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3 years

Part-time

6 years

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Brayford Pool

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Validated

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UCAS Code

W400

Course Code

DRADRAUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Part-time

6 years

Typical Offer

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Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

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UCAS Code

W400

Course Code

DRADRAUB

BA (Hons) Drama and Theatre BA (Hons) Drama and Theatre

Students can work and perform in the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre, a £6 million, 450-seat theatre situated on campus.

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Part-time

6 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

W400

Course Code

DRADRAUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Part-time

6 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

W400

Course Code

DRADRAUB

Select Year of Entry

Dr Arya Madhavan - Programme Leader

Dr Arya Madhavan - Programme Leader

Arya Madhavan joined the University in 2008 after completing her PhD from the University of Aberystwyth. Arya is a trained performer of Indian theatre and dance traditions with a specialism in Kutiyattam, the oldest surviving theatre form in the world. She is leading research on Women in Asian Performance and brought out the Routledge anthology titled 'Women in Asian Performance: Aesthetics and Politics' in 2017. She continues to research and write on Indian theatre/dance and is currently contributing to the OUP volume on Indian Dance.

School Staff List

Welcome to BA (Hons) Drama and Theatre

Our Drama and Theatre degree gives you the opportunity to create, perform, and examine innovative theatre and performance.

Led by experts in drama and theatre research, professional performers, theatre makers, and industry specialists, this course is designed to prepare you for a range of careers in drama, theatre, and the cultural industries.

Exploring theatre and performance from a variety of current and global perspectives, including different cultures, histories, politics, aesthetics and ethics, you can develop a detailed understanding of theatre and its important place in our modern lives.

Through a mixture of core and optional modules, both practical and theoretical, you have the opportunity to curate your own journey through the programme, and can choose to focus on Contemporary Theatre Practice, Theatre and Performance Studies, and Technical Theatre and Production.

Our course also provides opportunities for you to perform, create and participate in a variety of performances, trips, and events with a range of partners including interdisciplinary students, professional artists and performers, and external organisations. Recently we've worked with organisations including the BBC, National Youth Theatre, Nottingham Playhouse, and the Royal Air Force.

Welcome to BA (Hons) Drama and Theatre

Our Drama and Theatre degree gives you the opportunity to create, perform, and examine innovative theatre and performance.

Led by experts in drama and theatre research, professional performers, theatre makers, and industry specialists, this course is designed to prepare you for a range of careers in drama, theatre, and the cultural industries.

Exploring theatre and performance from a variety of current and global perspectives, including different cultures, histories, politics, aesthetics and ethics, you can develop a detailed understanding of theatre and its important place in our modern lives.

Through a mixture of core and optional modules, both practical and theoretical, you have the opportunity to curate your own journey through the programme, and can choose to focus on Contemporary Theatre Practice, Theatre and Performance Studies, and Technical Theatre and Production.

Our course also provides opportunities for you to perform, create and participate in a variety of performances, trips, and events with a range of partners including interdisciplinary students, professional artists and performers, and external organisations. Recently we've worked with organisations including the BBC, National Youth Theatre, Nottingham Playhouse, and the Royal Air Force.

How You Study

The BA (Hons) Drama and Theatre degree interrogates practice and theory side by side, creating a broad, interconnected range of knowledge and experience for our students. Teaching practice in the School diverse and takes place mainly through lectures, seminars, studio-based workshops, and individual tutorials. You may also receive opportunities to engage in practical workshops and talks delivered by a variety of guests including practitioners, academics, and industry leaders. Students may have the opportunity to participate in external visits and theatre trips, where offered.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

How You Study

The BA (Hons) Drama and Theatre degree interrogates practice and theory side by side, creating a broad, interconnected range of knowledge and experience for our students. Teaching practice in the School diverse and takes place mainly through lectures, seminars, studio-based workshops, and individual tutorials. You may also receive opportunities to engage in practical workshops and talks delivered by a variety of guests including practitioners, academics, and industry leaders. Students may have the opportunity to participate in external visits and theatre trips, where offered.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

Teaching and Learning During Covid-19

Information for Offer Holders Joining Us in Autumn 2021

Letter from Head of School of Fine and Performing Arts

We are delighted you are interested in joining us at the University of Lincoln and I am writing to let you know about our planning for the new academic year. You currently have an offer of a place at the University and we want to keep you updated so you can start preparing for your future, should you be successful in meeting any outstanding conditions of your offer.

We fully intend your experience with us at Lincoln will be engaging, supportive and academically challenging. We are determined to provide our students with a safe and exciting campus experience, ensuring you benefit from the best that both face-to-face and online teaching offer. We have kept our focus on friendliness and community spirit at Lincoln and we look forward to your participation in that community.

As you know, the UK Government has published its roadmap for the easing of Coronavirus lockdown restrictions in England. There are still some uncertainties for universities around possible restrictions for the next academic year, particularly in relation to social distancing in large group teaching. We are planning in line with government guidance for both face-to-face and online teaching to ensure you have a good campus experience and can complete all the requirements for your programme. We are fully prepared to adapt and flex our plans if changes in government regulations make this necessary during the year.

Face-to-face teaching and interaction with tutors and course mates are key to students’ learning and the broader student experience. Face-to-face sessions will be prioritised where it is most valuable, particularly for seminars, tutorials, workshops and practical studio work (including rehearsals). Students tell us that there are real benefits to some elements of online learning within a blended approach, such as revisiting recorded materials and developing new digital skills and confidence. At Lincoln we aim to take forward the best aspects of both.

This letter sets out in detail various aspects of the planned experience at Lincoln for your chosen subject area, and we hope the information is helpful as you plan for your future.

Teaching and Learning

Your programme will follow an on-campus, blended-learning model. This will involve a range of different learning styles where you will be able to engage with your tutors and peers in physical and virtual environments.

We are planning the majority of your teaching to be delivered face to face. This means that you will be on campus for sessions like workshops, studio classes, practical and performance work. We will also be using the benefits of online learning and teaching, particularly for large lectures, which may be delivered as live sessions in which you can interact with others, and/or recorded sessions that you can access whenever you want.

Our efforts to develop your employability within and outside of the curriculum will remain a key focus during your time at Lincoln. As your course progresses, you will be assessed in various ways, including coursework and examinations which may be online. Many of our assessment types involve live or performance work, and these will all be run safely and in line with Government guidance. The School’s various social media channels are full of great examples of live performance work that we’ve already undertaken this year.

The spaces on campus where your teaching will take place, such as performance and dance studios in the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre, our Fine Art Studios, or our Music rehearsal rooms, will be managed in ways that maximise your learning experience while also safeguarding your health and wellbeing in line with the latest Government guidance.

Should a change in Government guidance require a return to lockdown, we are ready to move fully online for the required period. We did this twice last year and managed to successfully deliver our curriculum and maintain our sense of community. Any changes of this kind will be communicated by email from myself and/or the university.

To complete your assignments, you will need a laptop or desktop computer. For some of our programmes, computers capable of running Adobe’s Creative Cloud software are helpful. For those that require it, we will provide an Adobe Creative Cloud license so that you can access this software at the start of your studies. All students will be provided with full access to Microsoft Office 365.

To support you in your studies, you will be assigned a Personal Tutor – a member of academic staff who is your designated ‘go to’ person for advice and support, both pastoral and academic. You will meet with them regularly in person and/or online. It is important to remember that independent learning is an essential aspect of your programme. Guided reading and other independent engagement remain key to performing well in your studies.

We are very much looking forward to welcoming you on campus in October for your induction events and supporting you as you embark on this new and exciting chapter in your life. 

The University Campus

We are very proud of our beautiful and vibrant campuses at the University of Lincoln and we have used our extensive indoor and outdoor spaces to provide students with access to study and social areas as well as learning resources and facilities, adapting them where necessary in line with government guidance. All the mitigations and safety measures you would expect are in place on our campuses (at Lincoln, Riseholme and Holbeach), such as hand sanitisers, one-way systems, and other social distancing measures where these are required.

Student Wellbeing and Support

The University’s Student Wellbeing Centre and Student Support Centre are fully open for face-to-face and online support. Should you, as one of our applicants, have any questions about coming to Lincoln in October or any other concerns, these specialist teams are here for you. You can contact Student Wellbeing and the Student Support Centre by visiting https://studentservices.lincoln.ac.uk where service details and contact information are available, or if you are in Lincoln you can make an appointment to meet a member of the team.

To enable you to make the most out of your experience in Lincoln and to help you access course materials and other services, we recommend that you have a desktop, laptop or tablet device available during your studies. This will enable you to engage easily with our online learning platforms from your student accommodation or from home. Students can use IT equipment on campus in the Library, our learning lounges, and specialist academic areas; however, there may not always be a space free when you have a timetabled session or an assessment to complete which is why we recommend you have your own device too, if possible. If you are struggling to access IT equipment or reliable internet services, please contact ICT for technical support and Student Support who can assist you with further advice and information.

We are committed to providing you with the best possible start to university life and to helping you to prepare for your time with us. As part of this commitment, you can access our Student Life pre-arrival online support package. This collection of digital resources, advice and helpful tips created by current students is designed to help you prepare for the all-important first steps into higher education, enabling you to learn within a supportive community and to make the most of the new opportunities that the University of Lincoln provides. When you are ready, you can begin by going to studentlife.lincoln.ac.uk/starting.

Students’ Union

Your Students’ Union is here to make sure that you get the most from every aspect of your student experience. They will be providing a huge range of in-person and virtual events and opportunities - you are sure to find something perfect for you! Meet people and find a new hobby by joining one of their 150 sports teams and societies. Grab lunch between teaching or a drink with friends in The Swan, Towers or The Barge. Learn new skills and boost your CV by taking part in training courses and volunteering opportunities in your spare time. Grab a bike from the Cycle Hire and explore the city you will be calling home.

To start off the new academic year, your Students’ Union will be bringing you The Official Lincoln Freshers Week 2021, with a huge line-up of social events, club nights, fayres and activities for you enjoy (restrictions permitting). Keep an eye on www.facebook.com/lincolnfreshers21 for line-up and ticket updates, so you don’t miss out.

Most importantly, your Students’ Union will always be there for you when you need it most; making sure that your voice as a student is always heard. The SU Advice Centre can provide independent advice and support on housing, finance, welfare and academic issues. As well as this, your Course Representatives are always on hand to make sure that you are getting the best from your academic experience. To find out more about the Students’ Union’s events, opportunities, support and how to get in contact go to: www.lincolnsu.com.

Student Accommodation

Many applicants will choose to live in dedicated student accommodation on, or close to, campus and you may well have already booked your student residence for the upcoming year. All University-managed student accommodation will have our Residential Wardens in place. Residential Wardens are here to help you settle into your new accommodation and will be offering flatmate and residential support activities throughout the year. If you have booked University accommodation, you will have already heard from us with further details on where you will be living to help you prepare. If you have not yet booked your accommodation, we still have plenty of options available. In the meantime, lots of advice and information can be found on the accommodation pages of our website.

The information detailed in this letter will form part of your agreement with the University of Lincoln. If we do not hear from you to the contrary prior to enrolment, we will assume that you acknowledge and accept the information contained in this letter. Adaptations to how we work may have to be made in line with any future changes in government guidance, and we will communicate these with you as necessary. Please do review the University’s Admissions Terms and Conditions (in particular sections 8 and 9) and Student Complaints Procedure so you understand your rights and the agreement between the University and its students.

We very much hope this information is useful to help you plan for the next step in your academic journey, and we look forward to welcoming you here at Lincoln this Autumn. This is the start of a new phase and will be an exciting time for all of us. If you have any questions, please do email me at awesterside@lincoln.ac.uk.

Dr Andrew Westerside

Head of the School of Fine and Performing Arts

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Devising and Making 2022-23DRA1046MLevel 42022-23A practice-based introduction to the foundational elements of performance technique and performance making, in this module students may undertake instruction in vocal and physical technique, learning the fundamentals of movement for theatre, spatial and ensemble awareness and the operation of the voice. Alongside these, weekly workshops investigate the theories and methodologies that underpin performance making. As they develop an applied understanding of technique and the ability to engage in critical reflection, students can form groups and work towards devising original performances which are showcased at the end of the semester.CoreEnsemble Show 2022-23DRA1047MLevel 42022-23This module is the practical culmination of Level One, in which the skills and techniques of performance and devising learned in Devising & Making are implemented in a larger group ensemble context. Here students may devise, produce, and perform a piece of original theatre based on their exploration of a particular theme, idea, or concept, with the performances taking place in the main auditorium at Lincoln Performing Arts Centre.CoreThinking Theatre 1 2022-23DRA1049MLevel 42022-23This core module introduces students to some of the most significant plays, playwrights, practitioners, traditions and movements throughout the history of theatre as they relate to guiding thematic concepts such as Place, Justice, Money, War, Marriage/Love, amongst others. Theatrical conventions studied might include Naturalism, Brechts Epic Theatre, the Theatre of the Absurd, international theatre practice and may cover a chronological range running from the theatre of the Ancient Greeks all the way to contemporary performance. Both practical and theoretical, students will critically engage with the material in lectures and seminars, and participate in workshops and script-work, working in a group towards the final performance of a scene from a piece they have encountered on the module.CoreThinking Theatre 2 2022-23DRA1050MLevel 42022-23This core module introduces students to some of the most significant plays, playwrights, practitioners, traditions and movements throughout the history of theatre as they relate to guiding thematic concepts such as Place, Justice, Money, War, Marriage/Love, amongst others. Theatrical conventions studied might include Naturalism, Brechts Epic Theatre, the Theatre of the Absurd, international theatre practice and may cover a chronological range running from the theatre of the Ancient Greeks all the way to contemporary performance. Both practical and theoretical, students will critically engage with the material in lectures and seminars, and participate in workshops and script-work, working in a group towards the final performance of a scene from a piece they have encountered on the module.CoreTheatre, Theory and Society 2023-24DRA2049MLevel 52023-24This module builds on - and moves beyond - the theoretical and cultural perspectives covered in first year to explore their real world relationships with a range of contemporary theatrical forms. You'll examine such ideas as body, space, time and audience within different national and international contexts. In doing so, you'll have the chance to develop a holistic understanding of theatre, considering its components and incarnations through analysis of case studies that may be drawn from live performance, scripts, as well as visual and video documentation. We encourage you to interrogate face-value assumptions and to unpack the various power relations in which contemporary theatre engages. In order to achieve this, the module promotes consideration of the social, cultural, and political positioning of diverse audiences, artists and performances. You'll have the opportunity to reach further towards sophisticated synthesis, to develop your skills in critical analysis, and to enhance your knowledge of how theatre, theory, and society intersect in todays world.CoreCollaborative Elective 2023-24DRA2043MLevel 52023-24This module enables groups of students from mixed disciplines to work together on a large-scale, interdisciplinary project. The module takes as its starting point a project brief from either an internal or external partner commissioning the student group to undertake and complete a collaborative project exploring pertinent cultural issues.OptionalContemporary Political Playwriting 2023-24DRA2045MLevel 52023-24In this module students have the opportunity to study a range of contemporary dramatic texts and performances grouped thematically into three key areas of contemporary cultural context: Neoliberalism; Borders and Nations; and Climate Change and the Environment. Applying the skills of close critical analysis developed throughout the course, students are expected to consider how contemporary theatre is engaging with the social, political and environmental fallout of 'the end of history' and examine the various dramaturgical strategies employed by contemporary theatre-makers to address these challenges. The module runs as a series of practical sessions in which the plays are workshopped as well as discussion-based seminars.OptionalDesigning Stages 2023-24DRA2046MLevel 52023-24How have the practices of lighting, spatial, sound and costume design developed over time? In what ways can ideas developed by pioneers of modern scenography be tested and put into practice today? How do spaces, bodies, materials and technologies interact in the production of meaning in theatre and performance? This 30-credit, Level 2 module introduces key aspects of the histories, theories and practices of scenography and performance design. In this module students can navigate these subjects historically, theoretically, and practically, exploring how different elements of design can work in tandem. As such, they may be exposed to ideas of how we might understand and apply a range of visual, spatial, material, sonic and other practices in live performance contexts.OptionalDrama Study Abroad 2023-24DRA2039MLevel 52023-24This module offers the opportunity for students to spend the second Semester of Level 2 living and studying at one of our international partner institutions. During the period abroad, students will share classes and modules of study with local students. Not only will students be living and socialising in another culture - providing opportunities to study their respective countries, they will also have an opportunity to examine international theatre practice through attending performances as part of modules and participating in extra-curricular activities.OptionalMusic Theatre 2023-24MUS2012MLevel 52023-24Musical theatre is an interdisciplinary form. Those that perform it require a triple threat skill set (acting, singing, and dancing), and similarly those that produce it need to have an understanding of directing, choreography and composition/arrangement. In this module students will have the opportunity to develop and integrate their skills across these disciplines. While, there will be the option to incorporate both performance and production roles, students will be required to participate in and contribute to the development of material that encompasses acting, dancing, singing/music making. This work will take place in the context of a preparing a piece of Music Theatre (60-90 minutes in length) for public performance. The production itself may take various forms. For instance, it could be a production of an existing Musical, or it could be devised and developed by the group. Similarly, an existing libretto could be set to new Music or vice versa. These decisions will be made by the member of staff directing the production at the beginning of the module.OptionalPlacements (LSFPA) 2023-24DRA2051MLevel 52023-24The Placement module encourages students to engage with the creative industries beyond the University through an 80-hour placement with a business or organisation of their choosing. Through direct workplace experience, students may develop new skills, strengthen existing ones, establish valuable professional networks, and target future employment opportunities. Following the placement students are assessed via presentations where they reflect upon their professional development and the impact of their work with the partner organisation.OptionalSpecialist Elective 2 2023-24DRA2054MLevel 52023-24This module offers students the opportunity to work alongside established academics conducting research into a specialist area of drama, theatre and/or performance studies. Specific module content will be informed by the research expertise of the tutor, who will aim to connect students with the contexts, practices, theories and debates associated with this field of research, developing skills of textual and critical analysis alongside creative and critical practices. Examples of level two Specialist Elective modules offered in past years include The Musical and Reactionary Politics and Modern Drama.OptionalSpecialist Elective B 2023-24DRA2053MLevel 52023-24OptionalStage Combat 2023-24DRA2037MLevel 52023-24This module aims to teach students the basics of engaging in stage combat and gives them the option of progressing to the Academy of Performance Combat Basic Three Weapon exam.OptionalStaging Shakespeare & Co 2023-24DRA2044MLevel 52023-24This practically-based module engages with selected plays of the Early Modern period and uses them as texts for performance on the contemporary stage. Working both as dramaturgs and performers, students can form a production ensemble and stage an Early Modern classic presented on the main auditorium of the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre. Students may connect their interpretation and re-interpretation the text and its performance history with their own ideas and experiences to situate the Early Modern text within our contemporary cultural moment. Recently staged performances on this module include versions of John Websters The Duchess of Malfi and Christopher Marlowes Dr Faustus.OptionalTeaching Drama 2023-24DRA2052MLevel 52023-24This module introduces students to the theory and practice of teaching drama within a variety of professional and academic contexts. It aims to provide students with a basic repertoire of skills, knowledge and experience for those considering teaching as a career, allowing them to develop and apply a range of teaching methods oriented around the way that the subject of drama is learned and taught. Key to the teaching and learning strategy on the module is engaging directly in schools or other appropriate learning environments.OptionalTechnical Theatre 2023-24DRA2048MLevel 52023-24How does a theatre performance work? What happens behind the scenes for a performance to operate effectively? The Technical Theatre module provides students with the opportunity to improve their understanding of creating and operating a theatrical performance through both theoretical and practical based workshops, demonstrating common principles and practices within the subject of technical theatre and Stage Management.OptionalTheatre Practice 2023-24DRA2050MLevel 52023-24This module on the Contemporary Theatre Practice pathway will introduce students to practical strategies for the making of performance in the real-world contemporary theatre industry. The focus is on approaching performance through the lens of a professional practitioner. While we take existing models from contemporary theatre companies and theatre makers, we are also interested in developing a professional skill-set and attitude at this level and enabling students to consider themselves on their professional trajectory as makers. Students can explore the associated practices of improvising, devising and dramaturgy. Companies and theatre makers covered on the module include Massive Owl, Forced Entertainment, Goat Island, Gob Squad, Action Hero, The Wooster Group, Reckless Sleepers, Lone Twin, Uninvited Guests, Proto-type. The teaching team includes staff who have worked with these companies and have direct experience of making theatre today.OptionalTheatres of Experiment: the Avant-Garde 2023-24DRA2042MLevel 52023-24This module explores the genealogies, practices, politics, cultural legacy and impact of the European Avant-garde circa 1880-1930 and can turn to more recent developments in the course of the module. Students may study the theories, manifestoes, interventions and artworks from key movements including: Symbolism, Futurism, German Expressionism, DaDa, Surrealism, Absurdism and Russian Constructivism, before turning to contemporary expressions of avant-garde practice such as 1960s Happenings and the Fluxus Group. The module asks: What can the theatre and other practices of these avant-garde movements and landmark practitioners teach us in our approach to making theatre today? Where can vestiges of avant-gardism be seen in diverse contemporary performances and artworks? And how do avant-garde artists attempt to create radical fusions of art, life and politics?OptionalDegree Show Festival 2024-25DRA3059MLevel 62024-25Final Project allows students the opportunity to work collaboratively to produce their Degree Show performance. Students will work together to propose and deliver an ambitious, large-scale performance that builds on their three years of experience on the Theatre programme. Embracing a broad spectrum of theatrical modes and genres, work may include (but not limited to) site-based pieces, restagings and adaptations, devised performance, intermedial, physical theatre and live art. All performances will have the opportunity to be shown in the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre as part of its professional programme.CoreArts and Cultural Industries 2024-25DRA3056MLevel 62024-25This module offers you the opportunity to develop a detailed understanding of the arts as an ecosystem in relation to the wider world. You'll be introduced to the organisational infrastructure of the creative sector to equip you for a career in the arts and enhance your core employability skills for life after graduation. Acknowledging that what happens offstage is as important, if not more important than what happens onstage, this module provides you with real-world guidance for working in creative and cultural industries though lectures, discussion, group and individual working, research, and a series of talks and presentations from industry professionals working in a variety of creative contexts. You'll also be encouraged to keep abreast of government policy and issues such as audience accessibility and diversity within the arts, and ask how the current political climate shapes this generation of arts organisations, makers and companies.OptionalCabaret, Satire & Song 2024-25DRA3062MLevel 62024-25What does it mean to be popular? Why are popular performance modes such as clowning, cabaret, the musical and stand-up comedy so often overlooked within the serious study of theatre? In this module, students can engage with the historical, theoretical and practical contexts of a range of popular performance forms.OptionalDirecting 2024-25DRA3077MLevel 62024-25What is the role of the director? What is the difference between directing an existing text and directing a piece 'from scratch'? What are the artistic and aesthetic concerns of the director, and what does it mean to direct theatre in the twenty-first century? This module introduces students to the practical process of classical and contemporary methodologies for directing theatre, from researching the script, through casting and rehearsals to auteurship, guided improvisation, and material development.OptionalDissertation (15c) 2024-25DRA3057MLevel 62024-25The Dissertation module provides the opportunity for a student to investigate and pursue a theatre and performance arts topic of his or her own choosing over an extended piece of academic writing. Each student is allocated a supervisor that will help them to select and refine a topic appropriate for extended study, evaluate progress and read and offer feedback on draft work. Students will be expected to work on their own initiative to undertake research and synthesise it into a logical and original argument in the form of a 4,500 piece of scholarly writing.OptionalDissertation (30c) 2024-25DRA3058MLevel 62024-25The Dissertation module provides the opportunity for a student to investigate and pursue a theatre and performance arts topic of his or her own choosing over an extended piece of academic writing. Each student is allocated a supervisor that will help them to select and refine a topic appropriate for extended study, evaluate progress and read and offer feedback on draft work. Students will be expected to work on their own initiative to undertake research and synthesise it into a logical and original argument in the form of a 9,000 word piece of scholarly writing.OptionalPerformance, Media & New Technologies 2024-25DRA3061MLevel 62024-25What happens when performance meets new technology? How can digital technologies reshape and reconfigure the possibilities for performative and aesthetic experience? In this module students can practically engage with a range of new and broadcast technologies to develop a piece of performance practice that explores the relationships between technology and the experience of performance.OptionalPhysical Theatre 2024-25DRA3048MLevel 62024-25In this module you'll explore a range of approaches to the constantly evolving field of Physical Theatre. Through a series of workshops, you will investigate different techniques, styles, methodologies ranging from classical traditions to contemporary performance. You'll have the opportunity to gain a practical and analytical insight into the countless possibilities of the body in performance - in relation to other bodies, to the space, to the audience. You will work to develop skills that will equip you to use the body expressively, imaginatively, communicatively, collaboratively. You will engage with and draw inspiration from a variety of stimuli - words, images, sounds, scents, objects, culture and society - in order to devise original performances, using the body as the primary vehicle to generate, express and communicate meaning.OptionalPostdramatic Theatre 2024-25DRA3063MLevel 62024-25Emerging in the twentieth century, postdramatic theatre calls into question such fundamentals of dramatic theatre such character, plot and dialogue, inviting us to conceive of a theatre beyond representation. This module asks why? and how?, in both practical and theoretical contexts.OptionalProfessional Production 2024-25DRA3078MLevel 62024-25OptionalSolo Performance 2024-25DRA3065MLevel 62024-25This module enables students to explore and analyse the various techniques of producing material which will eventually lead to the production of a Solo Performance. During the course of the module, students are expected to analyse and engage with the work of a variety of contemporary solo artists which will influence and guide their work. Engagement with a wide variety of Solo artists is important and the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre will provide a rich vein of resources in the form of incoming artists. These opportunities for students on this module are designed to enable them to discover a personal voice and a unique voice as a solo performance artist.OptionalSpecialist Elective II Semester A 2024-25DRA3064MLevel 62024-25This module offers students the opportunity to work alongside established academics conducting research into a specialist area of drama, theatre and/or performance studies. Specific module content will be informed by the research expertise of the tutor, who will connect students with the contexts, practices, theories and debates associated with this field of research, developing skills of textual and critical analysis alongside creative and critical practices.OptionalSpecialist Elective II Semester B 2024-25DRA3075MLevel 62024-25This module offers students the opportunity to work alongside established academics conducting research into a specialist area of drama, theatre and/or performance studies. Specific module content will be informed by the research expertise of the tutor, who will connect students with the contexts, practices, theories and debates associated with this field of research, developing skills of textual and critical analysis alongside creative and critical practices.OptionalTheatre for Young Audiences 2024-25DRA3066MLevel 62024-25What part does theatre play in the lives of children today? How do we make such theatre relevant, accessible and alive in a world dominated by screen-based interaction? What is the most appropriate setting and subject matter to engage children in a theatrical experience? Students can form small groups and devise short performances designed to tour to Primary Schools in the City of Lincoln. The tour will usually play in a different Primary School every day for one working week, with audience sizes ranging from 80 - 300 children. The tour will replicate a professional touring model, accompanied by a dedicated Technician with a full complement of audio, visual and lighting equipment. The audience will usually comprise of 4 - 7 year old children, their teachers and teaching or learning assistants. Students will require DBS Checks to tour, and these will be provided by the School of Fine and Performing Arts.OptionalWriting for the Stage 2024-25DRA3060MLevel 62024-25This 30-credit Level 3 module will investigate different modes of writing for, through and in performance. The module introduces radical new dramaturgies and the potentiality of text as material, site and set. Students can develop approaches, strategies and techniques for writing for performance, inclusive of the notion of writing-as-performance, and a critical understanding of their application in theatre today.Optional

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Devising and Making 2021-22DRA1046MLevel 42021-22A practice-based introduction to the foundational elements of performance technique and performance making, in this module students may undertake instruction in vocal and physical technique, learning the fundamentals of movement for theatre, spatial and ensemble awareness and the operation of the voice. Alongside these, weekly workshops investigate the theories and methodologies that underpin performance making. As they develop an applied understanding of technique and the ability to engage in critical reflection, students can form groups and work towards devising original performances which are showcased at the end of the semester.CoreEnsemble Show 2021-22DRA1047MLevel 42021-22This module is the practical culmination of Level One, in which the skills and techniques of performance and devising learned in Devising & Making are implemented in a larger group ensemble context. Here students may devise, produce, and perform a piece of original theatre based on their exploration of a particular theme, idea, or concept, with the performances taking place in the main auditorium at Lincoln Performing Arts Centre.CoreThinking Theatre 1 2021-22DRA1049MLevel 42021-22This core module introduces students to some of the most significant plays, playwrights, practitioners, traditions and movements throughout the history of theatre as they relate to guiding thematic concepts such as Place, Justice, Money, War, Marriage/Love, amongst others. Theatrical conventions studied might include Naturalism, Brechts Epic Theatre, the Theatre of the Absurd, international theatre practice and may cover a chronological range running from the theatre of the Ancient Greeks all the way to contemporary performance. Both practical and theoretical, students will critically engage with the material in lectures and seminars, and participate in workshops and script-work, working in a group towards the final performance of a scene from a piece they have encountered on the module.CoreThinking Theatre 2 2021-22DRA1050MLevel 42021-22This core module introduces students to some of the most significant plays, playwrights, practitioners, traditions and movements throughout the history of theatre as they relate to guiding thematic concepts such as Place, Justice, Money, War, Marriage/Love, amongst others. Theatrical conventions studied might include Naturalism, Brechts Epic Theatre, the Theatre of the Absurd, international theatre practice and may cover a chronological range running from the theatre of the Ancient Greeks all the way to contemporary performance. Both practical and theoretical, students will critically engage with the material in lectures and seminars, and participate in workshops and script-work, working in a group towards the final performance of a scene from a piece they have encountered on the module.CoreTheatre, Theory and Society 2022-23DRA2049MLevel 52022-23This module builds on - and moves beyond - the theoretical and cultural perspectives covered in first year to explore their real world relationships with a range of contemporary theatrical forms. You'll examine such ideas as body, space, time and audience within different national and international contexts. In doing so, you'll have the chance to develop a holistic understanding of theatre, considering its components and incarnations through analysis of case studies that may be drawn from live performance, scripts, as well as visual and video documentation. We encourage you to interrogate face-value assumptions and to unpack the various power relations in which contemporary theatre engages. In order to achieve this, the module promotes consideration of the social, cultural, and political positioning of diverse audiences, artists and performances. You'll have the opportunity to reach further towards sophisticated synthesis, to develop your skills in critical analysis, and to enhance your knowledge of how theatre, theory, and society intersect in todays world.CoreCollaborative Elective 2022-23DRA2043MLevel 52022-23This module enables groups of students from mixed disciplines to work together on a large-scale, interdisciplinary project. The module takes as its starting point a project brief from either an internal or external partner commissioning the student group to undertake and complete a collaborative project exploring pertinent cultural issues.OptionalContemporary Political Playwriting 2022-23DRA2045MLevel 52022-23In this module students have the opportunity to study a range of contemporary dramatic texts and performances grouped thematically into three key areas of contemporary cultural context: Neoliberalism; Borders and Nations; and Climate Change and the Environment. Applying the skills of close critical analysis developed throughout the course, students are expected to consider how contemporary theatre is engaging with the social, political and environmental fallout of 'the end of history' and examine the various dramaturgical strategies employed by contemporary theatre-makers to address these challenges. The module runs as a series of practical sessions in which the plays are workshopped as well as discussion-based seminars.OptionalDesigning Stages 2022-23DRA2046MLevel 52022-23How have the practices of lighting, spatial, sound and costume design developed over time? In what ways can ideas developed by pioneers of modern scenography be tested and put into practice today? How do spaces, bodies, materials and technologies interact in the production of meaning in theatre and performance? This 30-credit, Level 2 module introduces key aspects of the histories, theories and practices of scenography and performance design. In this module students can navigate these subjects historically, theoretically, and practically, exploring how different elements of design can work in tandem. As such, they may be exposed to ideas of how we might understand and apply a range of visual, spatial, material, sonic and other practices in live performance contexts.OptionalDrama Study Abroad 2022-23DRA2039MLevel 52022-23This module offers the opportunity for students to spend the second Semester of Level 2 living and studying at one of our international partner institutions. During the period abroad, students will share classes and modules of study with local students. Not only will students be living and socialising in another culture - providing opportunities to study their respective countries, they will also have an opportunity to examine international theatre practice through attending performances as part of modules and participating in extra-curricular activities.OptionalMusic Theatre 2022-23MUS2012MLevel 52022-23Musical theatre is an interdisciplinary form. Those that perform it require a triple threat skill set (acting, singing, and dancing), and similarly those that produce it need to have an understanding of directing, choreography and composition/arrangement. In this module students will have the opportunity to develop and integrate their skills across these disciplines. While, there will be the option to incorporate both performance and production roles, students will be required to participate in and contribute to the development of material that encompasses acting, dancing, singing/music making. This work will take place in the context of a preparing a piece of Music Theatre (60-90 minutes in length) for public performance. The production itself may take various forms. For instance, it could be a production of an existing Musical, or it could be devised and developed by the group. Similarly, an existing libretto could be set to new Music or vice versa. These decisions will be made by the member of staff directing the production at the beginning of the module.OptionalPlacements (LSFPA) 2022-23DRA2051MLevel 52022-23The Placement module encourages students to engage with the creative industries beyond the University through an 80-hour placement with a business or organisation of their choosing. Through direct workplace experience, students may develop new skills, strengthen existing ones, establish valuable professional networks, and target future employment opportunities. Following the placement students are assessed via presentations where they reflect upon their professional development and the impact of their work with the partner organisation.OptionalSpecialist Elective 2 2022-23DRA2054MLevel 52022-23This module offers students the opportunity to work alongside established academics conducting research into a specialist area of drama, theatre and/or performance studies. Specific module content will be informed by the research expertise of the tutor, who will aim to connect students with the contexts, practices, theories and debates associated with this field of research, developing skills of textual and critical analysis alongside creative and critical practices. Examples of level two Specialist Elective modules offered in past years include The Musical and Reactionary Politics and Modern Drama.OptionalSpecialist Elective B 2022-23DRA2053MLevel 52022-23OptionalStage Combat 2022-23DRA2037MLevel 52022-23This module aims to teach students the basics of engaging in stage combat and gives them the option of progressing to the Academy of Performance Combat Basic Three Weapon exam.OptionalStaging Shakespeare & Co 2022-23DRA2044MLevel 52022-23This practically-based module engages with selected plays of the Early Modern period and uses them as texts for performance on the contemporary stage. Working both as dramaturgs and performers, students can form a production ensemble and stage an Early Modern classic presented on the main auditorium of the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre. Students may connect their interpretation and re-interpretation the text and its performance history with their own ideas and experiences to situate the Early Modern text within our contemporary cultural moment. Recently staged performances on this module include versions of John Websters The Duchess of Malfi and Christopher Marlowes Dr Faustus.OptionalTeaching Drama 2022-23DRA2052MLevel 52022-23This module introduces students to the theory and practice of teaching drama within a variety of professional and academic contexts. It aims to provide students with a basic repertoire of skills, knowledge and experience for those considering teaching as a career, allowing them to develop and apply a range of teaching methods oriented around the way that the subject of drama is learned and taught. Key to the teaching and learning strategy on the module is engaging directly in schools or other appropriate learning environments.OptionalTechnical Theatre 2022-23DRA2048MLevel 52022-23How does a theatre performance work? What happens behind the scenes for a performance to operate effectively? The Technical Theatre module provides students with the opportunity to improve their understanding of creating and operating a theatrical performance through both theoretical and practical based workshops, demonstrating common principles and practices within the subject of technical theatre and Stage Management.OptionalTheatre Practice 2022-23DRA2050MLevel 52022-23This module on the Contemporary Theatre Practice pathway will introduce students to practical strategies for the making of performance in the real-world contemporary theatre industry. The focus is on approaching performance through the lens of a professional practitioner. While we take existing models from contemporary theatre companies and theatre makers, we are also interested in developing a professional skill-set and attitude at this level and enabling students to consider themselves on their professional trajectory as makers. Students can explore the associated practices of improvising, devising and dramaturgy. Companies and theatre makers covered on the module include Massive Owl, Forced Entertainment, Goat Island, Gob Squad, Action Hero, The Wooster Group, Reckless Sleepers, Lone Twin, Uninvited Guests, Proto-type. The teaching team includes staff who have worked with these companies and have direct experience of making theatre today.OptionalTheatres of Experiment: the Avant-Garde 2022-23DRA2042MLevel 52022-23This module explores the genealogies, practices, politics, cultural legacy and impact of the European Avant-garde circa 1880-1930 and can turn to more recent developments in the course of the module. Students may study the theories, manifestoes, interventions and artworks from key movements including: Symbolism, Futurism, German Expressionism, DaDa, Surrealism, Absurdism and Russian Constructivism, before turning to contemporary expressions of avant-garde practice such as 1960s Happenings and the Fluxus Group. The module asks: What can the theatre and other practices of these avant-garde movements and landmark practitioners teach us in our approach to making theatre today? Where can vestiges of avant-gardism be seen in diverse contemporary performances and artworks? And how do avant-garde artists attempt to create radical fusions of art, life and politics?OptionalDegree Show Festival 2023-24DRA3059MLevel 62023-24Final Project allows students the opportunity to work collaboratively to produce their Degree Show performance. Students will work together to propose and deliver an ambitious, large-scale performance that builds on their three years of experience on the Theatre programme. Embracing a broad spectrum of theatrical modes and genres, work may include (but not limited to) site-based pieces, restagings and adaptations, devised performance, intermedial, physical theatre and live art. All performances will have the opportunity to be shown in the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre as part of its professional programme.CoreArts and Cultural Industries 2023-24DRA3056MLevel 62023-24This module offers you the opportunity to develop a detailed understanding of the arts as an ecosystem in relation to the wider world. You'll be introduced to the organisational infrastructure of the creative sector to equip you for a career in the arts and enhance your core employability skills for life after graduation. Acknowledging that what happens offstage is as important, if not more important than what happens onstage, this module provides you with real-world guidance for working in creative and cultural industries though lectures, discussion, group and individual working, research, and a series of talks and presentations from industry professionals working in a variety of creative contexts. You'll also be encouraged to keep abreast of government policy and issues such as audience accessibility and diversity within the arts, and ask how the current political climate shapes this generation of arts organisations, makers and companies.OptionalCabaret, Satire & Song 2023-24DRA3062MLevel 62023-24What does it mean to be popular? Why are popular performance modes such as clowning, cabaret, the musical and stand-up comedy so often overlooked within the serious study of theatre? In this module, students can engage with the historical, theoretical, and practical contexts of a range of popular performance forms.OptionalDirecting 2023-24DRA3077MLevel 62023-24What is the role of the director? What is the difference between directing an existing text and directing a piece 'from scratch'? What are the artistic and aesthetic concerns of the director, and what does it mean to direct theatre in the twenty-first century? This module introduces students to the practical process of classical and contemporary methodologies for directing theatre, from researching the script, through casting and rehearsals to auteurship, guided improvisation, and material development.OptionalDissertation (15c) 2023-24DRA3057MLevel 62023-24The Dissertation module provides the opportunity for a student to investigate and pursue a theatre and performance arts topic of his or her own choosing over an extended piece of academic writing. Each student is allocated a supervisor that will help them to select and refine a topic appropriate for extended study, evaluate progress and read and offer feedback on draft work. Students will be expected to work on their own initiative to undertake research and synthesise it into a logical and original argument in the form of a 4,500-word piece of scholarly writing.OptionalDissertation (30c) 2023-24DRA3058MLevel 62023-24The Dissertation module provides the opportunity for a student to investigate and pursue a theatre and performance arts topic of his or her own choosing over an extended piece of academic writing. Each student is allocated a supervisor that will help them to select and refine a topic appropriate for extended study, evaluate progress and read and offer feedback on draft work. Students will be expected to work on their own initiative to undertake research and synthesise it into a logical and original argument in the form of a 9,000-word piece of scholarly writing.OptionalPerformance, Media & New Technologies 2023-24DRA3061MLevel 62023-24What happens when performance meets new technology? How can digital technologies reshape and reconfigure the possibilities for performative and aesthetic experience? In this module students can practically engage with a range of new and broadcast technologies to develop a piece of performance practice that explores the relationships between technology and the experience of performance.OptionalPhysical Theatre 2023-24DRA3048MLevel 62023-24In this module students can explore a range of approaches to the constantly evolving field of Physical Theatre. Through a series of workshops, students will investigate different techniques, styles, methodologies ranging from classical traditions to contemporary performance. There will be the opportunity to gain a practical and analytical insight into the countless possibilities of the body in performance - in relation to other bodies, to the space, to the audience. Students will work to develop skills that can equip them to use the body expressively, imaginatively, communicatively, collaboratively. They can engage with and draw inspiration from a variety of stimuli - words, images, sounds, scents, objects, culture and society - in order to devise original performances, using the body as the primary vehicle to generate, express, and communicate meaning.OptionalPostdramatic Theatre 2023-24DRA3063MLevel 62023-24Emerging in the twentieth century, postdramatic theatre calls into question such fundamentals of dramatic theatre such character, plot and dialogue, inviting us to conceive of a theatre beyond representation. This module asks why? and how?, in both practical and theoretical contexts.OptionalProfessional Production 2023-24DRA3078MLevel 62023-24OptionalSolo Performance 2023-24DRA3065MLevel 62023-24This module enables students to explore and analyse the various techniques of producing material which will eventually lead to the production of a Solo Performance. During the course of the module, students are expected to analyse and engage with the work of a variety of contemporary solo artists which will influence and guide their work. Engagement with a wide variety of Solo artists is important and the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre will provide a rich vein of resources in the form of incoming artists. These opportunities for students on this module are designed to enable them to discover a personal voice and a unique voice as a solo performance artist.OptionalSpecialist Elective II Semester A 2023-24DRA3064MLevel 62023-24This module offers students the opportunity to work alongside established academics conducting research into a specialist area of drama, theatre, and/or performance studies. Specific module content will be informed by the research expertise of the tutor, who will connect students with the contexts, practices, theories, and debates associated with this field of research, developing skills of textual and critical analysis alongside creative and critical practices.OptionalSpecialist Elective II Semester B 2023-24DRA3075MLevel 62023-24This module offers students the opportunity to work alongside established academics conducting research into a specialist area of drama, theatre, and/or performance studies. Specific module content will be informed by the research expertise of the tutor, who will connect students with the contexts, practices, theories, and debates associated with this field of research, developing skills of textual and critical analysis alongside creative and critical practices.OptionalTheatre for Young Audiences 2023-24DRA3066MLevel 62023-24What part does theatre play in the lives of children today? How do we make such theatre relevant, accessible and alive in a world dominated by screen-based interaction? What is the most appropriate setting and subject matter to engage children in a theatrical experience? Students can form small groups and devise short performances designed to tour to Primary Schools in the City of Lincoln. The tour will usually play in a different Primary School every day for one working week, with audience sizes ranging from 80 - 300 children. The tour will replicate a professional touring model, accompanied by a dedicated Technician with a full complement of audio, visual and lighting equipment. The audience will usually comprise of 4 - 7 year old children, their teachers and teaching or learning assistants. Students will require DBS Checks to tour, and these will be provided by the School of Fine and Performing Arts.OptionalWriting for the Stage 2023-24DRA3060MLevel 62023-24This 30-credit Level 3 module will investigate different modes of writing for, through and in performance. The module introduces radical new dramaturgies and the potentiality of text as material, site, and set. Students can develop approaches, strategies, and techniques for writing for performance, inclusive of the notion of writing-as-performance, and a critical understanding of their application in theatre today.Optional

How you are assessed

As this course aims to develop a wide range of practical and intellectual skills, assessment is varied and includes presentations, written projects, individual and group practical work, projects, and portfolios, in addition to academic essays.

There are no formal end-of-year examinations. Throughout the degree, students are assessed through their production of practical and written work.

As this course aims to develop a wide range of practical and intellectual skills, assessment is varied and includes presentations, written projects, individual and group practical work, projects, and portfolios, in addition to academic essays.

There are no formal end-of-year examinations. Throughout the degree, students are assessed through their production of practical and written work.

Fees and Scholarships

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

For students who wish to participate in The Lincoln Company's Edinburgh Festival Fringe performances there are additional costs. Students are currently required to contribute £150 towards the cost of attending the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and are responsible for their travel and general living costs.

Accommodation costs in Edinburgh are covered by the University. An approximate break down of these costs includes £570 for travel, accommodation and a levy to participate, and an additional £200-£400 to cover the cost of meals and entertainment during the trip. These costs are based on those incurred by individual students during the 2015 performances.

Those who choose to undertake a period of study abroad are expected to cover their own travel, accommodation, and general living costs.

There may be additional costs associated with external visits.

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

For students who wish to participate in The Lincoln Company's Edinburgh Festival Fringe performances there are additional costs. Students are currently required to contribute £150 towards the cost of attending the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and are responsible for their travel and general living costs.

Accommodation costs in Edinburgh are covered by the University. An approximate break down of these costs includes £570 for travel, accommodation and a levy to participate, and an additional £200-£400 to cover the cost of meals and entertainment during the trip. These costs are based on those incurred by individual students during the 2015 performances.

Those who choose to undertake a period of study abroad are expected to cover their own travel, accommodation, and general living costs.

There may be additional costs associated with external visits.

Entry Requirements 2022-23

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Entry Requirements 2021-22

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Facilities

Students can work and perform in the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre, a £6 million, 450-seat theatre on campus. The Centre hosts a year-round programme of performances from students and national touring companies. Facilities include industry-standard studio and rehearsal spaces.

Each student will receive event/performance credits which can be used against ticketed performances at the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre.

View of the audience seating area from the stage of the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre

Performance Opportunities

As an extracurricular activity, students can join The Lincoln Company, a professional collaboration between students, staff, and practicing artists which performs existing and original works at venues across the country, including runs at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. Students who join the visit to Edinburgh are required to make a contribution towards costs.

The work of The Lincoln Company ranges from new writing to contemporary and experimental performance, and works year-round. Previous work we have toured includes Joe Orton's Loot, David Greig's The Cosmonaut's Letter to the Woman He Once Loved in the Soviet Union, and Michael Pinchbeck's Sit With Us For a Moment and Remember.

The Lincoln Company may also support graduate companies and artists as they embark on professional careers as theatre-makers. Graduate company The Backpack Ensemble, whose degree-show The Search For a Black-Browed Albatross won three awards at the 2018 National Student Drama Festival, are the most recent example of The Lincoln Company's work with graduating student groups.

Group of students on stage during a performance

Study Abroad

The growing reputation of the Lincoln School of Fine and Performing Arts has led to the development of partnerships with other international institutions. We have established two exciting ‘study abroad’ affiliations in North America, with the University of Ottawa in Canada and at Drury University in Missouri, USA. These partnerships enable up to eight drama students per year to participate in an exchange programme, where they will study for a term at one of these partner institutions. These international exchange programmes can provide a fantastic opportunity for students to develop life skills, expand the breadth of their education, and enhance their employability upon graduation.

Exchange students applying to study outside of Europe do not pay tuition fees at their host university, but continue to pay tuition fees at their home institution.

Participants will usually be responsible for all other costs themselves including travel, accommodation, general living expenses, visas, insurance, vaccinations, and administrative fees at the host institution.

Students undertaking an exchange keep their entitlement to UK sources of funding such as student loans and should apply to their awarding body in the normal way, indicating that they will be studying abroad.

If a period of study or placement abroad is a mandatory part of your degree, you may be entitled to extra funding. Students should direct enquiries to their funding body about this.

Students may also be able to apply to their Local Education Authority or the Student Awards Agency for Scotland for further funding to assist with travel expenses. Please contact them for further information.

Student Experience

Level 3 students, Sydney Vanderhoeven-Palmer from our Drama and English course and Caoimhe Shanahan-Peart from Drama and Theatre, share their experiences of studying, practice, and research, and tell us why they applied to Lincoln.

Interviews

As part of the admissions process, Drama and Theatre applicants will be invited to attend an interview. More information can be found within our Dance and Drama - Frequently Asked Questions.

"The number of productions staged throughout the year is incredible. These extracurricular options enabled me to learn many skills in regard to performance genres and directing."

Stacie Cavell, BA (Hons) Drama graduate

Career Opportunities

Graduates can develop the skills and knowledge relevant to a variety of roles within the theatre industry, including actor, director, playwright, producer, stage manager, and technician. There is the opportunity to progress to related professions in the creative industries, including publishing, marketing, venue programming, and to work in television, film, and radio. Some students may choose to undertake further study at postgraduate level or take qualifications in teaching.

Recent graduate destinations have included theatre making, directing, stage management, technical theatre, producing, arts administration, teaching, BBC Radio, BBC Television, and drama therapy.

Visit Us in Person

The best way to find out what it is really like to live and learn at Lincoln is to join us for one of our Open Days. Visiting us in person is important and will help you to get a real feel for what it might be like to study here.

Book Your Place

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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