18th June 2007

 

DO VISUAL AIDS INFLUENCE HOW WE PERCEIVE THE NEWS?

 

A University of Lincoln senior academic has been awarded a £19,500 grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) to investigate the impact of visual aids used to communicate news on television.

 

Paul Middleton, senior academic in Design, is conducting the project on the under published area of television short life design which will look at the application of animation, design graphics, moving images, typography and sound to communicate information in television news.

 

Paul will be working with Central Television as part of the project. His research will investigate the roots of contemporary news graphics, explore current applications and speculate on future directions of short life design.

 

Some examples of short life design include visuals like weather maps which aid reporters and viewers when explaining the forecast, text and images to highlight key news items and facts and figures in large type to reinforce the key messages the news reporter wants to get across.

 

“This form of communication is just being realised with news readers interacting with animated graphics, illustrations moving images and sound,” said Paul.

 

“The research has been well received and I am delighted with the feedback from a range of sources including the AHRC and Central Television. I am ambitious for the future direction of this work which will have a meaningful impact on a range of communities. I hope that the research will help to establish short life design as an important discipline of communication and design”.

 

For more information contact Paul on 01522 837174 or email pmiddleton@lincoln.ac.uk

 

For more information contact:

Sophie Gayler Communications Officer (Press and Media)

(01522) 886042 sgayler@lincoln.ac.uk

Visit our news web pages: www.lincoln.ac.uk/news/latestnews.htm