evidence in visual and oral forms including mock courts. This module also aims to develop students' project planning and independent learning skills to enable them to devise a research project, drawing on the skills they have developed throughout the programme. Students can look at developing their capacity for the critical appraisal of scientific literature, to construct research aims and objectives and how to plan an appropriate programme of research for the area under investigation. Research governance will also be examined including research ethics, COSHH and risk assessments and their importance in order to safely and appropriately carry out a programme of research. Students will also have the opportunity to further develop their skills in the use of IT for presentation.CoreResearch Project 2025-26FRS3057MLevel 62025-26In this module, students can undertake an independent programme of research under supervision from a member of staff. It provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate original and critical thought, as well as to build practical and project-management skills. A wide range of subject expertise exists within the School, and students are expected to select a project that is relevant to their programme of study. Under the guidance of a supervisor, students will review the literature, identify a hypothesis or hypotheses and design a programme of research to test these. They will be expected to manage the project, which will include obtaining relevant ethical approval and conducting a risk assessment. We currently offer projects in the laboratory or field, projects that involve mathematical modelling, systematic reviews or meta-analysis of pre-collected data. Students may work individually or in groups addressing similar questions, but must write up individually. The findings of the research will be written up in the format of a scientific paper following closely the style of a key journal relevant to their area of study, or as a thesis, and will also be presented orally.CoreOverseas Field Course (Forensic) 2025-26FRS3051MLevel 62025-26This overseas field course aims to give students the opportunity to experience first hand the work of the forensic specialist within an international context. The module is designed to introduce students to laboratory and field work within an international context and for students to gain a global perspective of forensic science. Students can also familiarise themselves with the professional skills required to carry out this type of work.OptionalPublic Understanding of Forensic Science 2025-26FRS3056MLevel 62025-26This module provides students with an opportunity to put into practice the techniques they have learned regarding project management, literature review, data collection and analysis and reporting, with a focus on the public understanding of forensic science. Students will work independently to identify a discipline that is frequently used within forensic investigations, but is also known to the general public. Examples could include DNA fingerprinting, fingermark analysis, gunshot residue, fire debris analysis or analysis of drugs. Once the discipline has been identified, students will, through critical analysis of the literature, work to build a comprehensive understanding of the history of the discipline, its current use, benefits and drawbacks, its place within forensic regulations and the current legal framework. With a strong understanding of the scientific background, students will then design a survey to gauge public awareness and understanding of the discipline. Students will then design a digital tool that will aim to increase understanding of the forensic discipline. Students will then design, distribute and analyse the data from a survey to gauge public awareness and understanding of their discipline.Optional

An Introduction to Your Modules

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Analytical Chemistry 1: Molecular Techniques 2022-23FRS1053MLevel 42022-23This module provides students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the necessary basic theoretical and conceptual principles required in analytical chemistry. It offers a platform upon which students can build as they develop their analytical skills and understanding in later stages of their programme. Furthermore, students are encouraged to develop the practical skills necessary for all future analytical practical applications.CoreCrime Scene Investigation 2022-23FRS1051MLevel 42022-23This module is concerned with the skills required to protect, record, process and interpret a crime scene. Emphasis is placed on the role of crime scene investigation in the forensic process. The process of crime scene investigation is examined from scene preservation and recording (e.g. sketches and photography) to evidence recovery, packaging and documentation. The need for avoidance of contamination of the crime scene and for the subsequent continuity and integrity of the recovered evidence form an integral component of the module.CoreHuman Anatomy and Physiology 2022-23BMS1073MLevel 42022-23Human Anatomy and Physiology provides an overview of the anatomical structure and physiology of the human body. It is intended to explore the role of the nervous and endocrine systems in the physiology of stress its role in homeostasis. The module is also designed to enable students to identify and understand the function of human bones, muscles, and joints and provides an overview of the anatomical structure and physiology of the heart, lung, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems. It is intended to explore the components of the blood and immune system and their various functions, as well as enabling students to identify the anatomy and understand the physiology of the kidney, urogenital, and digestive systems.CoreIntroduction to Life Sciences 2022-23BIO1043MLevel 42022-23Introduction to the Life Sciences is designed to provide a foundation for students to develop their knowledge and understanding of fundamental cell biology, biochemistry and genetics in the context of life sciences.CoreProfessional Practice 1.1: Crime Scene to Court 2022-23FRS1055MLevel 42022-23This module introduces students to the forensic process (crime scene to court) and professional practice in forensic science. This is put into the context of the legal system of England and Wales and the requirements and expectations of forensic science, those that work in the field and the expert witness. The module aims to develop fundamental skills in mathematics and IT which will underpin other modules within the programme. The module will also look to develop transferable skills including knowledge of health and safety.CoreProfessional Practice 1.2: Forensic Laboratory Analysis 2022-23FRS1056MLevel 42022-23This module will explain the process of forensic practice within the laboratory, including areas such as chain of custody, contemporaneous note taking, standard operating procedures and quality control. The module is therefore built around the principle that high quality forensic scientific evidence is not only about employing sound scientific methodology but is also dependent on the rigour of the procedures employed and the accurate reporting of results. It will also look to develop a range of transferable skills relating to scientific literature retrieval, understanding, and presentation, and allow students to further develop their mathematical and statistical skills.CoreAdvanced Crime Scene Investigation 2023-24FRS2006MLevel 52023-24This module builds on the Crime Scene Investigation module and focuses on the application of advanced techniques for the detection, recovery, analysis and interpretation of a wide range of evidence found at a crime scene. Students can further develop their understanding of the role and responsibilities of the crime scene manager and the investigation of complex crime scenes, including key specialists and agencies to be involved. Within this context students will look at the need to follow ISO accredited procedures and the latest up to date working practices within crime scene investigation. As part of the module students are expected to undertake the examination of a complex crime scene.CoreAnalytical Chemistry 2.1: Separation Techniques 2023-24FRS2022MLevel 52023-24This module is designed to provide students with the underpinning knowledge related to the analytical process, which is later applied to further modules in the programme. Secondly, it introduces the theoretical principles, instrumentation, automation, and application of the principal separation techniques. Thirdly, it presents an essential suite of analytical tools utilised for inorganic analyses and speciation.CoreAnalytical Chemistry 2.2: Structural Techniques 2023-24FRS2023MLevel 52023-24This module covers the most advanced techniques in analytical chemistry and their use, focusing on category A techniques providing structural information and as such utilised for unequivocable identification. To emphasise this analytical aspect, the module also introduces students to Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) development and associated experimental planning as well as advanced validation strategies. The aim of the module is to provide students with the opportunity to develop the advanced knowledge required to support level 3 modules, and to develop the practical skills and independent thinking necessary for all future practical applications.CoreHuman Identification 2023-24FRS2024MLevel 52023-24This module is designed to introduce students to the methods used in Human Identification. Students will be introduced to forensic anthropology before embarking on an intense series of lectures and practical sessions covering the methods used to estimate a biological profile; sex, ancestry, age and stature estimation. Investigative procedures in a case of a missing person will also be discussed and the role of various experts involved including Forensic Pathology and Odontology. Other considerations will be given to human remains exposed to fire and how this affects human identification. This module will also introduce students to the use of DNA in a human identification context. This module will culminate in students producing their own biological profile of a human skeleton for identification purposesCoreMolecular Biology 2023-24BGY2003MLevel 52023-24Molecular biology is of critical importance when understanding biological systems. This module is designed to provide students with an insight into the techniques used and applied by molecular biologists in a number of specific contexts. The module will explore the origins of molecular life on Earth, before examining the molecular control of eukaryotic replication, transcription and translation. The focus will then move to in vitro experimentation including DNA isolation, amplification, sequencing and manipulation; before looking at applications of molecular biology and how they can be applied to our understanding of population genetics and health and diseaseCoreProfessional Practice 2.1: Scientific Experimental Design 2023-24FRS2025MLevel 52023-24This module aims to provide students with an appreciation of scientific method, the principles of experimental design and methods of collection of quantitative and qualitative data. The module will allow students the opportunity to critically assess published work with regard to design of experiment and analysis of data. Continuing from level 1 professional practice modules, students mathematics, statistics and IT skills can be further developed.CoreProfessional Practice 2.2: Quality Assurance and Regulation 2023-24FRS2026MLevel 52023-24This module aims to provide students with an appreciation of regulation and quality assurance in forensic science and the role of the Forensic Science Regulator in this key concepts in modern forensic science. Students will apply the method validation tools from previous modules to evaluate forensic data within a quality context. Students will also develop skills in the retrieval, critical review and communication of scientific literature and other published work.CoreTrace Evidence 2023-24FRS2018MLevel 52023-24This module is designed to develop an understanding of the importance of trace materials, such as hair, fibres, glass and latent fingermarks, as evidence, their detection, recovery, analysis and the interpretation of results gained from these. The issues of transfer and persistence of such materials is also highlighted and the need to consider this throughout the above processes. Students will have the opportunity to be introduced to microscopy and analytical procedures and techniques relevant to the analysis of trace evidence.CoreDrugs of Abuse and Forensic Toxicology 2024-25FRS3053MLevel 62024-25This module provides a context for the chemical, physiological and analytical content introduced at levels 1 and 2. It deciphers the complex and dynamic world context of Drugs of Abuse and intrinsic challenges faced by analytical chemists. It also covers the legislation of controlled substances and chemical precursors as well as the different classes of drugs. Additionally, the synthesis of illicit drugs will be explored to gain an understanding of how this knowledge can be used in drug profiling. The module also covers the ante and post-mortem toxicology of drugs, relates dose to physiological effect as well as consider appropriate samples and analytical strategies used in forensic toxicology. Supporting and illustrating these concepts, students can undertake the role of an analytical chemist in investigative practical activities which will cover best practice in Drug of Abuse and Toxicology laboratory analyses.CoreFire, Explosives and Nuclear Forensics 2024-25FRS3054MLevel 62024-25This module introduces the chemistry and physics of fire and explosives and considers the investigation of fire and explosion scenes with an emphasis on arson and the use of improvised explosive devices. The challenges of evidence recovery, laboratory examination and chemical analysis are covered. This module also considers the various aspects of nuclear terrorism, in the context of global security. The underpinning science and the forensic investigation of nuclear materials for intelligence building is discussed.CoreForensic Application of Biological Specialisms 2024-25FRS3055MLevel 62024-25This module aims to apply the knowledge gained in previous modules to the forensic analysis of biological materials and molecules of biological origin. Particular specialised fields of application will be treated in depth to allow understanding of how biological expertise may be used in the forensic arena. Research relevant to the development of these applications will be considered. The module aims specifically to develop an understanding in three major areas: advanced DNA analysis and presentation of DNA evidence, forensic microbiology and bioterrorism, and mass disasters and the identification of individuals.CoreProfessional Practice 3: Presentation of Evidence 2024-25FRS3059MLevel 62024-25This module looks at the final stage of the forensic process and the presentation of evidence. The module will consider best practice in presenting evidence in visual and oral forms including mock courts. This module also aims to develop students' project planning and independent learning skills to enable them to devise a research project, drawing on the skills they have developed throughout the programme. Students can look at developing their capacity for the critical appraisal of scientific literature, to construct research aims and objectives and how to plan an appropriate programme of research for the area under investigation. Research governance will also be examined including research ethics, COSHH and risk assessments and their importance in order to safely and appropriately carry out a programme of research. Students will also have the opportunity to further develop their skills in the use of IT for presentation.CoreResearch Project 2024-25FRS3057MLevel 62024-25In this module, students can undertake an independent programme of research under supervision from a member of staff. It provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate original and critical thought, as well as to build practical and project-management skills. A wide range of subject expertise exists within the School, and students are expected to select a project that is relevant to their programme of study. Under the guidance of a supervisor, students will review the literature, identify a hypothesis or hypotheses and design a programme of research to test these. They will be expected to manage the project, which will include obtaining relevant ethical approval and conducting a risk assessment. We currently offer projects in the laboratory or field, projects that involve mathematical modelling, systematic reviews or meta-analysis of pre-collected data. Students may work individually or in groups addressing similar questions, but must write up individually. The findings of the research will be written up in the format of a scientific paper following closely the style of a key journal relevant to their area of study, or as a thesis, and will also be presented orally.CoreOverseas Field Course (Forensic) 2024-25FRS3051MLevel 62024-25This overseas field course aims to give students the opportunity to experience first hand the work of the forensic specialist within an international context. The module is designed to introduce students to laboratory and field work within an international context and for students to gain a global perspective of forensic science. Students can also familiarise themselves with the professional skills required to carry out this type of work.OptionalPublic Understanding of Forensic Science 2024-25FRS3056MLevel 62024-25This module provides students with an opportunity to put into practice the techniques they have learned regarding project management, literature review, data collection and analysis and reporting, with a focus on the public understanding of forensic science. Students will work independently to identify a discipline that is frequently used within forensic investigations, but is also known to the general public. Examples could include DNA fingerprinting, fingermark analysis, gunshot residue, fire debris analysis or analysis of drugs. Once the discipline has been identified, students will, through critical analysis of the literature, work to build a comprehensive understanding of the history of the discipline, its current use, benefits and drawbacks, its place within forensic regulations and the current legal framework. With a strong understanding of the scientific background, students will then design a survey to gauge public awareness and understanding of the discipline. Students will then design a digital tool that will aim to increase understanding of the forensic discipline. Students will then design, distribute and analyse the data from a survey to gauge public awareness and understanding of their discipline.Optional

How you are assessed

Most modules on this course are assessed using a mixture of examinations and coursework. Coursework includes practical reports, project work, oral presentations, and written submissions.

The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Most modules on this course are assessed using a mixture of examinations and coursework. Coursework includes practical reports, project work, oral presentations, and written submissions.

The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Features

Industry Links

The University has close working relationships with law enforcement and private sector forensic science providers and consultants. Practitioners such as Key Forensic Services Ltd and JC Fire are key contributors to the programme, and may offer students access to training and real-world case studies.

Overseas Field Course

An optional overseas field course gives students the opportunity to experience first hand the work of the forensic specialist. This module is designed to introduce students to laboratory and field work within an international context while developing a global perspective of forensic science. Students can also familiarise themselves with the professional skills required to carry out this type of work.

Previous destinations have included Guatemala, New York, and Toronto. Students who choose to participate are required to pay for their own flights and general living costs. Accommodation is provided by the University.

Accreditations and Memberships

This programme has full accreditation from the Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences, meaning students are eligible for associate membership.

"My time at the University of Lincoln can be summed up in on word...Incredible! I learnt so much in my three years. The modules and content were interesting, informative, and inspiring. The lecturers are amazing at explaining things and staff also go the extra mile to support you. Most lecturers also practice in the field they teach so you really can’t get any better than that!"

James Gridley, BSc (Hons) Forensic Science graduate

Fees and Scholarships

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Entry Requirements 2023-24

United Kingdom

A Level: BBC, including grade C from A Level Biology, Chemistry, or Applied Science (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A Levels or equivalent qualifications).

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall, with Higher Level Grade 4 in Biology or Chemistry.

BTEC Extended Diploma in Applied Science or Forensic Science*: Distinction, Merit, Merit or equivalent.

*not all modules are accepted. Please contact our Admissions team for further information (admissions@lincoln.ac.uk)

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points, including 32 points from 15 credits in Biology or Chemistry.

A combination of qualifications which may include A Levels, BTEC, EPQ, etc.

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English and Maths. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry. We will also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages for information on equivalent qualifications.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

For applicants who do not meet our standard entry requirements, our Science Foundation Year can provide an alternative route of entry onto our full degree programmes:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/course/sfysfyub/

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Entry Requirements 2022-23

United Kingdom

A Level: BBC, including grade C from A Level Biology, Chemistry, or Applied Science (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A Levels or equivalent qualifications).

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall, with Higher Level Grade 4 in Biology or Chemistry.

BTEC Extended Diploma in Applied Science or Forensic Science*: Distinction, Merit, Merit or equivalent.

*not all modules are accepted. Please contact our Admissions team for further information (admissions@lincoln.ac.uk)

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points, including 32 points from 15 credits in Biology or Chemistry.

A combination of qualifications which may include A Levels, BTEC, EPQ, etc.

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English and Maths. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry. We will also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages for information on equivalent qualifications.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

For applicants who do not meet our standard entry requirements, our Science Foundation Year can provide an alternative route of entry onto our full degree programmes:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/course/sfysfyub/

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

"This degree was essential in providing me with the skills to start my current position as a scenes of crime officer for Warwickshire Police."

Tanya Caren, BSc (Hons) Forensic Science graduate

Career Opportunities

This course is designed to enable students to develop the advanced practical and analytical skills beneficial to a range of careers. Graduates may go on to roles in law enforcement organisations including police forces, HMRC, environmental health, private sector investigatory agencies, and in laboratories in the forensic, pharmaceutical, and food sectors. Opportunities also exist in teaching and research. Previous students have started careers as DNA analysts, crime scene investigators, analytical chemists, and reporting forensic practitioners.

Visit Us in Person

The best way to find out what it is really like to live and learn at Lincoln is to join us for one of our Open Days. Discover the Joseph Banks Laboratories where Chemistry students have access to high-specification instrumentation for spectroscopy, diffraction, imaging, and separation science.

Book Your Place

Related Courses

Prioritising Face-to-Face Teaching

At Lincoln, we strive to make sure our student experience is engaging, supportive, and academically challenging. That is why, in response to the issues presented by the Covid-19 pandemic, we have been prioritising face-to-face teaching sessions for our new and returning students in areas where they are the most valuable, such as seminars, tutorials, workshops, and lab and practical sessions. Additional online opportunities have been introduced where they support learning and have been shown to be successful and popular with our current students.

Safety remains a key focus. We are fully prepared to adapt our plans if changes in Government guidance makes this necessary, and we will endeavour to keep current and prospective students informed. For more information about how we are working to keep our community safe, please visit our coronavirus web pages.

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.