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3 years 6 years School of Engineering Lincoln Campus [L] Validated BCC (or equivalent qualifications) H785 3 years 6 years School of Engineering Lincoln Campus [L] Validated BCC (104 UCAS Tariff points) (or equivalent qualifications) H785

Engineering Bursaries

Global industry-leader Siemens offers a significant number of generous Bursaries to all full-time BEng and MEng Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering applicants.

Find out more about Engineering Bursaries.

Introduction

Electrical engineering is essential to the modern world, encompassing everything from energy and automation through to communications and transport. The BEng (Hons) Electrical Engineering programme is designed to equip students with the skills to succeed as the engineers of the future.

Founded in collaboration with Siemens, the University of Lincoln’s School of Engineering has a core philosophy of research-led teaching. Our innovative industrial collaborations has led to a generous programme of bursaries and workplace experience opportunities. Further details can be found using the link at the top of this page.

Throughout the course, there are opportunities to engage in hands-on projects and benefit from learning in an environment where electrical engineering research is being conducted by our academics.

Strong links exist between our Mechanical and Electrical degrees, aiming to ensure graduates gain an excellent cross-disciplinary focus and an excellent understanding of engineering.

Our ground-breaking collaboration with Siemens has won prestigious Lord Stafford and Times Higher Education awards.

How You Study

The course covers core electrical engineering subjects and provides opportunities to specialise in advanced electronics.

The first and second year of the BEng Electrical Engineering programmes offers a foundation in engineering theory and practice. Students can develop fundamental knowledge in areas such as robotics, semiconductor device physics, electrical technology, electromagnetism, engineering mathematics and numerical computation. Teaching includes important technical and workshop skills and, after the first year, students can specialise in electrical and electronic engineering.

Specialist modules in the third year include power and smart electronics. At each stage, students have opportunities to practise and develop their engineering skills on real-life problems through project work.

Recorded videos of lectures are made available to both full time and part time, distance learning students.

Jason Bradbury, host of The Gadget Show is currently a visiting speaker for the School.

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Contact hours may vary for each year of a degree. When engaging in a full-time degree students should, at the very least, expect to undertake a minimum of 37 hours of study each week during term time (including independent study) in addition to potentially undertaking assignments outside of term time. The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, work placements, research and one-to-one learning.

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

Please see the Unistats data, using the link at the bottom of this page, for specific information relating to this course in terms of course composition and delivery, contact hours and student satisfaction.

How You Study

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our School of Engineering Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2017-18

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC, including grade B A Level Maths. A level 'Use of Maths' will not be accepted in lieu of A level Maths.

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall, with higher level grade 5 in maths.

BTEC Extended Diploma in Engineering accepted: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma in Engineering, Electronics and a Physical Science accepted. Applicants must also have studied a level 3 Maths component as part of their Access Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits at merit or above will be required, including a distinction in the Maths component.

In addition, applicants must have at least 5 GCSEs at grade C or above in English and Maths. Level 2 equivalent qualifications such as BTEC First Certificates and Level 2 Functional Skills will be considered

The University of Lincoln offers international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the direct entry requirements for an undergraduate degree course the option of completing a degree preparation programme at the university’s International Study Centre. To find out more please visit www.lincoln.ac.uk/isc

Level 1

Computing for Engineers (Core)

Many sectors of engineering require high levels of computer literacy and the ability to write computer programs for problem solving is highly desirable. In learning the fundamentals of computer programming, logical thinking and problem solving, skills can be developed and coding techniques learnt, that can support the study of modules in forthcoming years.

This course delivers the concepts of structured computer programming and lab time is allocated for implementing these concepts. Students are provided with opportunities to plan, write and debug their own computer programs.

Electrical and Electronic Technology (Core)

An understanding of the basic principles and many of the important practical applications of electronic and electrical engineering is now essential to practitioners of other disciplines, especially Mechanical Engineers.

The aim of this module is to provide a foundation in Electrical Engineering and Electronics for students, of sufficient depth to be useful, and without being over complicated or cluttered with too-rigorous and exhaustive mathematical treatment.

Electricity and Electromagnetism (Core)

The aim of this module is to establish an understanding of electrostatics, electromagnetics and electroconductive fields - more commonly referred to as field theory. Students are introduced to the fundamental topics in electrostatics, magnetostatics and electromagnetics leading to an introduction to Maxwell’s equations which will support subsequent courses on devices, electricity and magnetism and optoelectronics. As well as providing a basic foundation in field theory the behaviours of materials under electric and magnetic fields are also explained along with more practical aspects of field theory that are pertinent to the modern day electrical engineer such as EMC.

Introduction to Robotics (Core)

The aim of this module is to introduce students to robotics engineering by providing a broad overview of diverse robotics applications.

The focus of this introductory module will be on the main technological aspects of robots as truly mechatronic systems, including mechanical configurations, sensing and actuation systems and programming methods. Some considerations about the mathematical description of robots will be provided. Finally, students will also have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience of designing a robotic system using an educational robotic kit.

Mathematics for Engineers (Core)

A good mathematical grounding is essential for all engineers. The theory developed in this module aims to underpin the other mechanical engineering modules studied at level one.

Wherever possible, mathematical theory is taught by considering a real example, to present students the mathematical tools they might need for the science they follow. Solutions are considered by both analytical and numerical techniques. Where basic principles are involved, some proofs will also be taught.

Professional and Workshop Skills (Core)

The purpose of this module is to provide students with development opportunities for the practical skills that are required throughout their studies, and beyond into their careers as professional engineers.

Students will have the opportunity to develop their communication skills, and begin the process of reflective practice in order to take responsibility for managing their own learning. It aims to introduce students to basic workshop practices and provides an understanding of rules and procedures that may be applicable in such an environment. The statistics topic introduces typical quantitative analysis methods for industrial engineering. These methods aims to enable the students to model industrial variables, framing the problem and making decisions in an uncertain environment.

Semiconductor Device Physics (Core)

Students with an understanding of the physics underlying semiconductor devices and applications will be given the opportunity to study the processing of semiconductors to produce devices.

Statics and Dynamics (Core)

The syllabus for this module can be divided into two topics:

Statics and Mechanics:
The primary aim of the study of engineering mechanics is to develop students' capacity to predict the effects of force and deformation in the course of carrying out the creative design function of engineering. As the student undertakes the study of solids and forces (first statics, mechanics, then dynamics) they can build a foundation of analytical capability for the solution of a great variety of engineering problems. Modern engineering practice demands a high level of analytical capability, and the study of mechanics can help in developing this.

Dynamics:
The study of dynamics gives students the opportunity to analyse and predict the motion of particles and bodies with and without reference to the forces that cause this motion. Successful prediction requires the ability of visualize physical configurations in terms of real machines ( in addition to knowledge of physical and mathematical principles of mechanics), actual constraints and the practical limitations which govern the behaviour of machines.

Level 2

Analogue Electronics (Core)

Analogue electronics covers the tools and methods necessary for the creative design of useful circuits using active devices. The module stresses insight and intuition, applied to the design of transistor circuits and the estimation of their performance.

Control Systems (Core)

The aim of this module is to provide students with a firm grounding in Classical Control methods, which will enable them to work with systems and control engineers, and prepare students on the control stream for advanced topics in the level three and four modules.

Students will be introduced to Control in relation to engineering systems, and in particular to develop methods of modelling the control of processes. Techniques are explored with particular reference to common practical engineering problems and their solutions, and the application of SIMULINK in this process.

Design Engineering (Core)

The content of this module aims to deepen a students’ understanding of engineering in practical applications. Students will have the opportunity to investigate the design process for mechanical, electrical or control components/systems and undertake analysis of the same.

These two strands of the module are brought together in a design project, which will be set by a professional engineering organisation. This major project will give students the opportunity to extend their creative design skills and obtain practical experience of the process of creating sound conceptual solutions through to real design problems within an industrial context. Students can build confidence and gain experience through working within a team with practicing engineers from industry.

Digital Systems and Microprocessors (Core)

This module aims to introduce digital system design, the principles of programmable logic devices, the implementation of combinational and sequential circuits, and the principles of hardware design using Verilog, a specialist hardware description language.

Electrical Power and Machines (Core)

Students will be introduced to electrical machines and power systems and their practical applications, supported by practical analysis/synthesis methods.

This ability is fundamental for the students with mechanical engineering background, if they are to be able to handle electromechanical problems encountered in real life situations.
Students will further have the opportunity to explore a general methodology for the calculation of electromechanical energy conversion. Students can obtain an appreciation of the features and characteristics of different types of electromechanical machines and drives and their applications.

Further Mathematics for Engineers (Core)

The purpose of this programme of mathematical study is to give students the opportunity to become more competent in calculations using a range of mathematical tools. The content builds upon that delivered at Level 1, and gives students the opportunity to extend their analytical skills by introducing more advanced topics that may form part of the modern engineers skill set.

Industrial Engineering (Core)

This module aims to provide an introduction to the subject of industrial engineering.

Industrial engineering is a branch of engineering dealing with the optimisation of complex processes or systems. It is concerned with the development, improvement, implementation and evaluation of integrated systems of people, economic resources, knowledge, information, equipment, energy, materials, analysis and synthesis, as well as the mathematical, physical and social sciences together with the principles and methods of engineering design to specify, predict, and evaluate the results to be obtained from such systems or processes. The various topics include management science, cost and value engineering, business economics and finance, engineering management, supply chain management, operations research, health and safety engineering, operation management.

Mechatronics (Core)

The term mechatronics integrates mechanical engineering with electronics and intelligent computer control in the design and manufacture of products and processes. As a result, many products which used to have mechanical functions have had many replaced with ones involving microprocessors. This has resulted in much flexibility, easier redesign and reprogramming, and the ability to carry out automated data collection and reporting. A consequence of this approach is the need for engineers to adopt an interdisciplinary and integrated approach to engineering.

The overall aim of this module is to give a comprehensive coverage of topics, such as analogue and digital signals, digital logic, sensors and signal conditioning, data acquisition systems, data presentation systems, mechanical and electrical actuation systems, microcontroller programming and interfacing, system response and modelling, and feedback control. Students may make extensive use of Simulink and a MATLAB support packages based an Arduino board, which allow for graphical simulation and programming of real-time control systems. The module serves as an introductory course to more advanced courses such as Measurement and Testing, Sensors, Actuators and Controllers, and Embedded Systems.

Level 3

Communication Systems (Core)

The module aims to enable students to gain knowledge and understanding of the principles and other key elements in communication systems and the theory involved in their design.

Students are introduced to analogue and digital communication systems, as well as to the use of information theory in the framework of communication systems and their performance. An important aspect of this module is studying the topics of random processes and noise, sampling and quantization, and introducing students to key issues of filter design and modulation. Laboratory work will be carried out in Matlab/Simulink or equivalent software tool.

Electrical Machine Design (Option)

This module aims to introduce students to the fundamental concepts and principles of operation of various types of electrical machines.

It aims to equip students with basic experimental and modelling skills for handling problems associated with electrical machines. This module will give students the opportunity to develop an appreciation of design and operational problems in the electrical power industry. Students are also introduced to the modern CAD environment in relation to design of electromechanical devices.

Energy Systems and Conversion (Option)

The aim of this module is to provide students with an understanding of the machines used in power generation applications, with a main focus on the principles of operation of machines used in base load power generation (gas turbines), but all rotating machines in power generation are considered. Students may then develop a methodology for measuring the impact of machines from energy and materials usage, standpoints, and to better understand where opportunities exist to increase the efficiency of energy machines, systems and devices.

Students will have the opportunity to build models of mass and energy flow through existing and proposed machines. These models are then used to pinpoint the most efficient and least efficient steps of device operation. This syllabus can be divided into two topics —

Fundamentals of Machines in Power and Energy:
The module begins with the theory of gas turbines, based on fundamental thermodynamic and fluid mechanic analyses and introduces methods for improving efficiencies and increasing specific work outputs.

Energy Systems Analysis:
Students may strengthen and expand their fundamental knowledge of thermodynamics, and apply this to develop a better understanding of energy systems and machine systems.

Individual Project (Bachelors) (Core)

The individual project aims to provide students with a learning experience that enables them to carry out independent research, and to integrate many of the subjects they have studied throughout their degree. Students are expected to plan, research and execute their task while developing skills in critical judgement, independent work and engineering competence. Students have the opportunity to gain experience in presenting and reporting a major piece of engineering work, of immediate engineering value, at a level appropriate for an honours degree student.

Power Electronics (Core)

The aim of this module is to provide students with a thorough understanding of power electronics and electrical drives.

The first part of the module begins with an overview of the main concepts behind electrical power processing and control. Power semiconductor switches are then introduced and their use as basic components in power electronics systems is deeply investigated. Subsequently, the main power converters architectures are defined and systematically analysed. The second part of the module aims to enable students to gain knowledge and understanding of classical electric machines and drives.

Power Generation and Transmission (Option)

The purpose of this module is to analyse electrical machines, switched mode power-electronic convertors and design power systems for medium to high power applications. Students will have the opportunity to examine the operation characteristics and capabilities of commonly used systems and their control methods.

In addition, students may examine the methods and issues surrounding transmission of electrical power, including insight and understanding of power system protection applications and the effects of system design on power quality.

Programmable Logic Design (Core)

In this module students will have the opportunity to work on the design of digital projects using Verilog for FPGA and ASIC implementation. Hierarchy of design abstraction and the process of top down design will also be covered, in addition to advanced concepts and methods of Verilog.

Investigation of FPGA architectures issues involved in FPGA based implementations of advanced digital designs are illustrated by practical laboratories and assignments.

Robotics and Automation (Option)

The aim of this module is to enable students to gain knowledge and understanding of the principles and other key elements in robotics, its interdisciplinary nature and its role and applications in automation.

The module starts with the history and definition of robotics and its role in automation with examples. The module continues by studying a number of issues related to classifying, modelling and operating robots, followed by an important aspect of the robotics interdisciplinary nature i.e. its control and use of sensors and interpretation of sensory information as well as vision systems. Students will also have the opportunity to be introduced to the topics of networked operation and teleoperation, as well as robot programming

Signal Processing and System Identification (Option)

The aim of this module is to introduce students to theory and methodology of advanced techniques relevant to engineering systems, in order to design and implement filters and systems.

System identification is a general term to describe mathematical tools and algorithms that build dynamic models from measured data. A dynamic model in this context is a mathematical description of the dynamic behaviour of a system or process in either the time or frequency domain. Students are given the opportunity to investigate methods by which they can perform useful operations on signals in either discrete or time-varying measurement.

Smart Electronics (Core)

This module is intended to introduce students with the fast growing area of consumer electronics design.

Apart from interface and size issues, portable consumer electronics present some of the toughest design and engineering challenges in all of technology. This module breaks the complex design process down into its component parts, detailing every crucial issue from interface design to chip packaging, focusing upon the key design parameters of convenience, utility and size.

State-Space Control (Option)

In control engineering, a state-space representation is a mathematical model of a physical system as a set of input, output and state variables. Students have the opportunity to explore different methods of resolving the control variables in order to analyse systems in a compact and relevant way.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

The academic team bring a rich array of research experience in various fields of electronics, control and power and energy. Our academics secure grants for major UK and European research funders and deliver research, development and consultancy for industrial partners such as Siemens, Castlet Inc, e2V and Dynex semiconductors. Students have the opportunity to engage in this cutting edge research through research-led teaching and project work.

Included in your fees

The costs of any field trips undertaken as part of the course are covered by the School of Engineering.

Industry Links

The School of Engineering’s award-winning collaboration with Siemens delivers numerous benefits for students, including a generous package of bursaries and opportunities for workplace experience. These are offered to selected students on BEng or MEng programmes who make the University of Lincoln their first choice institution during the application process. Further information can be found in the Introduction tab. Our collaboration with Siemens has won a prestigious Lord Stafford Award and a Times Higher Education Award.

Placements

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

The purpose-built Engineering Hub is a centre of technical innovation, housing industry-standard machinery, turbines, and laser and control laboratories. Work is currently underway to extend and enhance facilities for engineering students.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

Skilled engineers are in high demand in the UK and overseas. The Engineering School aims to prepare its graduates for a variety of career paths in areas such as electronic and electrical, control systems, and mechanical and materials engineering. The University’s status as a Siemens Global Principal Partner opens up opportunities for placements, mentoring and recruitment at Siemens. Some graduates choose to continue their studies at postgraduate level.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

The BSc (Hons) Computer Science degree provides you with the opportunity to develop the experience, skills and knowledge to design and develop a variety of software and hardware computing solutions for real-world problems. Particular attention is paid to cutting-edge topics, such as artificial intelligence and human-computer interaction, in addition to core computer science disciplines. This aims to ensure that your studies are at the forefront of research in the field. In addition, you are encouraged to work with academics on research projects, such as with MARC the robot.
The MComp Computer Science degree is a four-year, integrated Master's degree is designed to give the experience, skills and knowledge to design and develop a variety of software and hardware computing solutions for real-world problems.
This research-informed BSc (Hons) Mathematics degree aims to provide a fundamental education in the fascinating field of mathematics, including pure and applied mathematics. Students have opportunities to work alongside academic staff on challenging projects, which could contribute to academic research or collaboration with industry.
The research-informed MMath Mathematics degree aims to provide a fundamental education in mathematics, including pure and applied mathematics. There will be opportunities for students to develop high-level mathematical and problem-solving skills and to apply these in a variety of contexts. Students will also have the chance to work alongside fellow undergraduates and academic staff on projects.
The BEng (Hons) Mechanical Engineering degree at Lincoln aims to produce graduates who are highly skilled, creative engineers who can adapt to new challenges and deliver sustainable solutions for modern society.
The MEng (Hons) Mechanical Engineering degree at Lincoln aims to produce graduates who are highly skilled, creative engineers who can adapt to new challenges and deliver sustainable solutions for modern society. As a student in Mechanical Engineering, you will study core mechanical engineering subjects and specialise in the design and analysis of advanced mechanical and energy systems.
The BEng (Hons) Electrical Engineering (Control Systems) is a specialist engineering course, informed by industry. The programme aims to develop students into skilled, creative engineers who can adapt to new challenges and deliver sustainable solutions for modern society.
The MEng (Hons) Electrical Engineering (Control Systems) is a specialist engineering course, informed by industry. The programme aims to develop students into skilled, creative engineers who can adapt to new challenges and deliver sustainable solutions for modern society.
Electrical engineering is essential to the modern world, encompassing everything from energy and automation through to communications and transport. The MEng (Hons) Electrical Engineering programme is designed to equip students with the skills to succeed as the engineers of the future.
The BEng (Hons) Electrical Engineering (Power and Energy) degree offers students the opportunity to specialise in the fields of power systems and energy on both a large and small scale, exploring the generation of electricity for modern society.
The MEng (Hons) Electrical Engineering (Power and Energy) degree offers students the opportunity to specialise in the fields of power systems and energy on both a large and small scale, exploring the generation of electricity for modern society.

Introduction

Electrical engineering is essential to the modern world, encompassing everything from energy and automation through to communications and transport. The BEng (Hons) Electrical Engineering programme is designed to equip students with the skills to succeed as the engineers of the future.

Founded in collaboration with Siemens, the University of Lincoln’s School of Engineering has a core philosophy of research-led teaching. Our innovative industrial collaborations has led to a generous programme of bursaries and workplace experience opportunities. Further details can be found using the link at the top of this page.

Throughout the course, there are opportunities to engage in hands-on projects and benefit from learning in an environment where electrical engineering research is being conducted by our academics.

Strong links exist between our Mechanical and Electrical degrees, aiming to ensure graduates gain an excellent cross-disciplinary focus and an excellent understanding of engineering.

Our ground-breaking collaboration with Siemens has won prestigious Lord Stafford and Times Higher Education awards.

How You Study

The course covers core electrical engineering subjects and provides opportunities to specialise in advanced electronics.

The first and second year of the BEng Electrical Engineering programmes offers a foundation in engineering theory and practice. Students can develop fundamental knowledge in areas such as robotics, semiconductor device physics, electrical technology, electromagnetism, engineering mathematics and numerical computation. Teaching includes important technical and workshop skills and, after the first year, students can specialise in electrical and electronic engineering.

Specialist modules in the third year include power and smart electronics. At each stage, students have opportunities to practise and develop their engineering skills on real-life problems through project work.

Recorded videos of lectures are made available to full-time, part-time and distance learning students.

Jason Bradbury, host of The Gadget Show is currently a visiting speaker for the School.

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Contact hours may vary for each year of a degree. When engaging in a full-time degree students should, at the very least, expect to undertake a minimum of 37 hours of study each week during term time (including independent study) in addition to potentially undertaking assignments outside of term time. The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, work placements, research and one-to-one learning.

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

Please see the Unistats data, using the link at the bottom of this page, for specific information relating to this course in terms of course composition and delivery, contact hours and student satisfaction.

How You Study

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our School of Engineering Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2018-19

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC, including grade B A Level Maths. A level 'Use of Maths' will not be accepted in lieu of A level Maths.

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall, with higher level grade 5 in maths.

BTEC Extended Diploma in Engineering accepted: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma in Engineering, Electronics and a Physical Science accepted. Applicants must also have studied a level 3 Maths component as part of their Access Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits to include 30 at merit or above will be required, including a distinction in the Maths component.

In addition, applicants must have at least 3 GCSEs at grade C or above in English and Maths. Level 2 equivalent qualifications such as BTEC First Certificates and Level 2 Functional Skills will be considered

The University of Lincoln offers international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the direct entry requirements for an undergraduate degree course the option of completing a degree preparation programme at the university’s International Study Centre. To find out more please visit www.lincoln.ac.uk/isc

Level 1

Computing for Engineers (Core)

Many sectors of engineering require high levels of computer literacy and the ability to write computer programs for problem solving is highly desirable. In learning the fundamentals of computer programming, logical thinking and problem solving, skills can be developed and coding techniques learnt, that can support the study of modules in forthcoming years.

This course delivers the concepts of structured computer programming and lab time is allocated for implementing these concepts. Students are provided with opportunities to plan, write and debug their own computer programs.

Electrical and Electronic Technology (Core)

An understanding of the basic principles and many of the important practical applications of electronic and electrical engineering is now essential to practitioners of other disciplines, especially Mechanical Engineers.

The aim of this module is to provide a foundation in Electrical Engineering and Electronics for students, of sufficient depth to be useful, and without being over complicated or cluttered with too-rigorous and exhaustive mathematical treatment.

Electricity and Electromagnetism (Core)

The aim of this module is to establish an understanding of electrostatics, electromagnetics and electroconductive fields - more commonly referred to as field theory. Students are introduced to the fundamental topics in electrostatics, magnetostatics and electromagnetics leading to an introduction to Maxwell’s equations which will support subsequent courses on devices, electricity and magnetism and optoelectronics. As well as providing a basic foundation in field theory the behaviours of materials under electric and magnetic fields are also explained along with more practical aspects of field theory that are pertinent to the modern day electrical engineer such as EMC.

Introduction to Robotics (Core)

The aim of this module is to introduce students to robotics engineering by providing a broad overview of diverse robotics applications.

The focus of this introductory module will be on the main technological aspects of robots as truly mechatronic systems, including mechanical configurations, sensing and actuation systems and programming methods. Some considerations about the mathematical description of robots will be provided. Finally, students will also have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience of designing a robotic system using an educational robotic kit.

Mathematics for Engineers (Core)

A good mathematical grounding is essential for all engineers. The theory developed in this module aims to underpin the other mechanical engineering modules studied at level one.

Wherever possible, mathematical theory is taught by considering a real example, to present students the mathematical tools they might need for the science they follow. Solutions are considered by both analytical and numerical techniques. Where basic principles are involved, some proofs will also be taught.

Professional and Workshop Skills (Core)

The purpose of this module is to provide students with development opportunities for the practical skills that are required throughout their studies, and beyond into their careers as professional engineers.

Students will have the opportunity to develop their communication skills, and begin the process of reflective practice in order to take responsibility for managing their own learning. It aims to introduce students to basic workshop practices and provides an understanding of rules and procedures that may be applicable in such an environment. The statistics topic introduces typical quantitative analysis methods for industrial engineering. These methods aims to enable the students to model industrial variables, framing the problem and making decisions in an uncertain environment.

Semiconductor Device Physics (Core)

Students with an understanding of the physics underlying semiconductor devices and applications will be given the opportunity to study the processing of semiconductors to produce devices.

Statics and Dynamics (Core)

The syllabus for this module can be divided into two topics:

Statics and Mechanics:
The primary aim of the study of engineering mechanics is to develop students' capacity to predict the effects of force and deformation in the course of carrying out the creative design function of engineering. As the student undertakes the study of solids and forces (first statics, mechanics, then dynamics) they can build a foundation of analytical capability for the solution of a great variety of engineering problems. Modern engineering practice demands a high level of analytical capability, and the study of mechanics can help in developing this.

Dynamics:
The study of dynamics gives students the opportunity to analyse and predict the motion of particles and bodies with and without reference to the forces that cause this motion. Successful prediction requires the ability of visualize physical configurations in terms of real machines ( in addition to knowledge of physical and mathematical principles of mechanics), actual constraints and the practical limitations which govern the behaviour of machines.

Level 2

Analogue Electronics (Core)

Analogue electronics covers the tools and methods necessary for the creative design of useful circuits using active devices. The module stresses insight and intuition, applied to the design of transistor circuits and the estimation of their performance.

Control Systems (Core)

The aim of this module is to provide students with a firm grounding in Classical Control methods, which will enable them to work with systems and control engineers, and prepare students on the control stream for advanced topics in the level three and four modules.

Students will be introduced to Control in relation to engineering systems, and in particular to develop methods of modelling the control of processes. Techniques are explored with particular reference to common practical engineering problems and their solutions, and the application of SIMULINK in this process.

Design Engineering (Core)

The content of this module aims to deepen a students’ understanding of engineering in practical applications. Students will have the opportunity to investigate the design process for mechanical, electrical or control components/systems and undertake analysis of the same.

These two strands of the module are brought together in a design project, which will be set by a professional engineering organisation. This major project will give students the opportunity to extend their creative design skills and obtain practical experience of the process of creating sound conceptual solutions through to real design problems within an industrial context. Students can build confidence and gain experience through working within a team with practicing engineers from industry.

Digital Systems and Microprocessors (Core)

This module aims to introduce digital system design, the principles of programmable logic devices, the implementation of combinational and sequential circuits, and the principles of hardware design using Verilog, a specialist hardware description language.

Electrical Power and Machines (Core)

Students will be introduced to electrical machines and power systems and their practical applications, supported by practical analysis/synthesis methods.

This ability is fundamental for the students with mechanical engineering background, if they are to be able to handle electromechanical problems encountered in real life situations.
Students will further have the opportunity to explore a general methodology for the calculation of electromechanical energy conversion. Students can obtain an appreciation of the features and characteristics of different types of electromechanical machines and drives and their applications.

Further Mathematics for Engineers (Core)

The purpose of this programme of mathematical study is to give students the opportunity to become more competent in calculations using a range of mathematical tools. The content builds upon that delivered at Level 1, and gives students the opportunity to extend their analytical skills by introducing more advanced topics that may form part of the modern engineers skill set.

Industrial Engineering (Core)

This module aims to provide an introduction to the subject of industrial engineering.

Industrial engineering is a branch of engineering dealing with the optimisation of complex processes or systems. It is concerned with the development, improvement, implementation and evaluation of integrated systems of people, economic resources, knowledge, information, equipment, energy, materials, analysis and synthesis, as well as the mathematical, physical and social sciences together with the principles and methods of engineering design to specify, predict, and evaluate the results to be obtained from such systems or processes. The various topics include management science, cost and value engineering, business economics and finance, engineering management, supply chain management, operations research, health and safety engineering, operation management.

Mechatronics (Core)

The term mechatronics integrates mechanical engineering with electronics and intelligent computer control in the design and manufacture of products and processes. As a result, many products which used to have mechanical functions have had many replaced with ones involving microprocessors. This has resulted in much flexibility, easier redesign and reprogramming, and the ability to carry out automated data collection and reporting. A consequence of this approach is the need for engineers to adopt an interdisciplinary and integrated approach to engineering.

The overall aim of this module is to give a comprehensive coverage of topics, such as analogue and digital signals, digital logic, sensors and signal conditioning, data acquisition systems, data presentation systems, mechanical and electrical actuation systems, microcontroller programming and interfacing, system response and modelling, and feedback control. Students may make extensive use of Simulink and a MATLAB support packages based an Arduino board, which allow for graphical simulation and programming of real-time control systems. The module serves as an introductory course to more advanced courses such as Measurement and Testing, Sensors, Actuators and Controllers, and Embedded Systems.

Level 3

Communication Systems (Core)

The module aims to enable students to gain knowledge and understanding of the principles and other key elements in communication systems and the theory involved in their design.

Students are introduced to analogue and digital communication systems, as well as to the use of information theory in the framework of communication systems and their performance. An important aspect of this module is studying the topics of random processes and noise, sampling and quantization, and introducing students to key issues of filter design and modulation. Laboratory work will be carried out in Matlab/Simulink or equivalent software tool.

Electrical Machine Design (Option)

This module aims to introduce students to the fundamental concepts and principles of operation of various types of electrical machines.

It aims to equip students with basic experimental and modelling skills for handling problems associated with electrical machines. This module will give students the opportunity to develop an appreciation of design and operational problems in the electrical power industry. Students are also introduced to the modern CAD environment in relation to design of electromechanical devices.

Energy Systems and Conversion (Option)

The aim of this module is to provide students with an understanding of the machines used in power generation applications, with a main focus on the principles of operation of machines used in base load power generation (gas turbines), but all rotating machines in power generation are considered. Students may then develop a methodology for measuring the impact of machines from energy and materials usage, standpoints, and to better understand where opportunities exist to increase the efficiency of energy machines, systems and devices.

Students will have the opportunity to build models of mass and energy flow through existing and proposed machines. These models are then used to pinpoint the most efficient and least efficient steps of device operation. This syllabus can be divided into two topics —

Fundamentals of Machines in Power and Energy:
The module begins with the theory of gas turbines, based on fundamental thermodynamic and fluid mechanic analyses and introduces methods for improving efficiencies and increasing specific work outputs.

Energy Systems Analysis:
Students may strengthen and expand their fundamental knowledge of thermodynamics, and apply this to develop a better understanding of energy systems and machine systems.

Individual Project (Bachelors) (Core)

The individual project aims to provide students with a learning experience that enables them to carry out independent research, and to integrate many of the subjects they have studied throughout their degree. Students are expected to plan, research and execute their task while developing skills in critical judgement, independent work and engineering competence. Students have the opportunity to gain experience in presenting and reporting a major piece of engineering work, of immediate engineering value, at a level appropriate for an honours degree student.

Power Electronics (Core)

The aim of this module is to provide students with a thorough understanding of power electronics and electrical drives.

The first part of the module begins with an overview of the main concepts behind electrical power processing and control. Power semiconductor switches are then introduced and their use as basic components in power electronics systems is deeply investigated. Subsequently, the main power converters architectures are defined and systematically analysed. The second part of the module aims to enable students to gain knowledge and understanding of classical electric machines and drives.

Power Generation and Transmission (Option)

The purpose of this module is to analyse electrical machines, switched mode power-electronic convertors and design power systems for medium to high power applications. Students will have the opportunity to examine the operation characteristics and capabilities of commonly used systems and their control methods.

In addition, students may examine the methods and issues surrounding transmission of electrical power, including insight and understanding of power system protection applications and the effects of system design on power quality.

Programmable Logic Design (Core)

In this module students will have the opportunity to work on the design of digital projects using Verilog for FPGA and ASIC implementation. Hierarchy of design abstraction and the process of top down design will also be covered, in addition to advanced concepts and methods of Verilog.

Investigation of FPGA architectures issues involved in FPGA based implementations of advanced digital designs are illustrated by practical laboratories and assignments.

Robotics and Automation (Option)

The aim of this module is to enable students to gain knowledge and understanding of the principles and other key elements in robotics, its interdisciplinary nature and its role and applications in automation.

The module starts with the history and definition of robotics and its role in automation with examples. The module continues by studying a number of issues related to classifying, modelling and operating robots, followed by an important aspect of the robotics interdisciplinary nature i.e. its control and use of sensors and interpretation of sensory information as well as vision systems. Students will also have the opportunity to be introduced to the topics of networked operation and teleoperation, as well as robot programming

Signal Processing and System Identification (Option)

The aim of this module is to introduce students to theory and methodology of advanced techniques relevant to engineering systems, in order to design and implement filters and systems.

System identification is a general term to describe mathematical tools and algorithms that build dynamic models from measured data. A dynamic model in this context is a mathematical description of the dynamic behaviour of a system or process in either the time or frequency domain. Students are given the opportunity to investigate methods by which they can perform useful operations on signals in either discrete or time-varying measurement.

Smart Electronics (Core)

This module is intended to introduce students with the fast growing area of consumer electronics design.

Apart from interface and size issues, portable consumer electronics present some of the toughest design and engineering challenges in all of technology. This module breaks the complex design process down into its component parts, detailing every crucial issue from interface design to chip packaging, focusing upon the key design parameters of convenience, utility and size.

State-Space Control (Option)

In control engineering, a state-space representation is a mathematical model of a physical system as a set of input, output and state variables. Students have the opportunity to explore different methods of resolving the control variables in order to analyse systems in a compact and relevant way.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

The academic team brings a rich array of research experience in various fields of electronics, control, and power and energy. Our academics have secured grants from major UK and European research funders and have delivered research, development and consultancy for industrial partners such as Siemens, Castlet Inc, e2V, Dynex Semiconductor Ltd., and Arralis Ltd.

Included In Your Fees

The costs of any field trips undertaken as part of the course are covered by the School of Engineering.

Industry Links

The School of Engineering’s award-winning collaboration with Siemens delivers numerous benefits for students, including a generous package of bursaries and opportunities for workplace experience. These are offered to selected students on BEng or MEng programmes who make the University of Lincoln their first choice institution during the application process. Further information can be found in the Introduction tab. Our collaboration with Siemens has won a prestigious Lord Stafford Award and a Times Higher Education Award.

Placements

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

The purpose-built Engineering Hub is a centre of technical innovation, housing industry-standard machinery, turbines, and multiple specialist teaching and research laboratories. The Engineering Hub forms part of the Isaac Newton Building.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

The School of Engineering aims to prepare its graduates for a variety of career paths in areas such as energy, transportation, biomedical engineering, and microelectronics. This can include working with sensor networks, automotive electronics, in the microprocessor industry and in the aerospace and satellite sectors.

The University’s status as a Siemens Global Principal Partner gives Lincoln graduates opportunities for placements, mentoring and recruitment at Siemens.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

The BSc (Hons) Computer Science degree provides you with the opportunity to develop the experience, skills and knowledge to design and develop a variety of software and hardware computing solutions for real-world problems. Particular attention is paid to cutting-edge topics, such as artificial intelligence and human-computer interaction, in addition to core computer science disciplines. This aims to ensure that your studies are at the forefront of research in the field. In addition, you are encouraged to work with academics on research projects, such as with MARC the robot.
The MComp Computer Science degree is a four-year, integrated Master's degree is designed to give the experience, skills and knowledge to design and develop a variety of software and hardware computing solutions for real-world problems.
This research-informed BSc (Hons) Mathematics degree aims to provide a fundamental education in the fascinating field of mathematics, including pure and applied mathematics. Students have opportunities to work alongside academic staff on challenging projects, which could contribute to academic research or collaboration with industry.
The research-informed MMath Mathematics degree aims to provide a fundamental education in mathematics, including pure and applied mathematics. There will be opportunities for students to develop high-level mathematical and problem-solving skills and to apply these in a variety of contexts. Students will also have the chance to work alongside fellow undergraduates and academic staff on projects.
The BEng (Hons) Mechanical Engineering degree at Lincoln aims to produce graduates who are highly skilled, creative engineers who can adapt to new challenges and deliver sustainable solutions for modern society.
The MEng (Hons) Mechanical Engineering degree at Lincoln aims to produce graduates who are highly skilled, creative engineers who can adapt to new challenges and deliver sustainable solutions for modern society. As a student in Mechanical Engineering, you will study core mechanical engineering subjects and specialise in the design and analysis of advanced mechanical and energy systems.
The BEng (Hons) Electrical Engineering (Control Systems) is a specialist engineering course, informed by industry. The programme aims to develop students into skilled, creative engineers who can adapt to new challenges and deliver sustainable solutions for modern society.
The MEng (Hons) Electrical Engineering (Control Systems) is a specialist engineering course, informed by industry. The programme aims to develop students into skilled, creative engineers who can adapt to new challenges and deliver sustainable solutions for modern society.
Electrical engineering is essential to the modern world, encompassing everything from energy and automation through to communications and transport. The MEng (Hons) Electrical Engineering programme is designed to equip students with the skills to succeed as the engineers of the future.
The BEng (Hons) Electrical Engineering (Power and Energy) degree offers students the opportunity to specialise in the fields of power systems and energy on both a large and small scale, exploring the generation of electricity for modern society.
The MEng (Hons) Electrical Engineering (Power and Energy) degree offers students the opportunity to specialise in the fields of power systems and energy on both a large and small scale, exploring the generation of electricity for modern society.

Tuition Fees

2017/18 EntryUK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £14,500 per level
Part-time £77.09 per credit point  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2018/19 EntryUK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,600 per level
Part-time £77.09 per credit point  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

In 2017/18, fees for all new and continuing undergraduate UK and EU students will be £9,250.

In 2018/19, fees may increase in line with Government Policy. We will update this information when fees for 2018/19 are finalised.

Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/StudentAdmissionsTermsandConditions]