BSc (Hons) Strength and Conditioning in Sport

BSc (Hons) Strength and Conditioning in Sport

94% of Lincoln’s School of Sport and Exercise Science graduates were in employment or further study within six months of finishing their course according to the latest Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey.

The Course

This specialist degree is informed by current research and innovation within the sector. It focuses on developing knowledge, understanding and practical skills in applied strength and conditioning, physiology, biomechanics and nutrition.

Throughout the degree, students have access to specialist equipment in the University’s Human Performance Centre, which contains a fully-equipped strength and conditioning training facility, laboratories and an endless pool, as well as our Sports and Recreation Centre, which includes a fitness suite. These facilities provide students with an opportunity to engage in applied work and increase their practical experience.

A number of staff within the School of Sport and Exercise Science are nationally accredited as strength and conditioning specialists and are actively involved in the delivery of ongoing strength and conditioning support to both University of Lincoln Sports Bursary athletes and external athletes visiting the School for consultancy. Students on this degree may have the opportunity to work with staff on research and contribute to consultancy projects.

A number of the modules on the degree programme align to the professional standards of industry recognised qualifications such as Gym Instruction, Personal Training and Exercise Referral.

Academics from the School of Sport and Exercise Science are engaged in strength and conditioning-related research and regularly present at conferences. Students are encouraged to demonstrate their own research in collaboration with staff and showcase their work at national conferences, such as the annual British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences Student Conference and the UK Strength and Conditioning Association Conference.

This course provides an opportunity to acquire a critical understanding of the knowledge and practical competencies required by strength and conditioning professionals. Key concepts are presented throughout the three years, with deepening layers of complexity.

Applied assessments and work placement opportunities can expose students to real-life work scenarios that are designed to develop the skills needed to succeed in a range of sports-related careers.

The Course

This specialist degree is informed by current research and innovation within the sector. It focuses on developing knowledge, understanding and practical skills in applied strength and conditioning, physiology, biomechanics and nutrition.

Throughout the degree, students have access to specialist equipment in the University’s Human Performance Centre, which contains a fully-equipped strength and conditioning training facility, laboratories and an endless pool, as well as our Sports and Recreation Centre, which includes a fitness suite. These facilities provide students with an opportunity to engage in applied work and increase their practical experience.

A number of staff within the School of Sport and Exercise Science are nationally accredited as strength and conditioning specialists and are actively involved in the delivery of ongoing strength and conditioning support to both University of Lincoln Sports Bursary athletes and external athletes visiting the School for consultancy. Students on this degree may have the opportunity to work with staff on research and contribute to consultancy projects.

A number of the modules on the degree programme align to the professional standards of industry recognised qualifications such as Gym Instruction, Personal Training and Exercise Referral. Students may choose to undertake these qualifications alongside their degree at no extra cost.

Academics from the School of Sport and Exercise Science are engaged in strength and conditioning-related research and regularly present at conferences. Students are encouraged to demonstrate their own research in collaboration with staff and showcase their work at national conferences, such as the annual British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences Student Conference and the UK Strength and Conditioning Association Conference.

This course provides an opportunity to acquire a critical understanding of the knowledge and practical competencies required by strength and conditioning professionals. Key concepts are presented throughout the three years, with deepening layers of complexity.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Biomechanical Basis of Human Movement (Core)
Find out more

Biomechanical Basis of Human Movement (Core)

This module seeks to examine the mechanics of human movement, identifying the internal and external forces acting on the human body and the effects of these forces. Particular emphasis will be placed on applying the theoretical principles of biomechanics to sport and exercise.

The specific objectives are to:

  • Provide an opportunity to develop an understanding of the basic principles of biomechanics.
  • Investigate the relationship between the theoretical principles of biomechanics and sports performance.
  • Introduce students to the basic laboratory techniques for the biomechanical assessment of motion.

Foundations in Human Nutrition (Core)
Find out more

Foundations in Human Nutrition (Core)

This module introduces the key terminology and the scientific principles in human nutrition, metabolism and digestion. Importantly, both structure and function of all essential nutrients are covered alongside recommendations on dietary reference values (DRVs) for the population. Furthermore, basic molecular and cell biology are incorporated to better understand current and future developments in this field. Practical components will explore public health guidance on nutrition including, estimating portion sizing, food labelling and food choice education/skills training.

Foundations in Strength and Conditioning (Core)
Find out more

Foundations in Strength and Conditioning (Core)

This module aims to provide an introduction to key concepts within strength and conditioning in order for students to develop a foundation of knowledge. Context for the field of strength and conditioning will be addressed, introducing relevant professional bodies. Course content aims to cover the role, scope of practice and code of conduct of the strength and conditioning coach. Fundamental elements of athlete training will be introduced from both theoretical and practical perspectives.

Fundamentals of Human Physiology (Core)
Find out more

Fundamentals of Human Physiology (Core)

This module aims to provide the opportunity for students to develop a basic knowledge of the structure and function of the human body. The module seeks to focus on anatomical, biochemical and physiological integration necessary for human movement production.

Initial examination aims to develop an understanding of structures and processes relating to biological energy processing and systems, and the relationship between anatomical structures and physical functions. Students have the opportunity to develop an integrated systems approach to human movement, examining endocrine, neural and muscular functions required for movement initiation.

Research Skills (Core)
Find out more

Research Skills (Core)

On this module, students have the opportunity to develop useful study skills for the sport and exercise scientist and benefit from an introduction to the underpinning concepts of scientific study and research methods.

This module aims to enable students to benefit fully from the higher education learning environment and develop their reflective practice, alongside an understanding of the philosophy of science as related to scientific study in sport and exercise.

Applied Exercise Physiology (Option)
Find out more

Applied Exercise Physiology (Option)

This module aims to give students the opportunity to consolidate and expand their knowledge of the foundations of sport physiology developed at level one, by encouraging the application of the fundamental principles of anatomy and physiology.

There is an emphasis on practical skills development with the aim of enabling students to evaluate responses to exercise in a laboratory and field environment. Students have the opportunity to apply the generic principles of sports physiology to different athletic groups in order to develop an appreciation of suitable methods of fitness development and adaptations to training prescription.

Applied Health Physiology (Option)
Find out more

Applied Health Physiology (Option)

The aim of this module is to examine the relationship between physical activity and health, understanding the health problems that are caused by inactivity and their pathophysiology.

Students can learn both the risks and benefits of physical activity, understanding the contraindications to exercise for a range of special population groups. Students will be supported in the measurement of health-related fitness for sedentary individuals and make suitable recommendations for exercise in order to benefit health.

Applied Movement Analysis (Core)
Find out more

Applied Movement Analysis (Core)

This module aims to enable students to build on practical knowledge and skills gained at level one within the Biomechanical Basis of Human Movement module.

It aims to include a discussion of how to assess human movement through different kinetic, kinematic and performance analysis techniques and the delivery of application of theoretical concepts to practical sport assessment.

The specific objectives are to:

  • Introduce advanced theoretical concepts.
  • Apply these concepts to the practical assessment of human movement, with a particular emphasis on sports performance.
  • Provide an opportunity to develop competency in using specialist biomechanical equipment and software.
  • Apply performance analysis strategies and theory to the assessment of individual and team sports.

Applied Strength and Conditioning (Core)
Find out more

Applied Strength and Conditioning (Core)

This module aims to build and expand on prior knowledge of the foundations of strength and conditioning. There is an increased emphasis on the application of theoretical knowledge and developing the student’s strength and conditioning coaching skills. Outreach work is ingrained in the form of a placement, whereby students will spend a dedicated amount of time working in the local community with an athlete or group of athletes. This can provide a key insight and experience of delivering athlete support in the applied setting.

Please note that students who undertake a work placement are responsible for their own travel, accommodation and meal costs.

Exercise Instruction (Option)
Find out more

Exercise Instruction (Option)

This module aims to enable students to develop an understanding of the underpinning theory and skills required to be able to competently instruct different modalities of exercise pertaining to free weight exercises and cardiovascular/resistance machines.

Nutrition for Health and Performance (Option)
Find out more

Nutrition for Health and Performance (Option)

The Nutrition for Health and Performance module seeks to further develop the knowledge and skills required for students to effectively assess the diet and nutritional status of a client. The module will explore a range of dietary intake measures, body composition assessment methods and dietary analysis software tools, as well the relative strengths and weaknesses of associated methods and tools. Importantly, the practical elements of this module will allow students to develop the interpersonal/relationship building skills required for effective client interaction in performance nutrition and/or health contexts.

Research Methods and Analysis (Core)
Find out more

Research Methods and Analysis (Core)

This module aims to build directly on the key research concepts delivered at level one, as well as seeking to provide an introduction to a wide range of methodologies applicable to exercise, physical activity, health and sport performance research. Students have an opportunity to undertake independent research activities to develop their analytical skills through applied evidence-based practice.

Study Abroad (Option)
Find out more

Study Abroad (Option)

Students from the School of Sport and Exercise Science can enroll at partner institutions in the USA during the third year of their undergraduate degree programme*. It is anticipated that partner institutions in other countries will be added in the near future.

The Study Abroad Initiative is available to those who have successfully completed years 1 and 2 of their degree and enables students to spend a year studying overseas during what would be their third year of study. During the year abroad, students will not pay a tuition fee to either the University of Lincoln or their host university. Students will be responsible for their travel and accommodation costs in addition to their normal living costs throughout the year. Where applicable, visa costs will also need to be covered by the student. Students will then return to the University of Lincoln to complete the final year of their degree.

The initiative enables students to experience their subject from a different perspective and to explore different societies and cultures.

*Only a limited number of places are available

Advanced Biomechanical Analysis (Option)
Find out more

Advanced Biomechanical Analysis (Option)

This optional module provides students with an opportunity to develop their ability to carry out independent research and consultancy activities in the area of sport and exercise biomechanics. Seeking to build upon the knowledge gained at previous levels, this module introduces specialised techniques to assess performance and the wider issues surrounding support work.

The specific objectives of the module are to:

  • Provide an opportunity to develop proficiency in the use of advanced quantitative biomechanical systems to analyse and evaluate human performance.
  • Provide the opportunity to develop an advanced understanding of the use of biomechanics in supporting and developing performance within elite athletes.
  • Critically analyse recent and possible future developments in sports biomechanics.

Advanced Sport and Exercise Nutrition (Option)
Find out more

Advanced Sport and Exercise Nutrition (Option)

This optional module aims to draw upon prior knowledge and practical experience in sport and exercise nutrition and sport physiology.

The specific objectives of this module are to:

  • Integrate these disciplines to enhance understanding of the demands of sport and exercise upon nutritional requirements.
  • Provide an opportunity to develop an understanding of the relationship between the health requirements of daily nutritional intake and optimal sports performance.
  • Provide the opportunity to develop practical skills for the assessment of nutritional intake, hydration status, energy balance and body composition.
  • Improve ability to translate individual nutritional needs of different sports performers into appropriate dietary strategies and daily nutritional prescription.

Advanced Sport Physiology (Option)
Find out more

Advanced Sport Physiology (Option)

This optional module aims to encourage students to apply knowledge and understanding of the physiological systems active during exercise, at fatigue and following training, to the performance and specific requirements of different high-performance athletes.

The specific objectives of this module are to:

  • Provide the opportunity to develop an understanding and experience of physiological intervention and sports science support models as accepted tools for the performance development of the elite athlete.
  • Provide the opportunity to gain relevant vocational experience in relation to physiological assessment and training prescription.
  • Prepare students academically and vocationally for future work in terms of knowledge, planning, understanding, research and assessment.

Advanced Strength and Conditioning (Core)
Find out more

Advanced Strength and Conditioning (Core)

This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop an advanced knowledge of concepts within strength and conditioning, promote critical evaluation of current research topics and training methods and further refine and develop coaching practice.

Students will have the opportunity to develop a comprehensive knowledge of the periodisation and planning of strength and conditioning training for athletes, and the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of advanced strength and conditioning training methods and current research trends.

Dissertation (Core)
Find out more

Dissertation (Core)

The Dissertation module provides an opportunity for an in-depth study of a particular topic and to demonstrate original and critical thought.

Exercise Prescription for Health (Option)
Find out more

Exercise Prescription for Health (Option)

This elective module aims to explore the prescription of exercise to benefit specific medical conditions. It draws upon the theoretical issues and practical skills delivered at level two when exploring physical activity and health. Students have the opportunity to employ vocationally relevant skills in the health assessment of a client, designing and delivering an exercise programme to benefit a specified medical condition. Students can explore healthcare systems, critically examining roles and responsibilities and the use of evaluation.

This optional module includes a placement that is linked to the module assessment. Students who choose to take this module will be responsible for their travel, accommodation and general living costs during the placement.

Personal Training (Option)
Find out more

Personal Training (Option)

This interdisciplinary module is designed to build on prior knowledge of exercise instruction, and the anatomical and physiological processes of sport and exercise physiology related to the planning, prescription and delivery of a specific exercise programme.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

In the first year, assessment is 75% coursework and 25% written exams. In the second year it is 50% coursework, 10% practical exams, and 40% written exams. In the third year it is 61% coursework, 10% practical exams, and 29% written exams.

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that may be used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests.

The University of Lincoln’s policy is to ensure that staff return assessments to students promptly.

We may interview applicants on occasions where the applicant has a non-traditional background, falling short of the standard entry requirements but with relevant work experience and professional qualifications.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Tuition Fees

2018/19UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,600 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,900 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

Exceptionally tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits to include 30 at merit or above will be required.

Applicants will also be required to have at least five GCSEs at grade C or above (or the equivalent), including English, Maths and science/sports related subject.

We will also consider applicants with extensive relevant work experience.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Biomechanical Basis of Human Movement (Core)
Find out more

Biomechanical Basis of Human Movement (Core)

This module seeks to examine the mechanics of human movement, identifying the internal and external forces acting on the human body and the effects of these forces. Particular emphasis will be placed on applying the theoretical principles of biomechanics to sport and exercise.

The specific objectives are to:

  • Provide an opportunity to develop an understanding of the basic principles of biomechanics.
  • Investigate the relationship between the theoretical principles of biomechanics and sports performance.
  • Introduce students to the basic laboratory techniques for the biomechanical assessment of motion.

Foundations in Human Nutrition (Core)
Find out more

Foundations in Human Nutrition (Core)

This module introduces the key terminology and the scientific principles in human nutrition, metabolism and digestion. Importantly, both structure and function of all essential nutrients are covered alongside recommendations on dietary reference values (DRVs) for the population. Furthermore, basic molecular and cell biology are incorporated to better understand current and future developments in this field. Practical components will explore public health guidance on nutrition including, estimating portion sizing, food labelling and food choice education/skills training.

Foundations in Strength and Conditioning (Core)
Find out more

Foundations in Strength and Conditioning (Core)

This module aims to provide an introduction to key concepts within strength and conditioning in order for students to develop a foundation of knowledge. Context for the field of strength and conditioning will be addressed, introducing relevant professional bodies. Course content aims to cover the role, scope of practice and code of conduct of the strength and conditioning coach. Fundamental elements of athlete training will be introduced from both theoretical and practical perspectives.

Fundamentals of Human Physiology (Core)
Find out more

Fundamentals of Human Physiology (Core)

This module aims to provide the opportunity for students to develop a basic knowledge of the structure and function of the human body. The module seeks to focus on anatomical, biochemical and physiological integration necessary for human movement production.

Initial examination aims to develop an understanding of structures and processes relating to biological energy processing and systems, and the relationship between anatomical structures and physical functions. Students have the opportunity to develop an integrated systems approach to human movement, examining endocrine, neural and muscular functions required for movement initiation.

Research Skills (Core)
Find out more

Research Skills (Core)

On this module, students have the opportunity to develop useful study skills for the sport and exercise scientist and benefit from an introduction to the underpinning concepts of scientific study and research methods.

This module aims to enable students to benefit fully from the higher education learning environment and develop their reflective practice, alongside an understanding of the philosophy of science as related to scientific study in sport and exercise.

Applied Exercise Physiology (Option)
Find out more

Applied Exercise Physiology (Option)

This module aims to give students the opportunity to consolidate and expand their knowledge of the foundations of sport physiology developed at level one, by encouraging the application of the fundamental principles of anatomy and physiology.

There is an emphasis on practical skills development with the aim of enabling students to evaluate responses to exercise in a laboratory and field environment. Students have the opportunity to apply the generic principles of sports physiology to different athletic groups in order to develop an appreciation of suitable methods of fitness development and adaptations to training prescription.

Applied Health Physiology (Option)
Find out more

Applied Health Physiology (Option)

The aim of this module is to examine the relationship between physical activity and health, understanding the health problems that are caused by inactivity and their pathophysiology.

Students can learn both the risks and benefits of physical activity, understanding the contraindications to exercise for a range of special population groups. Students will be supported in the measurement of health-related fitness for sedentary individuals and make suitable recommendations for exercise in order to benefit health.

Applied Movement Analysis (Core)
Find out more

Applied Movement Analysis (Core)

This module aims to enable students to build on practical knowledge and skills gained at level one within the Biomechanical Basis of Human Movement module.

It aims to include a discussion of how to assess human movement through different kinetic, kinematic and performance analysis techniques and the delivery of application of theoretical concepts to practical sport assessment.

The specific objectives are to:

  • Introduce advanced theoretical concepts.
  • Apply these concepts to the practical assessment of human movement, with a particular emphasis on sports performance.
  • Provide an opportunity to develop competency in using specialist biomechanical equipment and software.
  • Apply performance analysis strategies and theory to the assessment of individual and team sports.

Applied Strength and Conditioning (Core)
Find out more

Applied Strength and Conditioning (Core)

This module aims to build and expand on prior knowledge of the foundations of strength and conditioning. There is an increased emphasis on the application of theoretical knowledge and developing the student’s strength and conditioning coaching skills. Outreach work is ingrained in the form of a placement, whereby students will spend a dedicated amount of time working in the local community with an athlete or group of athletes. This can provide a key insight and experience of delivering athlete support in the applied setting.

Please note that students who undertake a work placement are responsible for their own travel, accommodation and meal costs.

Exercise Instruction (Option)
Find out more

Exercise Instruction (Option)

This module aims to enable students to develop an understanding of the underpinning theory and skills required to be able to competently instruct different modalities of exercise pertaining to free weight exercises and cardiovascular/resistance machines.

Nutrition for Health and Performance (Option)
Find out more

Nutrition for Health and Performance (Option)

The Nutrition for Health and Performance module seeks to further develop the knowledge and skills required for students to effectively assess the diet and nutritional status of a client. The module will explore a range of dietary intake measures, body composition assessment methods and dietary analysis software tools, as well the relative strengths and weaknesses of associated methods and tools. Importantly, the practical elements of this module will allow students to develop the interpersonal/relationship building skills required for effective client interaction in performance nutrition and/or health contexts.

Research Methods and Analysis (Core)
Find out more

Research Methods and Analysis (Core)

This module aims to build directly on the key research concepts delivered at level one, as well as seeking to provide an introduction to a wide range of methodologies applicable to exercise, physical activity, health and sport performance research. Students have an opportunity to undertake independent research activities to develop their analytical skills through applied evidence-based practice.

Study Abroad (Option)
Find out more

Study Abroad (Option)

Students from the School of Sport and Exercise Science can enroll at partner institutions in the USA during the third year of their undergraduate degree programme*. It is anticipated that partner institutions in other countries will be added in the near future.

The Study Abroad Initiative is available to those who have successfully completed years 1 and 2 of their degree and enables students to spend a year studying overseas during what would be their third year of study. During the year abroad, students will not pay a tuition fee to either the University of Lincoln or their host university. Students will be responsible for their travel and accommodation costs in addition to their normal living costs throughout the year. Where applicable, visa costs will also need to be covered by the student. Students will then return to the University of Lincoln to complete the final year of their degree.

The initiative enables students to experience their subject from a different perspective and to explore different societies and cultures.

*Only a limited number of places are available

Advanced Biomechanical Analysis (Option)
Find out more

Advanced Biomechanical Analysis (Option)

This optional module provides students with an opportunity to develop their ability to carry out independent research and consultancy activities in the area of sport and exercise biomechanics. Seeking to build upon the knowledge gained at previous levels, this module introduces specialised techniques to assess performance and the wider issues surrounding support work.

The specific objectives of the module are to:

  • Provide an opportunity to develop proficiency in the use of advanced quantitative biomechanical systems to analyse and evaluate human performance.
  • Provide the opportunity to develop an advanced understanding of the use of biomechanics in supporting and developing performance within elite athletes.
  • Critically analyse recent and possible future developments in sports biomechanics.

Advanced Sport and Exercise Nutrition (Option)
Find out more

Advanced Sport and Exercise Nutrition (Option)

This optional module aims to draw upon prior knowledge and practical experience in sport and exercise nutrition and sport physiology.

The specific objectives of this module are to:

  • Integrate these disciplines to enhance understanding of the demands of sport and exercise upon nutritional requirements.
  • Provide an opportunity to develop an understanding of the relationship between the health requirements of daily nutritional intake and optimal sports performance.
  • Provide the opportunity to develop practical skills for the assessment of nutritional intake, hydration status, energy balance and body composition.
  • Improve ability to translate individual nutritional needs of different sports performers into appropriate dietary strategies and daily nutritional prescription.

Advanced Sport Physiology (Option)
Find out more

Advanced Sport Physiology (Option)

This optional module aims to encourage students to apply knowledge and understanding of the physiological systems active during exercise, at fatigue and following training, to the performance and specific requirements of different high-performance athletes.

The specific objectives of this module are to:

  • Provide the opportunity to develop an understanding and experience of physiological intervention and sports science support models as accepted tools for the performance development of the elite athlete.
  • Provide the opportunity to gain relevant vocational experience in relation to physiological assessment and training prescription.
  • Prepare students academically and vocationally for future work in terms of knowledge, planning, understanding, research and assessment.

Advanced Strength and Conditioning (Core)
Find out more

Advanced Strength and Conditioning (Core)

This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop an advanced knowledge of concepts within strength and conditioning, promote critical evaluation of current research topics and training methods and further refine and develop coaching practice.

Students will have the opportunity to develop a comprehensive knowledge of the periodisation and planning of strength and conditioning training for athletes, and the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of advanced strength and conditioning training methods and current research trends.

Dissertation (Core)
Find out more

Dissertation (Core)

The Dissertation module provides an opportunity for an in-depth study of a particular topic and to demonstrate original and critical thought.

Exercise Prescription for Health (Option)
Find out more

Exercise Prescription for Health (Option)

This elective module aims to explore the prescription of exercise to benefit specific medical conditions. It draws upon the theoretical issues and practical skills delivered at level two when exploring physical activity and health. Students have the opportunity to employ vocationally relevant skills in the health assessment of a client, designing and delivering an exercise programme to benefit a specified medical condition. Students can explore healthcare systems, critically examining roles and responsibilities and the use of evaluation.

This optional module includes a placement that is linked to the module assessment. Students who choose to take this module will be responsible for their travel, accommodation and general living costs during the placement.

Personal Training (Option)
Find out more

Personal Training (Option)

This interdisciplinary module is designed to build on prior knowledge of exercise instruction, and the anatomical and physiological processes of sport and exercise physiology related to the planning, prescription and delivery of a specific exercise programme.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

In the first year, assessment is 75% coursework and 25% written exams. In the second year it is 50% coursework, 10% practical exams, and 40% written exams. In the third year it is 61% coursework, 10% practical exams, and 29% written exams.

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that may be used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests.

The University of Lincoln’s policy is to ensure that staff return assessments to students promptly.

We may interview applicants on occasions where the applicant has a non-traditional background, falling short of the standard entry requirements but with relevant work experience and professional qualifications.
First year students currently provide weekly applied support to talented University-based athletes through a scheduled Strength and Conditioning Clinic.

Work

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Applied assessments and work placement opportunities can expose students to real-life work scenarios that are designed to develop the skills needed to succeed in a range of sports-related careers. The School will cover all reasonable costs associated with work placements.

The Work Opportunities Hub is available to support all students within the College of Social Science who are seeking to enhance their studies by engaging with a variety of work settings. This may be as part of their programme or as an activity during term time or holidays. Students are responsible for any travel, accommodation and living costs while undertaking a placement.

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Tuition Fees

2018/19UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,600 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,900 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

Exceptionally tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Applicants will also need at least five GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English, Maths and a Science or sport related subject. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

EU and International students whose first language is not English will require English Language IELTS 6.0 with no less than 5.5 in each element, or equivalent http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/englishrequirements

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry and will consider applicants who have a mix of qualifications.

We also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Learn from Experts

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may also be supported in their learning by other students.

Strength and Conditioning

Dr Thomas Gee

Programme Leader

Dr Gee's research interests include the acute and longitudinal effects of strength training on performance and health in both athletic and sedentary populations. He actively provides strength and conditioning support to athletes based at the University and the local area and has achieved UKSCA accredited strength and conditioning coach status.


Your Future Career

This degree is designed for those who want to work as a strength and conditioning coach with a professional sports team or to support individual athletes. A range of employment opportunities exist in the fitness and healthcare sector, as well as in lecturing, the emergency services and commissions in the armed forces. Some graduates may choose to continue to study at postgraduate level.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.

This degree is designed for those who want to work as a strength and conditioning coach with a professional sports team or to support individual athletes. A range of employment opportunities exist in the fitness and healthcare sector, as well as in lecturing, the emergency services and commissions in the armed forces. Some graduates may choose to continue to study at postgraduate level.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.


Human Performance Centre

The University of Lincoln’s state-of-the-art Human Performance Centre offers excellent facilities to meet the academic needs of our students. The Centre provides first class sport and exercise support. Our experienced staff have academic and professional expertise in a range of areas including sport and exercise physiology, sports biomechanics, sports psychology, coach education and sports nutrition.

Resources include physiology and biochemistry laboratories, a biomechanics laboratory, a motor control laboratory incorporating a golf specific analysis area, coach education suite, an interview and consultation suite, and British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES) accredited staff.

The School of Sport and Exercise Science has full access to the University’s Sports and Recreation Centre. A range of educational and recreational activities are utilised to accommodate the needs of both students and staff of the University of Lincoln, providing them with opportunities to participate in fitness classes and many sports based activities.


The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.