12th August 2015, 9:30am
Psychology at Lincoln ranked number one in UK by students
National Student Survey The latest National Student Survey, published today (12 August 2015), places the University of Lincoln, UK, in the top 25% nationally for student satisfaction in several subjects with its Psychology courses ranked number one in the UK.

Psychology at Lincoln was placed top out of 111 institutions for overall satisfaction*. Biology was ranked second in the UK out of 78 universities and Lincoln’s Design courses, which include degree programmes such as Creative Advertising, Graphic Design and Fashion, were ranked third out of 72 higher education institutions.

More than 2,000 final year undergraduates (73%) took part in the NSS 2015, rating student satisfaction over 22 questions in Teaching, Assessment and Feedback, Academic Support, Organisation and Management, Learning Resources, Personal Development and Overall Satisfaction.

The University of Lincoln rated strongly overall for Personal Development, placed 28th out of 124 institutions – its highest position in this category since the survey was introduced.

Alongside those subjects placed in the top three nationally, a number of Lincoln’s other courses rated in the top 25 per cent for overall satisfaction for their subject areas, including Computing; Criminology and Social Science; History; Marketing; and Social Policy.

Professor Scott Davidson, Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Teaching Quality & Student Experience) at the University of Lincoln, said: “This is a fantastic result for several of our subjects. Almost three quarters of our final year undergraduates completed the survey and it is clear that they valued the support given around personal development and learning resources and the quality of teaching and assessment in many of our disciplines.”

The National Student Survey (NSS) has been conducted by Ipsos MORI annually since 2005. The survey asks final year undergraduates to provide honest feedback on what it has been like to study their course at their institution. It runs across all publicly funded Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) in England, Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland and contributes to university national league tables such as in the Guardian and Times newspapers.
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