BSc (Hons) Computer Science

BSc (Hons) Computer Science

Computer Science at Lincoln is ranked 2nd in the UK for learning resources in the National Student Survey 2019 (out of 111 ranking institutions).

The Course

Society is in the midst of a digital revolution, from the smartphones we use to navigate our daily lives to the advances in artificial intelligence set to transform global industries.

The BSc (Hons) Computer Science degree provides students with the opportunity to develop the experience, skills, and knowledge to design and develop a variety of software and hardware computing solutions for real-world problems. Particular attention is paid to cutting-edge topics, such as artificial intelligence and human-computer interaction, in addition to core computer science disciplines. This aims to ensure that students' studies are at the forefront of research in the field and meeting the needs of the computing industry. In addition, students are encouraged to work with academics on research projects.

The course is designed to provide a broad foundation in computer science and provides students with the chance to develop the mathematical, analytical, and problem-solving skills required to succeed in the challenging and exciting modern computing industry. The degree covers digital technologies such as big data, cloud computing, artificial intelligence, and robotics, which are currently driving advances in all aspects of the modern world. Those with expertise in these areas of computer science are finding employment and developing careers in a wide range of sectors such as finance, healthcare, telecommunications, power and energy, and cyber security.

The Course

Society is in the midst of a digital revolution, from the smartphones we use to navigate our daily lives to the advances in artificial intelligence set to transform global industries.

The BSc (Hons) Computer Science degree provides students with the opportunity to develop the experience, skills, and knowledge to design and develop a variety of software and hardware computing solutions for real-world problems. Particular attention is paid to cutting-edge topics, such as artificial intelligence and human-computer interaction, in addition to core computer science disciplines. This aims to ensure that students' studies are at the forefront of research in the field and meeting the needs of the computing industry. In addition, students are encouraged to work with academics on research projects.

The course is designed to provide a broad foundation in computer science and provides students with the chance to develop the mathematical, analytical, and problem-solving skills required to succeed in the challenging and exciting modern computing industry. The degree covers digital technologies such as big data, cloud computing, artificial intelligence, and robotics, which are currently driving advances in all aspects of the modern world. Those with expertise in these areas of computer science are finding employment and developing careers in a wide range of sectors such as finance, healthcare, telecommunications, power and energy, and cyber security.

This course is accredited by The British Computer Society.

The University of Lincoln is also affiliated with The Institution of Analysts and Programmers.

In the first year, students have the opportunity to study the fundamental areas of computing science. This includes operating systems, maths for computing, and computer architectures.

The second year aims to build on this foundation, covering artificial intelligence, database systems and networking, with industry certification opportunities available to students for topics such as database systems, networking, and software development. Students will also have the opportunity to work on a group project in the Team Software Engineering module.

In the third year, students study topics such as machine learning, Big Data, and parallel programming. Additionally, students can choose a number of optional areas of study that are of specific interest, such as autonomous mobile robotics, cloud computing, cross-platform development, or cyber security. Third-year students will also be expected to undertake a substantial individual project on a topic of interest.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Algorithms and Complexity (Core)
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Algorithms and Complexity (Core)

The module introduces the concepts of Algorithms and Complexity, with the aim of providing an understanding of the range of applications where algorithmic solutions are required.

Students can be introduced to the analysis of time and space efficiency of algorithms; to the key issues in algorithm design; and to the range of techniques used in the design of various types of algorithms. Students can also explore relevant theoretical concepts around algorithms and complexity in the lectures, together with a practical experience of implementing a range of algorithms in the workshops.

Computer Architectures (Core)
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Computer Architectures (Core)

This module aims to introduce the fundamentals of computer hardware underpinning the key aspects of Computer Science. This knowledge is not only essential for deeper understanding of the governing processes behind computing but also for realising how hardware interacts with software.

By studying Computer Architecture, students can gain greater confidence in their study subject and future benefits when improving their programming skills. The module will study the individual components of a computer system, their function, main characteristics, performance and their mutual interaction. Examples of the practical application of the skills developed in this module are given utilising a range of computing applications, including but not restricted to the domains of Games and Social Computing applications.

Maths for Computing (Core)
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Maths for Computing (Core)

This module aims to equip students with mathematical knowledge and skills required to design and develop computer systems and software. Topics covered include: sets, relations and functions, logic, algebra, basic statistics, and an introduction to probability theory. The critical role of mathematics in computer science, games computing, and social computing will be demonstrated with applied examples.

Object-Oriented Programming (Core)
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Object-Oriented Programming (Core)

This module extends the concepts and practice of simple computer programming, with attention paid to the essentials that constitute an object-oriented computer program including layout, structure, and functionality. The module aims to extend students' knowledge of computer programming and introduces them to the object-oriented paradigm and related concepts applied to algorithm and software development. There is also emphasis upon the use of version control and its role in archiving and facilitating software development.

Operating Systems (Core)
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Operating Systems (Core)

In this module students will have the opportunity to study both the theoretical design concepts which underpin all operating systems and, through case studies, the practical implementation techniques of current operating systems. Special attention will be given to shell programming languages and examples, to practically implement concepts and techniques at the basis of the various operating systems.

Problem Solving (Core)
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Problem Solving (Core)

Problems are a natural occurrence in an organisational context and this module aims to introduce students to problem-solving from a mixture of theoretical and practical underpinnings.

The module examines the principles of abstraction, decomposition, modelling, and representation as a means to frame and characterise problem scenarios, and as tools to understand potential solutions. The module concentrates on problem-solving strategies and in particular the vocabulary through which these strategies are articulated. This type of vocabulary is explored as representational device for capturing organisational behaviour and form.

Programming Fundamentals (Core)
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Programming Fundamentals (Core)

This module introduces students to software constructs and the development of simple programs using a high-level programming language. Simple design concepts and standard programming practices are presented, and attention is paid to the fundamentals that constitute a complete computer program including layout, structure, and functionality. Additionally, the fundamental computing data structures allowing the representation of data in computer programs are explored and implemented.

Advanced Programming (Core)
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Advanced Programming (Core)

This module aims to provide a comprehensive analysis of the general principles and practices of advanced programming with respect to software development. Notions and techniques of advanced programming are emphasised in the context of analysis, design, and implementation of software and algorithms. Great importance is placed upon the Object-Oriented paradigm and related concepts applied to algorithm and software development using the C++ programming language, however students will also be exposed to the principles and underlying theories pertaining to functional programming.

Artificial Intelligence (Core)
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Artificial Intelligence (Core)

This module aims to provide a basic introduction to the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI).

The module first considers the symbolic model of intelligence, exploring some of the main conceptual issues, theoretical approaches and practical techniques. The module further explores knowledge-based systems such as expert systems, which mimic human reasoning performance by capturing knowledge of a domain and integrating it to deliver a performance comparable to that of a human practitioner. Modern developments such as artificial neural networks and uncertain reasoning are also covered using probability theory, culminating in a practical understanding of how to apply AI techniques in practice using logic programming.

Internet of Things (Core)
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Internet of Things (Core)

The Internet of Things (IoT) refers to the interconnection of physical computing systems, using a combination of hardware and software that can sense input from the real world and broadcast/respond to it in real-time. Students can learn how to design and develop prototype IoT systems using a rapid-prototyping approach and evaluate the interactive aspects the system affords end-users. Industry standard IoT low-power microcontrollers, sensors, and protocols will be at the forefront of the student development experience.

Network Fundamentals (Core)
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Network Fundamentals (Core)

This module considers basic computer communications and networking with an emphasis on the Internet Protocol.

The module examines the Internet Protocol as a model for intercommunication in modern network implementations. Additionally the module examines fundamental design features of a Network Protocol and the need to implement security in the modern Internet.

The module adopts a standards driven approach and determines methods used in modern network systems for the distribution of data. An emphasis on network infrastructure and protocols underpins the module together with basic security considerations important in modern network architectures. Aspects of security concepts are extended to consider mechanisms that counter various forms of threat that exist from different sources.

Scalable Database Systems (Core)
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Scalable Database Systems (Core)

This module explores the fundamental concepts of designing, implementing, and using database technologies and students are expected to develop a conceptual view of database theory and then transform it into a practical design of a database application. Alternate design principles for implementing databases for different uses, for example in social media or gaming contexts are also considered.

Study Period Abroad: Computer Science (Option)
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Study Period Abroad: Computer Science (Option)

This module is optional module allows students to spend a year at second level studying at one of the University’s approved partner institutions. During the year abroad, students share classes with local students and study on a suite of locally-delivered taught modules which have been approved in advance by the University.

Attention will be paid to ensure that the students’ study will be equivalent both in terms of level and extent to that undertaken by students continuing to study at level two at Lincoln.

Students are required to pay for their own travel, accommodation, and general living costs. There is no tuition fee for the placement year.

Team Software Engineering (Core)
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Team Software Engineering (Core)

This module aims to provide students with experience of working as part of a team within a simulated commercial setting. Students have the chance to go through the key phases of software development from ideation through to development, testing, delivery, and publishing. Throughout the module students can learn how to manage and deliver commercial software development projects. This will include ethical, social and professional issues, project management, communication, time management, and team-working strategies.

The module aims to further skills developed in the first year and places them in a simulated commercial setting. The final piece of work produced as part of the software development process should be suitable for inclusion within a professional portfolio.

User Experience Design (Core)
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User Experience Design (Core)

This module provides students with the opportunity to develop knowledge of the processes and principles of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and User Experience Design (UXD) starting with a history and overview of the role HCI in furthering the field of computer science. The module will guide students through notions of usability and accessibility, user-centred design and requirements analysis, prototyping, statistical analysis, and qualitative evaluation using state of the art methods and techniques. The professional, ethical, social, and legal issues in designing and studying interactive technology will be considered throughout.

Autonomous Mobile Robotics (Option)
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Autonomous Mobile Robotics (Option)

The module aims to introduce the main concepts of Autonomous Mobile Robotics, providing an understanding of the range of processing components required to build physically embodied robotic systems, from basic control architectures to spatial navigation in real-world environments.

Students can be introduced to relevant theoretical concepts around robotic sensing and control in the lectures, together with a practical “hands on” approach to robot programming in the workshops.

Big Data (Core)
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Big Data (Core)

The module introduces the fundamentals of data science and big data analytics, an emergent specialised area of computer science that is concerned with knowledge on ‘Big Data’ mining and visualisation, including state-of-the-art database platforms, development toolkits, and industrial and societal application scenarios. Students can be exposed to core Big Data analytics concepts and models, the current technology landscape, and topical application scenarios using a variety of simulation environments and open datasets.

Cloud Computing (Option)
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Cloud Computing (Option)

This module explores core Cloud Computing areas such as elastic compute, containers, networking, and durable, highly available storage services. The underlying theory on cloud virtualisation, storage, containerisation, and load-balancing is discussed, providing students with the opportunity to gain skills across the main cloud patterns of Platform as a Service (PaaS), Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), and Software as a Service (SaaS). Additionally, students will have the opportunity to develop skills in cloud based Development-Operations (DevOps), with emphasis on cloud scripting and automation using powerful command-line tools. The importance of interoperability will be a key theme of the module by using platform-agnostic approaches when designing and developing cloud services. The module will primarily focus on the PaaS and IaaS cloud patterns. The ethical, legal and security implications of cloud computing data storage are also discussed.

Cross-Platform Development (Option)
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Cross-Platform Development (Option)

This module aims to provide students with knowledge on an alternative, and increasingly important, ‘platform agnostic’ approach for mobile development. This approach embraces the use of cross-platform methods by developing applications with a single code base that run efficiently across distinct mobile platforms, with maximum code reuse and interoperability.

Students will have the opportunity to investigate platform-dependent constraints by critiquing the emergent space of cross-platform tools and frameworks that aim to maximise code sharing between mobile platforms, whilst retaining common like-for-like sensor features such as geolocation, camera, storage and push notification’s without compromising performance or overall user experience. Contemporary cross-platform tools will be adopted throughout the module for the creation of applications that bridge multiple mobile platforms.

Cyber Security (Option)
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Cyber Security (Option)

This module provides an understanding of the challenges in cyber security faced by society and industry. This includes an examination of the impact of threats and develops an understanding of mechanisms to reduce the risk of attack. The module examines a range of cyber threats and attack types and introduces strategies to mitigate these. It also prompts students to consider the legal, social, and ethical implications of cyber security.

Graphics (Option)
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Graphics (Option)

This module introduces the student to the theory, principles, methods, and techniques of 3D computer graphics. The specialised mathematical underpinnings are explored along with their practical application in algorithms commonly used in videogame development. The development of skills in implementing computer graphic applications with modern, standard graphics pipelines encourages students to develop their programming skills while observing the theory of 3D graphics in practice.

This is delivered through a hands-on games programming context where students will be encouraged to develop interactive 3D graphics applications using industry standard tools and technologies.

This module aims to develop students' awareness and ability to implement and utilise mathematical approaches commonly seen in real-time systems such as videogames. In addition, modern graphical techniques will be explored, with reference to current industry practice, and students will be expected to demonstrate an ability to analyse requirements, systematically appraise existing methods, and employ critical-thinking in the development of their own pieces of work.

Image Processing (Option)
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Image Processing (Option)

Digital image processing techniques are used in a wide variety of application areas such as computer vision, robotics, remote sensing, industrial inspection, and medical imaging. It is the study of any algorithms that take image as an input and returns useful information as output.

This module aims to provide a broad introduction to the field of image processing, culminating in a practical understanding of how to apply and combine techniques to various image-related applications. Students will have the opportunity to extract useful data from the raw image and interpret the image data — the techniques will be implemented using the mathematical programming language Matlab or OpenCV.

Machine Learning (Core)
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Machine Learning (Core)

The module introduces the fundamentals of machine learning and principled application of machine learning techniques to extract information and insights from data. The module covers supervised and unsupervised learning methods. The primary aim is to provide students with knowledge and applied skills in machine learning tools and techniques which can be used to solve real-world data science problems.

Parallel Programming (Core)
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Parallel Programming (Core)

Parallel Programming is an important modern paradigm in computer science, and a promising direction for keeping up with the expected exponential growth in the discipline. Executing multiple processes at the same time can tremendously increase computational throughput, not only benefiting scientific computations, but also leading to new exciting applications like real-time animated 3D graphics, video processing, and physics simulation. The relevance of parallel computing is especially prominent due to availability of modern, affordable computer hardware utilising multi-core and/or large number of massively parallel units.

Physics Simulation (Option)
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Physics Simulation (Option)

Realistic physics simulation is a key component for many modern technologies including computer games, video animation, medical imaging, and robotics. This wide range of applications benefiting from real-time physics simulation is a result of recent advances in developing new efficient simulation techniques and the common availability of powerful hardware.

The main application area considered in this module is computer games, but the taught content has much wider relevance and can be applied to other areas of computer science.

Project (Core)
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Project (Core)

This module offers students the chance to demonstrate their ability to work independently on a significant, in-depth project requiring the coherent and critical application of computer science theory and skills.

Students must initially produce a project proposal and related materials to frame the work, specifying clear, specific, academically justified, and appropriately scoped aims and objectives, as well as feasible means for fulfilling those aims and objectives. Students then work independently to fulfil those project goals. Throughout this process students are expected to demonstrate the application of practical development and analytical skills, innovation and/or creativity, and the synthesis of information, ideas and practices to generate a coherent problem solution.

Virtual and Augmented Reality (Option)
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Virtual and Augmented Reality (Option)

In this module, students can develop their understanding of how to design and develop and applications for Virtual and Augmented Reality (VR/AR) platforms. The module will start by introducing students to underpinning theoretical concepts of user experience in VR platforms, such as immersion, presence, fidelity, and embodiment. These will be used as a framework to explore a wide range of applications, primarily training and education, medical applications, therapy, and entertainment.

Fundamental design aspects will be introduced, such as interfaces and interactions, interactions with non-human characters, locomotion, and object manipulations. Within the context of training/education, design considerations relating to learning outcomes, knowledge transfer, and retention will be discussed.

Students are expected to consider the role of fidelity in relation to safety critical training, such as medical applications, and the advantages of VR over traditional displays will also be considered. Students can also learn how to assess user experience in VR using a variety of tools (primarily self-report measures). Students can also look at limitations such as simulator sickness, and accessibility of movement-based interfaces. The AR section of this module will mirror the VR topics mentioned, and compare and contrast AR platforms with VR, to enable students to make appropriate platform choices.

Alongside theoretical aspects, students can engage in parallel practical workshops, during which they will put into practice some of the concepts discussed in lectures. This will involve the use of appropriate development tools and platforms, and consideration of design aspects. Students have the chance to build an application during workshops, and use this as a tool to conduct an evaluation related to user experience.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

This course is assessed through a variety of means, including in-class tests, coursework, projects and examinations. The majority of assessments are coursework-based, reflecting the practical and applied nature of computer science, and in many instances are informed by the types of tasks currently undertaken in industry.

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Students on this course are taught by specialist academics whose research has been internationally recognised. Researchers include Nigel Allinson MBE, a Distinguished Professor of Image Engineering, who has been supported with a £3.3 million grant from the UK’s Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council for advances in proton beam therapy.

The School is also a Microsoft Imagine Academy member and Cisco Academy member, which gives students the opportunity to gain industry recognised qualifications such as Microsoft Technology Associate and Cisco certification.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

The BSc (Hons) Computer Science degree is optionally available in a sandwich mode variant. If students choose the sandwich placement option, they take a year out in industry between the second and third year. This provides the opportunity to gain industrial experience. Students are supported throughout their placement, which can be overseas. Students are required to pay for their own travel, accommodation, and general living costs while on placements and study visits. There is no tuition fee for the placement year.

There are also opportunities to take shorter work placements, for example over the summer period, and to be involved in systems development projects for real industry clients.

Placements

Some courses offer students the opportunity to undertake placements. When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry (where available). Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Tuition Fees

2020/21UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level* £15,900 per level**
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,900 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

* UK/EU: The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

** International: The fees quoted are for one year of study. For continuing students fees are subject to an increase of 2% each year and rounded to the nearest £100.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

- In exceptional circumstances, students who are required to re-take modules can do so on an 'assessment only' basis. This means that students do not attend timetabled teaching events but are required to take the assessments/examinations associated with the module(s). The 'assessment only' fee is half of the £ per credit point fee for each module.

Exceptionally, tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost.

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English and Maths. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry and will consider applicants who have a mix of qualifications.

We also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.
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Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/st.../entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/st...ort/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.
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University preparation courses for International students:

The University of Lincoln International Study Centre offers university preparation courses for international students who do not meet the direct entry requirements for their chosen degree course. Upon successful completion, students can progress to degree level study at the University of Lincoln.

Please visit http://www.lincolnisc.com/ for more information.
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If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk
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This course is accredited by The British Computer Society.

The University of Lincoln is also affiliated with The Institution of Analysts and Programmers.

In the first year, students have the opportunity to study the fundamental areas of computing science. This includes operating systems, maths for computing, and computer architectures.

The second year aims to build on this foundation, covering artificial intelligence, database systems and networking, with industry certification opportunities available to students for topics such as database systems, networking, and software development. Students will also have the opportunity to work on a group project in the Team Software Engineering module.

In the third year, students study topics such as machine learning, Big Data, and parallel programming. Additionally, students can choose a number of optional areas of study that are of specific interest, such as autonomous mobile robotics, cloud computing, cross-platform development, or cyber security. Third-year students will also be expected to undertake a substantial individual project on a topic of interest.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Algorithms and Complexity (Core)
Find out more

Algorithms and Complexity (Core)

The module aims to introduce the concepts of Algorithms and Complexity, providing an understanding of the range of applications where algorithmic solutions are required.

Students will have the opportunity to be introduced to the analysis of time and space efficiency of algorithms; to the key issues in algorithm design; to the range of techniques used in the design of various types of algorithms. Students can also be introduced to relevant theoretical concepts around algorithms and complexity in the lectures, together with a practical experience of implementing a range of algorithms in the workshops.

Computer Architectures (Core)
Find out more

Computer Architectures (Core)

This module aims to introduce the fundamentals of computer hardware underpinning the key aspects of Computer Science. This knowledge is not only essential for deeper understanding of the governing processes behind computing but also for realising how hardware interacts with software.

By studying Computer Architecture, students can gain greater confidence in their study subject and future benefits when improving their programming skills. The module will study the individual components of a computer system, their function, main characteristics, performance and their mutual interaction. Examples of the practical application of the skills developed in this module are given utilising a range of computing applications, including but not restricted to the domains of Games and Social Computing applications.

Maths for Computing (Core)
Find out more

Maths for Computing (Core)

This module aims to equip students with mathematical knowledge and skills required to design and develop computer systems and software.

Object-Oriented Programming (Core)
Find out more

Object-Oriented Programming (Core)

This module extends the concepts and practice of simple computer programming, with attention paid to the essentials that constitute an object-oriented computer program including layout, structure, and functionality. The module aims to extend students' knowledge of computer programming and introduces them to the object-oriented paradigm and related concepts applied to algorithm and software development. There is also emphasis upon the use of version control and its role in archiving and facilitating software development.

Operating Systems (Core)
Find out more

Operating Systems (Core)

In this module students will have the opportunity to study both the theoretical design concepts which underpin all operating systems and, through case studies, the practical implementation techniques of current operating systems. Special attention will be given to shell programming languages and examples, to practically implement concepts and techniques at the basis of the various operating systems.

Problem Solving (Core)
Find out more

Problem Solving (Core)

Problems are a natural occurrence in an organisational context and this module aims to introduce students to problem solving from a mixture of theoretical and practical underpinnings.

The module examines the principles of abstraction, decomposition, modelling and representation as a means to frame and characterise problem scenarios, and as tools to understand potential solutions. The module concentrates on problem-solving strategies and in particular the vocabulary through which these strategies are articulated. This type of vocabulary is explored as representational device for capturing organisational behaviour and form.

Programming Fundamentals (Core)
Find out more

Programming Fundamentals (Core)

This module introduces students to software constructs and the development of simple programs using a high-level programming language. Simple design concepts and standard programming practices are presented, and attention is paid to the fundamentals that constitute a complete computer program including layout, structure, and functionality. Additionally, the fundamental computing data structures allowing the representation of data in computer programs are explored and implemented.

Advanced Programming (Core)
Find out more

Advanced Programming (Core)

This module aims to provide a comprehensive analysis of the general principles and practices of advanced programming with respect to software development. Notions and techniques of advanced programming are emphasised in the context of analysis, design, and implementation of software and algorithms. Great importance is placed upon the Object-Oriented paradigm and related concepts applied to algorithm and software development using the C++ programming language, however students will also be exposed to the principles and underlying theories pertaining to functional programming.

Artificial Intelligence (Core)
Find out more

Artificial Intelligence (Core)

This module aims to provide a basic introduction to the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI).

The module first considers the symbolic model of intelligence, exploring some of the main conceptual issues, theoretical approaches and practical techniques. The module further explores knowledge-based systems such as expert systems, which mimic human reasoning performance by capturing knowledge of a domain and integrating it to deliver a performance comparable to that of a human practitioner. Modern developments such as artificial neural networks and uncertain reasoning are also covered using probability theory, culminating in a practical understanding of how to apply AI techniques in practice using logic programming.

Internet of Things (Core)
Find out more

Internet of Things (Core)

The Internet of Things (IoT) refers to the interconnection of physical computing systems, using a combination of hardware and software that can sense input from the real world and broadcast/respond to it in real-time. Students can learn how to design and develop prototype IoT systems using a rapid-prototyping approach and evaluate the interactive aspects the system affords end-users. Industry standard IoT low-power microcontrollers, sensors, and protocols will be at the forefront of the student development experience.

Network Fundamentals (Core)
Find out more

Network Fundamentals (Core)

This module considers basic computer communications and networking with an emphasis on the Internet Protocol.

The module examines the Internet Protocol as a model for intercommunication in modern network implementations. Additionally the module examines fundamental design features of a Network Protocol and the need to implement security in the modern Internet.

The module adopts a standards driven approach and determines methods used in modern network systems for the distribution of data. An emphasis on network infrastructure and protocols underpins the module together with basic security considerations important in modern network architectures. Aspects of security concepts are extended to consider mechanisms that counter various forms of threat that exist from different sources.

Scalable Database Systems (Core)
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Scalable Database Systems (Core)

This module explores the fundamental concepts of designing, implementing, and using database technologies and students are expected to develop a conceptual view of database theory and then transform it into a practical design of a database application. Alternate design principles for implementing databases for different uses, for example in social media or gaming contexts are also considered.

Team Software Engineering (Core)
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Team Software Engineering (Core)

This module aims to provide students with experience of working as part of a team within a simulated commercial setting. Students have the chance to go through the key phases of software development from ideation through to development, testing, delivery, and publishing. Throughout the module students can learn how to manage and deliver commercial software development projects. This will include ethical, social and professional issues, project management, communication, time management, and team-working strategies.

The module aims to further skills developed in the first year and places them in a simulated commercial setting. The final piece of work produced as part of the software development process should be suitable for inclusion within a professional portfolio.

User Experience Design (Core)
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User Experience Design (Core)

This module provides students with the opportunity to develop knowledge of the processes and principles of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and User Experience Design (UXD) starting with a history and overview of the role HCI in furthering the field of computer science. The module will guide students through notions of usability and accessibility, user-centred design and requirements analysis, prototyping, statistical analysis, and qualitative evaluation using state of the art methods and techniques. The professional, ethical, social, and legal issues in designing and studying interactive technology will be considered throughout.

Autonomous Mobile Robotics (Option)
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Autonomous Mobile Robotics (Option)

The module aims to introduce the main concepts of Autonomous Mobile Robotics, providing an understanding of the range of processing components required to build physically embodied robotic systems, from basic control architectures to spatial navigation in real-world environments.

Students will have the opportunity to be introduced to relevant theoretical concepts around robotic sensing and control in the lectures, together with a practical “hands on” approach to robot programming in the workshops.

Big Data (Core)
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Big Data (Core)

The module introduces the fundamentals of data science and big data analytics, an emergent specialised area of computer science that is concerned with knowledge on ‘Big Data’ mining and visualisation, including state-of-the-art database platforms, development toolkits, and industrial and societal application scenarios. Students can be exposed to core Big Data analytics concepts and models, the current technology landscape, and topical application scenarios using a variety of simulation environments and open datasets.

Cloud Computing (Option)
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Cloud Computing (Option)

This module explores core Cloud Computing areas such as elastic compute, containers, networking, and durable, highly available storage services. The underlying theory on cloud virtualisation, storage, containerisation, and load-balancing is discussed, providing students with the opportunity to gain skills across the main cloud patterns of Platform as a Service (PaaS), Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), and Software as a Service (SaaS). Additionally, students will have the opportunity to develop skills in cloud based Development-Operations (DevOps), with emphasis on cloud scripting and automation using powerful command-line tools. The importance of interoperability will be a key theme of the module by using platform-agnostic approaches when designing and developing cloud services. The module will primarily focus on the PaaS and IaaS cloud patterns. The ethical, legal and security implications of cloud computing data storage are also discussed.

Cross-Platform Development (Option)
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Cross-Platform Development (Option)

This module aims to provide students with knowledge on an alternative, and increasingly important, ‘platform agnostic’ approach for mobile development. This approach embraces the use of cross-platform methods by developing applications with a single code base that run efficiently across distinct mobile platforms, with maximum code reuse and interoperability.

Students will have the opportunity to investigate platform-dependent constraints by critiquing the emergent space of cross-platform tools and frameworks that aim to maximise code sharing between mobile platforms, whilst retaining common like-for-like sensor features such as geolocation, camera, storage and push notification’s without compromising performance or overall user experience. Contemporary cross-platform tools will be adopted throughout the module for the creation of applications that bridge multiple mobile platforms.

Cyber Security (Option)
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Cyber Security (Option)

This module provides an understanding of the challenges in cyber security faced by society and industry. This includes an examination of the impact of threats and develops an understanding of mechanisms to reduce the risk of attack. The module examines a range of cyber threats and attack types and introduces strategies to mitigate these. It also prompts students to consider the legal, social, and ethical implications of cyber security.

Graphics (Option)
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Graphics (Option)

This module introduces the student to the theory, principles, methods, and techniques of 3D computer graphics. The specialised mathematical underpinnings are explored along with their practical application in algorithms commonly used in videogame development. The development of skills in implementing computer graphic applications with modern, standard graphics pipelines encourages students to develop their programming skills while observing the theory of 3D graphics in practice.

This is delivered through a hands-on games programming context where students will be encouraged to develop interactive 3D graphics applications using industry standard tools and technologies.

This module aims to develop students' awareness and ability to implement and utilise mathematical approaches commonly seen in real-time systems such as videogames. In addition, modern graphical techniques will be explored, with reference to current industry practice, and students will be expected to demonstrate an ability to analyse requirements, systematically appraise existing methods, and employ critical-thinking in the development of their own pieces of work.

Image Processing (Option)
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Image Processing (Option)

Digital image processing techniques are used in a wide variety of application areas such as computer vision, robotics, remote sensing, industrial inspection, medical imaging, etc. It is the study of any algorithms that take image as an input and returns useful information as output.

This module aims to provide a broad introduction to the field of image processing, culminating in a practical understanding of how to apply and combine techniques to various image-related applications. Students will have the opportunity to extract useful data from the raw image and interpret the image data — the techniques will be implemented using the mathematical programming language Matlab or OpenCV.

Machine Learning (Core)
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Machine Learning (Core)

The module introduces the fundamentals of machine learning and principled application of machine learning techniques to extract information and insights from data. The module covers supervised and unsupervised learning methods. The primary aim is to provide students with knowledge and applied skills in machine learning tools and techniques which can be used to solve real-world data science problems.

Parallel Programming (Core)
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Parallel Programming (Core)

Parallel Programming is an important modern paradigm in computer science, and a promising direction for keeping up with the expected exponential growth in the discipline. Executing multiple processes at the same time can tremendously increase computational throughput, not only benefiting scientific computations, but also leading to new exciting applications like real-time animated 3D graphics, video processing, and physics simulation. The relevance of parallel computing is especially prominent due to availability of modern, affordable computer hardware utilising multi-core and/or large number of massively parallel units.

Physics Simulation (Option)
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Physics Simulation (Option)

Realistic physics simulation is a key component for many modern technologies including computer games, video animation, medical imaging, robotics, etc. This wide range of applications benefiting from real-time physics simulation is a result of recent advances in developing new efficient simulation techniques and the common availability of powerful hardware.

The main application area considered in this module is computer games, but the taught content has much wider relevance and can be applied to other areas of Computer Science.

Project (Core)
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Project (Core)

This module offers students the chance to demonstrate their ability to work independently on a significant, in-depth project requiring the coherent and critical application of computer science theory and skills.

Students must initially produce a project proposal and related materials to frame the work, specifying clear, specific, academically justified, and appropriately scoped aims and objectives, as well as feasible means for fulfilling those aims and objectives. Students then work independently to fulfil those project goals. Throughout this process students are expected to demonstrate the application of practical development and analytical skills, innovation and/or creativity, and the synthesis of information, ideas and practices to generate a coherent problem solution.

Virtual and Augmented Reality (Option)
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Virtual and Augmented Reality (Option)

In this module, students can develop their understanding of how to design and develop and applications for Virtual and Augmented Reality (VR/AR) platforms. The module will start by introducing students to underpinning theoretical concepts of user experience in VR platforms, such as immersion, presence, fidelity, and embodiment. These will be used as a framework to explore a wide range of applications, primarily training and education, medical applications, therapy, and entertainment.

Fundamental design aspects will be introduced, such as interfaces and interactions, interactions with non-human characters, locomotion, and object manipulations. Within the context of training/education, design considerations relating to learning outcomes, knowledge transfer, and retention will be discussed.

Students are expected to consider the role of fidelity in relation to safety critical training, such as medical applications, and the advantages of VR over traditional displays will also be considered. Students can also learn how to assess user experience in VR using a variety of tools (primarily self-report measures). Students can also look at limitations such as simulator sickness, and accessibility of movement-based interfaces. The AR section of this module will mirror the VR topics mentioned, and compare and contrast AR platforms with VR, to enable students to make appropriate platform choices.

Alongside theoretical aspects, students can engage in parallel practical workshops, during which they will put into practice some of the concepts discussed in lectures. This will involve the use of appropriate development tools and platforms, and consideration of design aspects. Students have the chance to build an application during workshops, and use this as a tool to conduct an evaluation related to user experience.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

This course is assessed through a variety of means, including in-class tests, coursework, projects and examinations. The majority of assessments are coursework-based, reflecting the practical and applied nature of computer science, and in many instances are informed by the types of tasks currently undertaken in industry.

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Students on this course are taught by specialist academics whose research has been internationally recognised. Researchers include Nigel Allinson MBE, a Distinguished Professor of Image Engineering, who has been supported with a £3.3 million grant from the UK’s Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council for advances in proton beam therapy.

The School is also a Microsoft Imagine Academy member and Cisco Academy member, which gives students the opportunity to gain industry recognised qualifications such as Microsoft Technology Associate and Cisco certification.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

The BSc (Hons) Computer Science degree is optionally available in a sandwich mode variant. If students choose the sandwich placement option, they take a year out in industry between the second and third year. This provides the opportunity to gain industrial experience. Students are supported throughout their placement, which can be overseas. Students are required to pay for their own travel, accommodation, and general living costs while on placements and study visits. There is no tuition fee for the placement year.

There are also opportunities to take shorter work placements, for example over the summer period, and to be involved in systems development projects for real industry clients.

Placements

Some courses offer students the opportunity to undertake placements. When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry (where available). Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Tuition Fees

2020/21UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level* £15,900 per level**
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,900 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

* UK/EU: The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

** International: The fees quoted are for one year of study. For continuing students fees are subject to an increase of 2% each year and rounded to the nearest £100.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

- In exceptional circumstances, students who are required to re-take modules can do so on an 'assessment only' basis. This means that students do not attend timetabled teaching events but are required to take the assessments/examinations associated with the module(s). The 'assessment only' fee is half of the £ per credit point fee for each module.

Exceptionally, tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost.

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English and Maths. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry and will consider applicants who have a mix of qualifications.

We also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.
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Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/st.../entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/st...ort/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.
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University preparation courses for International students:

The University of Lincoln International Study Centre offers university preparation courses for international students who do not meet the direct entry requirements for their chosen degree course. Upon successful completion, students can progress to degree level study at the University of Lincoln.

Please visit http://www.lincolnisc.com/ for more information.
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If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk
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Learn from Experts

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

Dr Derek Foster

Principal Lecturer and Programme Leader

Dr Foster has a strong background in Computer Science and Human Computer Interaction, with teaching primarily focused on the technical aspects of cloud and mobile computing, with the application of qualitative and quantitative research methods. Currently he is a Principal Investigator for a KTP in Cyber Security in the space of electro-mechanical locking systems, and the Principal Investigator for a recently completed project with the UK Space Agency on supporting evacuation of coastal regions in the UK using Cloud and Mobile technologies.


Your Future Career

This degree aims to equip graduates with the mathematical, analytical, and problem-solving skills required for computer and technology-related roles across a range of sectors. Recent graduates have secured roles at GCHQ and major companies including IBM, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Bloomberg, JP Morgan, and G4S. Some graduates may wish to pursue academic careers and study at postgraduate level.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.

This degree aims to equip graduates with the mathematical, analytical, and problem-solving skills required for computer and technology-related roles across a range of sectors. Recent graduates have secured roles at GCHQ and major companies including IBM, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Bloomberg, JP Morgan, and G4S. Some graduates may wish to pursue academic careers and study at postgraduate level.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.

Student Computer Science

Having just finished my placement year, I can confidently say that the material that I am learning at Lincoln is well sought after in the job market. I was able to work at a great company due to having knowledge in a wide range of topics from object-oriented programming to computer architecture.

Emma Darcy, BSc (Hons) Computer Science

Facilities

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

Technical resources include computer laboratories and workstations with full software development platforms. There is a range of equipment for loan, including Raspberry Pi devices, smartphones, robots, and virtual reality equipment such as HTC Vive.

Students also make the most of the University's award-winning Great Central Warehouse Library, which provides access to more than 250,000 printed books and over 400,000 electronic books and journals, as well as databases and specialist collections. The Library has a range of different spaces for shared and individual learning.


The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.