BA (Hons) Music

BA (Hons) Music

Music at Lincoln is ranked 1st in the UK for overall satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2019 (out of 68 ranking institutions).

The Course

The BA (Hons) Music course at Lincoln is a contemporary, industry-focused degree for musicians looking to develop their skills as performers, composers and collaborators within a flexible curriculum that encompasses classical, rock, pop and non-Western music.

This course connects practice with theory, tradition with innovation, and personal creativity with collaborative projects. As well as working with other musicians, students have the opportunity to work with dancers, actors, film­makers, animators and designers.

Practical skills are underpinned and enriched with an approach to studying music that positions practice alongside an understanding of musical histories, cultures and genres, as well as developing the critical and reflective skills needed to articulate these connections.

The teaching team is made up of professional musicians and experienced researchers with expertise that encompasses numerous professions, disciplines and mediums, such as musical theatre, composition, performance, orchestration, musical direction and editing.

The Course

Music at Lincoln is a contemporary, industry-focused degree for musicians looking to develop their skills as performers, composers, and collaborators within a flexible curriculum that encompasses classical, rock, pop, and non-Western music.

This course connects practice with theory, tradition with innovation, and personal creativity with collaborative projects. As well as working with other musicians, students have the opportunity to work with dancers, actors, film­makers, animators, and computer game designers.

Practical skills are underpinned and enriched with an approach to studying music that positions practice alongside an understanding of musical histories, cultures, and genres, as well as developing the critical and reflective skills needed to articulate these connections.

The teaching team is made up of professional musicians and experienced researchers with expertise that encompasses numerous professions, disciplines, and media, such as musical theatre, composition, performance, orchestration, musical direction and sound production.

The quality and industry relevance of this course has been accredited by the Joint Audio Media Education Support organisation (JAMES).
In the first year, topics include the development of key musical skills, the use of audio production technology, working with a score, the role of music in society and the contemporary music industry.

In the second and third years, students can tailor the degree to suit their individual interests. There are degree pathways that focus on performance or composition, as well as scope for students to explore a wide range of practical and academic skills. In the third year, students have the opportunity to present their work in a final-year showcase.

Practical work will take place in recording studios, performance spaces, rehearsal rooms and IT suites, where students will have the opportunity to develop skills in using equipment and creating music for recordings and performance.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

A History of Popular Music (Core)
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A History of Popular Music (Core)

This module charts and explores the history of popular music in the US and UK over the last one hundred years. It will introduce students to critical ways of understanding popular music through theoretical frameworks. Further consideration will be given to the cultural development of popular music and its associated industries from a variety of perspectives relating to identity (such as race, class, gender, ethnicity, and youth).

A Performer Prepares (Core)
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A Performer Prepares (Core)

A Performer Prepares develops students' performance skills from a range of practical, contextual and historical perspectives. At the heart of the module students will develop their individual instrumental or vocal skills with specialist teachers, preparing for a 15-minute recital at the end of the module. Students will also participate in at least one staff-led ensemble, with weekly rehearsals leading to performances across the year including one which will be assessed. Workshops underpin ongoing practical development that will see students working together in ad-hoc groups, performing to each other and receiving peer-to-peer feedback, and gaining practical training in areas of performance. Performance is critically, historically and socially situated through lecture/seminars that explore issues of performance practice through the study of musics from around the world, including western art music, traditional music and popular forms.

Approaching Notation and Analysis (Core)
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Approaching Notation and Analysis (Core)

This module introduces students to analytical and notational strategies and their application to a wide range of musics. An approach to analysis is proposed that puts 'the listener' at the heart of how we understand music, whilst notation is seen as an evolving tool that creates different meanings across different cultures, periods and traditions. Students will be introduced to a range of analytical tools and encouraged to critique disciplinary norms by producing work which focusses on experiential and perceptual dimensions, underpinning these with careful identification of musical devices and techniques. The impact that such musical devices have – not just what they are – will be seen. Through examining a range of approaches to notation and transcription, students will develop an understanding of the notion of the 'musical text' in a range of traditions and be able to apply some of these in their own work.

Electronic Music Production (Core)
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Electronic Music Production (Core)

In this module students are invited to investigate the practices and creative possibilities of working within a desktop music and sound design production environment. This will involve MIDI programming, composition of basic musical and rhythmic arrangements, sound design, sound effects and an introduction to software instruments, synthesis, sampling techniques and digital signal processing.

Music Industries (Core)
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Music Industries (Core)

Over the course of a semester, the students will be introduced to the various industries within the world of music. Through a combination of lectures and workshops, the students will learn about industry areas such as publishing, recording, composing, performing, funding bodies, management, and booking agencies. This will be complemented by a series of workshops where students will create their own podcasts and learn how to plan, record, produce and edit a radio piece.

Acting the Song (Option)
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Acting the Song (Option)

This is a practical module in which students can explore the techniques of singing and acting song. Students have the opportunity to work on both ensemble numbers and individual numbers, to develop vocal technique, group singing skills, acting approaches to song and character building techniques for musical theatre.

The final performance of both ensemble and solo numbers aims to leave students with the skill to put together a portfolio of song material appropriate for their voice. Assessment will be part practical, and part based on an annotated rehearsal log put together throughout the process. Studying 'The Musical' in Semester A is a prerequisite for 'Acting the Song' in Semester B.

Composition (Option)
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Composition (Option)

This module starts students' focus on the Composition programme pathway. The module enables students to develop skills in arranging for small ensembles, and leading rehearsals with small ensembles of performers. In seminar sessions, students can explore the role of a composer and musical director from a range of perspectives (technical, stylistic, aesthetic and critical). They will be introduced to existing work from practitioners in the area, and can develop their own techniques and approaches through analysis, practice and reflection.

Curating Music (Core)
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Curating Music (Core)

This module brings together a scholarly understanding of music with practical, industry-focused skills. By the end of the module students will have written an essay on a subject of their choice and also had the opportunity to prepare a detailed proposal in response to a creative brief, to be pitched to a music industry panel.

Ensemble Performance and Enterprise (Option)
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Ensemble Performance and Enterprise (Option)

Students work in small groups to develop a concert programme and find a performance venue, before promoting their event, rehearsing and performing the final show. Inventive approaches to performance, including considerations of unusual venues and engaging marketing techniques, are central to the module.

Joint Show (Core)
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Joint Show (Core)

This module continues students' focus on their programme pathway of choice (Composition and Musical Direction or Performance and Musicianship). In supervised workshop-rehearsals students can plan and develop a collaborative group performance exercising the skills of their chosen pathway.

Those on the Composition and Musical Direction pathway can take roles as composers, musical directors, vocal coaches and orchestrators of the material; those on the Performance and Musicianship pathway will take roles adapting material and performing the final show.

Music Production and Enterprise (Option)
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Music Production and Enterprise (Option)

Students learn the practical and critical skills needed to self-produce a recording of their work as a singer-songwriter, performer or composer. Through learning about music enterprise, marketing, promotion and areas of music business, students will then begin to market and promote their music using appropriate platforms. Learning is split between practical recording/production sessions, and contextual/practical sessions on elements of music enterprise. In addition, students will carefully manage their independent learning to record and produce their work in a timely manner.

Performance (Option)
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Performance (Option)

This module begins students' focus on the Performance programme pathway. The module aims to enable students to develop skills in collaborating within a small ensemble and working effectively within a rehearsal environment. In seminar sessions, students can explore the role of a performer and musician director from a range of perspectives (technical, stylistic, aesthetic and critical).

Students will be introduced to existing work from practitioners in the area, and can develop their own techniques and approaches through analysis, practice and reflection.

Placements (LSFPA) (Option)
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Placements (LSFPA) (Option)

The Placement module encourages students to engage with the creative industries beyond the University through an 80-hour placement with a business or organisation of their choosing. Through direct workplace experience, students may develop new skills, strengthen existing ones, establish valuable professional networks, and target future employment opportunities. Following the placement students are assessed via presentations where they reflect upon their professional development and the impact of their work with the partner organisation.

Study Abroad (Option)
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Study Abroad (Option)

Study Abroad is an optional module which enables students to spend a semester studying abroad at one of the University’s approved partner institutions. Eligible students must have completed their first year of study to a satisfactory standard and successfully completed the application process for the study abroad scheme. During the semester spent abroad, students share classes with local students and study on a suite of locally-delivered taught modules which have been approved in advance by the University. Upon their return, as part of the assessment for this module, students are required to critically reflect upon their experience of living and studying in a different cultural environment and the skills acquired.

Teaching Music (Option)
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Teaching Music (Option)

This module aims to develops students’ skills and experience in teaching music to individuals and small groups. Students can work together to explore teaching practices and methods for instrumental/vocal teaching, ensemble and aural training. In a series of workshops, students will give lessons in their first study instrument to another member of the cohort, who has no previous experience of that instrument. At the end of the process, students will be assigned to school-age class groups in order to teach a small ensemble elementary singing and music theory.

The Musical (Option)
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The Musical (Option)

Why are musicals so popular (and why are some more popular than others)? What can a musical tell us about the culture in which it is produced and staged? How do you apply a critical framework to a study of the musical?

These are some of the questions that will be addressed in this module. In interactive lecture/seminars, students will have the opportunity to investigate how the musical, whilst operating as a mainstream form of popular theatrical entertainment, it similarly can be seen to engage with, challenge or enforce issues of race, gender, class and national identity. The module will provide a historical framework for a study of the musical, and will explore the origins and development of the genre of musical theatre both on the American and the British stage.

Dissertation (Music) Written (Option)
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Dissertation (Music) Written (Option)

This module provides the opportunity for students to investigate and pursue a Music-based topic of their own choosing in more depth than is possible in a conventional essay. Students will be required to work on their own initiative and provide clear evidence of their ability to collect, select and evaluate relevant information, which can subsequently be presented in a clear and logical manner, in the form of a 7000 word dissertation.

Dissertation: Practice-led (Option)
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Dissertation: Practice-led (Option)

This module gives students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of practical work that can be in any area of their choosing, including a substantial performance or set of performances; a portfolio of compositions or substantial single work; an album or EP; music for a film; an audio installation. Students will be supported through a series of lectures and seminars alongside close work with an appropriate supervisor.

Music and Choreography (Option)
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Music and Choreography (Option)

This module provides an opportunity for students in music and dance to work collaboratively towards a final performance that showcases their musical and choreographic work. Dance and Music students are allocated in small groups at the beginning of the semester and they work together to create a live performance piece that forms a portion of the final assessment.

Music and media (Option)
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Music and media (Option)

This module is designed to develop students’ skills and experience in creating music for different media.

Students will have the opportunity to work alongside students from other programmes who are developing work in radio, film, animation, computer gaming, etc. to create appropriate musical scores and soundtracks.

Music and the Stage (Core)
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Music and the Stage (Core)

This module aims to develop students’ skills and experience in creating music for the stage. The module runs concurrently with the Shakespeare and Performance module within the BA (Hons) Drama degree, in which drama students work to produce a full-scale, staff-directed Shakespeare production to be staged and performed on the LPAC stage. In this companion module, Music students will have the opportunity to create and (where appropriate) record or perform scores for a Shakespeare play, working alongside the staff and students from the Drama programme.

Professional Practice (Music) (Core)
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Professional Practice (Music) (Core)

In this module students will have the opportunity to produce promotional material for, and participate in a music and performance showcase / festival. Students can pitch their proposed promotional projects to the organisers and report on their development and implementation throughout the module. The promotional projects will require students to engage with a range of digital media as well as more traditional forms of promotion. In addition to promoting their own performance, students will have the opportunity to propose and contribute to other aspects of festival promotion. The performance itself may include or be adapted from musical material the student has composed for previous modules. However, it will also include new material or demonstrate significant development of existing material.

Throughout the module students are required to maintain a digital record of the work completed which tracks the development of their ideas, the investigation of promotional methods used by musicians and the industry, as well as items of interest and inspiration.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Much of the assessment on this course will be practical. Depending on the chosen pathway, students may be asked to perform or asked to create and submit their music using various technologies.

Students may be required to submit their practical work as a portfolio of songwriting extracts and occasionally we will observe how students work in the studio, rehearsal space or as part of the collaborative process.

Whenever we assess practical work, students will be asked to reflect on their process and development, sometimes in writing and sometimes in conversation. Written assessments come in various forms and are designed to develop writing skills in preparation for the final-year dissertation.

Students may be expected to write in the style of sleevenotes, to prepare briefs or reports similar to those used in the industry, and to submit conventional academic essays discussing issues relating to contemporary music.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Following consideration of UCAS applications, we will invite selected candidates for an interview. This will be an opportunity for students to meet staff and view our facilities, and for us to find out more about applicants’ interests and experience in music.
Performance Opportunities

There are opportunities for students to perform their music (or have their music performed) at the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre, The Platform Stage in the Engine Shed and at Siren FM radio station. Students may choose to join the University Orchestra or our semi-professional theatre group, the Lincoln Company, which stages productions throughout the year including at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe.

Live Performance Ticket Allocation

Students on this course currently receive event/performance credits which can be used against ticketed performances at the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Our optional Placements module in the second year allows students the opportunity to gain valuable work experience in the industry, focusing on a role suited to their career aspirations and specialist expertise developed on the programme.

Placements

Some courses offer students the opportunity to undertake placements. When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry (where available). Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Tuition Fees

2020/21UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level* £15,900 per level**
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,900 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

* UK/EU: The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

** International: The fees quoted are for one year of study. For continuing students fees are subject to an increase of 2% each year and rounded to the nearest £100.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

- In exceptional circumstances, students who are required to re-take modules can do so on an 'assessment only' basis. This means that students do not attend timetabled teaching events but are required to take the assessments/examinations associated with the module(s). The 'assessment only' fee is half of the £ per credit point fee for each module.

Exceptionally, tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost.

Other Costs

There are no mandatory additional costs related to this course. However, we would however generally expect students to own and maintain the instrument they are studying. Though we do have pianos, guitars and drums that can be used or borrowed, other instruments may not be available.

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC and a recognised practical music examination at Grade 5, A Level Music or equivalent.

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 104 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may be considered.

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Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.
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If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk
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The quality, industry relevance, and innovation of this course has been accredited by the Joint Audio Media Education Support organisation (JAMES).
In the first year, topics include the development of key musical skills, the use of audio production technology, working with a score, the role of music in society, and the contemporary music industry. Individual instrumental and vocal tuition is also available to all students.

In the second and third years, students can tailor the degree to suit their individual interests. There are degree pathways that focus on performance or composition, as well as scope for students to explore a wide range of practical and academic skills. In their third year, students can complete either a written dissertation on a subject of their choosing or undertake a practical project, such as writing and recording an album or arranging and performing in a tour. There is also the opportunity to present their work in a final-year showcase.

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, ensemble rehearsals,discursive seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Practical work can take place in recording studios, performance spaces, rehearsal rooms and Mac workstations. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study. Students studying music should also schedule additional time to practise on their instrument.

The teaching team is made up of professional musicians and researchers with expertise that encompass numerous professions, disciplines and mediums, including performance, composition, musicology, and teaching music. Teaching is enhanced by visiting practitioners, masterclasses, careers events, and alumni talks.

A History of Popular Music (Core)
Find out more

A History of Popular Music (Core)

This module charts and explores the history of popular music in the US and UK over the last one hundred years. It will introduce students to critical ways of understanding popular music through theoretical frameworks. Further consideration will be given to the cultural development of popular music and its associated industries from a variety of perspectives relating to identity (such as race, class, gender, ethnicity, and youth).

A Performer Prepares (Core)
Find out more

A Performer Prepares (Core)

A Performer Prepares develops students' performance skills from a range of practical, contextual and historical perspectives. At the heart of the module students will develop their individual instrumental or vocal skills with specialist teachers, preparing for a 15-minute recital at the end of the module. Students will also participate in at least one staff-led ensemble, with weekly rehearsals leading to performances across the year including one which will be assessed. Workshops underpin ongoing practical development that will see students working together in ad-hoc groups, performing to each other and receiving peer-to-peer feedback, and gaining practical training in areas of performance. Performance is critically, historically and socially situated through lecture/seminars that explore issues of performance practice through the study of musics from around the world, including western art music, traditional music and popular forms.

Approaching Notation and Analysis (Core)
Find out more

Approaching Notation and Analysis (Core)

This module introduces students to analytical and notational strategies and their application to a wide range of musics. An approach to analysis is proposed that puts 'the listener' at the heart of how we understand music, whilst notation is seen as an evolving tool that creates different meanings across different cultures, periods and traditions. Students will be introduced to a range of analytical tools and encouraged to critique disciplinary norms by producing work which focusses on experiential and perceptual dimensions, underpinning these with careful identification of musical devices and techniques. The impact that such musical devices have – not just what they are – will be seen. Through examining a range of approaches to notation and transcription, students will develop an understanding of the notion of the 'musical text' in a range of traditions and be able to apply some of these in their own work.

Electronic Music Production (Core)
Find out more

Electronic Music Production (Core)

In this module students are invited to investigate the practices and creative possibilities of working within a desktop music and sound design production environment. This will involve MIDI programming, composition of basic musical and rhythmic arrangements, sound design, sound effects and an introduction to software instruments, synthesis, sampling techniques and digital signal processing.

Music Industries (Core)
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Music Industries (Core)

Over the course of a semester, the students will be introduced to the various industries within the world of music. Through a combination of lectures and workshops, the students will learn about industry areas such as publishing, recording, composing, performing, funding bodies, management, and booking agencies. This will be complemented by a series of workshops where students will create their own podcasts and learn how to plan, record, produce and edit a radio piece.

Acting the Song (Option)
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Acting the Song (Option)

This is a practical module in which students can explore the techniques of singing and acting song. Students have the opportunity to work on both ensemble numbers and individual numbers, to develop vocal technique, group singing skills, acting approaches to song and character building techniques for musical theatre.

The final performance of both ensemble and solo numbers aims to leave students with the skill to put together a portfolio of song material appropriate for their voice. Assessment will be part practical, and part based on an annotated rehearsal log put together throughout the process. Studying 'The Musical' in Semester A is a prerequisite for 'Acting the Song' in Semester B.

Composition (Option)
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Composition (Option)

This module starts students' focus on the Composition programme pathway. The module enables students to develop skills in arranging for small ensembles, and leading rehearsals with small ensembles of performers. In seminar sessions, students can explore the role of a composer and musical director from a range of perspectives (technical, stylistic, aesthetic and critical). They will be introduced to existing work from practitioners in the area, and can develop their own techniques and approaches through analysis, practice and reflection.

Curating Music (Core)
Find out more

Curating Music (Core)

This module brings together a scholarly understanding of music with practical, industry-focused skills. By the end of the module students will have written an essay on a subject of their choice and also had the opportunity to prepare a detailed proposal in response to a creative brief, to be pitched to a music industry panel.

Ensemble Performance and Enterprise (Option)
Find out more

Ensemble Performance and Enterprise (Option)

Students work in small groups to develop a concert programme and find a performance venue, before promoting their event, rehearsing and performing the final show. Inventive approaches to performance, including considerations of unusual venues and engaging marketing techniques, are central to the module.

Joint Show (Core)
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Joint Show (Core)

This module continues students' focus on their programme pathway of choice (Composition and Musical Direction or Performance and Musicianship). In supervised workshop-rehearsals students can plan and develop a collaborative group performance exercising the skills of their chosen pathway.

Those on the Composition and Musical Direction pathway can take roles as composers, musical directors, vocal coaches and orchestrators of the material; those on the Performance and Musicianship pathway will take roles adapting material and performing the final show.

Music Production and Enterprise (Option)
Find out more

Music Production and Enterprise (Option)

Students learn the practical and critical skills needed to self-produce a recording of their work as a singer-songwriter, performer or composer. Through learning about music enterprise, marketing, promotion and areas of music business, students will then begin to market and promote their music using appropriate platforms. Learning is split between practical recording/production sessions, and contextual/practical sessions on elements of music enterprise. In addition, students will carefully manage their independent learning to record and produce their work in a timely manner.

Performance (Option)
Find out more

Performance (Option)

This module begins students' focus on the Performance programme pathway. The module aims to enable students to develop skills in collaborating within a small ensemble and working effectively within a rehearsal environment. In seminar sessions, students can explore the role of a performer and musician director from a range of perspectives (technical, stylistic, aesthetic and critical).

Students will be introduced to existing work from practitioners in the area, and can develop their own techniques and approaches through analysis, practice and reflection.

Placements (LSFPA) (Option)
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Placements (LSFPA) (Option)

The Placement module encourages students to engage with the creative industries beyond the University through an 80-hour placement with a business or organisation of their choosing. Through direct workplace experience, students may develop new skills, strengthen existing ones, establish valuable professional networks, and target future employment opportunities. Following the placement students are assessed via presentations where they reflect upon their professional development and the impact of their work with the partner organisation.

Study Abroad (Option)
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Study Abroad (Option)

Study Abroad is an optional module which enables students to spend a semester studying abroad at one of the University’s approved partner institutions. Eligible students must have completed their first year of study to a satisfactory standard and successfully completed the application process for the study abroad scheme. During the semester spent abroad, students share classes with local students and study on a suite of locally-delivered taught modules which have been approved in advance by the University. Upon their return, as part of the assessment for this module, students are required to critically reflect upon their experience of living and studying in a different cultural environment and the skills acquired.

Teaching Music (Option)
Find out more

Teaching Music (Option)

This module aims to develops students’ skills and experience in teaching music to individuals and small groups. Students can work together to explore teaching practices and methods for instrumental/vocal teaching, ensemble and aural training. In a series of workshops, students will give lessons in their first study instrument to another member of the cohort, who has no previous experience of that instrument. At the end of the process, students will be assigned to school-age class groups in order to teach a small ensemble elementary singing and music theory.

Dissertation (Music) Written (Option)
Find out more

Dissertation (Music) Written (Option)

This module provides the opportunity for students to investigate and pursue a Music-based topic of their own choosing in more depth than is possible in a conventional essay. Students will be required to work on their own initiative and provide clear evidence of their ability to collect, select and evaluate relevant information, which can subsequently be presented in a clear and logical manner, in the form of a 7000 word dissertation.

Dissertation: Practice-led (Option)
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Dissertation: Practice-led (Option)

This module gives students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of practical work that can be in any area of their choosing, including a substantial performance or set of performances; a portfolio of compositions or substantial single work; an album or EP; music for a film; an audio installation. Students will be supported through a series of lectures and seminars alongside close work with an appropriate supervisor.

Music and media (Option)
Find out more

Music and media (Option)

This module is designed to develop students’ skills and experience in creating music for different media.

Students will have the opportunity to work alongside students from other programmes who are developing work in radio, film, animation, computer gaming, etc. to create appropriate musical scores and soundtracks.

Music and the Stage (Core)
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Music and the Stage (Core)

This module aims to develop students’ skills and experience in creating music for the stage. The module runs concurrently with the Shakespeare and Performance module within the BA (Hons) Drama degree, in which drama students work to produce a full-scale, staff-directed Shakespeare production to be staged and performed on the LPAC stage. In this companion module, Music students will have the opportunity to create and (where appropriate) record or perform scores for a Shakespeare play, working alongside the staff and students from the Drama programme.

Professional Practice (Music) (Core)
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Professional Practice (Music) (Core)

In this module students will have the opportunity to produce promotional material for, and participate in a music and performance showcase / festival. Students can pitch their proposed promotional projects to the organisers and report on their development and implementation throughout the module. The promotional projects will require students to engage with a range of digital media as well as more traditional forms of promotion. In addition to promoting their own performance, students will have the opportunity to propose and contribute to other aspects of festival promotion. The performance itself may include or be adapted from musical material the student has composed for previous modules. However, it will also include new material or demonstrate significant development of existing material.

Throughout the module students are required to maintain a digital record of the work completed which tracks the development of their ideas, the investigation of promotional methods used by musicians and the industry, as well as items of interest and inspiration.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Much of the assessment on this course will be practical. Depending on the chosen pathway, students may be asked to perform or asked to create and submit their music using various technologies.

Students may be required to submit their practical work as a portfolio documenting their creative process and development.

Whenever we assess practical work, students will be asked to reflect on their process and development, sometimes in writing and sometimes in conversation. Written assessments come in various forms and are designed to develop writing skills in preparation for the final-year dissertation.

Students may be expected to write in the style of sleevenotes, to prepare briefs or reports similar to those used in the industry, and to submit conventional academic essays discussing issues relating to contemporary music.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Some assessments are practical and/or performance based, others are more academic and take the form of oral presentations and written work. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Successful applicants will be invited to a performance workshop. You will be asked to talk about your interest and experience in music, and share with us your reasons for wanting to study at Lincoln. We would like you to perform a 3-5 minute unaccompanied performance piece on your primary instrument or voice that shows you at your best. Following the performance you will have the opportunity to have a tour of the facilities, meet current students and ask any questions you might have about the course or the University.
Performance Opportunities

There are opportunities for students to perform at Lincoln Performing Arts Centre, the Platform Stage in The Engine Shed, and at Siren Radio. Students can also join departmental ensembles run collaboratively by staff and students, including the University Orchestra, Choir, Jazz Ensemble and Soul Band. There are opportunities to get involved with the in-house semi-professional Lincoln Company, which stages productions throughout the year, including at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. Additional costs may apply.

Live Performance Ticket Allocation

Students on this course currently receive event/performance credits which can be used against ticketed performances at the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre.

Staff and Student Work

Listen to staff and student work on Soundcloud -http://bit.ly/uolmusic

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Our optional placements module in the second year allows students the opportunity to gain work experience in the industry, focusing on a role suited to their career aspirations and specialist expertise developed on the programme. The module encourages students to reach into the wider community to hone their skills for future employment.

Study Abroad

In second year, students can choose to study abroad. An optional module enables students to spend a semester studying abroad at one of the University’s approved partner institutions. Eligible students must have completed their first year of study to a satisfactory standard and successfully completed the application process for the study abroad scheme.

Students are responsible for travel, accommodation, and general living costs while on placement or study abroad.

Placements

Some courses offer students the opportunity to undertake placements. When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry (where available). Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Tuition Fees

2020/21UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level* £15,900 per level**
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,900 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

* UK/EU: The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

** International: The fees quoted are for one year of study. For continuing students fees are subject to an increase of 2% each year and rounded to the nearest £100.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

- In exceptional circumstances, students who are required to re-take modules can do so on an 'assessment only' basis. This means that students do not attend timetabled teaching events but are required to take the assessments/examinations associated with the module(s). The 'assessment only' fee is half of the £ per credit point fee for each module.

Exceptionally, tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost.

Other Costs

There are no mandatory additional costs related to this course. However, we would however generally expect students to own and maintain the instrument they are studying. Though we do have pianos, guitars and drums that can be used or borrowed, other instruments may not be available.

Additional costs may apply for those participating in productions with the Lincoln Company.

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC and a recognised practical music examination at Grade 5, A Level Music or equivalent.

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 104 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may be considered.

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Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.
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If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk
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Learn from Experts

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may also be supported in their learning by other students.

Music - Dr Robert Dean

Dr Robert Dean

Programme Leader

Dr Robert Dean is a Principal Lecturer in the College of Arts, Programme Leader for BA (Hons) Music and a Senior Teaching Fellow (HEA). His published work includes publications with a focus on popular culture, such as a consideration of ethics and catechism in the horror series The Walking Dead and an exploration of how representations of Batman have developed within gaming culture.


Your Future Career

This course aims to prepare graduates for careers as performers, songwriters, musical directors, arrangers, orchestrators, composers, teachers, vocal coaches, producers, agents and event managers, or to go on to study at postgraduate level.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.

We aim to provide our graduates with the necessary skills and experience to pursue careers as freelance songwriters, musical directors, arrangers, orchestrators, composers, studio technicians, teachers, vocal coaches, producers, agents, event managers, and arts managers among many other roles.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.


Facilities

Lincoln Music students have access to a range of industry-standard facilities. Fully equipped recording studios include facilities for live music, radio and drama productions. The Lincoln Sound Theatre is a 5.1 surround sound control room and Foley suite with large screen LCD projection for audio post-production. Mac suites are set up with notation software and orchestral voices.

Rehearsal facilities include large performance studio spaces and an acoustic cabin for soundproofed rehearsal. Students can access the fully equipped 450-seat flexible studio theatre in the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre and The Platform, 350 person capacity music venue with integrated in house PA system.

There are opportunities to use a variety of studios and suites including a multi-track studio with dual control room, three recording areas together with a live room, dead room, and drum isolation booth for music and drama production. Facilities also include audio edit suites, radio production suites, and audio production production suite.


The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.