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BSc (Hons)

BSc (Hons)

Select year of entry:
3 years School of Geography Lincoln Campus [L] Validated BBC (or equivalent qualifications) F800 3 years School of Geography Lincoln Campus [L] Validated BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points) (or equivalent qualifications) F800

"Geography at Lincoln represents one of the most significant investments in UK university Geography for a generation"

Dr Rita Gardner CBE, Director of the Royal Geographical Society

Introduction

The BSc (Hons) Geography Degree at Lincoln explores scientific perspectives on issues of environmental change and sustainability from local to global scales. It encourages students to develop the analytical, critical and collaborative skills needed to work across broad interdisciplinary issues. Physical Geography at Lincoln focuses on understanding the Earth system, developing skills relevant to managing environmental challenges and hazards such as floods and droughts, as well assisting decision makers in government and the environmental sector.

Geography is an integrative subject that aims to provide the intellectual tools necessary to understand the relationship between human society and its environment, and the issues that challenge our future.

This course is designed to develop subject understanding and geographical skills progressively in the context of real-world problems, enabling students to apply their learning to contemporary global challenges. With Lincoln’s unique focus on the ‘safety and health of the inhabited Earth’ our mission is to deliver a degree that is relevant for environmental and societal challenges in the 21st century.

A belief in the importance of interdisciplinary knowledge to address major issues is at the heart of our approach. Our academics are experienced researchers investigating key issues in global development across a spectrum of physical geography, in collaboration with academics in other disciplines, including human geography.

Students will be encouraged to engage in research and project work that builds on the expertise of staff. This includes the ‘Student as Producer’ initiative that encourages academics and undergraduates to collaborate on research activities.

How You Study

BSc and BA Geography students at Lincoln follow a common central thread of; concept lectures, seminars, small group tutorials, practical teaching of analytical skills through field and laboratory classes, as well as group project work under close personal supervision.

In the first year, a series of core modules are designed to integrate both Physical and Human geography skills and concepts. This approach aims to provide a foundation for students to become “geographers” in the true, interdisciplinary sense.

Year One consists of a range of Physical and Human geography modules which include both fieldwork and practical sessions, and provide the necessary groundwork for further study. In the second and third years, students will focus primarily on the Physical Geography pathway but also have the opportunity to study elements of Human Geography within the context of a broad interdisciplinary approach. Both years comprise a mixture of core modules covering research skills, laboratory techniques, fieldwork and modelling, as well as optional modules, designed to enable students to follow their interests.

Students will also be able to select optional modules from the BSc Geography programme as part of their course. Detailed information on all modules can be found within the module tab.

Core skills students have learned in gathering, collating and analysing data will be developed in extensive projects and fieldwork, in the UK and overseas. Students will also have the opportunity to develop skills in residential fieldwork, through placements and other activities, providing the chance to apply geographical knowledge in real-world settings, and put theory into practice.

For mandatory trips in the first and second years, costs of travel and accommodation are covered by the School. Should students choose to participate in any optional, additional third year field trips, they will be responsible for covering their travel, accommodation and general living costs.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

How You Are Assessed

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our School of Geography Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2017-18

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC including a B in Geography or related subject (Biology, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, Physics). General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted.

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall, with 5 at Higher Level in Geography or related subjects (in the fields of Sciences, Mathematics or Individuals and Societies).

BTEC Extended Diploma in Geography or related subjects (Applied Science, Computing, Engineering, Environmental Sustainability, Information Technology, Pharmaceutical Science): Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits at merit or above will be required, 15 of which must be in Geography or a related subject (from the fields of Information, Communications and Technology, Science and Mathematics or Agriculture, Horticultures and Animal Care).

In addition, applicants will be required to have a minimum of three GCSEs at grade C or above (or equivalent), to include English and Maths.

Level 1

Building the Earth: River Civilizations & the Making of the Inhabited World (Core)

This module explores how Holocene climate change and hydromorphic regimes shaped human societies and how human activities shaped global rivers and their catchments. Its aim is to introduce the conceptual and knowledge base that underpins the School of Geography’s distinctive and unifying theme of the “Safety and Health of the Inhabited Earth”.

It outlines a global framework of evolving climate and river environment variability over space and time, and considers how societies past and present responded to hydromorphic environmental opportunities and challenges. Case studies will be drawn from: the monsoonal river civilizations of the Indus and Nile Valleys, China and Amazonia; and mid-latitude and mountain river civilizations of Mesopotamia, Central Asia, North and South America.

In the final part of the module the importance of taking “the long view” to understand current global riverine environmental challenges (floods, droughts, pollution) in the context of anthropogenic climate change will be debated.

Challenges of Rural & Urban Living (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to the impact of globalisation and the penetration of markets across urban and rural space. The implications for changing urban and rural communities and the challenges of inequalities (economic and social) will be addressed.

Students have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the fundamentals of markets through an introduction to micro-economics and theories and indicators of inequalities at global and local scales. The impact of inequalities in different places at different spatial scales will be considered through an introduction to sociological approaches.

An understanding of social and economic principles can allow students to appraise contemporary issues relating to the health and safety of urban and rural communities across the globe. Appreciating the nature of globalisation will help them to contextualise contemporary processes and provide a firm grounding for entering employment in today’s globalised labour market.

Earth Observation & GIS (Core)

The aim of this module is to teach students the fundamental theory and practical applications of Earth observation (remote sensing) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Geospatial technologies (involving remote sensing and GIS) have changed the way businesses and policymakers solve problems and the way scientists understand Earth system processes and hazards. These technologies are routinely used by people in their work and their daily life (e.g. via Google Earth).

This module aims to introduce students to some of the important sources of geospatial data and the technologies underpinning them, and will highlight ways in which they are used both within geographical science and more widely. In addition students can gain hands-on, skills-based experience in processing and analysing data using GIS and Remote Sensing software. These are vital tools that will enable students to more rigorously assess the safety and health of the inhabited Earth.

Environmental Data Monitoring & Analysis (Core)

The aim of this module is to provide basic training in several key laboratory and field methods. This is provided via introductory lectures followed by a series of integrated computer and laboratory practical sessions, workshops and local fieldwork.

The lectures aim to demonstrate the importance of laboratory and field experimentation within modern geographical enquiry. The practical exercises aim to provide hands-on experience of the collection, synthesis, analysis and presentation of environmental data within the contexts of geomorphology/soil science, and meteorology/hydrology.

This module therefore aims to provide vocationally-relevant practical tools and insight that enable an informed judgement of the safety and health of the environment in the context of rapid human change.

Learning from Engagement (Core)

The aim of this module is to introduce students to contemporary issues and debates across the discipline of geography, focusing on the central theme of the School of Geography, “The Health and Safety of the Inhabited Earth”. This will be done through a combination of local fieldwork and a series of research seminars and guest lectures.

Local fieldwork is designed to introduce students to contemporary issues in the social and natural environment through in-depth studies in Lincolnshire. The County of Lincolnshire has a diverse physical geography and faces a number of human and societal challenges making it an excellent “laboratory” to study issues of national and international importance.

Students can also engage with a series of research seminars covering cutting-edge topics from the School’s staff, invited academics from other Universities as well as industry and policy practitioners. The series will be designed to offer insights into a range of career trajectories and application do f geography, as well as to showcase a breadth of academic and research opportunities.

Sustainable Environments & Ecosystems (Core)

The aim of this module is to introduce students to the links between ecosystems and human health. The module focuses heavily on the role of human activities in changing ecosystems, covering aspects of human impacts on ecosystems as well as policy and regulatory actions to improve and safeguard vital ecosystems. Impacts are assessed in terms of both human and wider environmental factors such as quality of life and access to safe and healthy resources as well as biodiversity, landscape assets and climate resilience.

Local and global case studies will be drawn to assess issues such as the sustainable design of built environments, sustainable approaches to waste management and threats linked to overconsumption of natural resources and excess pollution. By exploring a range of relevant case studies we will question assumptions about environmental/ecosystem interactions and equip students with the necessary critical knowledge and overview for deriving real-world solutions to a representative range of current environmental problems.

The Earth System: Processes & Hazards (Core)

The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to the general principles of physical geography for students with diverse backgrounds. Using a systems-based approach to physical geography, four environmental systems will be examined: geosphere, cryosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere.

The final part of the module will consider the interactions between physical systems and also the causes and consequences of system change, such as climate change, over time and space. The occurrence and impacts of some key natural hazards (earthquakes, volcanoes, floods and droughts) will also be considered, which will facilitate an improved appreciation of the safety and health of the environment.

Level 2

Biogeography & Planetary Health (Option)

Understanding and predicting the impacts of climatic- and human-induced changes on the distribution and functioning of biomes and terrestrial ecosystems are two of the most urgent current environmental challenges. Increases in global temperatures, changes in precipitation and radiation patterns, droughts, floods, fires and land-use change can all have major effects on the distribution and functioning of ecosystems, directly influencing their biogeographical patterns and their role in mitigating or alleviating current climate change.

This module provides an introduction to biogeography and ecosystem functioning and planetary health concepts; it also gives an overview of techniques (e.g. field vegetation surveys and climate-ecosystem modelling) that are used to monitor and quantify ecosystem health and predict changes in current ecosystem patterns and therefore delimit the implications for the future safety of the inhabited Earth.

Climatology & Hydrology (Option)

This module provides students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of global meteorology and climatology, focusing on the atmosphere but with some consideration of interaction with the ocean, and global hydrology, including ecohydrology, hydrogeology and water quality with an emphasis on water resources and management.

The first part of the module will consider the main characteristics of, and processes behind, climate from global to regional scales. The second part covers global hydrology, including consideration of the physical characteristics of rivers and their geographical variation, and related aspects of river-catchment science and the role of the rivers in the wider environmental system. The meteorological/climatological and hydrological insights gained can enable an improved appraisal of the safety and health of the inhabited Earth. Throughout the module links with the geology and/or engineering industries will be highlighted.

Cultural & Historical Geography (Option)

This module gives students the opportunity to develop the key skills and understanding of cultural theories of place and space that can be applied to an increasingly diverse range of other specialist areas of human geography.

The module focuses on the ways in which cultural norms and political power shape places in today’s world. From this perspective, we explore the ways in which different groups in today’s society are defined and identified, both by themselves and by others. Students are introduced to the meaning of scale and boundaries from a cultural perspective and asked to critically examine their roles in framing the nature of power and marginalisation.

Students completing this module can gain a deeper understanding of the culturally diverse nature of the world in which we live, including power imbalances and inequalities, which may prepare them for a range of policy-oriented as well as internationally-engaged employment opportunities.

Development Studies & the Global South (Option)

This module is about the challenges for economic development in the Global South. Such challenges cannot be studied in isolation so the key issues are examined from the perspective of an increasing pace of globalisation. This leads us to assess the role of political and corporate actors at the global scale as well as issues relating to local actors, resources and natural environments.

The module begins with a critical introduction to core theories of international development and evidence of different measures of inequality before more contemporary theories relating to urban growth, demographic change, technology and new industrial systems are applied to deepen understanding of the processes that perpetuate global inequality. As well as global systems, new opportunities for locally embedded growth in the form of local business development, tourism and technology-based opportunities can be explored.

Finally, the added vulnerability associated with wars, natural disasters and new geopolitics are considered in relation to the development potential of different regions of the Global South.

Earth Observation, Modelling & Visualisation: Representing Reality & Understanding Change (Core)

The ability to model the behaviour of natural and human systems, and their interaction, is an increasingly vital tool in understanding both these systems and the consequence of changes such as population growth or climate change.

This module uses lectures and computer practicals to introduce the numerical modelling of geographical processes and systems. The science and art of model formulation, construction, and testing will be covered in detail. Students can use a number of specially-written models from various areas of physical and human geography.

Overall the module aims to introduce modelling as an important method of understanding geographical systems and predicting changes in these systems, and to give students some experience of what is involved in creating and using geographical models.

Geographical Research: Theory & Practice (Core)

The ability to undertake independent research is a key skill in geography and in many areas of future employment. This module introduces the principles of research design and places methods of data collection in the overall context of research, including identifying a topic of study, carrying out a literature review, and designing research questions and linking them to appropriate methods of data collection, analysis and testing.

A European field trip provides the chance to gain practical experience in designing and carrying out field-based research projects in small groups and in focused individual research-project design. The purpose of the European field class is to get students practicing real-world geography through direct observation and measurement of their surroundings, and the processing, interpretation and presentation of the data collected.

Overall the module aims to equip students with the knowledge and skills required to undertake a piece of independent research while gearing them towards becoming independent researchers.

Placement (Level 2) (Option)

This placement provides students with the opportunity to develop their professional skills by spending time with a relevant employer. Students undertaking this placement will be expected to spend a minimum of 150 hours working under the direct supervision of the employer.Tasks will be developed to give students an insight into the professional working environment. Alongside the placement, students will be expected to prepare a report that reflects on their professional learning experience and identifies how elements of the Geography syllabus relate to at least one core area of their work experience.

Political & Social Geography (Option)

This module introduces students to the main schools of thinking in social and political geography as well as key theorists in each field. In particular, contemporary issues concerning the neo-liberalist agenda, social innovation and the role of civic society will be covered.

Mainstream debates about communities, institutions and nations will be within the social geography part of the course. This will allow students to examine in greater depth issues of social exclusion and geographies of class, ethnicity, sexuality and gender, with reference to theories of intersectionality and “othering”.

Political geography will focus on contemporary challenges to democracy and capitalism, including emergent social movements and global geo-political issues. The role of the nation state in a time of pressures for devolution in the UK and growing nationalism across Europe will be explored. The evolving politics and influence of global superpowers will also be examined.

Quantitative & Qualitative Geographical Analysis Methods (Core)

This module is concerned with developing the essential skills that are required to collect, process, interpret and present primary and secondary research data. It describes and discusses applications of descriptive and quantitative statistics and approaches to collating and analysing quantitative datasets. Overall the module will aim to provide students with a solid grounding in the proper application of qualitative and quantitative methods in geographical analysis, and an appreciation of their role in the study of contemporary environmental and social issues.

Quaternary Science (Option)

Great changes at global, regional and local scales have occurred during the last 2.6 million years of Earth’s history (Quaternary period). These changes are continuing and have implications for both current and future environments. This modules discusses the tools and techniques required to investigate past environmental changes and considers how natural variability can be distinguished from variability caused by humans.

River & Coastal Systems: Science & Management (Option)

This module will focus on coastal and river geomorphological processes, as a key component of the safety and health of highly-populated floodplain and coastal regions. It aims to develop an understanding of key methods of monitoring and modelling contemporary river and coastal morphodynamics, and include the use of hydraulic and hydrological models for monitoring river and coastal flooding and its impacts. As well as providing an in depth theoretical framework of catchment and coastal processes and exploring hands-on tools for investigating these processes, the module emphasises links with the environmental/flood protection agencies and/or consultancies.

Urban & Regional Economic Geography (Option)

All economic phenomena take place within geographical space and the economic activities shape the social and cultural places in which they occur. This module provides students with core principles about the emergence of distinctive regions within countries and at an international scale, focusing on the global north. As well as presenting students with core theories of regional economics, the impacts of geopolitics, regional policy and the roles of international trade and transnational corporations will also be analysed.

A critical understanding of the reasons for differing economic fortunes between regions aims to give students a more analytical understanding of the inequalities that impact the modern economy. This aims to prepare students for future work in the field of economic development policy as well enabling them to apply this knowledge in industry.

Level 3

Advanced Earth Observation GIS (Option)

Geographers are involved in the monitoring, modelling and management of environmental systems. Spatial data in digital form and computer systems capable of handling such data are vital tools for all three activities. This module aims to introduce students who are already familiar with the basics of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to the advanced techniques required for the successful collection and analysis of spatial data for environmental applications.

The module will consider the role of GIS in geography and environmental science, and will also introduce students to some of the ethical and policy issues surrounding data collection and dissemination. It aims to develop key skills using a powerful tool (GIS) that is widely used in commerce and industry (e.g. by local authorities and in environmental management), and this skillset is directly applicable to improving geographical understanding of the safety and health of the inhabited Earth.

Contemporary Climate Change & Processes (Option)

This module will involve the study of climate, with the emphasis on climatic forcing factors, observation and modelling of the climate system, and ice-climate links: all on the 'contemporary' timescale (past few to next few centuries). The underpinning geophysics will be presented, but using the minimum of mathematics, in order to gain the fullest understanding of processes involved. Students can also explore extreme weather events, climate hazards and the societal implications of climate change.

Dissertation Research Project (Physical) (Core)

The Dissertation is an extended piece of original research work on a geographical topic of students' own choice that is carried out under the guidance of a staff mentor. It allows students to draw together and build on the skills and subject expertise they have developed throughout their time at University. Students will be expected to either collect original material for investigation and/or to carry out original analysis of secondary data. Students' allocated supervisor will guide and advise them in their work. The dissertation should be written and presented in the style of an academic research paper but, wherever possible, will highlight the wider-world and vocational relevance of the research.

Environmental Histories of the New & Old World (Option)

This module is designed to provide students with a thorough grounding in the origins, contemporary understanding and practice of environmental history, landscape ecology and human impacts on landscapes and environments. Case studies from different geographical contexts allow students to apply approaches drawn from landscape ecology and environmental history to problems of environmental and resource management. In line with the School’s focus on the health and safety of the inhabited earth, the ways in which human activity has shaped landscapes and environmental changes as well as the impacts for human society can provide a cohesive theme throughout the module.

Environmental Impacts on Ecosystem, Human & Planetary Health (Option)

This module uses the concept of planetary health to introduce students to a wide range of critical environmental issues facing the world today from physical and human geographical perspectives.

Using a range of global and regional environmental problems, incorporating case studies on climate change, water and energy resources, land-use change and agriculture, the responsible and interrelated physical and social processes will be examined.

Students can critically explore the causes, consequences, management and solutions to ecosystem, human and planetary health issues and learn how to question assumptions about the underlying processes. This can be useful for a wide range of careers in environmental management and policy/regulation.

Geographies of Health & Wellbeing (Option)

This module addresses issues of uneven health and wellbeing at both local and global scales. As well as applying a range of indicators to assess the spread of different health inequalities, the different interpretations and implications of “wellbeing” and “health” inequalities will be debated. Examples will be drawn from the developed and less developed worlds. In the developed world, these will include challenges of poor health resulting from over-population and resource scarcity as well as attempts to manage disease and improve healthcare provision.

To ensure that students have the opportunity to develop specialist understanding of contemporary issues in the geography of health and wellbeing, a specialist topic will be studied in depth. This approach will allow students to apply statistical and mapping skills alongside their conceptual learning about the geopolitical and social challenges relating to health and well-being.

Geographies of Innovation (Option)

Innovation is increasingly championed as the driver of economic growth has therefore become a central focus for regional policy. This module will explore meanings and types of “Innovation” and then apply these in a spatial context. Students can explore the different actors and institutions involved in Regional Innovation Systems and use this knowledge to assess different policy options to create and sustain innovative regions.

Aligned to this, students can investigate the characteristics of “entrepreneurial regions” in terms of their labour markets, infrastructure and knowledge networks. Whilst the majority of the work will consider case study regions within the UK and Europe, international dimensions and increasingly international networks of innovation will also be introduced.

Geographies of Power, Conflict & Discrimination (Option)

The aim of this module is to develop deeper insights into contemporary issues of conflict and discrimination and the role of power. Students will be encouraged to analyse and critique the role of power at different scales and across different geographies.

Conflict can arise at a very local level, for example over planning permission, as well as at a global level – such as tensions over global climate treaties. Examples from both extremes will be studied to allow students to appraise the power relations, networks and tensions that are revealed.

This aims to prepare students to enter the labour market in a rapidly changing political environment and help them to appreciate the challenges of developing policies to address the diverse challenges to preserve and enhance the safety and health of the inhabited earth in an equitable manner.

Global Systems & Societies: Ageing, Migration & Mobility (Option)

Many pressing contemporary social and economic issues relating to the health and safety of the inhabited earth (including poverty, unemployment, environmental degradation and community transitions) can be linked to demographic processes.

Students can apply analytical skills to investigate demographic changes as well as examine broader processes of demographic change in the light of contemporary theory. Building their understanding of the social, economic, political and cultural processes that affect population geographies aims to provide a global awareness that is increasingly important in the modern workplace. It will also be an essential grounding for postgraduate study in the areas of human geography and demography.

Natural Hazards (Option)

This module covers a number of selected topics related to the geosphere where natural phenomena and circumstances (and sometimes human attempts to manage them) may result in harmful - and frequently catastrophic - effects on both humans and their environment. In each case the nature and underlying causes of the ‘natural hazard’ are explained and the effects, including those on the biosphere in general and humans in particular, are examined and discussed in some depth.

Students can also consider how hazards, exposure routes and consequences can be understood within a source-pathway-target risk assessment framework. Such a framework iis designed to enable students to understand how to analyse risk, define the chain of impact from source to target, and identify ways of controlling and managing risk. Each topic is illustrated with current or past examples and – with the aim of diagnosing and improving the safety and health of the inhabited Earth.

Overseas Fieldwork (Option)

This module aims to put into practice knowledge gained in previous modules by focusing on the physical and human processes that have shaped the environment and will influence future change (therefore helping to shape the safety and health of the inhabited region) – it will provide experience of process interpretation and understanding in an unfamiliar setting.

The module will allow students to work within a unique range of overseas environments and carry out a study that will result in the design, implementation and production of a research report that is mainly based on student-led fieldwork. Introductory lecture sessions will take place in Lincoln prior to fieldwork. Knowledge and understanding on the actual fieldclass can be gained via enquiry-based learning, followed by group/individual data collection and follow-up analysis, set in the context of wider research, and student-centred research presentations. Follow-up sessions will provide the opportunity to analyse and create a written presentation of research findings. Transferable and group skills gained in a largely unfamiliar setting can be invaluable for the workplace.

Placement (Level 3) (Option)

On this placement, students are expected to carry out a specific project for an external organisation. The project would be agreed between the Host Organisation, School of Geography Supervisor and Student prior to the commencement of the placement. The student would be expected to undertake a specific project task to address a particular requirement of the Host Organisation. This might include consultancy research, analytical research, public engagement or the development of a new teaching class/activity. The approach, outcome and an evaluation of the project should be presented in the form of a professional report and oral presentation.

Planetary Geoscience (Option)

This module enables students to explore the geoscience of our neighbouring planets (Mercury, Venus and Mars) and the Moon as an interesting, novel and insightful comparison to the physical geography and geology of our own planet. Geographical principles are used to study exotic planetary environments, based on topical issues from diverse interrelated fields of study including geomorphology, tectonics, hydrology, climate and life.

Starting with a focus on the Solar System, the module then progresses to study planetary matters, using the above ‘terrestrial’ planets as the main examples due to the wealth of recently-acquired observational data and because they are best used as analogues to our own planet. Students can consider how our planetary perspective offers useful insights into the evolution, safety and health of the inhabited Earth.

Project Essay (Option)

The aim of this module is to allow students to develop an extended piece of work that advances their understanding and engagement with one of their other chosen topics. Students will be given an extended essay/project to work on that builds their core understanding from another module. A supervisor will be allocated to guide the student on additional reading and other sources of information.

Students should be offered the option of either a research or theory based project, to be developed based the contemporary issues identified by the module leader in that given field.

River Systems & Global Environmental Change (Option)

The aim of this module is to help students develop a conceptual, factual and practical knowledge of channel, floodplain and catchment response to environmental change resulting from natural and anthropogenic perturbations. It has a global perspective and considers river systems on all of the Earth’s inhabited continents. The impact of climate change on river morphodynamics is evaluated over three time periods: (i) the Last Glacial to Interglacial Transition (c. 22,000-11,700 years before the present); the Holocene Epoch (c. 11,700 years before the present until today); and the historical period (generally the last 1000 years or so).

The modules aims to provide an advanced level understanding of river catchment systems and global environmental change worldwide and is suitable for students who want to pursue careers in river management and flood control, or postgraduate studies in river science.

Rural Geography (Option)

The aim of this module is to apply learning about economic and social development processes to the rural environment in order to understand contemporary challenges faced by rural places in the global north. Demographic changes and the effects of ageing, gentrification and counterurbanisation will be explored in a range of European and North American contexts. The role of demographic change influencing economic, social and political change will be a core feature of this module.

Building on the first year core module “challenges of urban and rural living” more detailed analysis of the changing composition of rural economies will focus principally on rural entrepreneurship across a diverse range of non-agricultural activities. The module will also develop concepts from social, cultural and economic geography covered at level two, including the role of power in shaping rural places, the economic development trajectories of rural regions and issues of social inequalities governance and local planning.

Students will be encouraged to think about rural places as part of an inter-dependent urban-rural system but also to identify specific patterns of change, opportunities and challenges that are embedded within rural places. Such perspectives are integral to a contemporary approach to addressing the health and sustainability of rural communities and their economies and can equip students with the knowledge to succeed in a rural environment, whether in business, policy-making or an increasing range of third-sector and community-based activities.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

The School of Geography at Lincoln is focused around the theme of:
‘A safe and healthy inhabited Earth’.

  • Our focus is the inhabited Earth, not so much the polar, glacierized or desert Earth.
  • Our aim is to promote the creation of healthy and safe environments in such places.
  • We take the ’long view’, recognising that ours is not the first civilisation to confront environmental problems, therefore setting the present challenge of climate change in context and avoiding ‘short-termism’.
  • We recognise the geographical and scale variety of environmental issues - the global and the local. From world climate, erosion and famine hazard ‘hotspots’, to the street challenges of cities and houses.

Our aim is to intellectually engage students:

  • Our courses are designed using evidence-based and active learning strategies.
  • In the creation and integration of knowledge our students will have the chance to encounter authentic research at all levels – either through their own activities or through the teaching staff sharing experiences from their own research.

We also aim to personally engage students:

  • Our courses recognise and value diversity, and relate geographical learning to local and global human problems.
  • Connections between the School of Geography, industry and business, and regulatory agencies will be promoted through placement and work experience opportunities.
  • Mentoring and support programmes are embedded across the programme.

Placements

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

Our aim is to produce students who:

  • Understand the environmental challenges of the world and of communities.
  • Are technically competent.
  • Can undertake investigative projects, reporting on their findings in an articulate and literate manner so that their findings are publicly understandable.
  • will be highly eligible for employment in a variety of business and management roles where environmental knowledge, investigative skills and articulacy are valued.

Geography can provide a broad range of career opportunities, including roles in; geographical information systems, social and environmental consultancy, planning and public policy, teaching, management, the property industry and the financial sector.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

The BA (Hons) Geography Degree at Lincoln explores social science perspectives on issues of globalisation, sustainability, geo-politics and cultural change ranging from the local to the global scale. It encourages students to develop the analytical, critical and collaborative skills needed to work across broad interdisciplinary issues.

Introduction

The BSc (Hons) Geography Degree at Lincoln explores scientific perspectives on issues of environmental change and sustainability from local to global scales. It encourages students to develop the analytical, critical and collaborative skills needed to work across broad interdisciplinary issues. Physical Geography at Lincoln focuses on understanding the Earth system, developing skills relevant to managing environmental challenges and hazards such as floods and droughts, as well assisting decision makers in government and the environmental sector.

Geography is an integrative subject that aims to provide the intellectual tools necessary to understand the relationship between human society and its environment, and the issues that challenge our future.

This course is designed to develop subject understanding and geographical skills progressively in the context of real-world problems, enabling students to apply their learning to contemporary global challenges. With Lincoln’s unique focus on the ‘safety and health of the inhabited Earth’ our mission is to deliver a degree that is relevant for environmental and societal challenges in the 21st century.

A belief in the importance of interdisciplinary knowledge to address major issues is at the heart of our approach. Our academics are experienced researchers investigating key issues in global development across a spectrum of physical geography, in collaboration with academics in other disciplines, including human geography.

Students will be encouraged to engage in research and project work that builds on the expertise of staff. This includes the ‘Student as Producer’ initiative that encourages academics and undergraduates to collaborate on research activities.

How You Study

BSc and BA Geography students at Lincoln follow a common central thread of; concept lectures, seminars, small group tutorials, practical teaching of analytical skills through field and laboratory classes, as well as group project work under close personal supervision.

In the first year, a series of core modules are designed to integrate both Physical and Human geography skills and concepts. This approach aims to provide a foundation for students to become “geographers” in the true, interdisciplinary sense.

Year One consists of a range of Physical and Human geography modules which include both fieldwork and practical sessions, and provide the necessary groundwork for further study. In the second and third years, students will focus primarily on the Physical Geography pathway but also have the opportunity to study elements of Human Geography within the context of a broad interdisciplinary approach. Both years comprise a mixture of core modules covering research skills, laboratory techniques, fieldwork and modelling, as well as optional modules, designed to enable students to follow their interests.

Students will also be able to select optional modules from the BSc Geography programme as part of their course. Detailed information on all modules can be found within the module tab.

Core skills students have learned in gathering, collating and analysing data will be developed in extensive projects and fieldwork, in the UK and overseas. Students will also have the opportunity to develop skills in residential fieldwork, through placements and other activities, providing the chance to apply geographical knowledge in real-world settings, and put theory into practice.

For mandatory trips in the first and second years, costs of travel and accommodation are covered by the School. Should students choose to participate in any optional, additional third year field trips, they will be responsible for covering their travel, accommodation and general living costs.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

How You Are Assessed

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our School of Geography Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2018-19

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC including a B in Geography or related subject (Biology, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, Physics). General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted.

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall, with 5 at Higher Level in Geography or related subjects (in the fields of Sciences, Mathematics or Individuals and Societies).

BTEC Extended Diploma in Geography or related subjects (Applied Science, Computing, Engineering, Environmental Sustainability, Information Technology, Pharmaceutical Science): Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits at merit or above will be required, 15 of which must be in Geography or a related subject (from the fields of Information, Communications and Technology, Science and Mathematics or Agriculture, Horticultures and Animal Care).

In addition, applicants will be required to have a minimum of three GCSEs at grade C or above (or equivalent), to include English and Maths.

Level 1

Building the Earth: River Civilizations & the Making of the Inhabited World (Core)

This module explores how Holocene climate change and hydromorphic regimes shaped human societies and how human activities shaped global rivers and their catchments. Its aim is to introduce the conceptual and knowledge base that underpins the School of Geography’s distinctive and unifying theme of the “Safety and Health of the Inhabited Earth”.

It outlines a global framework of evolving climate and river environment variability over space and time, and considers how societies past and present responded to hydromorphic environmental opportunities and challenges. Case studies will be drawn from: the monsoonal river civilizations of the Indus and Nile Valleys, China and Amazonia; and mid-latitude and mountain river civilizations of Mesopotamia, Central Asia, North and South America.

In the final part of the module the importance of taking “the long view” to understand current global riverine environmental challenges (floods, droughts, pollution) in the context of anthropogenic climate change will be debated.

Challenges of Rural & Urban Living (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to the impact of globalisation and the penetration of markets across urban and rural space. The implications for changing urban and rural communities and the challenges of inequalities (economic and social) will be addressed.

Students have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the fundamentals of markets through an introduction to micro-economics and theories and indicators of inequalities at global and local scales. The impact of inequalities in different places at different spatial scales will be considered through an introduction to sociological approaches.

An understanding of social and economic principles can allow students to appraise contemporary issues relating to the health and safety of urban and rural communities across the globe. Appreciating the nature of globalisation will help them to contextualise contemporary processes and provide a firm grounding for entering employment in today’s globalised labour market.

Earth Observation & GIS (Core)

The aim of this module is to teach students the fundamental theory and practical applications of Earth observation (remote sensing) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Geospatial technologies (involving remote sensing and GIS) have changed the way businesses and policymakers solve problems and the way scientists understand Earth system processes and hazards. These technologies are routinely used by people in their work and their daily life (e.g. via Google Earth).

This module aims to introduce students to some of the important sources of geospatial data and the technologies underpinning them, and will highlight ways in which they are used both within geographical science and more widely. In addition students can gain hands-on, skills-based experience in processing and analysing data using GIS and Remote Sensing software. These are vital tools that will enable students to more rigorously assess the safety and health of the inhabited Earth.

Environmental Data Monitoring & Analysis (Core)

The aim of this module is to provide basic training in several key laboratory and field methods. This is provided via introductory lectures followed by a series of integrated computer and laboratory practical sessions, workshops and local fieldwork.

The lectures aim to demonstrate the importance of laboratory and field experimentation within modern geographical enquiry. The practical exercises aim to provide hands-on experience of the collection, synthesis, analysis and presentation of environmental data within the contexts of geomorphology/soil science, and meteorology/hydrology.

This module therefore aims to provide vocationally-relevant practical tools and insight that enable an informed judgement of the safety and health of the environment in the context of rapid human change.

Learning from Engagement (Core)

The aim of this module is to introduce students to contemporary issues and debates across the discipline of geography, focusing on the central theme of the School of Geography, “The Health and Safety of the Inhabited Earth”. This will be done through a combination of local fieldwork and a series of research seminars and guest lectures.

Local fieldwork is designed to introduce students to contemporary issues in the social and natural environment through in-depth studies in Lincolnshire. The County of Lincolnshire has a diverse physical geography and faces a number of human and societal challenges making it an excellent “laboratory” to study issues of national and international importance.

Students can also engage with a series of research seminars covering cutting-edge topics from the School’s staff, invited academics from other Universities as well as industry and policy practitioners. The series will be designed to offer insights into a range of career trajectories and application do f geography, as well as to showcase a breadth of academic and research opportunities.

Sustainable Environments & Ecosystems (Core)

The aim of this module is to introduce students to the links between ecosystems and human health. The module focuses heavily on the role of human activities in changing ecosystems, covering aspects of human impacts on ecosystems as well as policy and regulatory actions to improve and safeguard vital ecosystems. Impacts are assessed in terms of both human and wider environmental factors such as quality of life and access to safe and healthy resources as well as biodiversity, landscape assets and climate resilience.

Local and global case studies will be drawn to assess issues such as the sustainable design of built environments, sustainable approaches to waste management and threats linked to overconsumption of natural resources and excess pollution. By exploring a range of relevant case studies we will question assumptions about environmental/ecosystem interactions and equip students with the necessary critical knowledge and overview for deriving real-world solutions to a representative range of current environmental problems.

The Earth System: Processes & Hazards (Core)

The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to the general principles of physical geography for students with diverse backgrounds. Using a systems-based approach to physical geography, four environmental systems will be examined: geosphere, cryosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere.

The final part of the module will consider the interactions between physical systems and also the causes and consequences of system change, such as climate change, over time and space. The occurrence and impacts of some key natural hazards (earthquakes, volcanoes, floods and droughts) will also be considered, which will facilitate an improved appreciation of the safety and health of the environment.

Level 2

Biogeography & Planetary Health (Option)

Understanding and predicting the impacts of climatic- and human-induced changes on the distribution and functioning of biomes and terrestrial ecosystems are two of the most urgent current environmental challenges. Increases in global temperatures, changes in precipitation and radiation patterns, droughts, floods, fires and land-use change can all have major effects on the distribution and functioning of ecosystems, directly influencing their biogeographical patterns and their role in mitigating or alleviating current climate change.

This module provides an introduction to biogeography and ecosystem functioning and planetary health concepts; it also gives an overview of techniques (e.g. field vegetation surveys and climate-ecosystem modelling) that are used to monitor and quantify ecosystem health and predict changes in current ecosystem patterns and therefore delimit the implications for the future safety of the inhabited Earth.

Climatology & Hydrology (Option)

This module provides students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of global meteorology and climatology, focusing on the atmosphere but with some consideration of interaction with the ocean, and global hydrology, including ecohydrology, hydrogeology and water quality with an emphasis on water resources and management.

The first part of the module will consider the main characteristics of, and processes behind, climate from global to regional scales. The second part covers global hydrology, including consideration of the physical characteristics of rivers and their geographical variation, and related aspects of river-catchment science and the role of the rivers in the wider environmental system. The meteorological/climatological and hydrological insights gained can enable an improved appraisal of the safety and health of the inhabited Earth. Throughout the module links with the geology and/or engineering industries will be highlighted.

Cultural & Historical Geography (Option)

This module gives students the opportunity to develop the key skills and understanding of cultural theories of place and space that can be applied to an increasingly diverse range of other specialist areas of human geography.

The module focuses on the ways in which cultural norms and political power shape places in today’s world. From this perspective, we explore the ways in which different groups in today’s society are defined and identified, both by themselves and by others. Students are introduced to the meaning of scale and boundaries from a cultural perspective and asked to critically examine their roles in framing the nature of power and marginalisation.

Students completing this module can gain a deeper understanding of the culturally diverse nature of the world in which we live, including power imbalances and inequalities, which may prepare them for a range of policy-oriented as well as internationally-engaged employment opportunities.

Development Studies & the Global South (Option)

This module is about the challenges for economic development in the Global South. Such challenges cannot be studied in isolation so the key issues are examined from the perspective of an increasing pace of globalisation. This leads us to assess the role of political and corporate actors at the global scale as well as issues relating to local actors, resources and natural environments.

The module begins with a critical introduction to core theories of international development and evidence of different measures of inequality before more contemporary theories relating to urban growth, demographic change, technology and new industrial systems are applied to deepen understanding of the processes that perpetuate global inequality. As well as global systems, new opportunities for locally embedded growth in the form of local business development, tourism and technology-based opportunities can be explored.

Finally, the added vulnerability associated with wars, natural disasters and new geopolitics are considered in relation to the development potential of different regions of the Global South.

Earth Observation, Modelling & Visualisation: Representing Reality & Understanding Change (Core)

The ability to model the behaviour of natural and human systems, and their interaction, is an increasingly vital tool in understanding both these systems and the consequence of changes such as population growth or climate change.

This module uses lectures and computer practicals to introduce the numerical modelling of geographical processes and systems. The science and art of model formulation, construction, and testing will be covered in detail. Students can use a number of specially-written models from various areas of physical and human geography.

Overall the module aims to introduce modelling as an important method of understanding geographical systems and predicting changes in these systems, and to give students some experience of what is involved in creating and using geographical models.

Geographical Research: Theory & Practice (Core)

The ability to undertake independent research is a key skill in geography and in many areas of future employment. This module introduces the principles of research design and places methods of data collection in the overall context of research, including identifying a topic of study, carrying out a literature review, and designing research questions and linking them to appropriate methods of data collection, analysis and testing.

A European field trip provides the chance to gain practical experience in designing and carrying out field-based research projects in small groups and in focused individual research-project design. The purpose of the European field class is to get students practicing real-world geography through direct observation and measurement of their surroundings, and the processing, interpretation and presentation of the data collected.

Overall the module aims to equip students with the knowledge and skills required to undertake a piece of independent research while gearing them towards becoming independent researchers.

Placement (Level 2) (Option)

This placement provides students with the opportunity to develop their professional skills by spending time with a relevant employer. Students undertaking this placement will be expected to spend a minimum of 150 hours working under the direct supervision of the employer.Tasks will be developed to give students an insight into the professional working environment. Alongside the placement, students will be expected to prepare a report that reflects on their professional learning experience and identifies how elements of the Geography syllabus relate to at least one core area of their work experience.

Political & Social Geography (Option)

This module introduces students to the main schools of thinking in social and political geography as well as key theorists in each field. In particular, contemporary issues concerning the neo-liberalist agenda, social innovation and the role of civic society will be covered.

Mainstream debates about communities, institutions and nations will be within the social geography part of the course. This will allow students to examine in greater depth issues of social exclusion and geographies of class, ethnicity, sexuality and gender, with reference to theories of intersectionality and “othering”.

Political geography will focus on contemporary challenges to democracy and capitalism, including emergent social movements and global geo-political issues. The role of the nation state in a time of pressures for devolution in the UK and growing nationalism across Europe will be explored. The evolving politics and influence of global superpowers will also be examined.

Quantitative & Qualitative Geographical Analysis Methods (Core)

This module is concerned with developing the essential skills that are required to collect, process, interpret and present primary and secondary research data. It describes and discusses applications of descriptive and quantitative statistics and approaches to collating and analysing quantitative datasets. Overall the module will aim to provide students with a solid grounding in the proper application of qualitative and quantitative methods in geographical analysis, and an appreciation of their role in the study of contemporary environmental and social issues.

Quaternary Science (Option)

Great changes at global, regional and local scales have occurred during the last 2.6 million years of Earth’s history (Quaternary period). These changes are continuing and have implications for both current and future environments. This modules discusses the tools and techniques required to investigate past environmental changes and considers how natural variability can be distinguished from variability caused by humans.

River & Coastal Systems: Science & Management (Option)

This module will focus on coastal and river geomorphological processes, as a key component of the safety and health of highly-populated floodplain and coastal regions. It aims to develop an understanding of key methods of monitoring and modelling contemporary river and coastal morphodynamics, and include the use of hydraulic and hydrological models for monitoring river and coastal flooding and its impacts. As well as providing an in depth theoretical framework of catchment and coastal processes and exploring hands-on tools for investigating these processes, the module emphasises links with the environmental/flood protection agencies and/or consultancies.

Urban & Regional Economic Geography (Option)

All economic phenomena take place within geographical space and the economic activities shape the social and cultural places in which they occur. This module provides students with core principles about the emergence of distinctive regions within countries and at an international scale, focusing on the global north. As well as presenting students with core theories of regional economics, the impacts of geopolitics, regional policy and the roles of international trade and transnational corporations will also be analysed.

A critical understanding of the reasons for differing economic fortunes between regions aims to give students a more analytical understanding of the inequalities that impact the modern economy. This aims to prepare students for future work in the field of economic development policy as well enabling them to apply this knowledge in industry.

Level 3

Advanced Earth Observation GIS (Option)

Geographers are involved in the monitoring, modelling and management of environmental systems. Spatial data in digital form and computer systems capable of handling such data are vital tools for all three activities. This module aims to introduce students who are already familiar with the basics of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to the advanced techniques required for the successful collection and analysis of spatial data for environmental applications.

The module will consider the role of GIS in geography and environmental science, and will also introduce students to some of the ethical and policy issues surrounding data collection and dissemination. It aims to develop key skills using a powerful tool (GIS) that is widely used in commerce and industry (e.g. by local authorities and in environmental management), and this skillset is directly applicable to improving geographical understanding of the safety and health of the inhabited Earth.

Contemporary Climate Change & Processes (Option)

This module will involve the study of climate, with the emphasis on climatic forcing factors, observation and modelling of the climate system, and ice-climate links: all on the 'contemporary' timescale (past few to next few centuries). The underpinning geophysics will be presented, but using the minimum of mathematics, in order to gain the fullest understanding of processes involved. Students can also explore extreme weather events, climate hazards and the societal implications of climate change.

Dissertation Research Project (Physical) (Core)

The Dissertation is an extended piece of original research work on a geographical topic of students' own choice that is carried out under the guidance of a staff mentor. It allows students to draw together and build on the skills and subject expertise they have developed throughout their time at University. Students will be expected to either collect original material for investigation and/or to carry out original analysis of secondary data. Students' allocated supervisor will guide and advise them in their work. The dissertation should be written and presented in the style of an academic research paper but, wherever possible, will highlight the wider-world and vocational relevance of the research.

Environmental Histories of the New & Old World (Option)

This module is designed to provide students with a thorough grounding in the origins, contemporary understanding and practice of environmental history, landscape ecology and human impacts on landscapes and environments. Case studies from different geographical contexts allow students to apply approaches drawn from landscape ecology and environmental history to problems of environmental and resource management. In line with the School’s focus on the health and safety of the inhabited earth, the ways in which human activity has shaped landscapes and environmental changes as well as the impacts for human society can provide a cohesive theme throughout the module.

Environmental Impacts on Ecosystem, Human & Planetary Health (Option)

This module uses the concept of planetary health to introduce students to a wide range of critical environmental issues facing the world today from physical and human geographical perspectives.

Using a range of global and regional environmental problems, incorporating case studies on climate change, water and energy resources, land-use change and agriculture, the responsible and interrelated physical and social processes will be examined.

Students can critically explore the causes, consequences, management and solutions to ecosystem, human and planetary health issues and learn how to question assumptions about the underlying processes. This can be useful for a wide range of careers in environmental management and policy/regulation.

Geographies of Health & Wellbeing (Option)

This module addresses issues of uneven health and wellbeing at both local and global scales. As well as applying a range of indicators to assess the spread of different health inequalities, the different interpretations and implications of “wellbeing” and “health” inequalities will be debated. Examples will be drawn from the developed and less developed worlds. In the developed world, these will include challenges of poor health resulting from over-population and resource scarcity as well as attempts to manage disease and improve healthcare provision.

To ensure that students have the opportunity to develop specialist understanding of contemporary issues in the geography of health and wellbeing, a specialist topic will be studied in depth. This approach will allow students to apply statistical and mapping skills alongside their conceptual learning about the geopolitical and social challenges relating to health and well-being.

Geographies of Innovation (Option)

Innovation is increasingly championed as the driver of economic growth has therefore become a central focus for regional policy. This module will explore meanings and types of “Innovation” and then apply these in a spatial context. Students can explore the different actors and institutions involved in Regional Innovation Systems and use this knowledge to assess different policy options to create and sustain innovative regions.

Aligned to this, students can investigate the characteristics of “entrepreneurial regions” in terms of their labour markets, infrastructure and knowledge networks. Whilst the majority of the work will consider case study regions within the UK and Europe, international dimensions and increasingly international networks of innovation will also be introduced.

Geographies of Power, Conflict & Discrimination (Option)

The aim of this module is to develop deeper insights into contemporary issues of conflict and discrimination and the role of power. Students will be encouraged to analyse and critique the role of power at different scales and across different geographies.

Conflict can arise at a very local level, for example over planning permission, as well as at a global level – such as tensions over global climate treaties. Examples from both extremes will be studied to allow students to appraise the power relations, networks and tensions that are revealed.

This aims to prepare students to enter the labour market in a rapidly changing political environment and help them to appreciate the challenges of developing policies to address the diverse challenges to preserve and enhance the safety and health of the inhabited earth in an equitable manner.

Global Systems & Societies: Ageing, Migration & Mobility (Option)

Many pressing contemporary social and economic issues relating to the health and safety of the inhabited earth (including poverty, unemployment, environmental degradation and community transitions) can be linked to demographic processes.

Students can apply analytical skills to investigate demographic changes as well as examine broader processes of demographic change in the light of contemporary theory. Building their understanding of the social, economic, political and cultural processes that affect population geographies aims to provide a global awareness that is increasingly important in the modern workplace. It will also be an essential grounding for postgraduate study in the areas of human geography and demography.

Natural Hazards (Option)

This module covers a number of selected topics related to the geosphere where natural phenomena and circumstances (and sometimes human attempts to manage them) may result in harmful - and frequently catastrophic - effects on both humans and their environment. In each case the nature and underlying causes of the ‘natural hazard’ are explained and the effects, including those on the biosphere in general and humans in particular, are examined and discussed in some depth.

Students can also consider how hazards, exposure routes and consequences can be understood within a source-pathway-target risk assessment framework. Such a framework iis designed to enable students to understand how to analyse risk, define the chain of impact from source to target, and identify ways of controlling and managing risk. Each topic is illustrated with current or past examples and – with the aim of diagnosing and improving the safety and health of the inhabited Earth.

Overseas Fieldwork (Option)

This module aims to put into practice knowledge gained in previous modules by focusing on the physical and human processes that have shaped the environment and will influence future change (therefore helping to shape the safety and health of the inhabited region) – it will provide experience of process interpretation and understanding in an unfamiliar setting.

The module will allow students to work within a unique range of overseas environments and carry out a study that will result in the design, implementation and production of a research report that is mainly based on student-led fieldwork. Introductory lecture sessions will take place in Lincoln prior to fieldwork. Knowledge and understanding on the actual fieldclass can be gained via enquiry-based learning, followed by group/individual data collection and follow-up analysis, set in the context of wider research, and student-centred research presentations. Follow-up sessions will provide the opportunity to analyse and create a written presentation of research findings. Transferable and group skills gained in a largely unfamiliar setting can be invaluable for the workplace.

Placement (Level 3) (Option)

On this placement, students are expected to carry out a specific project for an external organisation. The project would be agreed between the Host Organisation, School of Geography Supervisor and Student prior to the commencement of the placement. The student would be expected to undertake a specific project task to address a particular requirement of the Host Organisation. This might include consultancy research, analytical research, public engagement or the development of a new teaching class/activity. The approach, outcome and an evaluation of the project should be presented in the form of a professional report and oral presentation.

Planetary Geoscience (Option)

This module enables students to explore the geoscience of our neighbouring planets (Mercury, Venus and Mars) and the Moon as an interesting, novel and insightful comparison to the physical geography and geology of our own planet. Geographical principles are used to study exotic planetary environments, based on topical issues from diverse interrelated fields of study including geomorphology, tectonics, hydrology, climate and life.

Starting with a focus on the Solar System, the module then progresses to study planetary matters, using the above ‘terrestrial’ planets as the main examples due to the wealth of recently-acquired observational data and because they are best used as analogues to our own planet. Students can consider how our planetary perspective offers useful insights into the evolution, safety and health of the inhabited Earth.

Project Essay (Option)

The aim of this module is to allow students to develop an extended piece of work that advances their understanding and engagement with one of their other chosen topics. Students will be given an extended essay/project to work on that builds their core understanding from another module. A supervisor will be allocated to guide the student on additional reading and other sources of information.

Students should be offered the option of either a research or theory based project, to be developed based the contemporary issues identified by the module leader in that given field.

River Systems & Global Environmental Change (Option)

The aim of this module is to help students develop a conceptual, factual and practical knowledge of channel, floodplain and catchment response to environmental change resulting from natural and anthropogenic perturbations. It has a global perspective and considers river systems on all of the Earth’s inhabited continents. The impact of climate change on river morphodynamics is evaluated over three time periods: (i) the Last Glacial to Interglacial Transition (c. 22,000-11,700 years before the present); the Holocene Epoch (c. 11,700 years before the present until today); and the historical period (generally the last 1000 years or so).

The modules aims to provide an advanced level understanding of river catchment systems and global environmental change worldwide and is suitable for students who want to pursue careers in river management and flood control, or postgraduate studies in river science.

Rural Geography (Option)

The aim of this module is to apply learning about economic and social development processes to the rural environment in order to understand contemporary challenges faced by rural places in the global north. Demographic changes and the effects of ageing, gentrification and counterurbanisation will be explored in a range of European and North American contexts. The role of demographic change influencing economic, social and political change will be a core feature of this module.

Building on the first year core module “challenges of urban and rural living” more detailed analysis of the changing composition of rural economies will focus principally on rural entrepreneurship across a diverse range of non-agricultural activities. The module will also develop concepts from social, cultural and economic geography covered at level two, including the role of power in shaping rural places, the economic development trajectories of rural regions and issues of social inequalities governance and local planning.

Students will be encouraged to think about rural places as part of an inter-dependent urban-rural system but also to identify specific patterns of change, opportunities and challenges that are embedded within rural places. Such perspectives are integral to a contemporary approach to addressing the health and sustainability of rural communities and their economies and can equip students with the knowledge to succeed in a rural environment, whether in business, policy-making or an increasing range of third-sector and community-based activities.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

The School of Geography at Lincoln is focused around the theme of:
‘A safe and healthy inhabited Earth’.

  • Our focus is the inhabited Earth, not so much the polar, glacierized or desert Earth.
  • Our aim is to promote the creation of healthy and safe environments in such places.
  • We take the ’long view’, recognising that ours is not the first civilisation to confront environmental problems, therefore setting the present challenge of climate change in context and avoiding ‘short-termism’.
  • We recognise the geographical and scale variety of environmental issues - the global and the local. From world climate, erosion and famine hazard ‘hotspots’, to the street challenges of cities and houses.

Our aim is to intellectually engage students:

  • Our courses are designed using evidence-based and active learning strategies.
  • In the creation and integration of knowledge our students will have the chance to encounter authentic research at all levels – either through their own activities or through the teaching staff sharing experiences from their own research.

We also aim to personally engage students:

  • Our courses recognise and value diversity, and relate geographical learning to local and global human problems.
  • Connections between the School of Geography, industry and business, and regulatory agencies will be promoted through placement and work experience opportunities.
  • Mentoring and support programmes are embedded across the programme.

Placements

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

Our aim is to produce students who:

  • Understand the environmental challenges of the world and of communities.
  • Are technically competent.
  • Can undertake investigative projects, reporting on their findings in an articulate and literate manner so that their findings are publicly understandable.
  • will be highly eligible for employment in a variety of business and management roles where environmental knowledge, investigative skills and articulacy are valued.

Geography can provide a broad range of career opportunities, including roles in; geographical information systems, social and environmental consultancy, planning and public policy, teaching, management, the property industry and the financial sector.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

The BA (Hons) Geography Degree at Lincoln explores social science perspectives on issues of globalisation, sustainability, geo-politics and cultural change ranging from the local to the global scale. It encourages students to develop the analytical, critical and collaborative skills needed to work across broad interdisciplinary issues.

Tuition Fees

2017/18UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £14,500 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2018/19UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,600 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

In 2018/19, fees for all new and continuing undergraduate UK and EU students will be £9,250.

Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions [www.lincoln.ac.uk/StudentAdmissionsTermsandConditions].