12th March 2010, 8:46am
President of the RIBA praises 'extraordinary' effect of University on Brayford's regeneration
President of the RIBA, Ruth Reed The President of the RIBA (Royal Institute of British Architects) has praised the effect of the University of Lincoln on the regeneration of the Brayford Pool area of the city.

Ruth Reed toured the University's main Brayford campus this week to learn more about the contribution the University is making to the built environment.

The visit came during a high profile three-day tour of the region by the first female president of the RIBA.

Ruth Reed praised the 'extraordinary' effect the University has had on 'revitalising' the Brayford area of Lincoln.

The Brayford campus was the first new city centre campus to be created in the UK for 25 years when it was opened in 1996 by Her Majesty the Queen.

More than 100m has been invested in developing the campus over the last 14 years. Landmark recent additions include the Engine Shed student centre and the Great Central Warehouse Library - both sympathetic conversions of former industrial buildings.

The University of Lincoln is now estimated to be worth more than 200m to the local economy and has created at least 3,000 new jobs, according to a 2008 government report.

Ruth Reed said: "We will look back on the last decade as being the great period of university expansion in this country. Those institutions which have used wit and imagination in their developments will have a real legacy and I think Lincoln is one of those."

The tour, which was led by Nigel Stevenson, the architect behind the Engine Shed, library and other university buildings, was the first time in almost five years that the national president of RIBA has visited the University of Lincoln.

An academic, Ruth Reed became president of the RIBA in September 2009. She is course director of the Postgraduate Diploma in Architectural Practice at the Birmingham School of Architecture and a partner of Green Planning Solutions, a practice which is developing innovative concepts for developments in sensitive rural areas.

Julian Owen, Chairman of the RIBA East Midlands, said: "We are delighted that the first female president of the RIBA could visit Lincoln at the start of her three-day tour to get an insight into the work of local architects and the contribution they are making in both urban and rural areas to the development of the built environment."
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