Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

P313

Course Code

MEDPROUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

P313

Course Code

MEDPROUB

BA (Hons) Film Production BA (Hons) Film Production

Film Production students are taught by award-winning industry professionals, including BAFTA Scotland New Talent Award (2008) recipient Dr Mikey Murray.

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

P313

Course Code

MEDPROUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

P313

Course Code

MEDPROUB

Teaching and Learning During COVID-19

The current COVID-19 pandemic has meant that at Lincoln we are making changes to our teaching and learning approach and to our campus, to ensure that students and staff can enjoy a safe and positive learning experience here at Lincoln.

From autumn 2020 our aim is to provide an on-campus learning experience. Our intention is that teaching will be delivered through a mixture of face-to-face and online sessions. There will be social activities in place for students - all in line with appropriate social distancing and fully adhering to any changes in government guidance as our students' safety is our primary concern.

We want to ensure that your Lincoln experience is as positive, exciting and enjoyable as possible as you embark on the next phase of your life. COVID-19 has encouraged us to review our practices and, as a result, to take the opportunity to find new ways to enhance the Lincoln experience. It has challenged us to find innovative new approaches to supporting students' learning and social interactions. These learning experiences, which blend digital and face-to-face, will be vital in helping to prepare our students for a 21st Century workplace.

Of course at Lincoln, personal tutoring is key to our delivery, providing every student with a dedicated tutor to support them throughout their time here at the University. Smaller class sizes mean our academic staff can engage with each student as an individual, and work with them to enhance their strengths. In this environment we hope that students have more opportunities for discussion and engagement and get to know each other better.

Course learning outcomes are vital to prepare you for your future and we aim to utilise this mix of face-to-face and online teaching to deliver these. Students benefit from and enjoy fieldtrips and placements and, whilst it is currently hard to predict the availability of these, we are working hard and with partners and will aspire to offer these wherever possible - obviously in compliance with whatever government guidance is in place at the time.

We are utilising a range of different digital tools for teaching including our dedicated online managed learning environment. All lectures for larger groups will be delivered online using interactive software and a range of different formats. We aim to make every contact count and seminars and small group sessions will maximise face-to-face interaction. Practicals, workshops, studio sessions and performance-based sessions are planned to be delivered face-to-face, in a socially distanced way with appropriate PPE.

The University of Lincoln is a top 20 TEF Gold University and we have won awards for our approach to teaching and learning, our partnerships and industry links, and the opportunities these provide for our students. Our aim is that our online and socially distanced delivery during this COVID-19 pandemic is engaging and that students can interact with their tutors and each other and contribute to our academic community.

As and when restrictions start to lift, we aim to deliver an increasing amount of face-to-face teaching and external engagements, depending on each course. Safety will continue to be our primary focus and we will respond to any changing circumstances as they arise to ensure our community is supported. More information about the specific approaches for each course will be shared when teaching starts.

Of course as you start a new academic year it will be challenging but we will be working with you every step of the way. For all our students new and established, we look forward to welcoming you to our vibrant community this Autumn. If you have any questions please visit our FAQs or contact us on 01522 886644.

Dr Mikey Murray - Programme Leader

Dr Mikey Murray - Programme Leader

Mikey is a graduate of UCLA's MA Film programme and has won several short film accolades as a director, producer, and screenwriter. In 2007 he won a BAFTA Scotland New Talent Award for Best First Time Writer and his most recent film Natalie premiered, and was nominated for Best Short Film, at the prestigious Edinburgh International Film Festival in 2017. Mikey is also the creator and festival director of the Indie-Lincs International Film Festival.

School Staff List

Welcome to BA (Hons) Film Production

Explore the fundamentals of film-making from narrative right through to post-production, with a degree designed to develop the next generation of innovative filmmakers.

Film Production at Lincoln is taught by award-winning industry practitioners and research-active academics, including Programme Leader and BAFTA Scotland New Talent Award (2008) recipient Dr Mikey Murray, and award-winning producer, Dominique Webb.

The degree offers students the opportunity to gain extensive experience in all areas of the film production process, working with contemporary industry-standard facilities, equipment, and software. Students can apply for paid work experience with external clients to develop their CV and showreel, and may have the opportunity to learn on professional film sets with industry-active staff.

Dr Mikey Murray is an award-winning director, producer and screenwriter and heads up a team that includes director Philip Stevens, who has won international festival awards including Best UK Short at Nottingham Film Festival (2017).

Facilities include cinema camera and prime lenses, video-editing suites with Avid Media Composer, Da Vinci Resolve and Adobe Creative Cloud; audio editing suites with ProTools and Adobe software; digital imaging, design and multi-media suites; a sound dubbing theatre with foley room; a high-end post-production finishing suite with Flame software; writers' room; and production offices.

Welcome to BA (Hons) Film Production

Explore the fundamentals of film-making from narrative right through to post-production, with a degree designed to develop the next generation of innovative filmmakers.

Film Production at Lincoln is taught by award-winning industry practitioners and research-active academics.

The degree offers students the opportunity to gain extensive experience in all areas of the film production process, working with contemporary industry-standard facilities, equipment, and software. Students can apply for paid work experience with external clients to develop their CV and showreel, and may have the opportunity to learn on professional film sets with industry-active staff.

Facilities include industry-specification cameras; prime lenses; video editing suites with Avid Media Composer, Da Vinci Resolve and Adobe Creative Cloud; audio editing suites with ProTools and Adobe software; digital imaging, design and multi-media suites; a sound dubbing theatre with foley room; a high-end post-production finishing suite with Flame software; writers' room; and production offices

Commitment to forging a career in film production is a highly recommended predisposition for this degree.

How You Study

The first year introduces students to a range of skills such as directing, producing, screenwriting, cinematography, sound recording, and editing. Students can explore filmmaking through a variety of projects in a range of genres, while developing an understanding of film theories.

In the second year, students are expected to explore creative areas in greater depth through advanced specialist workshops and a range of filmmaking projects. A variety of optional theory modules aim to develop students’ critical understanding and analytical thinking as they build towards major project outputs in their final year.

Collaborative filmmaking is a key feature of the course, with students working across the programme to produce films. Throughout the course there is a focus on employability, with the degree aiming to prepare graduates for a career in the screen and creative industries.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

How You Study

You can benefit from teaching by award-winning industry professionals such as Programme leader Dr Mikey Murray (BAFTA Scotland New Talent Award Winner), Sci-Fi producer/director Daz Scales, or experienced industry cinematographer, Jack Shelbourn.

The first year introduces students to a range of skills such as directing, producing, screenwriting, cinematography, sound recording, and editing. Students can explore filmmaking through a variety of projects in a range of genres, while developing an understanding of film theories.

In the second year, students are expected to explore creative areas in greater depth through advanced specialist workshops and a range of filmmaking projects. A variety of optional theory modules aim to develop students’ critical understanding and analytical thinking as they build towards major project outputs in their final year.

Collaborative filmmaking is a key feature of the course, with students working in teams across the programme to produce films. Throughout the course there is a focus on employability, with the degree aiming to prepare graduates for a career in the screen and creative industries.

Contact time with tutors can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars, or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year.

Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions, or entire cohort lectures. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits, fieldwork or self-acquired industry placements.

There is a high level of group work in Film Production and students will be consistently required to communicate effectively with their peers.

Students on this programme will also learn from academic staff who are engaged in world-leading or internationally recognised research.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

This module aims to enable students to better understand the practical skills required with which to collaborate on a film production project.

Students can join a film production team which aims to develop a fundamental understanding of how to interact under the guidance of their peers, as well as learn the importance of collaboration in the film production process.

Students will be expected to formally explain their role and to record their experiences in a learning journal, outlining both independent study areas, and also critically evaluating their experiences from a contextual perspective.

Lectures discuss the nature of collaborative work and students will be expected to attend mentorship meetings and show an understanding of film production job roles. Assessments include reflective assignments and peer review.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to research and development, and the production processes involved in making documentary films. Students propose, create, and evaluate a short character-based documentary and can explore production roles and team working. The module also introduces the ethics of documentary filmmaking as well as concepts that define the form.

Module Overview

Film and TV History 2 is a survey of European film movements in context. It charts, analyses and reassesses the significance and novelty of, and the role of TV in the emergence of the various European new waves from Italian Neorealism through the French New Wave to the British New Wave and Free Cinema and New German Cinema.

Module Overview

This module is an introductory course for the technologies of film production and the key craft skills students will need during their time on the programme.

Module Overview

This module provides an introduction to television studies and focuses on historic and current modes of address, distribution and reception forms and the social function of the medium. The module supports students in developing the skills to critically read television texts through a range of contexts including the economic, cultural and regulatory. An understanding of the historical development of the medium in Western contexts will enable students to critically locate television’s place in the present and future media landscape.

Module Overview

This module introduces key skills in screenwriting and short fiction film production.

Module Overview

An in depth look into the practice, theoretical and technical skills of cinematography. Students will be introduced to the roles of the camera team, lighting team and the grip team. This module will prepare them to undertake the role of Cinematographer in their graduation films.

Module Overview

An advanced module that focuses on the fundamental skills of directing for film.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to advanced techniques of film editing and creative picture and sound manipulation specifically related to the film production process. The module will introduce students to the craft of film editing from its widest perspectives, gain an understanding of narrative, story arc and story-telling techniques as well as knowledge of editing in various genres through practical exercises.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to advanced techniques of creative sound design and audio editing techniques specifically related to the film production process. The module divides its time between how a film editor deals with the sound components of a film during the editing process, and the role of sound editor/sound designer and the sound post-production processes which occur at the later stages of completion.

Students can develop and understanding of how separate sound is recorded and synchronised to picture before picture editing commences, and work with digital audio workstations and software technologies and the sound ‘dubbing theatre’.

Areas covered include, using sound during the edit, sound editing for factual and fiction productions, supplying audio files for the editing process, synchronising sound and picture rushes, audio tracklaying using Digital Audio Workstations (DAW’s) recording 'Foley sound', (the art of movement re-recording and using props for sound effects creation to picture), ADR (Automated Dialogue Replacement) and 'lip sync' to picture and music production are also covered, including composer spotting sessions and assessing musical requirements.

The roles of mixer, assistant and sound editor are explored, in relation to selecting and assembling sound recordings and different mixes in preparation for final sound production of a television programme, or film. Students can understand the distinctive relationship between location sound recordist, film and television editor and the creative sound post-production process. Upon completion students are expected to be well equipped to work with sound during a film edit session and enhance soundtracks with post-production skills.

Module Overview

The module allows students to understand and develop the skills required to work towards becoming and industry ready film producer.

Module Overview

This module is an advanced level module in the practical screenplay craft, building on skills acquired in Advanced Craft Skills - Screenwriting. Students will explore the conventions of the feature film screenplay, developing story and scenes for a feature script of their own.

Module Overview

This module is an advanced level module in the practical screenplay craft. Students will produce and pitch finished short screenplays and begin to explore the conventions of the feature film screenplay.

Module Overview

This module investigates and analyses the debates about and developments in children’s film and television, largely in the UK but drawing on the USA, for elements of comparison informed by politics, ideology and economics.

Module Overview

This module can enable students to further develop skills in film production and apply them to a range of genre projects.

Lectures have been developed to present best practice in production techniques and offer stimulus for idea development in production projects.

Seminars aims to provide a programme of student support for production teams conducting a range of creative projects. This can include guidance on idea development, the proposal writing process, production critique and script development, as well as the pre- and post production techniques involved in carrying out successful scripts to a conclusion.

Students work in production teams in a range of roles as required by the project assessment briefs.

Module Overview

This module explores the history and theory of the documentary film. It will introduce students to media texts (films, video, broadcast television and digital platforms) that claim, in distinction to the cinema of fiction, to capture and re-present unmediated – to one degree or another-- reality. Students on this module will be asked to consider, via close text analysis and an understanding of moving image history, the problematics of making such a claim. This will involve students investigating the nature of the documentary image – that is: the relationship of the signifier to the thing signified. It will require them to determine the ethical implications of documentary’s claim on the real for the filmmaker, the persons filmed and the spectators. It will engage them in debates about documentary’s impact in the social sphere. The module will be organised around a series of case studies. Students will gain an understanding of media texts that have had a significant impact on society, knowledge of history and theory of documentary, and skills in close text reading and historical reception studies.

Module Overview

This module can enable students to further develop skills in film production and apply them to a range of genre projects.

Lectures have been developed to present best practice in production techniques and offer stimulus for idea development in production projects.

Seminars aim to provide a programme of student support for production teams conducting a range of creative projects. This can include guidance on idea development, the proposal writing process, production critique and script development, as well as the pre- and post production techniques involved in carrying out successful scripts to a conclusion.

Students work in production teams in a range of roles as required by the project assessment briefs.

Module Overview

A guide to specific films and accompanying theoretical concepts. Key films provide a platform for debating the political, institutional and cultural context of individual cinemas and regions in an increasingly globalised industry where audiences and producers are exposed to a variety of film styles. Critical engagement and debate are encouraged within the broader structure of World Cinema, alongside cultural and globalisation studies.

Module Overview

This module can enable students to further develop skills in film production and apply them to a range of genre projects.

Lectures have been developed to present best practice in production techniques and offer stimulus for idea development in production projects.

Seminars aims to provide a programme of student support for production teams conducting a range of creative projects. This can include guidance on idea development, the proposal writing process, production critique and script development, as well as the pre- and post production techniques involved in carrying out successful scripts to a conclusion.

Students work in production teams in a range of roles as required by the project assessment briefs.

Module Overview

The Minnesota State University Moorhead USA Exchange Programme is an optional unit of study. As part of the three-year course, some students may study for the duration of Semester A of level 2 at Minnesota State University Moorhead USA. The target units of study include areas of practical and theoretical studies comparable with those of Level 2 study for the Media Production Award at Lincoln.

During the semester abroad, students will share classes and units of study with local students. Students can experience another culture and have the opportunity to examine USA media industry practice through optional internships for exchange students. The Moorhead-Fargo twin cities also offer practical opportunities for students to engage with USA production companies including NBC, Fox, ABC, CBS, and Prairie Public TV, all of whom have local bases.

Module Overview

•\tThis module will investigate the Hollywood musical as one of Hollywood’s most popular and important film genres, from its beginnings in the early sound era to the integrated musicals of the 1940s and 1950s, from critically acclaimed box office successes such as West Side Story (1961) and cultural phenomena such as Saturday Night Fever (1977) and Dirty Dancing (1987) to more recent musicals such as Moulin Rouge! (2001), Dreamgirls (2006), La La Land (2016), and Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again (2018).

A close study of a number of significant films and associated scholarly literature will support discussion of structural, stylistic and thematic issues. Stardom and the function of the star performance will be considered and ethnicity, race, sexuality, class and gender as constructed through the musical will be analysed.

Module Overview

The module aims to introduce you to a range of conceptual and theoretical approaches to the study of horror in popular culture. It explores the history of the genre and selected subgenres as well as contemporary manifestations, both supernatural, and realist horror.

The module looks at the horror genre in terms of various social, cultural and national contexts. Students can study psychoanalytical approaches to these fictions as well as approaches such as affect theory which attempt to go beyond psychoanalysis. Through lectures, screenings and discussions, students are encouraged to apply these approaches to the analysis of selected media texts and subgenres.

Module Overview

This module aims to encourage students to consider the options open to them upon graduation and prepare for life after university. Students have the opportunity to reach into the wider community to develop their skills for future employment. The module aims to enable students to closely examine how a range of film production companies function on a day to day basis and relate their experience to their studies.

Module Overview

Location sound recording is a critical component of the film-making process. Ranging from the technical aspects such as multichannel field recording using lavalier style personal microphones and boom microphone techniques; to dealing with challenging weather situations and understanding on-set etiquette and working with actors.

Students will learn how separate sound is utilised in film production and how to synchronise picture and sound prior to editing with traditional clapperboard and software techniques along with studio/interview techniques. This practical module will equip students with the essential skills needed to provide film-makers with high quality production sound, whether that be dialogue or other sound elements captured during the filming process.

Module Overview

This module aims to develop an understanding of the complex problem of realism in film and media studies as it relates to fictional narrative forms. Students will have the opportunity to engage with academic debates around realist texts and examine these in relation to historical, contemporary and potential examples.

Module Overview

Methods of analysis of media representations and approaches to representing difference will be considered in this module as well as issues such as gender, nationality and ethnicity apparent in film & broadcast media. A range of critical approaches will be considered and contrasted and Post-colonial theory and Third Cinema will be utilised in relation to these.

Module Overview

This module will give students an advanced theoretical understanding of the craft skills employed in film production through observation and analysis of the work of pioneering filmmakers.

Module Overview

This module will give students an advanced theoretical understanding of the craft skills employed in film production through observation and analysis of the work of pioneering filmmakers.

Module Overview

This module will give students an advanced theoretical understanding of the craft skills employed in film production through observation and analysis of the work of pioneering filmmakers.

Module Overview

In the 21st century we no longer believe that a single unified world can be visualized from a privileged position. Any sense of distance from the world has collapsed. We are conscious of living in a time of continual change and transformation as opposed to a state of equilibrium. After all, the early 21st century has been marked by rising urbanism, the movements of people, the crisis of global warming, the dominance of ever more complex logistical networks, the emergence of new cultures of speed, experiments with new modes of warfare, etc. This is a confusing situation – simultaneously liberating, exciting, anarchic and dangerous. We are traversed and overwhelmed by these affective forces. This innovative module, in which students collaborate to produce film essays, presents an opportunity to reassess aesthetic theories and practices – our modes of visualizing - in order to confront the conditions of the present.

Module Overview

Art Cinemas will focus on moving-image practice at the intersection of art and media. Work studied will range from early film experiments to contemporary gallery-based video. Teaching will be a mixture of lectures, screenings and seminars with a trip organised to a relevant exhibition where possible. Students will be assessed by essay and a curatorial assignment, helping them develop practical skills in presenting such work in a public context.

Module Overview

This module marks the culmination of three years of practical development through production work. Students will either collaborate on substantial short film products in a clearly defined head of department role or write a feature length film screenplay.

Module Overview

This module aims to prepare students for their Graduation Project and develops the skills required for writing their Practice-Led Thesis.

Module Overview

This module provides students with a unique opportunity to engage in practice as research alongside their graduation project. It forms the final output of the student for graduation and will take the form of a written thesis that reflects on their artefacts from both a theoretical and contextual perspective.

Module Overview

This module can enable students to deepen their understanding of the environments and contexts of the film industries and to consider wider issues such as copyright, ethics, law and regulation. This can enable students to develop their awareness in these areas in order to understand complexities of the professional landscape when they leave university. The module provides students with the opportunity to prepare effectively and professionally for life in the film industries after university, exploring potential careers and options.

Module Overview

This module analyses the range and diversity of a genre encompassing many highly popular texts. Metaphor and allegory are explored to understand how science fiction has been appreciated and has developed from cult to mainstream acceptance and popularity. Innovation and cross-fertilisation of generic forms are also be considered.

Module Overview

Artefact creation led, this module is unique in allowing students to choose the style and content of their outputs. Particular emphasis is also placed on peer review in the assessment.

Module Overview

This module surveys and assesses a period that represents a break with a range of ideological, aesthetic and commercial traditions together with a process of retrenchment and recuperation. Post-classical Hollywood saw both films and the industry experience ideological and socio-cultural upheaval, demonstrated through cinematic modes of representation, industrial re-structuring and artistic transformations.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

This module aims to enable students to better understand the practical skills required with which to collaborate on a film production project.

Students can join a film production team which aims to develop a fundamental understanding of how to interact under the guidance of their peers, as well as learn the importance of collaboration in the film production process.

Students will be expected to formally explain their role and to record their experiences in a learning journal, outlining both independent study areas, and also critically evaluating their experiences from a contextual perspective.

Lectures discuss the nature of collaborative work and students will be expected to attend mentorship meetings and show an understanding of film production job roles. Assessments include reflective assignments and peer review.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to research and development, and the production processes involved in making documentary films. Students propose, create, and evaluate a short character-based documentary and can explore production roles and team working. The module also introduces the ethics of documentary filmmaking as well as concepts that define the form.

Module Overview

Film and TV History 2 is a survey of European film movements in context. It charts, analyses and reassesses the significance and novelty of, and the role of TV in the emergence of the various European new waves from Italian Neorealism through the French New Wave to the British New Wave and Free Cinema and New German Cinema.

Module Overview

This module is an introductory course for the technologies of film production and the key craft skills students will need during their time on the programme.

Module Overview

This module provides an introduction to television studies and focuses on historic and current modes of address, distribution and reception forms and the social function of the medium. The module supports students in developing the skills to critically read television texts through a range of contexts including the economic, cultural and regulatory. An understanding of the historical development of the medium in Western contexts will enable students to critically locate television’s place in the present and future media landscape.

Module Overview

This module introduces key skills in screenwriting and short fiction film production.

Module Overview

An in depth look into the practice, theoretical and technical skills of cinematography. Students will be introduced to the roles of the camera team, lighting team and the grip team. This module will prepare them to undertake the role of Cinematographer in their graduation films.

Module Overview

An advanced module that focuses on the fundamental skills of directing for film.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to advanced techniques of film editing and creative picture and sound manipulation specifically related to the film production process. The module will introduce students to the craft of film editing from its widest perspectives, gain an understanding of narrative, story arc and story-telling techniques as well as knowledge of editing in various genres through practical exercises.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to advanced techniques of creative sound design and audio editing techniques specifically related to the film production process. The module divides its time between how a film editor deals with the sound components of a film during the editing process, and the role of sound editor/sound designer and the sound post-production processes which occur at the later stages of completion.

Students can develop and understanding of how separate sound is recorded and synchronised to picture before picture editing commences, and work with digital audio workstations and software technologies and the sound ‘dubbing theatre’.

Areas covered include, using sound during the edit, sound editing for factual and fiction productions, supplying audio files for the editing process, synchronising sound and picture rushes, audio tracklaying using Digital Audio Workstations (DAW’s) recording 'Foley sound', (the art of movement re-recording and using props for sound effects creation to picture), ADR (Automated Dialogue Replacement) and 'lip sync' to picture and music production are also covered, including composer spotting sessions and assessing musical requirements.

The roles of mixer, assistant and sound editor are explored, in relation to selecting and assembling sound recordings and different mixes in preparation for final sound production of a television programme, or film. Students can understand the distinctive relationship between location sound recordist, film and television editor and the creative sound post-production process. Upon completion students are expected to be well equipped to work with sound during a film edit session and enhance soundtracks with post-production skills.

Module Overview

The module allows students to understand and develop the skills required to work towards becoming and industry ready film producer.

Module Overview

This module is an advanced level module in the practical screenplay craft, building on skills acquired in Advanced Craft Skills - Screenwriting. Students will explore the conventions of the feature film screenplay, developing story and scenes for a feature script of their own.

Module Overview

This module is an advanced level module in the practical screenplay craft. Students will produce and pitch finished short screenplays and begin to explore the conventions of the feature film screenplay.

Module Overview

This module investigates and analyses the debates about and developments in children’s film and television, largely in the UK but drawing on the USA, for elements of comparison informed by politics, ideology and economics.

Module Overview

This module can enable students to further develop skills in film production and apply them to a range of genre projects.

Lectures have been developed to present best practice in production techniques and offer stimulus for idea development in production projects.

Seminars aims to provide a programme of student support for production teams conducting a range of creative projects. This can include guidance on idea development, the proposal writing process, production critique and script development, as well as the pre- and post production techniques involved in carrying out successful scripts to a conclusion.

Students work in production teams in a range of roles as required by the project assessment briefs.

Module Overview

This module explores the history and theory of the documentary film. It will introduce students to media texts (films, video, broadcast television and digital platforms) that claim, in distinction to the cinema of fiction, to capture and re-present unmediated – to one degree or another-- reality. Students on this module will be asked to consider, via close text analysis and an understanding of moving image history, the problematics of making such a claim. This will involve students investigating the nature of the documentary image – that is: the relationship of the signifier to the thing signified. It will require them to determine the ethical implications of documentary’s claim on the real for the filmmaker, the persons filmed and the spectators. It will engage them in debates about documentary’s impact in the social sphere. The module will be organised around a series of case studies. Students will gain an understanding of media texts that have had a significant impact on society, knowledge of history and theory of documentary, and skills in close text reading and historical reception studies.

Module Overview

This module can enable students to further develop skills in film production and apply them to a range of genre projects.

Lectures have been developed to present best practice in production techniques and offer stimulus for idea development in production projects.

Seminars aim to provide a programme of student support for production teams conducting a range of creative projects. This can include guidance on idea development, the proposal writing process, production critique and script development, as well as the pre- and post production techniques involved in carrying out successful scripts to a conclusion.

Students work in production teams in a range of roles as required by the project assessment briefs.

Module Overview

A guide to specific films and accompanying theoretical concepts. Key films provide a platform for debating the political, institutional and cultural context of individual cinemas and regions in an increasingly globalised industry where audiences and producers are exposed to a variety of film styles. Critical engagement and debate are encouraged within the broader structure of World Cinema, alongside cultural and globalisation studies.

Module Overview

This module can enable students to further develop skills in film production and apply them to a range of genre projects.

Lectures have been developed to present best practice in production techniques and offer stimulus for idea development in production projects.

Seminars aims to provide a programme of student support for production teams conducting a range of creative projects. This can include guidance on idea development, the proposal writing process, production critique and script development, as well as the pre- and post production techniques involved in carrying out successful scripts to a conclusion.

Students work in production teams in a range of roles as required by the project assessment briefs.

Module Overview

The Minnesota State University Moorhead USA Exchange Programme is an optional unit of study. As part of the three-year course, some students may study for the duration of Semester A of level 2 at Minnesota State University Moorhead USA. The target units of study include areas of practical and theoretical studies comparable with those of Level 2 study for the Media Production Award at Lincoln.

During the semester abroad, students will share classes and units of study with local students. Students can experience another culture and have the opportunity to examine USA media industry practice through optional internships for exchange students. The Moorhead-Fargo twin cities also offer practical opportunities for students to engage with USA production companies including NBC, Fox, ABC, CBS, and Prairie Public TV, all of whom have local bases.

Module Overview

•\tThis module will investigate the Hollywood musical as one of Hollywood’s most popular and important film genres, from its beginnings in the early sound era to the integrated musicals of the 1940s and 1950s, from critically acclaimed box office successes such as West Side Story (1961) and cultural phenomena such as Saturday Night Fever (1977) and Dirty Dancing (1987) to more recent musicals such as Moulin Rouge! (2001), Dreamgirls (2006), La La Land (2016), and Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again (2018).

A close study of a number of significant films and associated scholarly literature will support discussion of structural, stylistic and thematic issues. Stardom and the function of the star performance will be considered and ethnicity, race, sexuality, class and gender as constructed through the musical will be analysed.

Module Overview

The module aims to introduce you to a range of conceptual and theoretical approaches to the study of horror in popular culture. It explores the history of the genre and selected subgenres as well as contemporary manifestations, both supernatural, and realist horror.

The module looks at the horror genre in terms of various social, cultural and national contexts. Students can study psychoanalytical approaches to these fictions as well as approaches such as affect theory which attempt to go beyond psychoanalysis. Through lectures, screenings and discussions, students are encouraged to apply these approaches to the analysis of selected media texts and subgenres.

Module Overview

This module aims to encourage students to consider the options open to them upon graduation and prepare for life after university. Students have the opportunity to reach into the wider community to develop their skills for future employment. The module aims to enable students to closely examine how a range of film production companies function on a day to day basis and relate their experience to their studies.

Module Overview

Location sound recording is a critical component of the film-making process. Ranging from the technical aspects such as multichannel field recording using lavalier style personal microphones and boom microphone techniques; to dealing with challenging weather situations and understanding on-set etiquette and working with actors.

Students will learn how separate sound is utilised in film production and how to synchronise picture and sound prior to editing with traditional clapperboard and software techniques along with studio/interview techniques. This practical module will equip students with the essential skills needed to provide film-makers with high quality production sound, whether that be dialogue or other sound elements captured during the filming process.

Module Overview

This module aims to develop an understanding of the complex problem of realism in film and media studies as it relates to fictional narrative forms. Students will have the opportunity to engage with academic debates around realist texts and examine these in relation to historical, contemporary and potential examples.

Module Overview

This module will give students an advanced theoretical understanding of the craft skills employed in film production through observation and analysis of the work of pioneering filmmakers.

Module Overview

This module will give students an advanced theoretical understanding of the craft skills employed in film production through observation and analysis of the work of pioneering filmmakers.

Module Overview

This module will give students an advanced theoretical understanding of the craft skills employed in film production through observation and analysis of the work of pioneering filmmakers.

Module Overview

In the 21st century we no longer believe that a single unified world can be visualized from a privileged position. Any sense of distance from the world has collapsed. We are conscious of living in a time of continual change and transformation as opposed to a state of equilibrium. After all, the early 21st century has been marked by rising urbanism, the movements of people, the crisis of global warming, the dominance of ever more complex logistical networks, the emergence of new cultures of speed, experiments with new modes of warfare, etc. This is a confusing situation – simultaneously liberating, exciting, anarchic and dangerous. We are traversed and overwhelmed by these affective forces. This innovative module, in which students collaborate to produce film essays, presents an opportunity to reassess aesthetic theories and practices – our modes of visualizing - in order to confront the conditions of the present.

Module Overview

This module marks the culmination of three years of practical development through production work. Students will either collaborate on substantial short film products in a clearly defined head of department role or write a feature length film screenplay.

Module Overview

This module aims to prepare students for their Graduation Project and develops the skills required for writing their Practice-Led Thesis.

Module Overview

This module provides students with a unique opportunity to engage in practice as research alongside their graduation project. It forms the final output of the student for graduation and will take the form of a written thesis that reflects on their artefacts from both a theoretical and contextual perspective.

Module Overview

This module can enable students to deepen their understanding of the environments and contexts of the film industries and to consider wider issues such as copyright, ethics, law and regulation. This can enable students to develop their awareness in these areas in order to understand complexities of the professional landscape when they leave university. The module provides students with the opportunity to prepare effectively and professionally for life in the film industries after university, exploring potential careers and options.

Module Overview

This module analyses the range and diversity of a genre encompassing many highly popular texts. Metaphor and allegory are explored to understand how science fiction has been appreciated and has developed from cult to mainstream acceptance and popularity. Innovation and cross-fertilisation of generic forms are also be considered.

Module Overview

Artefact creation led, this module is unique in allowing students to choose the style and content of their outputs. Particular emphasis is also placed on peer review in the assessment.

Module Overview

This module surveys and assesses a period that represents a break with a range of ideological, aesthetic and commercial traditions together with a process of retrenchment and recuperation. Post-classical Hollywood saw both films and the industry experience ideological and socio-cultural upheaval, demonstrated through cinematic modes of representation, industrial re-structuring and artistic transformations.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

How you are assessed

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Fees and Scholarships

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Postgraduate study is an investment in yourself and your future, and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

There are more ways than ever before to fund your postgraduate study, whether you want to do a taught or research course. For those wishing to undertake a Master's course, you can apply for a loan as a contribution towards the course and living costs. Loans are also available to those who wish to undertake doctoral study. The University offers a number of scholarships and funded studentships for those interested in postgraduate study. Learn how Master's and PhD loans, scholarships, and studentships can help you fund your studies on our Postgraduate Fees and Funding pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

Additional cost to students are likely during the creation of their film production projects, and may also apply during the optional study abroad or work placement pathways.

Tuition fees for the USA study abroad exchange opportunity are included in the course but travel, accommodation, and general living costs are the responsibility of the student.

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Postgraduate study is an investment in yourself and your future, and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

There are more ways than ever before to fund your postgraduate study, whether you want to do a taught or research course. For those wishing to undertake a Master's course, you can apply for a loan as a contribution towards the course and living costs. Loans are also available to those who wish to undertake doctoral study. The University offers a number of scholarships and funded studentships for those interested in postgraduate study. Learn how Master's and PhD loans, scholarships, and studentships can help you fund your studies on our Postgraduate Fees and Funding pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

Additional cost to students are likely during the creation of their film production projects, and may also apply during the optional study abroad or work placement pathways.

Tuition fees for the USA study abroad exchange opportunity are included in the course but travel, accommodation, and general living costs are the responsibility of the student.

Entry Requirements 2020-21

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry and will consider applicants who have a mix of qualifications.

We also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Entry Requirements 2021-22

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may be considered.

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry and will consider applicants who have a mix of qualifications.

We also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/st.../entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/st...ort/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Specialist Facilities

Students have access to a specialist production environment with a sound stage and green screen studio. Facilities include video editing suites with Avid Media Composer, Da Vinci Resolve and Adobe Creative Cloud; audio editing suites with ProTools and Adobe software; digital imaging, design and multi-media suites; a sound dubbing theatre with foley room; a high-end post production finishing suite with Flame software; a writer’s room and production offices.

There is a full range of quality portable equipment for filming and recording on location, and students in the Lincoln School of Film and Media currently have free access to Adobe Creative Cloud for the duration of their studies via our design and media studios.

Study Abroad

There is an opportunity to take part in exchange programmes in the USA and with several EU partners. Tuition fees for the exchange opportunity in the USA are included in the course but travel, accommodation, and general living costs are the responsibility of the student. Places are allocated on a competitive basis.

Students have the opportunity to study abroad through the Erasmus scheme. Find out more about ERASMUS opportunities at Lincoln at https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/shortstudyopportunities/erasmus/

The University of Lincoln is committed to continued participation in the Erasmus+ programme, however, participation
in future years is dependent on the nature of the UK’s withdrawal from the European Union. Find out more.

Career Opportunities

Graduates may go on to work at production companies and creative media start-up businesses, or as freelance craft specialists. Some may choose to continue their studies at postgraduate level or take a qualification in teaching.

Book an Open Day

Visiting a university is an important step in deciding where and what to study. Visit us to find out more about our courses, facilities, and the student experience at Lincoln.

Book Your Place

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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