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Full-time

4 years

Typical Offer

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Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

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UCAS Code

F1GC

Course Code

CHMMTHUM

Key Information

Full-time

4 years

Typical Offer

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Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

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UCAS Code

F1GC

Course Code

CHMMTHUM

MChem Chemistry with Mathematics MChem Chemistry with Mathematics

Chemistry at Lincoln is ranked 2nd overall in the Guardian University Guide 2022 (out of 52 ranking institutions) and is ranked 3rd in the UK for overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2021 (out of 60 ranking institutions).

Key Information

Full-time

4 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

F1GC

Course Code

CHMMTHUM

Key Information

Full-time

4 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

F1GC

Course Code

CHMMTHUM

Select Year of Entry

Dr Tasnim Munshi - Programme Leader

Dr Tasnim Munshi - Programme Leader

Tasnim has full responsibility for the management of all teaching provision within the School of Chemistry. Tasnim's specialisms are co-ordination chemistry, spectroscopy, and inorganic chemistry.

School Staff List

Welcome to MChem Chemistry with Mathematics

Knowledge of advanced mathematics provides a key to understanding the diversity and complexity of the chemical world. This joint honours degree integrates these fundamental subjects, providing students with the chance to examine the relationship between the disciplines and the important roles they play in different contexts.

The chemistry curriculum on this programme has been devised to integrate the main sub-disciplines of chemistry effectively, relating physical chemistry concepts to aspects of organic and inorganic chemistry, and to the methods used for analysing substances. The programme provides the opportunity to gain a comprehensive knowledge of chemistry alongside subject-specific and generic skills with the aim of developing a strong understanding of how chemistry is applied to problems with direct impact on society.

Chemistry at Lincoln is designed to produce employable graduates with a broad background in academic chemistry and significant experience of the application of chemistry in contexts relevant to society and industry.

Welcome to MChem Chemistry with Mathematics

Knowledge of advanced mathematics provides a key to understanding the diversity and complexity of the chemical world. This joint honours degree integrates these fundamental subjects, providing students with the chance to examine the relationship between the disciplines and the important roles they play in different contexts.

The chemistry curriculum on this programme has been devised to integrate the main sub-disciplines of chemistry effectively, relating physical chemistry concepts to aspects of organic and inorganic chemistry, and to the methods used for analysing substances. The programme provides the opportunity to gain a comprehensive knowledge of chemistry alongside subject-specific and generic skills with the aim of developing a strong understanding of how chemistry is applied to problems with direct impact on society.

Chemistry at Lincoln is designed to produce employable graduates with a broad background in academic chemistry and significant experience of the application of chemistry in contexts relevant to society and industry.

How You Study

The course covers core chemistry subjects, which can include synthetic methodologies and molecular characterisation; laboratory techniques; molecular structure, bonding and mechanism; and electronic structure, spectroscopy, and reactivity in p-block compounds.

Throughout the programme, students may have opportunities to engage with industry professionals to develop professional practice that can enhance employability. Challenges based on industry-led, interdisciplinary projects are undertaken throughout the course with national and multi-national companies.

In mathematics, students are given the opportunity to gain knowledge in a variety of subjects including programming, computation, and data analysis. Students are also encouraged to develop transferable skills in areas such as communications, problem-solving, and decision-making throughout their studies.

All students in the fourth year of the MChem programme currently have the opportunity to undertake a full-year industrial placement. You can choose your placement with one of the Universitys industry or overseas partners, or in one of our research groups. Placements are conducted alongside advanced academic study, focusing on research frontiers in chemistry.

Students are supported in finding their placement and when undertaking it. Salaried placements are competitive and students will be expected to complete an application process for such positions. In addition to paying their tuition fees, students will need to cover their own travel, accommodation, and general living costs throughout their placement.

The course includes lectures, seminars, laboratory-based practical classes, and lectures from visiting scientists. Extensive small-group teaching and innovative team-based learning aims to create a supportive learning environment to help students train through practice and problem-based approaches.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

How You Study

The course covers core chemistry subjects, which can include synthetic methodologies and molecular characterisation; laboratory techniques; molecular structure, bonding and mechanism; and electronic structure, spectroscopy, and reactivity in p-block compounds.

Throughout the programme, students may have opportunities to engage with industry professionals to develop professional practice that can enhance employability. Challenges based on industry-led, interdisciplinary projects are undertaken throughout the course with national and multi-national companies.

In mathematics, students are given the opportunity to gain knowledge in a variety of subjects including programming, computation, and data analysis. Students are also encouraged to develop transferable skills in areas such as communications, problem-solving, and decision-making throughout their studies.

All students in the fourth year of the MChem programme currently have the opportunity to undertake a full-year industrial placement. You can choose your placement with one of the Universitys industry or overseas partners, or in one of our research groups. Placements are conducted alongside advanced academic study, focusing on research frontiers in chemistry.

Students are supported in finding their placement and when undertaking it. Salaried placements are competitive and students will be expected to complete an application process for such positions. In addition to paying their tuition fees, students will need to cover their own travel, accommodation, and general living costs throughout their placement.

The course includes lectures, seminars, laboratory-based practical classes, and lectures from visiting scientists. Extensive small-group teaching and innovative team-based learning aims to create a supportive learning environment to help students train through practice and problem-based approaches.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

Teaching and Learning During Covid-19

Information for Offer Holders Joining Us in Autumn 2021

Letter from Head of School of Chemistry

We are delighted you are interested in joining us at the University of Lincoln and I am writing to let you know about our planning for the new academic year. You currently have an offer of a place at the University and we want to keep you updated so you can start preparing for your future,   should you be successful in meeting any outstanding conditions of your offer.

We fully intend your experience with us at Lincoln will be engaging, supportive and academically challenging. We are determined to provide our students with a safe and exciting campus experience, ensuring you benefit from the best that both face-to-face and online teaching offer. We have kept our focus on friendliness and community spirit at Lincoln and we look forward to your participation in that community.

As you know, the UK Government has published its roadmap for the easing of Coronavirus lockdown restrictions in England. There are still some uncertainties for universities around possible restrictions for the next academic year, particularly in relation to social distancing in large group teaching. We are planning in line with government guidance for both face-to-face and online teaching to ensure you have a good campus experience and can complete all the requirements for your programme.  We are fully prepared to adapt and flex our plans if changes in government regulations make this necessary during the year.

Face-to-face teaching and interaction with tutors and course mates are key to students’ learning and the broader student experience. Face-to-face sessions will be prioritised where it is most valuable, particularly for seminars, tutorials, workshops, practicals and lab sessions. Students tell us that there are real benefits to some elements of online learning within a blended approach, such as revisiting recorded materials and developing new digital skills and confidence.  At Lincoln we aim to take forward the best aspects of both.

This letter sets out in detail various aspects of the planned experience at Lincoln for your chosen subject area, and we hope the information is helpful as you plan for your future.

Teaching and Learning

Chemistry is a practical discipline, and in particular, training in laboratory environments is a key facet of your professional development for the future and plays a significant role in the accreditation of all our Chemistry Undergraduate programmes by the Royal Society of Chemistry. We will prioritise hands-on laboratory sessions, and will enhance these with aspects of digital learning that has proved to be very effective and well-received in last year. These include pre-lab videos to help you prepare for the techniques you will use in the practicals, guidance in real-time of the use of specialist software for data analysis and remotely-controlled use of advanced instrumentation (e.g. NMR, X-ray diffraction) help you develop the confidence to use these research instruments.

Furthermore, after the positive feedback received from our current students, we plan to continue with our online interactive lectures (comprehensively captured online for independent learning) but use face-to-face teaching for discussion in seminars and tutorials. Face-to-face teaching will be delivered following guidelines on social distancing and increased health and safety measures.

In the School of Chemistry, we run a weekly drop-in consultation and feedback session for students to meet any academic staff member. We will continue to run these sessions in a blended form with students having the choice to meet either face-to-face or online.

Our Chemistry programmes are accredited by the Royal Society of Chemistry, and we will work closely with them to ensure that our arrangements fully comply with their requirements.

The University Campus

We are very proud of our beautiful and vibrant campuses at the University of Lincoln and we have used our extensive indoor and outdoor spaces to provide students with access to study and social areas as well as learning resources and facilities, adapting them where necessary in line with government guidance. All the mitigations and safety measures you would expect are in place on our campuses (at Lincoln, Riseholme and Holbeach), such as hand sanitisers, one-way systems, and other social distancing measures where these are required.

Student Wellbeing and Support

The University’s Student Wellbeing Centre and Student Support Centre are fully open for face-to-face and online support. Should you, as one of our applicants, have any questions about coming to Lincoln in October or any other concerns, these specialist teams are here for you. You can contact Student Wellbeing and the Student Support Centre by visiting https://studentservices.lincoln.ac.uk where service details and contact information are available, or if you are in Lincoln you can make an appointment to meet a member of the team.

To enable you to make the most out of your experience in Lincoln and to help you access course materials and other services, we recommend that you have a desktop, laptop or tablet device available during your studies. This will enable you to engage easily with our online learning platforms from your student accommodation or from home. Students can use IT equipment on campus in the Library, our learning lounges, and specialist academic areas; however, there may not always be a space free when you have a timetabled session or an assessment to complete which is why we recommend you have your own device too, if possible. If you are struggling to access IT equipment or reliable internet services, please contact ICT for technical support and Student Support who can assist you with further advice and information.

We are committed to providing you with the best possible start to university life and to helping you to prepare for your time with us. As part of this commitment, you can access our Student Life pre-arrival online support package. This collection of digital resources, advice and helpful tips created by current students is designed to help you prepare for the all-important first steps into higher education, enabling you to learn within a supportive community and to make the most of the new opportunities that the University of Lincoln provides. When you are ready, you can begin by going to studentlife.lincoln.ac.uk/starting.

Students’ Union

Your Students’ Union is here to make sure that you get the most from every aspect of your student experience. They will be providing a huge range of in-person and virtual events and opportunities - you are sure to find something perfect for you! Meet people and find a new hobby by joining one of their 150 sports teams and societies. Grab lunch between teaching or a drink with friends in The Swan, Towers or The Barge. Learn new skills and boost your CV by taking part in training courses and volunteering opportunities in your spare time. Grab a bike from the Cycle Hire and explore the city you will be calling home.

To kick-off the new academic year, your Students’ Union will be bringing you The Official Lincoln Freshers Week 2021, with a huge line-up of social events, club nights, fayres and activities for you enjoy (restrictions permitting). Keep an eye on www.facebook.com/lincolnfreshers21 for line-up and ticket updates, so you don’t miss out.

Most importantly, your Students’ Union will always be there for you when you need it most; making sure that your voice as a student is always heard. The SU Advice Centre can provide independent advice and support on housing, finance, welfare and academic issues. As well as this, your Course Representatives are always on hand to make sure that you are getting the best from your academic experience. To find out more about the Students’ Union’s events, opportunities, support and how to get in contact go to: www.lincolnsu.com.

Student Accommodation

Many applicants will choose to live in dedicated student accommodation on, or close to, campus and you may well have already booked your student residence for the upcoming year. All University-managed student accommodation will have our Residential Wardens in place. Residential Wardens are here to help you settle into your new accommodation and will be offering flatmate and residential support activities throughout the year. If you have booked University accommodation, you will have already heard from us with further details on where you will be living to help you prepare. If you have not yet booked your accommodation, we still have plenty of options available. In the meantime, lots of advice and information can be found on the accommodation pages of our website.

The information detailed in this letter will form part of your agreement with the University of Lincoln. If we do not hear from you to the contrary prior to enrolment, we will assume that you acknowledge and accept the information contained in this letter. Adaptations to how we work may have to be made in line with any future changes in government guidance, and we will communicate these with you as necessary. Please do review the University’s Admissions Terms and Conditions (in particular sections 8 and 9) and Student Complaints Procedure so you understand your rights and the agreement between the University and its students.

We very much hope this information is useful to help you plan for the next step in your academic journey, and we look forward to welcoming you here at Lincoln this Autumn. This is the start of a new phase and will be an exciting time for all of us. If you have any questions, please do email me at ISCowen@lincoln.ac.uk.

Professor Ian Scowen

Head of the School of Chemistry

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Calculus 2022-23MTH1002MLevel 42022-23This module focuses on the concepts of the derivative and the Riemann integral, which are indispensable in modern sciences. Two approaches are used: both intuitive-geometric, and mathematically rigorous, based on the definition of continuous limits. Important results are the Mean Value Theorem, leading to the representation of some functions as power series (the Taylor series), and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus which establishes the relationship between differentiation and integration. Further calculus tools are explored, such as the general properties of the derivative and the Riemann integral, as well as the techniques of integration. In this module, students may deal with many "popular" functions used throughout mathematics.CoreChemistry Extension 1: Electronic Structure, Spectroscopy and Reactivity in p-Block Compounds 2022-23CHM1001MLevel 42022-23This module extends the theoretical approaches related to atomic and molecular structure to develop models to explain structure, reactivity and spectroscopy of systems. It aims to provide the underpinning knowledge to understand how structure and reactivity are applied to develop new compounds and materials that change the world around us.CoreCore Chemistry 1.1: Introduction to Energy, Change and Electronic Structure 2022-23CHM1002MLevel 42022-23This module aims to provide a breadth core understanding of the main chemical principles behind the chemistry of elements, systems in equilibrium and chemical reactivity, with special emphasis in basic organic reactions. Students will have the opportunity to learn basic concepts about elements and their main periodic properties and how some of these elements can be combined to produce molecules. Organic molecules will be used as an example to explain reactivity and how chemical structure can condition molecular properties. Energy transfers are also studied to understand the key role they play in chemical and physical transformations and how systems in equilibrium are affected by these.CoreCore Chemistry 1.2: Molecular Structure, Bonding and Mechanism 2022-23CHM1003MLevel 42022-23This module aims to introduce core chemistry concepts with an emphasis on chemical change. Movement and interaction of molecules and chemical kinetics are key physical chemistry topics covered and applied to chemical reactions of both organic and inorganic substances. The use of empirical data to develop and support laws, theories and models will be covered and how chemical kinetics can be used to develop reaction mechanisms. An introduction to crystallography and absorption spectroscopy is covered.CorePractical Chemistry 1.1: Fundamental laboratory techniques 2022-23CHM1005MLevel 42022-23This module aims to introduce students to the chemistry laboratory environment. The purpose of the module is to provide students with a platform which can be built upon in subsequent practical modules and equalise their potentially pre-university laboratory experience. Within this module students can learn a portfolio of skills and be evaluated via competency based assessments. The module also covers best practice in health and safety in the laboratory environment as part of the series of key core concepts delivered in the module.CorePractical Chemistry 1.2: Introduction to synthetic methodologies and molecular characterisation 2022-23CHM1006MLevel 42022-23This module aims to provide students with the practical experience associated with the topics delivered in Core Chemistry 1.1 and Core Chemistry 1.2. The module will outline key organic, inorganic and physical chemistry concepts with a series of laboratory activities reinforced by the use of relevant analytical techniques and tools throughout a range of experiments.CoreProbability and Statistics 2022-23MTH1005MLevel 42022-23This module begins with an introduction of a probability space, which models the possible outcomes of a random experiment. Basic concepts such as statistical independence and conditional probability are introduced, with various practical examples used as illustrations. Random variables are introduced, and certain well-known probability distributions are explored. Further study includes discrete distributions, independence of random variables, mathematical expectation, random vectors, covariance and correlation, conditional distributions and the law of total expectation. The ideas developed for discrete distributions are applied to continuous distributions. Probability theory is a basis of mathematical statistics, which has so many important applications in science, industry, government and commerce. Students will have the opportunity to gain a basic understanding of statistics and its tools. It is important that these tools are used correctly when, for example, the full picture of a problem (population) must be inferred from collected data (random sample).CoreChemistry Extension 2: Electronic Structure, Spectroscopy and Reactivity in d- and f-Block Compounds 2023-24CHM2001MLevel 52023-24This module aims to cover the fundamental concepts relating to structure, reactivity and reaction mechanism, building on the knowledge and understanding acquired at level one. It provides the underpinning knowledge to understand how structure and reactivity are applied to develop new materials and new technologies in the world around us.CoreCore Chemistry 2.1: Stability, Structure and Mechanism in Molecular Systems 2023-24CHM2002MLevel 52023-24This module aims to provide a breadth core understanding of the physicochemical principles behind some of the main analytical techniques and how these can be applied to identify atomic and molecular structures in both inorganic and organic chemistry. It also offers an insight on advanced synthetic methods and how these techniques can be used to explain and interpret structure and reactivity of complex molecules, such as coordination and organometallic compounds.CoreCore Chemistry 2.2: Chemistry of Activated Systems and Radicals 2023-24CHM2003MLevel 52023-24This module aims to further develop core chemistry concepts relating to chemical change. Electrochemistry is used to study thermodynamic properties of redox reactions as well as the kinetics of electrode processes. The kinetics of complex reactions builds upon the chemical kinetics material covered at level one. Bonding between metals and carbon is explored and further developed as the main group organometallics.CoreDifferential Equations 2023-24MTH2004MLevel 52023-24Calculus techniques already provide solutions of simple first-order differential equations. Solution of second-order differential equations can sometimes be achieved by certain manipulations. Students may learn about existence and geometric interpretations of solutions, even when calculus techniques do not yield solutions in a simple form. This is a part of the existence theory of ordinary differential equations and leads to fundamental techniques of the asymptotic and qualitative study of their solutions, including the important question of stability. Fourier series and Fourier transform are introduced. This module provides an introduction to the classical second-order linear partial differential equations and techniques for their solution. The basic concepts and methods are introduced for typical partial differential equations representing the three classes: parabolic, elliptic, and hyperbolic.CoreIndustrial and Financial Mathematics 2023-24MTH2006MLevel 52023-24Students have the opportunity to learn how mathematics is applied to modern industrial problems, and how the mathematical apparatus finds applications in the financial sector.CorePractical Chemistry 2.1: Organic synthesis, purification and advanced characterisation 2023-24CHM2004MLevel 52023-24This module aims to provide students with the practical experience associated with the topics delivered in Core Chemistry 2.1, with a strong focus on organic chemistry. The module will outline essential complex organic chemistry concepts with a series of laboratory activities designed around multistep syntheses and reinforced by the use of relevant analytical techniques and tools throughout a range experiments.CorePractical Chemistry 2.2: Inorganic synthesis and structural methods 2023-24CHM2005MLevel 52023-24This module aims to provide students with the practical experience associated with the topics delivered in Core Chemistry 2.2, with a strong focus on inorganic and physical chemistry. The module is constituted of a series of laboratory activities designed to familiarise students with an array of techniques centred around key aspects of inorganic syntheses. Specifically, the module emphasizes stability and speciation methods and their applications to the inorganic chemistry field. All aspects of the module will be supported by associated relevant analytical technologies.CoreCore Chemistry 3.1: Defining Shape, Symmetry and Stereochemistry 2024-25CHM3002MLevel 62024-25This module aims to provide deeper understanding on physicochemical principles behind materials and their properties, exploring advanced concepts in supramolecular chemistry and synthetic routes for more complex organic molecules. Crystals, colloids, discontinuous phases and solid state chemistry concepts are studied in depth to understand physical and chemical properties that give these materials a wide range of application in industry and research.CoreCore Chemistry 3.2: Heterogeneous Systems, Surfaces and Nanoscience 2024-25CHM3003MLevel 62024-25This module covers in greater depth the thermodynamics and kinetics of processes occurring on solid surfaces. Heterogeneous catalysis is used as an example of how reactions at solid surfaces differ from those in the bulk. Electrochemistry is further developed. Organic chemistry topics are the advanced areas of radical chemistry and orbital symmetry along with heteroelement and organometallic synthesis. Concepts of supramolecular chemistry are covered.CoreMathematics Project 2024-25MTH3005MLevel 62024-25This is a double module in which a student undertakes a project under supervision of a research-active member of staff. The project can be undertaken at an external collaborating establishment. Projects will be offered to students in a wide range of subjects, assigned with consideration of a students' individual preferences and programme of their studies. Some projects will be more focused on a detailed study of mathematical theories or techniques in an area of current interest. Other projects may require solving specific problems that require the formulation of a mathematical model, its development and solution. Student meet regularly with their supervisor in order to receive guidance and review progress.CorePractical Chemistry 3.1: Advanced techniques in IO-chemistry 2024-25CHM3004MLevel 62024-25This module builds upon previous practical modules and provides a support for the illustration of the theory delivered in the Core chemistry 3.1 module. The concept of this module is to offer students the opportunity to experience and dissect the process of designing a material which fulfils specific requirements or needs, its synthesis and its characterisation. Through this process, the module offers the opportunity to host advanced complex organic syntheses (such as asymmetric synthesis) and supramolecular synthesis. Additionally, the module introduces students to a series of stereoselective analytical techniques designed to characterise aforementioned materials.CoreStructured project 2024-25CHM3006MLevel 62024-25This module offers students the opportunity to undertake an independent programme of research under the supervision of a member of staff. It provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate original and critical thoughts as well as build practical and project-management skills. Students may select a project from a series of proposals provided by staff, conduct a review of the literature, identify a hypothesis, and design a programme of research to test the hypothesis (under guidance from their supervisor). Students will be expected to manage the project including obtaining relevant ethical approval and conducting COSHH and risk assessments. Students may analyse and interpret data which will be collected in the laboratory or the field, or using computational sources (e.g. software for mathematical modelling; the internet for the meta-analysis of pre-collected data). The project will be written up either as a thesis or a scientific paper following closely defined criteria.CoreAdvanced Topics in Chemistry 2025-26CHM9004MLevel 72025-26This module aims to provide students skills to critically analyse and adopt topical areas of research and advance instrumentation in the field of chemistry. This information will be utilised to provide students with an understanding and appreciation of how fundamental chemistry theory and experimentation are being applied to contemporary cutting edge science. The module will draw inspiration from both grand challenges for chemical sciences and will reflect the current research focus within the chemistry school. The module comprises a series of lectures, workshops and experimentation and the content within each topic and instrumental techniques, will aim to build on students' knowledge of basic physical, organic and inorganic chemistry and will deliver in-depth analysis of its application in the main-stream chemical, biological and environmental processes. Students will also have the opportunity to learn to provide an up-to-date account of modern methods in synthetic organic chemistry, material & inorganic chemistry and application of physical chemistry theory in experimentation, as well as cover key advanced instrumentation techniques in chemistry and provide hands-on experience.CoreProfessional and Personal Development 2025-26CHM9007MLevel 72025-26This module aims to develop systematic personal and professional development of a student in a specialist area of chemistry to enhance employability. This is achieved through development and execution of a personal learning plan designed using a process of self-reflection around five development themes: personal development; professional skills development; technical skills development; research interests; career development.CoreAcademic Research Project 2025-26CHM9005MLevel 72025-26This module provides students with the opportunity to apply chemical knowledge and laboratory skills to an extended practical research study. It also provides the opportunity to further develop professional skills, including the use of online literature/chemical data searching; ability to critically review relevant published literature & written/oral presentation of research activities.OptionalCommercial Research Project 2025-26CHM9006MLevel 72025-26This module provides students with the opportunity to apply chemical knowledge and laboratory skills to an extended practical research study within a commercial context. Students can further develop professional skills, incl. use of online literature/chemical data searching; ability to critically review relevant published literature and written/oral presentation of research activities.Optional

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Calculus 2021-22MTH1002MLevel 42021-22This module focuses on the concepts of the derivative and the Riemann integral, which are indispensable in modern sciences. Two approaches are used: both intuitive-geometric, and mathematically rigorous, based on the definition of continuous limits. Important results are the Mean Value Theorem, leading to the representation of some functions as power series (the Taylor series), and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus which establishes the relationship between differentiation and integration. Further calculus tools are explored, such as the general properties of the derivative and the Riemann integral, as well as the techniques of integration. In this module, students may deal with many "popular" functions used throughout mathematics.CoreChemistry Extension 1: Electronic Structure, Spectroscopy and Reactivity in p-Block Compounds 2021-22CHM1001MLevel 42021-22This module extends the theoretical approaches related to atomic and molecular structure to develop models to explain structure, reactivity and spectroscopy of systems. It aims to provide the underpinning knowledge to understand how structure and reactivity are applied to develop new compounds and materials that change the world around us.CoreCore Chemistry 1.1: Introduction to Energy, Change and Electronic Structure 2021-22CHM1002MLevel 42021-22This module aims to provide a breadth core understanding of the main chemical principles behind the chemistry of elements, systems in equilibrium and chemical reactivity, with special emphasis in basic organic reactions. Students will have the opportunity to learn basic concepts about elements and their main periodic properties and how some of these elements can be combined to produce molecules. Organic molecules will be used as an example to explain reactivity and how chemical structure can condition molecular properties. Energy transfers are also studied to understand the key role they play in chemical and physical transformations and how systems in equilibrium are affected by these.CoreCore Chemistry 1.2: Molecular Structure, Bonding and Mechanism 2021-22CHM1003MLevel 42021-22This module aims to introduce core chemistry concepts with an emphasis on chemical change. Movement and interaction of molecules and chemical kinetics are key physical chemistry topics covered and applied to chemical reactions of both organic and inorganic substances. The use of empirical data to develop and support laws, theories and models will be covered and how chemical kinetics can be used to develop reaction mechanisms. An introduction to crystallography and absorption spectroscopy is covered.CorePractical Chemistry 1.1: Fundamental laboratory techniques 2021-22CHM1005MLevel 42021-22This module aims to introduce students to the chemistry laboratory environment. The purpose of the module is to provide students with a platform which can be built upon in subsequent practical modules and equalise their potentially pre-university laboratory experience. Within this module students can learn a portfolio of skills and be evaluated via competency based assessments. The module also covers best practice in health and safety in the laboratory environment as part of the series of key core concepts delivered in the module.CorePractical Chemistry 1.2: Introduction to synthetic methodologies and molecular characterisation 2021-22CHM1006MLevel 42021-22This module aims to provide students with the practical experience associated with the topics delivered in Core Chemistry 1.1 and Core Chemistry 1.2. The module will outline key organic, inorganic and physical chemistry concepts with a series of laboratory activities reinforced by the use of relevant analytical techniques and tools throughout a range of experiments.CoreProbability and Statistics 2021-22MTH1005MLevel 42021-22This module begins with an introduction of a probability space, which models the possible outcomes of a random experiment. Basic concepts such as statistical independence and conditional probability are introduced, with various practical examples used as illustrations. Random variables are introduced, and certain well-known probability distributions are explored. Further study includes discrete distributions, independence of random variables, mathematical expectation, random vectors, covariance and correlation, conditional distributions and the law of total expectation. The ideas developed for discrete distributions are applied to continuous distributions. Probability theory is a basis of mathematical statistics, which has so many important applications in science, industry, government and commerce. Students will have the opportunity to gain a basic understanding of statistics and its tools. It is important that these tools are used correctly when, for example, the full picture of a problem (population) must be inferred from collected data (random sample).CoreChemistry Extension 2: Electronic Structure, Spectroscopy and Reactivity in d- and f-Block Compounds 2022-23CHM2001MLevel 52022-23This module aims to cover the fundamental concepts relating to structure, reactivity and reaction mechanism, building on the knowledge and understanding acquired at level one. It provides the underpinning knowledge to understand how structure and reactivity are applied to develop new materials and new technologies in the world around us.CoreCore Chemistry 2.1: Stability, Structure and Mechanism in Molecular Systems 2022-23CHM2002MLevel 52022-23This module aims to provide a breadth core understanding of the physicochemical principles behind some of the main analytical techniques and how these can be applied to identify atomic and molecular structures in both inorganic and organic chemistry. It also offers an insight on advanced synthetic methods and how these techniques can be used to explain and interpret structure and reactivity of complex molecules, such as coordination and organometallic compounds.CoreCore Chemistry 2.2: Chemistry of Activated Systems and Radicals 2022-23CHM2003MLevel 52022-23This module aims to further develop core chemistry concepts relating to chemical change. Electrochemistry is used to study thermodynamic properties of redox reactions as well as the kinetics of electrode processes. The kinetics of complex reactions builds upon the chemical kinetics material covered at level one. Bonding between metals and carbon is explored and further developed as the main group organometallics.CoreDifferential Equations 2022-23MTH2004MLevel 52022-23Calculus techniques already provide solutions of simple first-order differential equations. Solution of second-order differential equations can sometimes be achieved by certain manipulations. Students may learn about existence and geometric interpretations of solutions, even when calculus techniques do not yield solutions in a simple form. This is a part of the existence theory of ordinary differential equations and leads to fundamental techniques of the asymptotic and qualitative study of their solutions, including the important question of stability. Fourier series and Fourier transform are introduced. This module provides an introduction to the classical second-order linear partial differential equations and techniques for their solution. The basic concepts and methods are introduced for typical partial differential equations representing the three classes: parabolic, elliptic, and hyperbolic.CoreIndustrial and Financial Mathematics 2022-23MTH2006MLevel 52022-23Students have the opportunity to learn how mathematics is applied to modern industrial problems, and how the mathematical apparatus finds applications in the financial sector.CorePractical Chemistry 2.1: Organic synthesis, purification and advanced characterisation 2022-23CHM2004MLevel 52022-23This module aims to provide students with the practical experience associated with the topics delivered in Core Chemistry 2.1, with a strong focus on organic chemistry. The module will outline essential complex organic chemistry concepts with a series of laboratory activities designed around multistep syntheses and reinforced by the use of relevant analytical techniques and tools throughout a range experiments.CorePractical Chemistry 2.2: Inorganic synthesis and structural methods 2022-23CHM2005MLevel 52022-23This module aims to provide students with the practical experience associated with the topics delivered in Core Chemistry 2.2, with a strong focus on inorganic and physical chemistry. The module is constituted of a series of laboratory activities designed to familiarise students with an array of techniques centred around key aspects of inorganic syntheses. Specifically, the module emphasizes stability and speciation methods and their applications to the inorganic chemistry field. All aspects of the module will be supported by associated relevant analytical technologies.CoreCore Chemistry 3.1: Defining Shape, Symmetry and Stereochemistry 2023-24CHM3002MLevel 62023-24This module aims to provide deeper understanding on physicochemical principles behind materials and their properties, exploring advanced concepts in supramolecular chemistry and synthetic routes for more complex organic molecules. Crystals, colloids, discontinuous phases and solid state chemistry concepts are studied in depth to understand physical and chemical properties that give these materials a wide range of application in industry and research.CoreCore Chemistry 3.2: Heterogeneous Systems, Surfaces and Nanoscience 2023-24CHM3003MLevel 62023-24This module covers in greater depth the thermodynamics and kinetics of processes occurring on solid surfaces. Heterogeneous catalysis is used as an example of how reactions at solid surfaces differ from those in the bulk. Electrochemistry is further developed. Organic chemistry topics are the advanced areas of radical chemistry and orbital symmetry along with heteroelement and organometallic synthesis. Concepts of supramolecular chemistry are covered.CoreMathematics Project 2023-24MTH3005MLevel 62023-24This is a double module in which a student undertakes a project under supervision of a research-active member of staff. The project can be undertaken at an external collaborating establishment. Projects will be offered to students in a wide range of subjects, assigned with consideration of a students' individual preferences and programme of their studies. Some projects will be more focused on a detailed study of mathematical theories or techniques in an area of current interest. Other projects may require solving specific problems that require the formulation of a mathematical model, its development and solution. Student meet regularly with their supervisor in order to receive guidance and review progress.CorePractical Chemistry 3.1: Advanced techniques in IO-chemistry 2023-24CHM3004MLevel 62023-24This module builds upon previous practical modules and provides a support for the illustration of the theory delivered in the Core chemistry 3.1 module. The concept of this module is to offer students the opportunity to experience and dissect the process of designing a material which fulfils specific requirements or needs, its synthesis and its characterisation. Through this process, the module offers the opportunity to host advanced complex organic syntheses (such as asymmetric synthesis) and supramolecular synthesis. Additionally, the module introduces students to a series of stereoselective analytical techniques designed to characterise aforementioned materials.CoreStructured project 2023-24CHM3006MLevel 62023-24This module offers students the opportunity to undertake an independent programme of research under the supervision of a member of staff. It provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate original and critical thoughts as well as build practical and project-management skills. Students may select a project from a series of proposals provided by staff, conduct a review of the literature, identify a hypothesis, and design a programme of research to test the hypothesis (under guidance from their supervisor). Students will be expected to manage the project including obtaining relevant ethical approval and conducting COSHH and risk assessments. Students may analyse and interpret data which will be collected in the laboratory or the field, or using computational sources (e.g. software for mathematical modelling; the internet for the meta-analysis of pre-collected data). The project will be written up either as a thesis or a scientific paper following closely defined criteria.CoreAdvanced Topics in Chemistry 2024-25CHM9004MLevel 72024-25This module aims to provide students skills to critically analyse and adopt topical areas of research and advance instrumentation in the field of chemistry. This information will be utilised to provide students with an understanding and appreciation of how fundamental chemistry theory and experimentation are being applied to contemporary cutting edge science. The module will draw inspiration from both grand challenges for chemical sciences and will reflect the current research focus within the chemistry school. The module comprises a series of lectures, workshops and experimentation and the content within each topic and instrumental techniques, will aim to build on students' knowledge of basic physical, organic and inorganic chemistry and will deliver in-depth analysis of its application in the main-stream chemical, biological and environmental processes. Students will also have the opportunity to learn to provide an up-to-date account of modern methods in synthetic organic chemistry, material & inorganic chemistry and application of physical chemistry theory in experimentation, as well as cover key advanced instrumentation techniques in chemistry and provide hands-on experience.CoreProfessional and Personal Development 2024-25CHM9007MLevel 72024-25This module aims to develop systematic personal and professional development of a student in a specialist area of chemistry to enhance employability. This is achieved through development and execution of a personal learning plan designed using a process of self-reflection around five development themes: personal development; professional skills development; technical skills development; research interests; career development.CoreAcademic Research Project 2024-25CHM9005MLevel 72024-25This module provides students with the opportunity to apply chemical knowledge and laboratory skills to an extended practical research study. It also provides the opportunity to further develop professional skills, including the use of online literature/chemical data searching; ability to critically review relevant published literature & written/oral presentation of research activities.OptionalCommercial Research Project 2024-25CHM9006MLevel 72024-25This module provides students with the opportunity to apply chemical knowledge and laboratory skills to an extended practical research study within a commercial context. Students can further develop professional skills, incl. use of online literature/chemical data searching; ability to critically review relevant published literature and written/oral presentation of research activities.Optional

Features

Skills Development and Professional Practice

Our Chemistry courses have an embedded explicit skills development programme through the professional practice modules. The programme delivers a systematic programme in skills development, which includes CV writing and interview skills. The modules exemplify the application of chemistry into key employment sectors and present chemistry through an integrated approach.

Industry Challenges

A series of themed industry challenges are co-delivered during the professional practice modules through industry partnerships with multi-national and SME organisations representing the analytical, formulation, pharmaceutical, and energy and environmental sectors.

After systematic project planning and management training, students can devise and present technical proposals in response to the challenge. After consultation and feedback from a joint academic and industry panel, students can execute project plans and report within industry standard methods. The professional practice modules aim to prepare students for placements and future employment.

Placements

We use an innovative ‘end-on’ full-year industrial placement programme for all students at Stage 4 of the MChem. You can choose to focus on research through a placement in a research group at the University or another institution, or complete a full-year placement (usually salaried £15-20k). Salaried placements are competitive and students will be expected to undertake an application process for such positions.

In addition to paying their tuition fees, students will need to cover their own travel, accommodation, and general living costs throughout their placement. There are also opportunities for overseas placements with European, American, and Australian institutions through our International Intern Programme which takes place between the third and fourth year.

How you are assessed

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Entry Requirements 2022-23

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBB, to include a grade B from A Level Maths.

International Baccalaureate: 30 points overall, with Higher Level Grade 5 in Maths or Chemistry.

BTEC Extended Diploma in Applied Science*: Distinction, Distinction, Merit

*not all modules are accepted. Please contact our Admissions team for further information (admissions@lincoln.ac.uk)

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 120 UCAS Tariff points, including 40 points from 15 credits in Maths

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English, Maths and Science. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages for information on equivalent qualifications.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

For applicants who do not meet our standard entry requirements, our Science Foundation Year can provide an alternative route of entry onto our full degree programmes:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/course/sfysfyub/

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Entry Requirements 2021-22

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBB, to include a grade B from A Level Maths.

International Baccalaureate: 30 points overall, with Higher Level Grade 5 in Maths or Chemistry.

BTEC Extended Diploma in Applied Science*: Distinction, Distinction, Merit

*not all modules are accepted. Please contact our Admissions team for further information (admissions@lincoln.ac.uk)

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 120 UCAS Tariff points, including 40 points from 15 credits in Maths

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English, Maths and Science. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages for information on equivalent qualifications.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

For applicants who do not meet our standard entry requirements, our Science Foundation Year can provide an alternative route of entry onto our full degree programmes:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/course/sfysfyub/

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Fees and Scholarships

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Career Opportunities

Chemistry graduates may pursue a wide range of science-related careers in sectors including energy, petrochemicals, pharmaceuticals, and consumer and personal care products.

This course aims to equip graduates with extensive analytical and mathematical skills which are relevant to roles in finance, management, science-based marketing and journalism, education, and academic research. Some graduates may choose to continue their studies at doctoral level.

Visit Us in Person

The best way to find out what it is really like to live and learn at Lincoln is to join us for one of our Open Days. Discover the Joseph Banks Laboratories where Chemistry students have access to high-specification instrumentation for spectroscopy, diffraction, imaging, and separation science.

Book Your Place

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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