23rd December 2010, 2:14pm
Engineering recognition for Head of Lincoln’s new School
paul stewart Professor Paul Stewart, Head of the University of Lincoln’s new School of Engineering, has been awarded an Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) Fellowship, the highest class of elected membership.

The title is awarded to individuals who have demonstrated exceptional commitment to and innovation in mechanical engineering.

The recognition comes just weeks after Professor Stewart and his team were shortlisted for an Innovation award by another of the engineering industry’s professional organisations, the Institution of Engineering and Technology.

The School of Engineering is the first purpose-built engineering school in the UK for more than 20 years and sees the University collaborating closely with global engineering heavyweight, Siemens. The School is part-funded by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) from the European Union and Lincolnshire County Council Single Programme Funding, the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), Siemens and the University.

Professor Stewart, the founding Head of Engineering, has had a challenging time so far which has required extreme multi-tasking: setting up the School; recruiting a team to work alongside him to deliver the undergraduate and research programmes; designing the new Engineering School building; rolling out a new MSc programme in Sustainable Power and Energy.

He said: “Acting as the client for the architectural practice Allies and Morrison, who created the School, made me consider some fairly fundamental questions about what an engineering building is, what’s in it and what should it look like.  I tried to design the perfect School, which would offer the best possible facilities for research, the optimum environment for interacting with industry, and would be a very attractive proposition for potential students.  I took a holistic approach to try to include all the things that were good and avoid things that I had perhaps encountered in the past and knew did not work in the context of an effective Engineering School.”

The Engineering Faculty is intimately connected with Siemens who are looking to take cohorts of their employees to work around the globe, not just in the UK. This led to designing a way of learning that fitted in with the needs of industry.  The revolution for a university engineering course is this intimate connection with industry, effectively creating ‘industry-ready graduates’.   Lincoln aims to deliver a course which is academically rigorous but which also maximises the industrial readiness of its students by reducing the time companies take to train the graduates by six months.  Professor Stewart said: “We want to ensure that a company will take just one year to train graduates – thus making significant savings.

“Our close relationship with Siemens means that all undergraduates at Lincoln can apply not only for Siemens business awards to cover fees and living costs, but also for paid work placements during the summer vacation.  We are looking to work with other big companies and major engineering employers as well.”  


The Institution of Mechanical Engineers is the fastest growing professional engineering institution in the UK and has around 80,000 members. The organisation’s heritage goes back 160 years. Today’s Institution works with leading companies, universities and think tanks, creating and sharing knowledge to provide government, businesses and the public with fresh thinking and authoritative guidance on all aspects of mechanical engineering.

For more information about the School of Engineering see http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/engineering/

For more information about the Institution of Mechanical Engineers visit: http://www.imeche.org/Home
--Ends--