Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

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Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Subject to Revalidation

Fees

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UCAS Code

L700

Course Code

GEHGEHUB

BA (Hons) Geography

Geography and Environmental Studies at Lincoln is ranked in the top 10 in the UK in The Guardian University Guide 2022 (out of 68 ranking institutions).

Peace of mind guaranteed. Find out more about our Guaranteed Place Scheme.

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

View

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Subject to Revalidation

Fees

View

UCAS Code

L700

Course Code

GEHGEHUB

Dr Adegbola Ojo - Programme Leader

Dr Adegbola Ojo - Programme Leader

Prior to joining the University of Lincoln, Adegbola held research and teaching roles at the London School of Economics and Political Science, the University of York, and Liverpool John Moores University. He combines his academic expertise with more than a decade of agile practical industry experience across a wide range of disciplinary sectors in various organisations, and is deeply committed to undertaking research that addresses significant global challenges.

Academic Staff List

Welcome to BA (Hons) Geography

Geography is an integrative subject that seeks to understand the relationship between human society and its environment, addressing some of the critical issues that are challenging our future.

The BA (Hons) Geography Degree at Lincoln explores social science perspectives on issues of globalisation, sustainability, geo-politics and cultural change ranging from the local to the global scale. It encourages students to develop the analytical, critical and collaborative skills needed to work across broad interdisciplinary issues.

This course is designed to develop subject understanding and geographical skills progressively in the context of real-world problems, enabling students to apply their learning to contemporary global challenges. With Lincoln's unique focus on the 'safety and health of the inhabited Earth', our mission is to deliver a degree that is relevant to the global, environmental and societal challenges for the 21st century.

A belief in the importance of interdisciplinary knowledge to address major issues is at the heart of our approach. Our academics are experienced researchers investigating key and emerging issues in global development across a spectrum of human geography, in collaboration with academics in other disciplines, including physical geography.

Students can engage in research and project work that builds on the expertise of staff. This includes the 'Student as Producer' initiative that facilitates undergraduates and academics to collaborate on research activities.

How You Study

BA and BSc Geography students at Lincoln follow a common central thread of concept lectures, seminars, small group tutorials, practical teaching of analytical skills through field and laboratory classes, as well as group project work under close personal supervision. We aim to provide a strong staff to student ratio to support student learning throughout the programme.

In the first year, a series of core modules are designed to integrate both human and physical geography skills and concepts. This approach aims to provide a foundation for students to become geographers in the true, interdisciplinary sense.

The first year consists of a range of human and physical geography modules which include both fieldwork and practical sessions, and provide the necessary groundwork for further study. In the second and third years students will focus primarily on the human geography pathway but also have the opportunity to study elements of physical geography within the context of a broad interdisciplinary approach. Both years comprise a mixture of core modules covering research skills, laboratory techniques, fieldwork and modelling, as well as optional modules, designed to enable students to follow their interests.

Students will also be able to select optional modules from the BSc Geography programme as part of their course. Detailed information on all modules can be found within the module tab.

Core skills students have learned in gathering, collating and analysing data will be developed in extensive projects and fieldwork, in the UK and overseas. Students also have the opportunity to develop skills in residential fieldwork, through placements and other activities, providing the chance to apply geographical knowledge in real-world settings, and put theory into practice.

For mandatory trips in the first and second years, costs of travel and accommodation are covered by the Department. Should students choose to participate in any optional, additional third year field trips they will be responsible for covering their travel, accommodation and general living costs.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

Field Work

Extensive projects and fieldwork in the UK and overseas support the development of core skills in gathering, collating, and analysing data. The travel and accommodation costs of compulsory first and second-year field trips are covered by the University. Destinations have previously included the Lincolnshire Coast and Crete, Greece. Students who choose to participate in any optional field trips, internships, or work experience are responsible for covering their travel, accommodation, and general living costs.

An Introduction to Your Modules

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

A Sustainable Lincolnshire 2022-23GEH1007MLevel 42022-23This module is based on the concept of sustainability and lives within an environment. It encompasses three key themes: economic and social geography, ecosystems, and environmental hazards, assessing how these systems interact. To do this, we will study three environments in the local area: the urban environment, the rural environment and coastal environment. Local fieldwork introduces students to contemporary issues in the social and natural environment through in-depth studies in the county of Lincolnshire. Lincolnshire has a diverse physical geography and faces a number of human and societal challenges making it an excellent laboratory to study issues of national and international importance that are directly relevant to The Health and Safety of the Inhabited Earth and the Universitys local to global remit.CoreEarth Observation & GIS 2022-23GEP1006MLevel 42022-23The aim of this module is to teach students the fundamental theory and practical applications of Earth observation (remote sensing) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Geospatial technologies (involving remote sensing and GIS) have changed the way businesses and policymakers solve problems and the way scientists understand Earth system processes and hazards. These technologies are routinely used by people in their work and their daily life (e.g. via Google Earth). This module aims to introduce students to some of the important sources of geospatial data and the technologies underpinning them, and will highlight ways in which they are used both within geographical science and more widely. In addition students can gain hands-on, skills-based experience in processing and analysing data using GIS and Remote Sensing software. These are vital tools that will enable students to more rigorously assess the safety and health of the inhabited Earth.CoreEarths Changing Surface and the Anthropocene 2022-23GEP1007MLevel 42022-23This module aims to provide a grounding in the key aspects of Geomorphology, including fluvial, coastal, aeolian, glacial, and hillslope geomorphology, and looks to build a firm foundation in understanding surface processes and hazards. It outlines a local to global framework of Earth surface processes and variability over space and time, drawing on case studies from both locally and across the world. There is therefore excellent complementarity with its sister module The Earth System Processes and Hazards, but with a stronger focus on Geomorphology and mass movements. These two modules taken together aim to develop essential knowledge and understanding that underpin the School of Geographys distinctive and unifying flavour of the Safety and Health of the Inhabited Earth. The importance of taking the long view (e.g. Holocene and longer perspective) in order to understand Earths changing surface in the context of anthropogenic climate change will be emphasised.CoreFoundations of Human Geography 2022-23Level 42022-23CoreLearning From Geographical Engagement 2022-23Level 42022-23CorePeople, Places, Patterns and Processes 2022-23GEH1006MLevel 42022-23Certain forces are shaping the structure of human populations and societies in the 21st century. The aim of this module is to help students gain foundational understanding of these different forces as well as their effects on human population structure. Students will get an opportunity to explore different aspects of population dynamics across developed and developing societies. From this quantitative starting point, students will be progressed into qualitative exploration of different place identities and attachments, cultural changes, and representations of places at a global scale. Teaching sessions will focus on people, their individual and collective characteristics, spatial distributions, and the undercurrents that account for these spatial patterns. In a broad sense, the module reflects the diversity of geography and it is closely aligned to spatial demography. Consequently, in addition to gaining insights into theoretical basis of population geography, students will also be exposed to the technical foundations of demographic data analysis through hands-on software training.CoreSustainable Environments & Ecosystems 2022-23GEH1003MLevel 42022-23The aim of this module is to introduce students to the links between ecosystems and human health. The module focuses heavily on the role of human activities in changing ecosystems, covering aspects of human impacts on ecosystems as well as policy and regulatory actions to improve and safeguard vital ecosystems. Impacts are assessed in terms of both human and wider environmental factors such as quality of life and access to safe and healthy resources as well as biodiversity, landscape assets and climate resilience. Local and global case studies will be drawn to assess issues such as the sustainable design of built environments, sustainable approaches to waste management and threats linked to overconsumption of natural resources and excess pollution. By exploring a range of relevant case studies we will question assumptions about environmental/ecosystem interactions and equip students with the necessary critical knowledge and overview for deriving real-world solutions to a representative range of current environmental problems.CoreThe Earth System: Processes & Hazards 2022-23GEP1005MLevel 42022-23The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to the general principles of physical geography for students with diverse backgrounds. Using a systems-based approach to physical geography, four environmental systems will be examined: geosphere, cryosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere. The final part of the module will consider the interactions between physical systems and also the causes and consequences of system change, such as climate change, over time and space. The occurrence and impacts of some key natural hazards (earthquakes, volcanoes, floods and droughts) will also be considered, which will facilitate an improved appreciation of the safety and health of the environment.CoreEarth Observation, Modelling & Visualisation: Representing Reality & Understanding Change 2023-24GEH2009MLevel 52023-24The ability to model the behaviour of natural and human systems, and their interaction, is an increasingly vital tool in understanding both these systems and the consequence of changes such as population growth or climate change. This module uses lectures and computer practicals to introduce the numerical modelling of geographical processes and systems. The science and art of model formulation, construction, and testing will be covered in detail. Students can use a number of specially-written models from various areas of physical and human geography. Overall the module aims to introduce modelling as an important method of understanding geographical systems and predicting changes in these systems, and to give students some experience of what is involved in creating and using geographical models.CoreGeographical Data Analysis Methods 2023-24Level 52023-24CoreHazards and Society 2023-24GEH2010MLevel 52023-24CoreHuman Geography Theory and Research 2023-24Level 52023-24CoreUrban & Regional Economic Geography 2023-24GEH2006MLevel 52023-24All economic phenomena take place within geographical space and the economic activities shape the social and cultural places in which they occur. This module provides students with core principles about the emergence of distinctive regions within countries and at an international scale, focusing on the global north. As well as presenting students with core theories of regional economics, the impacts of geopolitics, regional policy and the roles of international trade and transnational corporations will also be analysed. A critical understanding of the reasons for differing economic fortunes between regions aims to give students a more analytical understanding of the inequalities that impact the modern economy. This aims to prepare students for future work in the field of economic development policy as well enabling them to apply this knowledge in industry.CoreBiogeography & Planetary Health 2023-24GEP2002MLevel 52023-24Understanding and predicting the impacts of climatic- and human-induced changes on the distribution and functioning of biomes and terrestrial ecosystems are two of the most urgent current environmental challenges. Increases in global temperatures, changes in precipitation and radiation patterns, droughts, floods, fires and land-use change can all have major effects on the distribution and functioning of ecosystems, directly influencing their biogeographical patterns and their role in mitigating or alleviating current climate change. This module provides an introduction to biogeography and ecosystem functioning and planetary health concepts; it also gives an overview of techniques (e.g. field vegetation surveys and climate-ecosystem modelling) that are used to monitor and quantify ecosystem health and predict changes in current ecosystem patterns and therefore delimit the implications for the future safety of the inhabited Earth.OptionalClimatology & Hydrology 2023-24GEP2003MLevel 52023-24This module provides students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of global meteorology and climatology, focusing on the atmosphere but with some consideration of interaction with the ocean, and global hydrology, including ecohydrology, hydrogeology and water quality with an emphasis on water resources and management. The first part of the module will consider the main characteristics of, and processes behind, climate from global to regional scales. The second part covers global hydrology, including consideration of the physical characteristics of rivers and their geographical variation, and related aspects of river-catchment science and the role of the rivers in the wider environmental system. The meteorological/climatological and hydrological insights gained can enable an improved appraisal of the safety and health of the inhabited Earth. Throughout the module links with the geology and/or engineering industries will be highlighted.OptionalCultural & Historical Geography 2023-24GEH2003MLevel 52023-24This module gives students the opportunity to develop the key skills and understanding of cultural theories of place and space that can be applied to an increasingly diverse range of other specialist areas of human geography. The module focuses on the ways in which cultural norms and political power shape places in todays world. From this perspective, we explore the ways in which different groups in todays society are defined and identified, both by themselves and by others. Students are introduced to the meaning of scale and boundaries from a cultural perspective and asked to critically examine their roles in framing the nature of power and marginalisation. Students completing this module can gain a deeper understanding of the culturally diverse nature of the world in which we live, including power imbalances and inequalities, which may prepare them for a range of policy-oriented as well as internationally-engaged employment opportunities.OptionalDevelopment Studies & the Global South 2023-24GEH2004MLevel 52023-24This module is about the challenges for economic development in the Global South. Such challenges cannot be studied in isolation so the key issues are examined from the perspective of an increasing pace of globalisation. This leads us to assess the role of political and corporate actors at the global scale as well as issues relating to local actors, resources and natural environments. The module begins with a critical introduction to core theories of international development and evidence of different measures of inequality before more contemporary theories relating to urban growth, demographic change, technology and new industrial systems are applied to deepen understanding of the processes that perpetuate global inequality. As well as global systems, new opportunities for locally embedded growth in the form of local business development, tourism and technology-based opportunities can be explored. Finally, the added vulnerability associated with wars, natural disasters and new geopolitics are considered in relation to the development potential of different regions of the Global South.OptionalPlacement (Level 2) 2023-24GEH2007MLevel 52023-24This placement provides students with the opportunity to develop their professional skills by spending time with a relevant employer. Students undertaking this placement will be expected to spend a minimum of 70 hours working under the direct supervision of the employer. Tasks will be developed to give students an insight into the professional working environment. Alongside the placement, students will be expected to prepare a report that reflects on their professional learning experience and identifies how elements of the Geography syllabus relate to at least one core area of their work experience.OptionalPolitical & Social Geography 2023-24GEH2005MLevel 52023-24This module introduces students to the main schools of thinking in social and political geography as well as key theorists in each field. In particular, contemporary issues concerning the neo-liberalist agenda, social innovation and the role of civic society will be covered. Mainstream debates about communities, institutions and nations will be within the social geography part of the course. This will allow students to examine in greater depth issues of social exclusion and geographies of class, ethnicity, sexuality and gender, with reference to theories of intersectionality and othering. Political geography will focus on contemporary challenges to democracy and capitalism, including emergent social movements and global geo-political issues. The role of the nation state in a time of pressures for devolution in the UK and growing nationalism across Europe will be explored. The evolving politics and influence of global superpowers will also be examined.OptionalSoG International Study Year 2023-24GEH2011MLevel 52023-24The School believes that an option to study overseas is a valuable educational opportunity for our students. Provision of this option supports the educational aims of the School of Geography and enhances the distinctiveness of its degrees at Lincoln. The optional year is intended to: - enable students to benefit from studying within a cross cultural environment; - expose students to a wider academic and cultural experience; - enhance their future employment opportunities; - by increasing their cultural and professional mobility. This module is optional for students within the School. Study Abroad is a year long module which enables students to spend a year studying abroad at one of the Universitys approved partner institutions. Eligible students must have completed their second year of study to a satisfactory standard and successfully completed the application process for the year abroad. During the year spent abroad, students share classes with local students and study on a suite of locally-delivered taught modules which have been approved in advance by the University. Upon their return, as part of the assessment for this modules, students are required to critically reflect upon their experience of living and studying in a different cultural environment and the skills acquired.OptionalSoG Work Placement Year 2023-24GEH2002XLevel 52023-24OptionalClimate Change: Processes, Politics & Policy 2024-25GEH3013MLevel 62024-25CoreGeographies of Health & Wellbeing 2024-25GEH3007MLevel 62024-25This module addresses issues of uneven health and wellbeing at both local and global scales. As well as applying a range of indicators to assess the spread of different health inequalities, the different interpretations and implications of wellbeing and health inequalities are debated. Examples are drawn from the developed and less developed worlds. In the Global North these include challenges of poor health resulting from over-population and resource scarcity as well as attempts to manage disease and improve healthcare provision. In the Global South, particular emphasis is given to famine and food security issues.CoreGeography Dissertation 2024-25Level 62024-25CoreAdvanced Earth Observation GIS 2024-25GEP3008MLevel 62024-25Geographers are involved in the monitoring, modelling and management of environmental systems. Spatial data in digital form and computer systems capable of handling such data are vital tools for all three activities. This module aims to introduce students who are already familiar with the basics of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to the advanced techniques required for the successful collection and analysis of spatial data for environmental applications. The module examines the role of GIS in geography and environmental science, and introduces students to some of the ethical and policy issues surrounding data collection and dissemination. It aims to develop key skills using a powerful tool (GIS) that is widely used in commerce and industry (e.g. by local authorities and in environmental management), and this skillset is directly applicable to improving geographical understanding of the safety and health of the inhabited Earth.OptionalEnvironmental Histories of the New & Old World 2024-25GEH3003MLevel 62024-25This module is designed to provide students with a thorough grounding in the origins, contemporary understanding and practice of environmental history, landscape ecology, and human impacts on landscapes and environments. Case studies from different geographical contexts allow students to apply approaches drawn from landscape ecology and environmental history to problems of environmental and resource management. In line with the Schools focus on the health and safety of the inhabited earth, the ways in which human activity has shaped landscapes and environmental changes as well as the impacts for human society can provide a cohesive theme throughout the module.OptionalEnvironmental Management 2024-25GEP3012MLevel 62024-25This module examines a range of interdisciplinary environmental management techniques and conservation strategies that are used to address critical environmental, human, and planetary health issues. Students are expected to gain an understanding of the most appropriate techniques and solutions using a range of global, regional, and local environmental case studies. There is a strong emphasis on practice-based skills with guest lectures from practitioners in the field, field excursions, practical and seminar classes. An innovative assessment will give students the opportunity to be involved in actively influencing sustainable behaviour in the younger generation and giving them a chance to become the teacher. This approach is especially useful in the third year as it exposes students to a wide range of career options in environmental science management and policy/regulation.OptionalGlobal Systems & Societies: Ageing, Migration & Mobility 2024-25GEH3006MLevel 62024-25Many pressing contemporary social and economic issues relating to the health and safety of the inhabited earth (including poverty, unemployment, environmental degradation, and community transitions) can be linked to demographic processes. Students can apply analytical skills to investigate demographic changes as well as examine broader processes of demographic change in the light of contemporary theory. Building a deep understanding of the social, economic, political and cultural aspects of demographic processes can provide a global awareness that is increasingly important in the modern workplace. It will also be an essential grounding for postgraduate study in the areas of human geography and demography.OptionalOverseas Fieldwork 2024-25GEP3005MLevel 62024-25This module seeks to put into practice knowledge gained in previous modules by focusing on the physical and human processes that have shaped the environment and will influence future change (therefore helping to shape the safety and health of the inhabited region) it provides experience of process interpretation and understanding in an unfamiliar setting. Currently, two destinations, Chile and the Netherlands are available to students, although this is subject to change. Students who choose to participate in the optional field trip are responsible for covering their travel, accommodation, and general living costs. The module is designed to allow students to work within an overseas environment and carry out a study that will result in the design, implementation, and production of a research report that is mainly based on student-led fieldwork. Introductory lecture sessions will take place in Lincoln prior to fieldwork. Knowledge and understanding on the actual fieldclass can be gained via enquiry-based learning, followed by group/individual data collection and follow-up analysis, set in the context of wider research, and student-centred research presentations. Follow-up sessions will provide the opportunity to analyse and create a written presentation of research findings.OptionalPlacement (Level 3) 2024-25GEH3009MLevel 62024-25On this placement, students are expected to carry out a specific project for an external organisation. The project would be agreed between the Host Organisation, School of Geography Supervisor and Student prior to the commencement of the placement. The student would be expected to undertake a specific project task to address a particular requirement of the Host Organisation. This might include consultancy research, analytical research, public engagement or the development of a new teaching class/activity. The approach, outcome and an evaluation of the project should be presented in the form of a professional report and oral presentation.OptionalRural Geography 2024-25GEH3008MLevel 62024-25The aim of this module is to apply learning about economic and social development processes to the rural environment in order to understand contemporary challenges faced by rural places in the global north. Demographic changes and the effects of ageing, gentrification and counterurbanisation are explored in a range of European and North American contexts. The role of demographic change influencing economic, social and political change is a core feature of this module. Building on the first year core module Challenges of Rural and Urban Living, more detailed analysis of the changing composition of rural economies focuses heavily on rural enterprises and social innovation across a diverse range of non-agricultural activities. The module develops concepts from social, cultural and economic geography covered at level two, including the role of power in shaping rural places, the economic development trajectories of rural regions and issues of social inequalities governance and local planning. Students are encouraged to think about rural places as part of an interdependent urban-rural system but also to identify specific patterns of change, opportunities and challenges that are embedded within rural places. Such perspectives are integral to a contemporary approach to addressing the health and sustainability of rural communities and their economies and can equip students with the knowledge to succeed in a rural environment, whether in business, policy-making or an increasing range of third-sector and community-based activities.Optional

How you are assessed

Students are assessed using multiple, diverse methods including coursework such as written assignments, blogs, reports or dissertations; practical tasks, fieldwork and presentations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. Both group and individual assessments are commonly used. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year.

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that all in-course assessments are returned to students promptly usually within 15 working days after the submission date. The Department of Geography aims to provide continuing feedback to students through our tutorial system and scheduled open office hours.

Entry Requirements 2022-23

United Kingdom

A Level: BBC including a B in Geography or a related subject (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A Levels or equivalent qualifications). History, English, Economics, Sociology, a modern Language, Psychology, Mathematics or Biology are accepted. General Studies and Critical Thinking are accepted.

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall, with 5 at Higher Level in Geography or a related subject from the fields of the Arts, studies in Language and Literature or Individuals and Societies.

BTEC Extended Diploma in Geography or related subjects: Distinction, Merit, Merit or equivalent. Applied Science, Computing, Engineering, Environmental Sustainability, Information Technology, Pharmaceutical Science are accepted.

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points, including 40 points from 15 credits in Geography or a related subject from the fields of History, Philosophy, Theology, Languages, Literature, Culture, or Social Sciences.

A combination of qualifications which may include A Levels, BTEC, EPQ, etc.

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English and Maths. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry. We will also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages for information on equivalent qualifications.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Fees and Scholarships

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Accreditations and Memberships

This programme has been accredited by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG). Accredited degree programmes contain a solid academic foundation in geographical knowledge and skills, and prepare graduates to address the needs of the world beyond higher education. The accreditation criteria require evidence that graduates from accredited programmes meet defined sets of learning outcomes, including subject knowledge, technical ability and transferable skills.

Learn From Experts

Research is essential in informing our teaching and each of our academics is passionate about research. The College of Science hosts the Lincoln Centre for Water and Planetary Health, led by Professor Mark Macklin and Professor Chris Thomas, and Rural Visions, an interdisciplinary rural research group.

Our students have the chance to encounter authentic research at all levels – either through their own activities or through the teaching staff sharing experiences from their own research. The first year module Learning from Engagement requires students to prepare group blogs about cutting-edge research and practice in geography, reporting on a series of interdisciplinary seminars and lectures.

Wider opportunities to engage in research are provided through guest lectures within the course, working closely with the Lincoln branch of the Geographical Association externally, and engaging in research projects with staff. Two students have already completed UROS projects with the Department of Geography.

Placement Opportunities

There may be opportunities to work with industry partners, schools, and public organisations. These can include placement modules in both the second and third years of study, as well as the option to take a “placement year” between the second and third years. The Department of Geography works with a dedicated placement officer to support students in setting up placement opportunities.

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

From the first year students may have opportunities to attend lectures from people whose careers are built on geographical skills and knowledge. The Department also works closely with the University Careers and Employability team to promote the Lincoln Award, an initiative designed to enhance employability skills.

Career Opportunities

Geography can offer a broad range of career opportunities for its graduates. These include roles in geographical information systems, social environmental consultancy, planning and public policy, management, teaching, and the financial sector. The Department's links with industry, business, and environmental regulatory agencies provide opportunities for internships and work experience.

Visit Us in Person

The best way to find out what it is really like to live and learn at Lincoln is to join us for one of our Open Days. Visiting us in person is important and will help you to get a real feel for what it might be like to study here.

Book Your Place

Related Courses

Prioritising Face-to-Face Teaching

At Lincoln, we strive to make sure our student experience is engaging, supportive, and academically challenging. That is why, in response to the issues presented by the Covid-19 pandemic, we have been prioritising face-to-face teaching sessions for our new and returning students in areas where they are the most valuable, such as seminars, tutorials, workshops, and lab and practical sessions. Additional online opportunities have been introduced where they support learning and have been shown to be successful and popular with our current students.

Safety remains a key focus. We are fully prepared to adapt our plans if changes in Government guidance makes this necessary, and we will endeavour to keep current and prospective students informed. For more information about how we are working to keep our community safe, please visit our coronavirus web pages.

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.