Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

View

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

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UCAS Code

F1F4

Course Code

CHMFRSUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

View

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

F1F4

Course Code

CHMFRSUB

BSc (Hons) Forensic Chemistry BSc (Hons) Forensic Chemistry

Chemistry at Lincoln is ranked 2nd overall in the Guardian University Guide 2022 (out of 52 ranking institutions) and is ranked 3rd in the UK for overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2021 (out of 60 ranking institutions).

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

F1F4

Course Code

CHMFRSUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

F1F4

Course Code

CHMFRSUB

Select Year of Entry

Dr Tasnim Munshi - Programme Leader

Dr Tasnim Munshi - Programme Leader

Tasnim has full responsibility for the management of all teaching provision within the School of Chemistry. Tasnim's specialisms are co-ordination chemistry, spectroscopy, and inorganic chemistry.

School Staff List

Welcome to BSc (Hons) Forensic Chemistry

Forensic chemistry is the application of scientific knowledge and investigation to law enforcement. From identifying substances to analysing crime scenes, the skills of a forensic chemist often play a vital role in criminal investigations.

The course provides students with the opportunity to develop the skills of a professional forensic chemist, including laboratory examination, report writing, crime scene analysis and courtroom presentation. With a broad spectrum of modules, it is possible to specialise in areas such as DNA analysis, biological chemistry, or nuclear forensics.

The School of Chemistry takes a research-centred approach to teaching and learning, and students have the chance to work closely with leading academics on collaborative research projects.

Welcome to BSc (Hons) Forensic Chemistry

Forensic chemistry is the application of scientific knowledge and investigation to law enforcement. From identifying substances to analysing crime scenes, the skills of a forensic chemist often play a vital role in criminal investigations.

The course provides students with the opportunity to develop the skills of a professional forensic chemist, including laboratory examination, report writing, crime scene analysis and courtroom presentation. With a broad spectrum of modules, it is possible to specialise in areas such as DNA analysis, biological chemistry, or nuclear forensics.

The School of Chemistry takes a research-centred approach to teaching and learning, and students have the chance to work closely with leading academics on collaborative research projects.

How You Study

The first year offers a solid foundation in chemistry, including laboratory work and mathematics and statistics, as well as the principles of forensic science and crime scene investigation. In their second year, students go on to explore advanced aspects of forensic chemistry and are introduced to key areas of advanced crime scene methods and trace evidence, before tailoring the course to match their interests with a range of modules in their third year.

The course includes lectures, seminars, laboratory-based practical classes, and lectures from visiting scientists.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

How You Study

The first year offers a solid foundation in chemistry, including laboratory work and mathematics and statistics, as well as the principles of forensic science and crime scene investigation. In their second year, students go on to explore advanced aspects of forensic chemistry and are introduced to key areas of advanced crime scene methods and trace evidence, before tailoring the course to match their interests with a range of modules in their third year.

The course includes lectures, seminars, laboratory-based practical classes, and lectures from visiting scientists.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

Teaching and Learning During Covid-19

Information for Offer Holders Joining Us in Autumn 2021

Letter from Head of School of Chemistry

We are delighted you are interested in joining us at the University of Lincoln and I am writing to let you know about our planning for the new academic year. You currently have an offer of a place at the University and we want to keep you updated so you can start preparing for your future,   should you be successful in meeting any outstanding conditions of your offer.

We fully intend your experience with us at Lincoln will be engaging, supportive and academically challenging. We are determined to provide our students with a safe and exciting campus experience, ensuring you benefit from the best that both face-to-face and online teaching offer. We have kept our focus on friendliness and community spirit at Lincoln and we look forward to your participation in that community.

As you know, the UK Government has published its roadmap for the easing of Coronavirus lockdown restrictions in England. There are still some uncertainties for universities around possible restrictions for the next academic year, particularly in relation to social distancing in large group teaching. We are planning in line with government guidance for both face-to-face and online teaching to ensure you have a good campus experience and can complete all the requirements for your programme.  We are fully prepared to adapt and flex our plans if changes in government regulations make this necessary during the year.

Face-to-face teaching and interaction with tutors and course mates are key to students’ learning and the broader student experience. Face-to-face sessions will be prioritised where it is most valuable, particularly for seminars, tutorials, workshops, practicals and lab sessions. Students tell us that there are real benefits to some elements of online learning within a blended approach, such as revisiting recorded materials and developing new digital skills and confidence.  At Lincoln we aim to take forward the best aspects of both.

This letter sets out in detail various aspects of the planned experience at Lincoln for your chosen subject area, and we hope the information is helpful as you plan for your future.

Teaching and Learning

Chemistry is a practical discipline, and in particular, training in laboratory environments is a key facet of your professional development for the future and plays a significant role in the accreditation of all our Chemistry Undergraduate programmes by the Royal Society of Chemistry. We will prioritise hands-on laboratory sessions, and will enhance these with aspects of digital learning that has proved to be very effective and well-received in last year. These include pre-lab videos to help you prepare for the techniques you will use in the practicals, guidance in real-time of the use of specialist software for data analysis and remotely-controlled use of advanced instrumentation (e.g. NMR, X-ray diffraction) help you develop the confidence to use these research instruments.

Furthermore, after the positive feedback received from our current students, we plan to continue with our online interactive lectures (comprehensively captured online for independent learning) but use face-to-face teaching for discussion in seminars and tutorials. Face-to-face teaching will be delivered following guidelines on social distancing and increased health and safety measures.

In the School of Chemistry, we run a weekly drop-in consultation and feedback session for students to meet any academic staff member. We will continue to run these sessions in a blended form with students having the choice to meet either face-to-face or online.

Our Chemistry programmes are accredited by the Royal Society of Chemistry, and we will work closely with them to ensure that our arrangements fully comply with their requirements.

The University Campus

We are very proud of our beautiful and vibrant campuses at the University of Lincoln and we have used our extensive indoor and outdoor spaces to provide students with access to study and social areas as well as learning resources and facilities, adapting them where necessary in line with government guidance. All the mitigations and safety measures you would expect are in place on our campuses (at Lincoln, Riseholme and Holbeach), such as hand sanitisers, one-way systems, and other social distancing measures where these are required.

Student Wellbeing and Support

The University’s Student Wellbeing Centre and Student Support Centre are fully open for face-to-face and online support. Should you, as one of our applicants, have any questions about coming to Lincoln in October or any other concerns, these specialist teams are here for you. You can contact Student Wellbeing and the Student Support Centre by visiting https://studentservices.lincoln.ac.uk where service details and contact information are available, or if you are in Lincoln you can make an appointment to meet a member of the team.

To enable you to make the most out of your experience in Lincoln and to help you access course materials and other services, we recommend that you have a desktop, laptop or tablet device available during your studies. This will enable you to engage easily with our online learning platforms from your student accommodation or from home. Students can use IT equipment on campus in the Library, our learning lounges, and specialist academic areas; however, there may not always be a space free when you have a timetabled session or an assessment to complete which is why we recommend you have your own device too, if possible. If you are struggling to access IT equipment or reliable internet services, please contact ICT for technical support and Student Support who can assist you with further advice and information.

We are committed to providing you with the best possible start to university life and to helping you to prepare for your time with us. As part of this commitment, you can access our Student Life pre-arrival online support package. This collection of digital resources, advice and helpful tips created by current students is designed to help you prepare for the all-important first steps into higher education, enabling you to learn within a supportive community and to make the most of the new opportunities that the University of Lincoln provides. When you are ready, you can begin by going to studentlife.lincoln.ac.uk/starting.

Students’ Union

Your Students’ Union is here to make sure that you get the most from every aspect of your student experience. They will be providing a huge range of in-person and virtual events and opportunities - you are sure to find something perfect for you! Meet people and find a new hobby by joining one of their 150 sports teams and societies. Grab lunch between teaching or a drink with friends in The Swan, Towers or The Barge. Learn new skills and boost your CV by taking part in training courses and volunteering opportunities in your spare time. Grab a bike from the Cycle Hire and explore the city you will be calling home.

To kick-off the new academic year, your Students’ Union will be bringing you The Official Lincoln Freshers Week 2021, with a huge line-up of social events, club nights, fayres and activities for you enjoy (restrictions permitting). Keep an eye on www.facebook.com/lincolnfreshers21 for line-up and ticket updates, so you don’t miss out.

Most importantly, your Students’ Union will always be there for you when you need it most; making sure that your voice as a student is always heard. The SU Advice Centre can provide independent advice and support on housing, finance, welfare and academic issues. As well as this, your Course Representatives are always on hand to make sure that you are getting the best from your academic experience. To find out more about the Students’ Union’s events, opportunities, support and how to get in contact go to: www.lincolnsu.com.

Student Accommodation

Many applicants will choose to live in dedicated student accommodation on, or close to, campus and you may well have already booked your student residence for the upcoming year. All University-managed student accommodation will have our Residential Wardens in place. Residential Wardens are here to help you settle into your new accommodation and will be offering flatmate and residential support activities throughout the year. If you have booked University accommodation, you will have already heard from us with further details on where you will be living to help you prepare. If you have not yet booked your accommodation, we still have plenty of options available. In the meantime, lots of advice and information can be found on the accommodation pages of our website.

The information detailed in this letter will form part of your agreement with the University of Lincoln. If we do not hear from you to the contrary prior to enrolment, we will assume that you acknowledge and accept the information contained in this letter. Adaptations to how we work may have to be made in line with any future changes in government guidance, and we will communicate these with you as necessary. Please do review the University’s Admissions Terms and Conditions (in particular sections 8 and 9) and Student Complaints Procedure so you understand your rights and the agreement between the University and its students.

We very much hope this information is useful to help you plan for the next step in your academic journey, and we look forward to welcoming you here at Lincoln this Autumn. This is the start of a new phase and will be an exciting time for all of us. If you have any questions, please do email me at ISCowen@lincoln.ac.uk.

Professor Ian Scowen

Head of the School of Chemistry

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Core Chemistry 1.1: Introduction to Energy, Change and Electronic Structure 2022-23CHM1002MLevel 42022-23This module aims to provide a breadth core understanding of the main chemical principles behind the chemistry of elements, systems in equilibrium and chemical reactivity, with special emphasis in basic organic reactions. Students will have the opportunity to learn basic concepts about elements and their main periodic properties and how some of these elements can be combined to produce molecules. Organic molecules will be used as an example to explain reactivity and how chemical structure can condition molecular properties. Energy transfers are also studied to understand the key role they play in chemical and physical transformations and how systems in equilibrium are affected by these.CoreCore Chemistry 1.2: Molecular Structure, Bonding and Mechanism 2022-23CHM1003MLevel 42022-23This module aims to introduce core chemistry concepts with an emphasis on chemical change. Movement and interaction of molecules and chemical kinetics are key physical chemistry topics covered and applied to chemical reactions of both organic and inorganic substances. The use of empirical data to develop and support laws, theories and models will be covered and how chemical kinetics can be used to develop reaction mechanisms. An introduction to crystallography and absorption spectroscopy is covered.CoreCrime Scene Investigation 2022-23FRS1051MLevel 42022-23This module is concerned with the skills required to protect, record, process and interpret a crime scene. Emphasis is placed on the role of crime scene investigation in the forensic process. The process of crime scene investigation is examined from scene preservation and recording (e.g. sketches and photography) to evidence recovery, packaging and documentation. The need for avoidance of contamination of the crime scene and for the subsequent continuity and integrity of the recovered evidence form an integral component of the module.CoreIntroduction to Professional Practice 2022-23CHM1004MLevel 42022-23This module aims to provide students with an overview of the application of chemistry in commercial and industrial contexts to underpin more detailed coverage in later models in this series. The module aims to develop fundamental skills in mathematics and IT which will underpin their core chemistry modules. The module will also give students the opportunity to develop their transferable skills including knowledge of health and safety in the chemistry laboratory, effective communication in both written and oral form and group work.CorePractical Chemistry 1.1: Fundamental laboratory techniques 2022-23CHM1005MLevel 42022-23This module aims to introduce students to the chemistry laboratory environment. The purpose of the module is to provide students with a platform which can be built upon in subsequent practical modules and equalise their potentially pre-university laboratory experience. Within this module students can learn a portfolio of skills and be evaluated via competency based assessments. The module also covers best practice in health and safety in the laboratory environment as part of the series of key core concepts delivered in the module.CorePractical Chemistry 1.2: Introduction to synthetic methodologies and molecular characterisation 2022-23CHM1006MLevel 42022-23This module aims to provide students with the practical experience associated with the topics delivered in Core Chemistry 1.1 and Core Chemistry 1.2. The module will outline key organic, inorganic and physical chemistry concepts with a series of laboratory activities reinforced by the use of relevant analytical techniques and tools throughout a range of experiments.CoreProfessional Practice 1.2: Forensic Laboratory Analysis 2022-23FRS1056MLevel 42022-23This module will explain the process of forensic practice within the laboratory, including areas such as chain of custody, contemporaneous note taking, standard operating procedures and quality control. The module is therefore built around the principle that high quality forensic scientific evidence is not only about employing sound scientific methodology but is also dependent on the rigour of the procedures employed and the accurate reporting of results. It will also look to develop a range of transferable skills relating to scientific literature retrieval, understanding, and presentation, and allow students to further develop their mathematical and statistical skills.CoreAdvanced Crime Scene Investigation 2023-24FRS2006MLevel 52023-24This module builds on the Crime Scene Investigation module and focuses on the application of advanced techniques for the detection, recovery, analysis and interpretation of a wide range of evidence found at a crime scene. Students can further develop their understanding of the role and responsibilities of the crime scene manager and the investigation of complex crime scenes, including key specialists and agencies to be involved. Within this context students will look at the need to follow ISO accredited procedures and the latest up to date working practices within crime scene investigation. As part of the module students are expected to undertake the examination of a complex crime scene.CoreCore Chemistry 2.1: Stability, Structure and Mechanism in Molecular Systems 2023-24CHM2002MLevel 52023-24This module aims to provide a breadth core understanding of the physicochemical principles behind some of the main analytical techniques and how these can be applied to identify atomic and molecular structures in both inorganic and organic chemistry. It also offers an insight on advanced synthetic methods and how these techniques can be used to explain and interpret structure and reactivity of complex molecules, such as coordination and organometallic compounds.CoreCore Chemistry 2.2: Chemistry of Activated Systems and Radicals 2023-24CHM2003MLevel 52023-24This module aims to further develop core chemistry concepts relating to chemical change. Electrochemistry is used to study thermodynamic properties of redox reactions as well as the kinetics of electrode processes. The kinetics of complex reactions builds upon the chemical kinetics material covered at level one. Bonding between metals and carbon is explored and further developed as the main group organometallics.CorePractical Chemistry 2.1: Organic synthesis, purification and advanced characterisation 2023-24CHM2004MLevel 52023-24This module aims to provide students with the practical experience associated with the topics delivered in Core Chemistry 2.1, with a strong focus on organic chemistry. The module will outline essential complex organic chemistry concepts with a series of laboratory activities designed around multistep syntheses and reinforced by the use of relevant analytical techniques and tools throughout a range experiments.CorePractical Chemistry 2.2: Inorganic synthesis and structural methods 2023-24CHM2005MLevel 52023-24This module aims to provide students with the practical experience associated with the topics delivered in Core Chemistry 2.2, with a strong focus on inorganic and physical chemistry. The module is constituted of a series of laboratory activities designed to familiarise students with an array of techniques centred around key aspects of inorganic syntheses. Specifically, the module emphasizes stability and speciation methods and their applications to the inorganic chemistry field. All aspects of the module will be supported by associated relevant analytical technologies.CoreProfessional Practice 2.2: Quality Assurance and Regulation 2023-24FRS2026MLevel 52023-24This module aims to provide students with an appreciation of regulation and quality assurance in forensic science and the role of the Forensic Science Regulator in this key concepts in modern forensic science. Students will apply the method validation tools from previous modules to evaluate forensic data within a quality context. Students will also develop skills in the retrieval, critical review and communication of scientific literature and other published work.CoreTrace Evidence 2023-24FRS2018MLevel 52023-24This module is designed to develop an understanding of the importance of trace materials, such as hair, fibres, glass and latent fingermarks, as evidence, their detection, recovery, analysis and the interpretation of results gained from these. The issues of transfer and persistence of such materials is also highlighted and the need to consider this throughout the above processes. Students will have the opportunity to be introduced to microscopy and analytical procedures and techniques relevant to the analysis of trace evidence.CoreCore Chemistry 3.1: Defining Shape, Symmetry and Stereochemistry 2024-25CHM3002MLevel 62024-25This module aims to provide deeper understanding on physicochemical principles behind materials and their properties, exploring advanced concepts in supramolecular chemistry and synthetic routes for more complex organic molecules. Crystals, colloids, discontinuous phases and solid state chemistry concepts are studied in depth to understand physical and chemical properties that give these materials a wide range of application in industry and research.CoreCore Chemistry 3.2: Heterogeneous Systems, Surfaces and Nanoscience 2024-25CHM3003MLevel 62024-25This module covers in greater depth the thermodynamics and kinetics of processes occurring on solid surfaces. Heterogeneous catalysis is used as an example of how reactions at solid surfaces differ from those in the bulk. Electrochemistry is further developed. Organic chemistry topics are the advanced areas of radical chemistry and orbital symmetry along with heteroelement and organometallic synthesis. Concepts of supramolecular chemistry are covered.CoreDrugs of Abuse and Forensic Toxicology 2024-25FRS3053MLevel 62024-25This module provides a context for the chemical, physiological and analytical content introduced at levels 1 and 2. It deciphers the complex and dynamic world context of Drugs of Abuse and intrinsic challenges faced by analytical chemists. It also covers the legislation of controlled substances and chemical precursors as well as the different classes of drugs. Additionally, the synthesis of illicit drugs will be explored to gain an understanding of how this knowledge can be used in drug profiling. The module also covers the ante and post-mortem toxicology of drugs, relates dose to physiological effect as well as consider appropriate samples and analytical strategies used in forensic toxicology. Supporting and illustrating these concepts, students can undertake the role of an analytical chemist in investigative practical activities which will cover best practice in Drug of Abuse and Toxicology laboratory analyses.CorePractical Chemistry 3.1: Advanced techniques in IO-chemistry 2024-25CHM3004MLevel 62024-25This module builds upon previous practical modules and provides a support for the illustration of the theory delivered in the Core chemistry 3.1 module. The concept of this module is to offer students the opportunity to experience and dissect the process of designing a material which fulfils specific requirements or needs, its synthesis and its characterisation. Through this process, the module offers the opportunity to host advanced complex organic syntheses (such as asymmetric synthesis) and supramolecular synthesis. Additionally, the module introduces students to a series of stereoselective analytical techniques designed to characterise aforementioned materials.CoreStructured project 2024-25CHM3006MLevel 62024-25This module offers students the opportunity to undertake an independent programme of research under the supervision of a member of staff. It provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate original and critical thoughts as well as build practical and project-management skills. Students may select a project from a series of proposals provided by staff, conduct a review of the literature, identify a hypothesis, and design a programme of research to test the hypothesis (under guidance from their supervisor). Students will be expected to manage the project including obtaining relevant ethical approval and conducting COSHH and risk assessments. Students may analyse and interpret data which will be collected in the laboratory or the field, or using computational sources (e.g. software for mathematical modelling; the internet for the meta-analysis of pre-collected data). The project will be written up either as a thesis or a scientific paper following closely defined criteria.CoreBiological Chemistry 2024-25CHM3001MLevel 62024-25The Biological Chemistry module is taught across the disciplines of biology and chemistry and is designed to challenge and develop an awareness of multidiscipline research within students. The overarching aim is to encourage and develop a mode of thinking in students of how chemistry influences biological processes and how this can be exploited by industry and emerging fields.OptionalFire, Explosives and Nuclear Forensics 2024-25FRS3054MLevel 62024-25This module introduces the chemistry and physics of fire and explosives and considers the investigation of fire and explosion scenes with an emphasis on arson and the use of improvised explosive devices. The challenges of evidence recovery, laboratory examination and chemical analysis are covered. This module also considers the various aspects of nuclear terrorism, in the context of global security. The underpinning science and the forensic investigation of nuclear materials for intelligence building is discussed.Optional

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Core Chemistry 1.1: Introduction to Energy, Change and Electronic Structure 2021-22CHM1002MLevel 42021-22This module aims to provide a breadth core understanding of the main chemical principles behind the chemistry of elements, systems in equilibrium and chemical reactivity, with special emphasis in basic organic reactions. Students will have the opportunity to learn basic concepts about elements and their main periodic properties and how some of these elements can be combined to produce molecules. Organic molecules will be used as an example to explain reactivity and how chemical structure can condition molecular properties. Energy transfers are also studied to understand the key role they play in chemical and physical transformations and how systems in equilibrium are affected by these.CoreCore Chemistry 1.2: Molecular Structure, Bonding and Mechanism 2021-22CHM1003MLevel 42021-22This module aims to introduce core chemistry concepts with an emphasis on chemical change. Movement and interaction of molecules and chemical kinetics are key physical chemistry topics covered and applied to chemical reactions of both organic and inorganic substances. The use of empirical data to develop and support laws, theories and models will be covered and how chemical kinetics can be used to develop reaction mechanisms. An introduction to crystallography and absorption spectroscopy is covered.CoreCrime Scene Investigation 2021-22FRS1051MLevel 42021-22This module is concerned with the skills required to protect, record, process and interpret a crime scene. Emphasis is placed on the role of crime scene investigation in the forensic process. The process of crime scene investigation is examined from scene preservation and recording (e.g. sketches and photography) to evidence recovery, packaging and documentation. The need for avoidance of contamination of the crime scene and for the subsequent continuity and integrity of the recovered evidence form an integral component of the module.CoreIntroduction to Professional Practice 2021-22CHM1004MLevel 42021-22This module aims to provide students with an overview of the application of chemistry in commercial and industrial contexts to underpin more detailed coverage in later models in this series. The module aims to develop fundamental skills in mathematics and IT which will underpin their core chemistry modules. The module will also give students the opportunity to develop their transferable skills including knowledge of health and safety in the chemistry laboratory, effective communication in both written and oral form and group work.CorePractical Chemistry 1.1: Fundamental laboratory techniques 2021-22CHM1005MLevel 42021-22This module aims to introduce students to the chemistry laboratory environment. The purpose of the module is to provide students with a platform which can be built upon in subsequent practical modules and equalise their potentially pre-university laboratory experience. Within this module students can learn a portfolio of skills and be evaluated via competency based assessments. The module also covers best practice in health and safety in the laboratory environment as part of the series of key core concepts delivered in the module.CorePractical Chemistry 1.2: Introduction to synthetic methodologies and molecular characterisation 2021-22CHM1006MLevel 42021-22This module aims to provide students with the practical experience associated with the topics delivered in Core Chemistry 1.1 and Core Chemistry 1.2. The module will outline key organic, inorganic and physical chemistry concepts with a series of laboratory activities reinforced by the use of relevant analytical techniques and tools throughout a range of experiments.CoreProfessional Practice 1.2: Forensic Laboratory Analysis 2021-22FRS1056MLevel 42021-22This module will explain the process of forensic practice within the laboratory, including areas such as chain of custody, contemporaneous note taking, standard operating procedures and quality control. The module is therefore built around the principle that high quality forensic scientific evidence is not only about employing sound scientific methodology but is also dependent on the rigour of the procedures employed and the accurate reporting of results. It will also look to develop a range of transferable skills relating to scientific literature retrieval, understanding, and presentation, and allow students to further develop their mathematical and statistical skills.CoreAdvanced Crime Scene Investigation 2022-23FRS2006MLevel 52022-23This module builds on the Crime Scene Investigation module and focuses on the application of advanced techniques for the detection, recovery, analysis and interpretation of a wide range of evidence found at a crime scene. Students can further develop their understanding of the role and responsibilities of the crime scene manager and the investigation of complex crime scenes, including key specialists and agencies to be involved. Within this context students will look at the need to follow ISO accredited procedures and the latest up to date working practices within crime scene investigation. As part of the module students are expected to undertake the examination of a complex crime scene.CoreCore Chemistry 2.1: Stability, Structure and Mechanism in Molecular Systems 2022-23CHM2002MLevel 52022-23This module aims to provide a breadth core understanding of the physicochemical principles behind some of the main analytical techniques and how these can be applied to identify atomic and molecular structures in both inorganic and organic chemistry. It also offers an insight on advanced synthetic methods and how these techniques can be used to explain and interpret structure and reactivity of complex molecules, such as coordination and organometallic compounds.CoreCore Chemistry 2.2: Chemistry of Activated Systems and Radicals 2022-23CHM2003MLevel 52022-23This module aims to further develop core chemistry concepts relating to chemical change. Electrochemistry is used to study thermodynamic properties of redox reactions as well as the kinetics of electrode processes. The kinetics of complex reactions builds upon the chemical kinetics material covered at level one. Bonding between metals and carbon is explored and further developed as the main group organometallics.CorePractical Chemistry 2.1: Organic synthesis, purification and advanced characterisation 2022-23CHM2004MLevel 52022-23This module aims to provide students with the practical experience associated with the topics delivered in Core Chemistry 2.1, with a strong focus on organic chemistry. The module will outline essential complex organic chemistry concepts with a series of laboratory activities designed around multistep syntheses and reinforced by the use of relevant analytical techniques and tools throughout a range experiments.CorePractical Chemistry 2.2: Inorganic synthesis and structural methods 2022-23CHM2005MLevel 52022-23This module aims to provide students with the practical experience associated with the topics delivered in Core Chemistry 2.2, with a strong focus on inorganic and physical chemistry. The module is constituted of a series of laboratory activities designed to familiarise students with an array of techniques centred around key aspects of inorganic syntheses. Specifically, the module emphasizes stability and speciation methods and their applications to the inorganic chemistry field. All aspects of the module will be supported by associated relevant analytical technologies.CoreProfessional Practice 2.2: Quality Assurance and Regulation 2022-23FRS2026MLevel 52022-23This module aims to provide students with an appreciation of regulation and quality assurance in forensic science and the role of the Forensic Science Regulator in this key concepts in modern forensic science. Students will apply the method validation tools from previous modules to evaluate forensic data within a quality context. Students will also develop skills in the retrieval, critical review and communication of scientific literature and other published work.CoreTrace Evidence 2022-23FRS2018MLevel 52022-23This module is designed to develop an understanding of the importance of trace materials, such as hair, fibres, glass and latent fingermarks, as evidence, their detection, recovery, analysis and the interpretation of results gained from these. The issues of transfer and persistence of such materials is also highlighted and the need to consider this throughout the above processes. Students will have the opportunity to be introduced to microscopy and analytical procedures and techniques relevant to the analysis of trace evidence.CoreCore Chemistry 3.1: Defining Shape, Symmetry and Stereochemistry 2023-24CHM3002MLevel 62023-24This module aims to provide deeper understanding on physicochemical principles behind materials and their properties, exploring advanced concepts in supramolecular chemistry and synthetic routes for more complex organic molecules. Crystals, colloids, discontinuous phases and solid state chemistry concepts are studied in depth to understand physical and chemical properties that give these materials a wide range of application in industry and research.CoreCore Chemistry 3.2: Heterogeneous Systems, Surfaces and Nanoscience 2023-24CHM3003MLevel 62023-24This module covers in greater depth the thermodynamics and kinetics of processes occurring on solid surfaces. Heterogeneous catalysis is used as an example of how reactions at solid surfaces differ from those in the bulk. Electrochemistry is further developed. Organic chemistry topics are the advanced areas of radical chemistry and orbital symmetry along with heteroelement and organometallic synthesis. Concepts of supramolecular chemistry are covered.CoreDrugs of Abuse and Forensic Toxicology 2023-24FRS3053MLevel 62023-24This module provides a context for the chemical, physiological and analytical content introduced at levels 1 and 2. It deciphers the complex and dynamic world context of Drugs of Abuse and intrinsic challenges faced by analytical chemists. It also covers the legislation of controlled substances and chemical precursors as well as the different classes of drugs. Additionally, the synthesis of illicit drugs will be explored to gain an understanding of how this knowledge can be used in drug profiling. The module also covers the ante and post-mortem toxicology of drugs, relates dose to physiological effect as well as consider appropriate samples and analytical strategies used in forensic toxicology. Supporting and illustrating these concepts, students can undertake the role of an analytical chemist in investigative practical activities which will cover best practice in Drug of Abuse and Toxicology laboratory analyses.CorePractical Chemistry 3.1: Advanced techniques in IO-chemistry 2023-24CHM3004MLevel 62023-24This module builds upon previous practical modules and provides a support for the illustration of the theory delivered in the Core chemistry 3.1 module. The concept of this module is to offer students the opportunity to experience and dissect the process of designing a material which fulfils specific requirements or needs, its synthesis and its characterisation. Through this process, the module offers the opportunity to host advanced complex organic syntheses (such as asymmetric synthesis) and supramolecular synthesis. Additionally, the module introduces students to a series of stereoselective analytical techniques designed to characterise aforementioned materials.CoreStructured project 2023-24CHM3006MLevel 62023-24This module offers students the opportunity to undertake an independent programme of research under the supervision of a member of staff. It provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate original and critical thoughts as well as build practical and project-management skills. Students may select a project from a series of proposals provided by staff, conduct a review of the literature, identify a hypothesis, and design a programme of research to test the hypothesis (under guidance from their supervisor). Students will be expected to manage the project including obtaining relevant ethical approval and conducting COSHH and risk assessments. Students may analyse and interpret data which will be collected in the laboratory or the field, or using computational sources (e.g. software for mathematical modelling; the internet for the meta-analysis of pre-collected data). The project will be written up either as a thesis or a scientific paper following closely defined criteria.CoreBiological Chemistry 2023-24CHM3001MLevel 62023-24The Biological Chemistry module is taught across the disciplines of biology and chemistry and is designed to challenge and develop an awareness of multidiscipline research within students. The overarching aim is to encourage and develop a mode of thinking in students of how chemistry influences biological processes and how this can be exploited by industry and emerging fields.OptionalFire, Explosives and Nuclear Forensics 2023-24FRS3054MLevel 62023-24This module introduces the chemistry and physics of fire and explosives and considers the investigation of fire and explosion scenes with an emphasis on arson and the use of improvised explosive devices. The challenges of evidence recovery, laboratory examination and chemical analysis are covered. This module also considers the various aspects of nuclear terrorism, in the context of global security. The underpinning science and the forensic investigation of nuclear materials for intelligence building is discussed.Optional

Features

Skills Development and Professional Practice

Our Chemistry courses have an embedded explicit skills development programme through the professional practice modules. The programme delivers a systematic programme in skills development, which includes CV writing and interview skills. The modules exemplify the application of chemistry into key employment sectors and present chemistry through an integrated approach.

Industry Challenges

A series of themed industry challenges are co-delivered during the professional practice modules through industry partnerships with multi-national and SME organisations representing the analytical, formulation, pharmaceutical, and energy and environmental sectors.

After systematic project planning and management training, students can devise and present technical proposals in response to the challenge. After consultation and feedback from a joint academic and industry panel, students can execute project plans and report within industry standard methods. The professional practice modules aim to prepare students for placements and future employment.

Placements

Students may have the opportunity to undertake placements. When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs.

Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry (where available). Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Accreditations and Memberships

This course is accredited by the Royal Society of Chemistry. Through accreditation, the Royal Society of Chemistry aims to promote good practices in the university education of chemical scientists, and ensure that future practising scientists are knowledgeable and competent.

How you are assessed

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports, or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances, or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports, or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances, or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Fees and Scholarships

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Entry Requirements 2022-23

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC, to include a grade B from A Level Chemistry.

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall, with Higher Level Grade 5 in Chemistry.

BTEC Extended Diploma in Applied Science or Forensic Science*: Distinction, Merit, Merit

*not all modules are accepted. Please contact our Admissions team for further information (admissions@lincoln.ac.uk)

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points, including 40 points from 15 credits in Chemistry

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English, Maths and Science. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages for information on equivalent qualifications.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

For applicants who do not meet our standard entry requirements, our Science Foundation Year can provide an alternative route of entry onto our full degree programmes:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/course/sfysfyub/

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Entry Requirements 2021-22

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC, to include a grade B from A Level Chemistry.

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall, with Higher Level Grade 5 in Chemistry.

BTEC Extended Diploma in Applied Science or Forensic Science*: Distinction, Merit, Merit

*not all modules are accepted. Please contact our Admissions team for further information (admissions@lincoln.ac.uk)

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points, including 40 points from 15 credits in Chemistry

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English, Maths and Science. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages for information on equivalent qualifications.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

For applicants who do not meet our standard entry requirements, our Science Foundation Year can provide an alternative route of entry onto our full degree programmes:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/course/sfysfyub/

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

"The best thing about the programme was that it challenged me, kept me engaged, and had me always wanting to learn more."

Victoria Hugill, MChem Forensic Chemistry graduate

Career Opportunities

Forensic Chemistry graduates can benefit from specialist skills and technical knowledge that are transferable to careers in chemistry, forensic laboratories, and law enforcement organisations, such as police forces, HMRC, and environmental health. Some graduates go on to study at postgraduate level.

Visit Us in Person

The best way to find out what it is really like to live and learn at Lincoln is to join us for one of our Open Days. Discover the Joseph Banks Laboratories where Chemistry students have access to high-specification instrumentation for spectroscopy, diffraction, imaging, and separation science.

Book Your Place

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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