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3 years

Part-time

6 years

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Campus

Brayford Pool

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Validated

Fees

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UCAS Code

X301

Course Code

EDMPSYUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Part-time

6 years

Typical Offer

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Campus

Brayford Pool

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Validated

Fees

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UCAS Code

X301

Course Code

EDMPSYUB

BSc (Hons) Education and Psychology BSc (Hons) Education and Psychology

Research-based learning is an important part of the course and students will be encouraged to use enquiry and investigative approaches to learn more about education and psychology during their studies.

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Part-time

6 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

X301

Course Code

EDMPSYUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Part-time

6 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

X301

Course Code

EDMPSYUB

Select Year of Entry

Welcome to BSc (Hons) Education and Psychology

Education professionals make a difference to the lives of children and young people, inspiring them to learn and developing their knowledge and skills to prepare them for their future.

The way that children and young people learn can shape their entire lives. Those who are passionate about the future of learning can deepen their understanding of education by applying psychology to understand the connection between the brain and behaviour.

The BSc (Hons) Education and Psychology degree looks at the way in which children and young people develop and learn. It uses the application of psychology to support a broader understanding of education, enabling students to gain an insight into the ways in which learning is shaped and delivered.

At Lincoln students have the opportunity to gain an insight into the ways in which learning is shaped and delivered. The course explores how psychological theory can be related to a variety of educational environments, as well as considering a range of psychological issues.

Learning and teaching are explored through four areas: philosophy, sociology, history, and psychology - with a strong focus on how psychology can support a broad understanding of education. Education systems in compulsory schools and other learning environments can also be examined throughout the degree.

The programme considers the different ways in which education is implemented and understood throughout the UK, and globally. The course aims to support students to understand and question current and historical education systems, and to consider how these systems align with policy, practice and social expectations. The psychology aspects of the programme aim to support students to understand how brain processes can support function, and approaches to measuring abilities such as intelligence. Students can also explore contemporary theories in relation to personality development, and social psychology.

Research based learning is an important part of this course and students will be encouraged to use enquiry and investigative approaches to learn more about education and psychology throughout their three-year study.

Welcome to BSc (Hons) Education and Psychology

Education professionals make a difference to the lives of children and young people, inspiring them to learn and developing their knowledge and skills to prepare them for their future.

The way that children and young people learn can shape their entire lives. Those who are passionate about the future of learning can deepen their understanding of education by applying psychology to understand the connection between the brain and behaviour.

The BSc (Hons) Education and Psychology degree looks at the way in which children and young people develop and learn. It uses the application of psychology to support a broader understanding of education, enabling students to gain an insight into the ways in which learning is shaped and delivered.

At Lincoln students have the opportunity to gain an insight into the ways in which learning is shaped and delivered. The course explores how psychological theory can be related to a variety of educational environments, as well as considering a range of psychological issues.

Learning and teaching are explored through four areas: philosophy, sociology, history, and psychology - with a strong focus on how psychology can support a broad understanding of education. Education systems in compulsory schools and other learning environments can also be examined throughout the degree.

The programme considers the different ways in which education is implemented and understood throughout the UK, and globally. The course aims to support students to understand and question current and historical education systems, and to consider how these systems align with policy, practice and social expectations. The psychology aspects of the programme aim to support students to understand how brain processes can support function, and approaches to measuring abilities such as intelligence. Students can also explore contemporary theories in relation to personality development, and social psychology.

Research based learning is an important part of this course and students will be encouraged to use enquiry and investigative approaches to learn more about education and psychology throughout their three-year study.

How You Study

During the first year, students are introduced to core education topics which focus on learning, brain, behaviour and cognition, the developing individual in society, and research skills. Students can reflect on the global and local influences on policy and practice, and consider how this has shaped the ways children and young people are enabled to learn. Students can also investigate cognitive capacity, and how the brain develops in order to support learning.

A tutorial system operates throughout the three-year course. The first year aims to provide a sound basis for students to develop their own personal and academic skills, and also aims to facilitate a sound basis for transition to second year. The course also includes a series of scheduled meetings with a personal tutor.

In the second year, students have the opportunity to develop and refine their research skills, and can begin to tailor their course to their interests by choosing two optional modules to examine topics in greater depth. Students can take part in core modules focusing on: developmental psychology; psychometric testing; and diversity, inclusion and alternate approaches to education.

In the final year students have to opportunity to complete two further core modules, one which reflects on contemporary issues in education, and one which involves the completion of an extended research-based project. This extended research based module, along with further elective modules aims to provide opportunities for students to build on their own interests, and may be determined by their career aspirations.

Teaching takes place in lectures, seminars and workshops, and in small groups, depending on the level and the topic of study. In addition, staff use the intranet to provide materials to support teaching; course materials are posted to an online virtual learning environment to supplement face to face teaching, and support onsite and remote study.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

How You Study

During the first year, students are introduced to core education topics which focus on learning, brain, behaviour and cognition, the developing individual in society, and research skills. Students can reflect on the global and local influences on policy and practice, and consider how this has shaped the ways children and young people are enabled to learn. Students can also investigate cognitive capacity, and how the brain develops in order to support learning.

A tutorial system operates throughout the three-year course. The first year aims to provide a sound basis for students to develop their own personal and academic skills, and also aims to facilitate a sound basis for transition to second year. The course also includes a series of scheduled meetings with a personal tutor.

In the second year, students have the opportunity to develop and refine their research skills, and can begin to tailor their course to their interests by choosing two optional modules to examine topics in greater depth. Students can take part in core modules focusing on: developmental psychology; psychometric testing; and diversity, inclusion and alternate approaches to education.

In the final year students have to opportunity to complete two further core modules, one which reflects on contemporary issues in education, and one which involves the completion of an extended research-based project. This extended research based module, along with further elective modules aims to provide opportunities for students to build on their own interests, and may be determined by their career aspirations.

Teaching takes place in lectures, seminars and workshops, and in small groups, depending on the level and the topic of study. In addition, staff use the intranet to provide materials to support teaching; course materials are posted to an online virtual learning environment to supplement face to face teaching, and support onsite and remote study.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

Teaching and Learning During Covid-19

Information for Offer Holders Joining Us in Autumn 2021

Letter from Acting Head of School of Education

We are delighted you are interested in joining us at the University of Lincoln and I am writing to let you know about our planning for the new academic year. You currently have an offer of a place at the University and we want to keep you updated so you can start preparing for your future, should you be successful in meeting any outstanding conditions of your offer.

We fully intend your experience with us at Lincoln will be engaging, supportive and academically challenging. We are determined to provide our students with a safe and exciting campus experience, ensuring you benefit from the best that both face-to-face and online teaching offer. We have kept our focus on friendliness and community spirit at Lincoln and we look forward to your participation in that community.

As you know, the UK Government has published its roadmap for the easing of Coronavirus lockdown restrictions in England. There are still some uncertainties for universities around possible restrictions for the next academic year, particularly in relation to social distancing in large group teaching. We are planning in line with government guidance for both face-to-face and online teaching to ensure you have a good campus experience and can complete all the requirements for your programme.  We are fully prepared to adapt and flex our plans if changes in government regulations make this necessary during the year. 

Face-to-face teaching and interaction with tutors and course mates are key to students’ learning and the broader student experience. Face-to-face sessions will be prioritised where it is most valuable, particularly for seminars, tutorials, workshops, practicals and lab sessions. Students tell us that there are real benefits to some elements of online learning within a blended approach, such as revisiting recorded materials and developing new digital skills and confidence.  At Lincoln we aim to take forward the best aspects of both.

This letter sets out in detail various aspects of the planned experience at Lincoln for your chosen subject area, and we hope the information is helpful as you plan for your future.

Teaching and Learning

At any one time you will be taking two or three modules per semester in your first year of study depending which programme you are studying, these modules will prepare you for subsequent years’ study.  Your programme of study is typically delivered by a combination of lectures and seminars.  Face-to-face sessions will be prioritised where it is most valuable, particularly for seminars, tutorials, and workshop-based teaching. In addition to this, you will have a Personal Tutor – a member of academic staff who is your designated ‘go to’ person for advice and support, both pastoral and academic. Secondly, independent learning continues to be an essential aspect of learning in an Education degree, and guided reading and other independent engagement remains key to performing well in your studies and we are available to support you with this.

Most of our assessments are submitted online as standard in normal circumstances. Where there are exams, in-class tests, or oral assessments planned, decisions as to whether they go ahead in this form or in an online variant (for example, ‘take home’ exams or online presentations) will depend on circumstances determined by any government restrictions that might be in place at the time.

Ongoing communications from the School of Education, and from the University, will be sent via email or via announcements through Blackboard (the University online learning platform).

The University Campus

We are very proud of our beautiful and vibrant campuses at the University of Lincoln and we have used our extensive indoor and outdoor spaces to provide students with access to study and social areas as well as learning resources and facilities, adapting them where necessary in line with government guidance. All the mitigations and safety measures you would expect are in place on our campuses (at Lincoln, Riseholme and Holbeach), such as hand sanitisers, one-way systems, and other social distancing measures where these are required.

Student Wellbeing and Support

The University’s Student Wellbeing Centre and Student Support Centre are fully open for face-to-face and online support.  Should you, as one of our applicants, have any questions about coming to Lincoln in October or any other concerns, these specialist teams are here for you. You can contact Student Wellbeing and the Student Support Centre by visiting https://studentservices.lincoln.ac.uk where service details and contact information are available, or if you are in Lincoln you can make an appointment to meet a member of the team.

To enable you to make the most out of your experience in Lincoln and to help you access course materials and other services, we recommend that you have a desktop, laptop or tablet device available during your studies. This will enable you to engage easily with our online learning platforms from your student accommodation or from home. Students can use IT equipment on campus in the Library, our learning lounges, and specialist academic areas; however, there may not always be a space free when you have a timetabled session or an assessment to complete which is why we recommend you have your own device too if possible. If you are struggling to access IT equipment or reliable internet services, please contact ICT for technical support and Student Support who can assist you with further advice and information.

We are committed to providing you with the best possible start to university life and to helping you to prepare for your time with us. As part of this commitment, you can access our Student Life pre-arrival online support package. This collection of digital resources, advice and helpful tips created by current students is designed to help you prepare for the all-important first steps into higher education, enabling you to learn within a supportive community and to make the most of the new opportunities that the University of Lincoln provides. When you are ready, you can begin by going to studentlife.lincoln.ac.uk/starting.

Students Union

Your Students’ Union is here to make sure that you get the most from every aspect of your student experience. They will be providing a huge range of in-person and virtual events and opportunities - you are sure to find something perfect for you! Meet people and find a new hobby by joining one of their 150 sports teams and societies. Grab lunch between teaching or a drink with friends in The Swan, Towers or The Barge. Learn new skills and boost your CV by taking part in training courses and volunteering opportunities in your spare time. Grab a bike from the Cycle Hire and explore the city you will be calling home!

To kick-off the new academic year, your Students’ Union will be bringing you The Official Lincoln Freshers Week 2021, with a huge line-up of social events, club nights, fayres, and activities for you enjoy (restrictions permitting). Keep an eye on www.facebook.com/lincolnfreshers21 for line-up and ticket updates, so you don’t miss out.

Most importantly, your Students’ Union will always be there for you when you need it most; making sure that your voice as a student is always heard. The SU Advice Centre can provide independent advice and support on housing, finance, welfare, and academic issues. As well as this, your Course Reps are always on hand to make sure that you are getting the best from your academic experience. To find out more about the Students’ Union’s events, opportunities, support and how to get in contact go to: www.lincolnsu.com

Student Accommodation

Many applicants will choose to live in dedicated student accommodation on, or close to, campus and you may well have already booked your student residence for the upcoming year. All University-managed student accommodation will have our Residential Wardens in place. Residential Wardens are here to help you settle into your new accommodation and will be offering flatmate and residential support activities throughout the year. If you have booked University accommodation, you will have already heard from us with further details on where you will be living to help you prepare. If you have not yet booked your accommodation, we still have plenty of options available. In the meantime, lots of advice and information can be found on the accommodation pages of our website: https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studentlife/accommodation/

The information detailed in this letter will form part of your agreement with the University of Lincoln. If we do not hear from you to the contrary prior to enrolment, we will assume that you acknowledge and accept the information contained in this letter. Adaptations to how we work may have to be made in line with any future changes in government guidance, and we will communicate these with you as necessary. Please do review the University’s Admissions Terms and Conditions (in particular sections 8 and 9) and Student Complaints Procedure so you understand your rights and the  agreement between the University and its students.

We very much hope this information is useful to help you plan for the next step in your academic journey, and we look forward to welcoming you here at Lincoln this Autumn. This is the start of a new phase and will be an exciting time for all of us. If you have any questions, please do email me at abackhouse@lincoln.ac.uk.

Very Best Wishes,

Dr Anita Backhouse

Acting Head of School of Education

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Brain, Behaviour & Cognition 2022-23PSY1160MLevel 42022-23This module aims to introduce students to a wide range of topics outlining the structure and functions of the brain and nervous system, and the relationship between these brain structures and the behaviours, both covert and overt, resulting from them. The module serves as the foundation for the second year core module in cognition, and a number of elective modules expand on ideas introduced here.CoreDeveloping Individual in Society 2022-23PSY1162MLevel 42022-23This module provides an introduction to three major areas of psychological theory and research, Developmental, Social and Individual psychology. The topics are covered in Semesters A and B respectively and grouped thematically. Content across all topics is embedded in the context of major, relevant general, developmental, social and individual differences theories.CoreIntroduction to Educational Research 2022-23EDM1006MLevel 42022-23This module is designed to introduce students to research methods including quantitative and qualitative research methods used in education research, and aims to help students to develop the understanding of what qualitative and quantitative research projects are like. It will provide an overview of the purpose and different approaches that can be used within research in education.CoreIntroduction to Learning 2022-23EDM1003MLevel 42022-23This module is designed to provide students with an insight into what learning is, how this takes place and what strategies or approaches can be used to support learning. It is anticipated that the module will draw on learning across the lifetime, e.g. in early childhood through to adulthood. However, it will also provide focused examples of learning in early years, primary and secondary learning environments in order to support students who are aiming for careers in teaching, other educational roles, psychology or educational research. Students can gain a broad overview of learning theory and considerations.CoreDevelopmental Psychology 2023-24PSY2004MLevel 52023-24This module aims to examine the concepts, theories, research methods and influencing factors in child development relevant to the period from birth to pre-adolescence.CoreDiversity, Inclusion and Alternative Education 2023-24EDM2004MLevel 52023-24This module is designed to provide students with insight into the diversity that can be observed between learning, concepts of inclusion and approaches to alternative education. The module focuses on teaching and learning in a range of educational environments and through educational research. The module provides the opportunity for students to engage with contemporary research and ideas linked to these key concepts and to explore how policy impacts on provision for different groups of learners.CorePsychological Assessment & Psychometrics 2023-24PSY2174MLevel 52023-24The module aims to provide an introduction into psychological assessments using psychometrics, including questionnaires and scales. Based on the established theoretical and research context, this module will consider a range of assessment tools used in psychology to assess an individuals behaviour or behavioural disposition, and provide an introduction into psychometric test development. The modules also aims to provide students with the opportunity to administer, score, and interpret psychological tests.CoreResearch Methods in Education 2023-24EDM2003MLevel 52023-24The aim of this module is to support students in preparing for their dissertation in year three. Students have the opportunity to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills in relation to the complex nature, and processes of research in education. Students can plan and develop a realistic project proposal which should enable them to address a research question of their choice within a specific educational context.CoreCurriculum: Principles and purposes 2023-24EDM2007MLevel 52023-24This module focuses on curricula for learning in education. It considers the purpose, breadth and design of curriculum structures and models and how these can differ in relation to context and culture. Students can gain an understanding of how the curriculum in England has changed and developed, and can describe the subject specific elements within current education provision. This module aims to help students to know, understand and contextualise the core components that make up curricula.OptionalEducation in Digital Society 2023-24EDM2013MLevel 52023-24OptionalIntermediate Education 2023-24EDM2005MLevel 52023-24This optional module is designed to provide students with a deepening understanding of education studies. The module will focus on how education impacts on and is viewed by society. It will consider how social justice, educational policy and representations of education in society can impact on knowledge, understanding and attitudes.OptionalPsychology of Education 2023-24EDM2006MLevel 52023-24This module is designed to provide students with an insight into the psychology of education and how psychology can be used to support practice in a range of learning environments. The module provides students with an opportunity to engage with cutting edge research and how this impacts on practice. Students can gain an insight into some of the key ideas in psychology and how these influence educational practice.OptionalStudies of Childhood 2023-24EDM2008MLevel 52023-24This optional module focuses on childhood by comparing the theories and perceptions of children. It reflects on developmental aspects including social, cognitive, emotional, environmental, physical and language. It considers the ways in which children are portrayed in the media and the impact this may have on cultural representations of children. The module draws on classical and contemporary texts, academic studies and media such as television programmes and films.OptionalContemporary Issues in Education 2024-25EDM3002MLevel 62024-25This module is designed to introduce students to major issues shaping education today, and to the conceptual tools needed to understand these in an informed way. Students can gain an understanding of key sites of debate in compulsory and alternative education, and critically examine a range of current debates in areas such as educational systems, policies, and reform within the UK and in global context, through multidisciplinary perspectives. This module aims to help students understand and confidently engage with the discursive, social and political contexts of education today.CoreDissertation 2024-25EDM3009MLevel 62024-25The dissertation module builds on previous education research modules and facilitates independent research into an area of interest that is central to a student's programme of study. Typically the module will involve a small-scale investigation into a topic agreed between the student and personal tutor, and with the agreement of the personal tutor, students may undertake more theoretical studies as long as they offer an original framing or interpretation of the research problem. It is designed to develop students understanding of, and skills in applying research methods while building and synthesising knowledge gained in previous modules. Students will be asked to complete a research proposal, and if collecting empirical data, an ethical approval form in the first term.CoreAdvanced Digital Education: Perspectives and Practice 2024-25EDM3013MLevel 62024-25OptionalAdvanced Psychology of Education 2024-25EDM3003MLevel 62024-25This module is designed to provide students with an advanced insight into the psychology of education and how psychology can be used to support practice in a range of learning environments. The module is particularly aimed at those considering a career in teaching and provides students with an opportunity to engage with cutting-edge research and how this impacts on practice. Students will be able to gain an insight into the specifics of psychology and how these influence educational practice.OptionalAdvanced SEND 2024-25EDM3008MLevel 62024-25This optional module is designed to provide students with an insight into the different categories of needs that learners may have in the learning environment. The module focuses on learning, teaching, education related work and educational research, and provides students with an opportunity to engage with cutting-edge research and how this impacts on practice. Students will be able to gain an insight into some of the key ideas in the pedagogy associated with supporting children with Special Educational Needs and Disability.OptionalAutistic Spectrum Disorders 2024-25PSY3012MLevel 62024-25This module aims to examine the developmental disability of Autism (and Autistic Spectrum Disorders). It aims to cover a range of approaches to understanding Autism, from diagnosis and etiology.OptionalCross-Cultural Psychology 2024-25PSY3125MLevel 62024-25This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to discuss concepts, theories and research methods in cross-cultural psychology, including analysis of psychological definitions of culture and cultural variables. Specific topics in social and developmental psychology are considered from a cross-cultural perspective, for example, cultural values, social roles and relationships, family organisation, and selected topics in child development.OptionalDevelopmental Psychopathology 2024-25PSY3007MLevel 62024-25This module aims to emphasise the importance of a developmental framework for understanding how children come to exhibit adaptive and maladaptive behaviour. The module will seek to address the changing nature of problems, influences and risk factors over the course of development.OptionalDiscourse 2024-25PSY3009MLevel 62024-25This module aims to develop students' knowledge of the development, theory and applications of the Discourse approach, which is a growing field within psychology. The module aims to introduce the Discourse perspective, in which language is seen as a means for people to do social actions: from blamings and invitations, to the establishment and maintenance of social relationships.OptionalHistory of Education 2024-25EDM3004MLevel 62024-25This module focuses on the development of state-funded education, primarily in the UK, but with reference to systems of education in other countries. It provides a social history of education and situates it within a broader social history of the public sector. The module draws on archival documents, the media, public policy, academic theory and applied research, and pays particular attention to the role of educators, students and parents in shaping debates around public education.OptionalInvestigative and Courtroom Psychology 2024-25PSY3178MLevel 62024-25The module aims to introduce some of the key areas in Forensic Psychology that occur during the pre-conviction stage of a criminal investigation. Specifically, the module will focus on the police investigation and courtroom stage of the criminal process. It will explore a variety of established theoretical work and research within these domains and consider how this knowledge can be used to inform several key areas of the criminal investigation. The module will highlight the applied importance of Psychology to significant issues in the real-world.OptionalLearning Through Reflection 2024-25EDM3007MLevel 62024-25This module is designed to introduce students to the concept of learning through reflection, where reflection is deliberate, purposeful, and structured. Reflective skills will be linked to theory and practice and will encompass learning, change and development. The module is designed to build on students' critical thinking and critical reflection skills through the close study of educational theory, practice and through the exploration of the educational philosophers, their relevance to modern educational thought and through the development of critical writing skills.OptionalPhilosophy of Education 2024-25EDM3005MLevel 62024-25This optional module is designed to provide students with an insight into education from a philosophical perspective. It considers how curricula, teaching and learning are influenced and shaped by the broader views, values and beliefs of what education is and what it is for. Students can engage critically with the fundamental, and enduring questions about education.OptionalPsychology of Music 2024-25PSY3180MLevel 62024-25This is a module designed to help students to develop their knowledge of human interactions and responses to music. Over the course of the module, students will consider the ways in which we engage with, listen to, perform, and learn about music. This course will aim to provide a better understanding on the role of music in attachment, emotion regulation, social affiliation, the neurological overlap between music and language processing, and the development of humans as a species who enjoy music. Through explaining the research underlying the Psychology of Music we also aim to provide an understanding of how this field builds on and connects with other areas in psychology.OptionalSociology of Education 2024-25EDM3006MLevel 62024-25This module is designed to help students see education sociologically by exploring the relationship between education, individuals and social life, and between learning and power. How do schools and other educational institutions influence peoples life chances? How do the state, religion, family and economic systems shape educational values and practices? Who decides how people should be educated, about what, and why? How are social inequalities of class, race, dis/ability, gender and sexuality produced and challenged through educational theory, policy and practice? What is the relationship between educational and social change? Drawing on historical and contemporary examples in national and international perspective, this module aims to help students map theoretical perspectives and research methods in the sociology of education and apply these in their own thinking and practice.Optional

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Brain, Behaviour & Cognition 2021-22PSY1160MLevel 42021-22This module aims to introduce students to a wide range of topics outlining the structure and functions of the brain and nervous system, and the relationship between these brain structures and the behaviours, both covert and overt, resulting from them. The module serves as the foundation for the second year core module in cognition, and a number of elective modules expand on ideas introduced here.CoreDeveloping Individual in Society 2021-22PSY1162MLevel 42021-22This module provides an introduction to three major areas of psychological theory and research, Developmental, Social and Individual psychology. The topics are covered in Semesters A and B respectively and grouped thematically. Content across all topics is embedded in the context of major, relevant general, developmental, social and individual differences theories.CoreIntroduction to Educational Research 2021-22EDM1006MLevel 42021-22This module is designed to introduce students to research methods including quantitative and qualitative research methods used in education research, and aims to help students to develop the understanding of what qualitative and quantitative research projects are like. It will provide an overview of the purpose and different approaches that can be used within research in education.CoreIntroduction to Learning 2021-22EDM1003MLevel 42021-22This module is designed to provide students with an insight into what learning is, how this takes place and what strategies or approaches can be used to support learning. It is anticipated that the module will draw on learning across the lifetime, e.g. in early childhood through to adulthood. However, it will also provide focused examples of learning in early years, primary and secondary learning environments in order to support students who are aiming for careers in teaching, other educational roles, psychology or educational research. Students can gain a broad overview of learning theory and considerations.CoreDevelopmental Psychology 2022-23PSY2004MLevel 52022-23This module aims to examine the concepts, theories, research methods and influencing factors in child development relevant to the period from birth to pre-adolescence.CoreDiversity, Inclusion and Alternative Education 2022-23EDM2004MLevel 52022-23This module is designed to provide students with insight into the diversity that can be observed between learning, concepts of inclusion and approaches to alternative education. The module focuses on teaching and learning in a range of educational environments and through educational research. The module provides the opportunity for students to engage with contemporary research and ideas linked to these key concepts and to explore how policy impacts on provision for different groups of learners.CorePsychological Assessment & Psychometrics 2022-23PSY2174MLevel 52022-23The module aims to provide an introduction into psychological assessments using psychometrics, including questionnaires and scales. Based on the established theoretical and research context, this module will consider a range of assessment tools used in psychology to assess an individuals behaviour or behavioural disposition, and provide an introduction into psychometric test development. The modules also aims to provide students with the opportunity to administer, score, and interpret psychological tests.CoreResearch Methods in Education 2022-23EDM2003MLevel 52022-23The aim of this module is to support students in preparing for their dissertation in year three. Students have the opportunity to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills in relation to the complex nature, and processes of research in education. Students can plan and develop a realistic project proposal which should enable them to address a research question of their choice within a specific educational context.CoreCurriculum: Principles and purposes 2022-23EDM2007MLevel 52022-23This module focuses on curricula for learning in education. It considers the purpose, breadth and design of curriculum structures and models and how these can differ in relation to context and culture. Students can gain an understanding of how the curriculum in England has changed and developed, and can describe the subject specific elements within current education provision. This module aims to help students to know, understand and contextualise the core components that make up curricula.OptionalEducation in Digital Society 2022-23EDM2013MLevel 52022-23OptionalIntermediate Education 2022-23EDM2005MLevel 52022-23This optional module is designed to provide students with a deepening understanding of education studies. The module will focus on how education impacts on and is viewed by society. It will consider how social justice, educational policy and representations of education in society can impact on knowledge, understanding and attitudes.OptionalPsychology of Education 2022-23EDM2006MLevel 52022-23This module is designed to provide students with an insight into the psychology of education and how psychology can be used to support practice in a range of learning environments. The module provides students with an opportunity to engage with cutting edge research and how this impacts on practice. Students can gain an insight into some of the key ideas in psychology and how these influence educational practice.OptionalStudies of Childhood 2022-23EDM2008MLevel 52022-23This optional module focuses on childhood by comparing the theories and perceptions of children. It reflects on developmental aspects including social, cognitive, emotional, environmental, physical and language. It considers the ways in which children are portrayed in the media and the impact this may have on cultural representations of children. The module draws on classical and contemporary texts, academic studies and media such as television programmes and films.OptionalContemporary Issues in Education 2023-24EDM3002MLevel 62023-24This module is designed to introduce students to major issues shaping education today, and to the conceptual tools needed to understand these in an informed way. Students can gain an understanding of key sites of debate in compulsory and alternative education, and critically examine a range of current debates in areas such as educational systems, policies, and reform within the UK and in global context, through multidisciplinary perspectives. This module aims to help students understand and confidently engage with the discursive, social and political contexts of education today.CoreDissertation 2023-24EDM3009MLevel 62023-24The dissertation module builds on previous education research modules and facilitates independent research into an area of interest that is central to a student's programme of study. Typically the module will involve a small-scale investigation into a topic agreed between the student and personal tutor, and with the agreement of the personal tutor, students may undertake more theoretical studies as long as they offer an original framing or interpretation of the research problem. It is designed to develop students understanding of, and skills in applying research methods while building and synthesising knowledge gained in previous modules. Students will be asked to complete a research proposal, and if collecting empirical data, an ethical approval form in the first term.CoreAdvanced Digital Education: Perspectives and Practice 2023-24EDM3013MLevel 62023-24OptionalAdvanced Psychology of Education 2023-24EDM3003MLevel 62023-24This module is designed to provide students with an advanced insight into the psychology of education and how psychology can be used to support practice in a range of learning environments. The module is particularly aimed at those considering a career in teaching and provides students with an opportunity to engage with cutting-edge research and how this impacts on practice. Students will be able to gain an insight into the specifics of psychology and how these influence educational practice.OptionalAdvanced SEND 2023-24EDM3008MLevel 62023-24This optional module is designed to provide students with an insight into the different categories of needs that learners may have in the learning environment. The module focuses on learning, teaching, education related work and educational research, and provides students with an opportunity to engage with cutting-edge research and how this impacts on practice. Students will be able to gain an insight into some of the key ideas in the pedagogy associated with supporting children with Special Educational Needs and Disability.OptionalAutistic Spectrum Disorders 2023-24PSY3012MLevel 62023-24This module aims to examine the developmental disability of Autism (and Autistic Spectrum Disorders). It aims to cover a range of approaches to understanding Autism, from diagnosis and etiology.OptionalCross-Cultural Psychology 2023-24PSY3125MLevel 62023-24This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to discuss concepts, theories and research methods in cross-cultural psychology, including analysis of psychological definitions of culture and cultural variables. Specific topics in social and developmental psychology are considered from a cross-cultural perspective, for example, cultural values, social roles and relationships, family organisation, and selected topics in child development.OptionalDevelopmental Psychopathology 2023-24PSY3007MLevel 62023-24This module aims to emphasise the importance of a developmental framework for understanding how children come to exhibit adaptive and maladaptive behaviour. The module will seek to address the changing nature of problems, influences and risk factors over the course of development.OptionalDiscourse 2023-24PSY3009MLevel 62023-24This module aims to develop students' knowledge of the development, theory and applications of the Discourse approach, which is a growing field within psychology. The module aims to introduce the Discourse perspective, in which language is seen as a means for people to do social actions: from blamings and invitations, to the establishment and maintenance of social relationships.OptionalHistory of Education 2023-24EDM3004MLevel 62023-24This module focuses on the development of state-funded education, primarily in the UK, but with reference to systems of education in other countries. It provides a social history of education and situates it within a broader social history of the public sector. The module draws on archival documents, the media, public policy, academic theory and applied research, and pays particular attention to the role of educators, students and parents in shaping debates around public education.OptionalInvestigative and Courtroom Psychology 2023-24PSY3178MLevel 62023-24The module aims to introduce some of the key areas in Forensic Psychology that occur during the pre-conviction stage of a criminal investigation. Specifically, the module will focus on the police investigation and courtroom stage of the criminal process. It will explore a variety of established theoretical work and research within these domains and consider how this knowledge can be used to inform several key areas of the criminal investigation. The module will highlight the applied importance of Psychology to significant issues in the real-world.OptionalLearning Through Reflection 2023-24EDM3007MLevel 62023-24This module is designed to introduce students to the concept of learning through reflection, where reflection is deliberate, purposeful, and structured. Reflective skills will be linked to theory and practice and will encompass learning, change and development. The module is designed to build on students' critical thinking and critical reflection skills through the close study of educational theory, practice and through the exploration of the educational philosophers, their relevance to modern educational thought and through the development of critical writing skills.OptionalPhilosophy of Education 2023-24EDM3005MLevel 62023-24This optional module is designed to provide students with an insight into education from a philosophical perspective. It considers how curricula, teaching and learning are influenced and shaped by the broader views, values and beliefs of what education is and what it is for. Students can engage critically with the fundamental, and enduring questions about education.OptionalPsychology of Music 2023-24PSY3180MLevel 62023-24This is a module designed to help students to develop their knowledge of human interactions and responses to music. Over the course of the module, students will consider the ways in which we engage with, listen to, perform, and learn about music. This course will aim to provide a better understanding on the role of music in attachment, emotion regulation, social affiliation, the neurological overlap between music and language processing, and the development of humans as a species who enjoy music. Through explaining the research underlying the Psychology of Music we also aim to provide an understanding of how this field builds on and connects with other areas in psychology.OptionalSociology of Education 2023-24EDM3006MLevel 62023-24This module is designed to help students see education sociologically by exploring the relationship between education, individuals and social life, and between learning and power. How do schools and other educational institutions influence peoples life chances? How do the state, religion, family and economic systems shape educational values and practices? Who decides how people should be educated, about what, and why? How are social inequalities of class, race, dis/ability, gender and sexuality produced and challenged through educational theory, policy and practice? What is the relationship between educational and social change? Drawing on historical and contemporary examples in national and international perspective, this module aims to help students map theoretical perspectives and research methods in the sociology of education and apply these in their own thinking and practice.Optional

"Whether you are interested in education in schools, other settings, or more generally, this programme will give you the opportunity to reflect on the philosophy, history, sociology and psychology of learning and teaching."

Dr Helen Childerhouse, Programme Leader

Research

Students will be encouraged, through the study of various modules, to consider education from a global perspective. Whilst formal placements are not currently included in the BSc (Hons) Education and Psychology course, students are encouraged to consider the possibility of taking part in the Lincoln Award.

 

Entry Requirements 2022-23

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English and Maths. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Entry Requirements 2021-22

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English and Maths. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Fees and Scholarships

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

How you are assessed

The aim of module assessments are to provide a measure of the development and attainment of course outcomes, including the attainment of high-level intellectual skills such as critical analysis and evaluation.

Accordingly, the nature of assessment varies across the three levels of the course. Assessments at levels one and two focus on the acquisition and understanding of knowledge and skills. In contrast, the level three assessments place far greater emphasis on the ability to apply, analyse, and evaluate knowledge.

The aim of module assessments are to provide a measure of the development and attainment of course outcomes, including the attainment of high-level intellectual skills such as critical analysis and evaluation.

Accordingly, the nature of assessment varies across the three levels of the course. Assessments at levels one and two focus on the acquisition and understanding of knowledge and skills. In contrast, the level three assessments place far greater emphasis on the ability to apply, analyse, and evaluate knowledge.

Dr Carol Callinan - Programme Leader

Dr Carol Callinan - Programme Leader

Dr Callinan works on the undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in the School of Education. Her expertise are related to Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) and Inclusion. Her research combines learning theories with approaches to supporting the learning needs of children. Furthermore her teaching aims to explore current and relevant topics that prepare students for working with a range of learners in a number of different environments.

School Staff List

What We Look For In Your Application

Applicants should demonstrate an interest in education and psychology in general. We would like to hear about your own thoughts about the education system and psychology and why you are interested in studying this subject at undergraduate level.

Features

This course draws key aspects of education and psychology together in one undergraduate programme. The programme aims to incorporate research-based opportunities and as a result, students can gain the knowledge and skills required for studying aspects of education or psychology of specific interest. The course has been designed to provide a strong base for postgraduate study and beyond.

The four pillars of knowledge; psychology, history, sociology, and philosophy can support a broad understanding of education and psychology, and this in conjunction with the study of local and global issues as well as contemporary psychological theories, aims to enable students to gain depth and breadth in their knowledge.

Study may also include self-funded trips abroad to experience education in other countries. There are currently plans for study abroad visits to Finland and Ireland to observe other global education systems, although these have not been finalised. Students will be responsible for their own travel, accommodation, and living expenses when undertaking such trips.

Visit Us in Person

The best way to find out what it is really like to live and learn at Lincoln is to join us for one of our Open Days. Visiting us in person is important and will help you to get a real feel for what it might be like to study here.

Book Your Place

Related Courses

Teaching and Learning During Covid-19

Information for Offer Holders Joining Us in Autumn 2021

Letter from Acting Head of Lincoln Law School

We are delighted you are interested in joining us at the University of Lincoln and I am writing to let you know about our planning for the new academic year. You currently have an offer of a place at the University and we want to keep you updated so you can start preparing for your future, should you be successful in meeting any outstanding conditions of your offer.

We fully intend your experience with us at Lincoln will be engaging, supportive and academically challenging. We are determined to provide our students with a safe and exciting campus experience, ensuring you benefit from the best that both face-to-face and online teaching offer. We have kept our focus on friendliness and community spirit at Lincoln and we look forward to your participation in that community.

As you know, the UK Government has published its roadmap for the easing of Coronavirus lockdown restrictions in England. There are still some uncertainties for universities around possible restrictions for the next academic year, particularly in relation to social distancing in large group teaching. We are planning in line with government guidance for both face-to-face and online teaching to ensure you have a good campus experience and can complete all the requirements for your programme.  We are fully prepared to adapt and flex our plans if changes in government regulations make this necessary during the year. 

Face-to-face teaching and interaction with tutors and course mates are key to students’ learning and the broader student experience. Face-to-face sessions will be prioritised where it is most valuable, particularly for seminars, tutorials, workshops, practicals and lab sessions. Students tell us that there are real benefits to some elements of online learning within a blended approach, such as revisiting recorded materials and developing new digital skills and confidence.  At Lincoln we aim to take forward the best aspects of both.

This letter sets out in detail various aspects of the planned experience at Lincoln for your chosen subject area, and we hope the information is helpful as you plan for your future.

Teaching and Learning

The undergraduate law degrees at Lincoln have been developed to advance students’ understanding of the changing and dynamic nature of law and how it operates in practice. There is the opportunity to gain important practical legal skills, such as mooting, and a chance to take part in the Lincoln Law Clinic, a pro bono law clinic which handles real cases.

Our programme enable students to progress their knowledge of substantive law and to think about law practically. Students are encouraged to build an understanding of the context of the English legal system – its origins, history, and practices – and reflect upon policy and the social, political, ethical, philosophical, and cultural contexts in which the law operates.

The programmes are taught through a blend of lectures, seminars, workshops, and online learning sessions and associated activities. Face-to-face sessions will be prioritised where it is most valuable, particularly for seminars, tutorials, and workshops.

In addition, further activities such as personal development workshops (covering topics such as study skills, assessment skills, and career planning) will be offered on a fortnightly basis. Each student will be allocated a personal tutor, who is their point of contact for guidance and support, and regular personal tutor meetings will take place during the year. The remainder of your time should be spent on individual study and research, which is a core component of any university course.

Students undertaking the programmes may also wish to benefit from an optional study abroad period between their second and third years. Previous students have studied in Norway, South Africa, and Japan. Limited places are available and are allocated competitively, subject to academic criteria. Please note that students are responsible for their own travel, accommodation, and general living costs when studying abroad.

The way students are assessed on the programmes may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations and moots; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year.

On successful completion of your programme, you will be awarded an LL.B. Hons degree, bearing the name of your programme of study (Single Honours; Law and Criminlogy; Law for Business). Each degree would be of interest to those wishing to qualify as solicitors or barristers and will provide a foundation of knowledge for students to take with them onto the relevant SQE (Solicitors’ Qulaifying Examinations) preparation course, or BPC (Bar Professional Training Course) following graduation.  The degrees also open the door to a wide range of graduate careers, including in business, finance, management, and government service.

You can look forward to more information from the Law School closer to the start of term.

The University Campus

We are very proud of our beautiful and vibrant campuses at the University of Lincoln and we have used our extensive indoor and outdoor spaces to provide students with access to study and social areas as well as learning resources and facilities, adapting them where necessary in line with government guidance. All the mitigations and safety measures you would expect are in place on our campuses (at Lincoln, Riseholme and Holbeach), such as hand sanitisers, one-way systems, and other social distancing measures where these are required.

Student Wellbeing and Support

The University’s Student Wellbeing Centre and Student Support Centre are fully open for face-to-face and online support.  Should you, as one of our applicants, have any questions about coming to Lincoln in October or any other concerns, these specialist teams are here for you. You can contact Student Wellbeing and the Student Support Centre by visiting https://studentservices.lincoln.ac.uk where service details and contact information are available, or if you are in Lincoln you can make an appointment to meet a member of the team.

To enable you to make the most out of your experience in Lincoln and to help you access course materials and other services, we recommend that you have a desktop, laptop or tablet device available during your studies. This will enable you to engage easily with our online learning platforms from your student accommodation or from home. Students can use IT equipment on campus in the Library, our learning lounges, and specialist academic areas; however, there may not always be a space free when you have a timetabled session or an assessment to complete which is why we recommend you have your own device too if possible. If you are struggling to access IT equipment or reliable internet services, please contact ICT for technical support and Student Support who can assist you with further advice and information.

We are committed to providing you with the best possible start to university life and to helping you to prepare for your time with us. As part of this commitment, you can access our Student Life pre-arrival online support package. This collection of digital resources, advice and helpful tips created by current students is designed to help you prepare for the all-important first steps into higher education, enabling you to learn within a supportive community and to make the most of the new opportunities that the University of Lincoln provides. When you are ready, you can begin by going to studentlife.lincoln.ac.uk/starting.

Students Union

Your Students’ Union is here to make sure that you get the most from every aspect of your student experience. They will be providing a huge range of in-person and virtual events and opportunities - you are sure to find something perfect for you! Meet people and find a new hobby by joining one of their 150 sports teams and societies. Grab lunch between teaching or a drink with friends in The Swan, Towers or The Barge. Learn new skills and boost your CV by taking part in training courses and volunteering opportunities in your spare time. Grab a bike from the Cycle Hire and explore the city you will be calling home!

To kick-off the new academic year, your Students’ Union will be bringing you The Official Lincoln Freshers Week 2021, with a huge line-up of social events, club nights, fayres and activities for you enjoy (restrictions permitting). Keep an eye on www.facebook.com/lincolnfreshers21 for line-up and ticket updates, so you don’t miss out.

Most importantly, your Students’ Union will always be there for you when you need it most; making sure that your voice as a student is always heard. The SU Advice Centre can provide independent advice and support on housing, finance, welfare and academic issues. As well as this, your Course Reps are always on hand to make sure that you are getting the best from your academic experience. To find out more about the Students’ Union’s events, opportunities, support and how to get in contact go to: www.lincolnsu.com

Student Accommodation

Many applicants will choose to live in dedicated student accommodation on, or close to, campus and you may well have already booked your student residence for the upcoming year. All University-managed student accommodation will have our Residential Wardens in place. Residential Wardens are here to help you settle into your new accommodation and will be offering flatmate and residential support activities throughout the year. If you have booked University accommodation, you will have already heard from us with further details on where you will be living to help you prepare. If you have not yet booked your accommodation, we still have plenty of options available. In the meantime, lots of advice and information can be found on the accommodation pages of our website: https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studentlife/accommodation/

The information detailed in this letter will form part of your agreement with the University of Lincoln. If we do not hear from you to the contrary prior to enrolment, we will assume that you acknowledge and accept the information contained in this letter. Adaptations to how we work may have to be made in line with any future changes in government guidance, and we will communicate these with you as necessary. Please do review the University’s Admissions Terms and Conditions (in particular sections 8 and 9) and Student Complaints Procedure so you understand your rights and the  agreement between the University and its students.

We very much hope this information is useful to help you plan for the next step in your academic journey, and we look forward to welcoming you here at Lincoln this Autumn. This is the start of a new phase and will be an exciting time for all of us. If you have any questions, please do email me at mheathcote@linco;n.ac.uk 

Very Best Wishes,

Martyn Heathcote

Acting Head of Lincoln Law School

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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