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3 Years

Part-time

6 years

Typical Offer

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Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

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UCAS Code

C840

Course Code

PSYCPYUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 Years

Part-time

6 years

Typical Offer

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Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

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UCAS Code

C840

Course Code

PSYCPYUB

BSc (Hons) Psychology with Mental Health BSc (Hons) Psychology with Clinical Psychology

The course is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) as conferring eligibility for the Graduate Basis for Chartered membership (GBC) the first step towards becoming a chartered psychologist.

Key Information

Full-time

3 Years

Part-time

6 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

C840

Course Code

PSYCPYUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 Years

Part-time

6 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

C840

Course Code

PSYCPYUB

Select Year of Entry

Welcome to BSc (Hons) Psychology with Mental Health

Clinical psychology, as a discipline, is the integration and application of empirically valid and evidence based psychological theories and principles to the understanding and alleviation of distress and problem behaviour.

The BSc (Hons) Psychology with Mental Health degree at the University of Lincoln covers a broad range of psychological theories, alongside specialist modules in mental health and well-being, counselling skills and theory, and approaches to treatment and therapy. Students will also have the opportunity to take elective modules in topics such as cognitive behaviour therapy, taught by practitioner therapists and psychologists.

The course is informed by the scientist-practitioner model, combining theory, research and practical skills development. Furthermore, the course aims to develop students' appreciation and knowledge of the range of skills required to work in clinical settings. The programme will therefore be of interest to students who wish to embark on postgraduate study to become a practising psychologist, or to engage in clinical research.

Welcome to BSc (Hons) Psychology with Clinical Psychology

Clinical psychology, as a discipline, is the integration and application of empirically valid and evidence based psychological theories and principles to the understanding and alleviation of distress and problem behaviour.

The BSc (Hons) Psychology with Clinical Psychology degree at the University of Lincoln covers a broad range of psychological theories, alongside specialist modules in mental health and well-being, counselling skills and theory, and approaches to treatment and therapy. Students will also have the opportunity to take elective modules in topics such as cognitive behaviour therapy, taught by practitioner therapists and psychologists.

The course is informed by the scientist-practitioner model, combining theory, research and practical skills development. Furthermore, the course aims to develop students' appreciation and knowledge of the range of skills required to work in clinical settings. The programme will therefore be of interest to students who wish to embark on postgraduate study to become a practising psychologist, or to engage in clinical research.

Dr Kyla Pennington - Senior Lecturer

Dr Kyla Pennington - Senior Lecturer

Dr Kyla Pennington is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Psychology with expertise in the psychobiology of mental health. Kyla teaching and research aims to convey and understand further the interaction of psychological and biological processes in the context of mental health risk and vulnerability. Her research also includes evaluating interventions which may improve mental health and wellbeing.

School Staff List

How You Study

Our School aims to produce graduates who are critical thinkers and independent researchers. This means that graduating students are expected to be able to tackle psychological problems and issues as independent researchers taking a critical and analytical approach.

The course also aims to equip students with the ability to reflect on the nature of human behaviour in an informed and systematic manner, and to provide them with an opportunity to gain an understanding of the scope of clinical psychology theory and practice.

During the final year, students may choose from a wide selection of optional modules and are expected to complete an extended independent study. At this stage, it is expected that the majority of students' studies will be determined by their interests and career aspirations.

Teaching takes place in large lecture rooms, smaller seminars and workshops and in small groups, depending on the level and the topic. In addition, staff use the intranet to provide materials to support teaching and have regular drop in sessions for students. Most modules involve two hours a week timetabled teaching time. Students are expected to contribute to small group sessions and to undertake independent study.

There are dedicated Psychology Labs for student projects as well as the research labs that students may use as part of their final year research project.

Course materials are posted to an online virtual learning environment to supplement face to face teaching and to support onsite and remote study.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

How You Study

Our School aims to produce graduates who are critical thinkers and independent researchers. This means that graduating students are expected to be able to tackle psychological problems and issues as independent researchers taking a critical and analytical approach.

The course also aims to equip students with the ability to reflect on the nature of human behaviour in an informed and systematic manner, and to provide them with an opportunity to gain an understanding of the scope of clinical psychology theory and practice.

During the final year, students may choose from a wide selection of optional modules and are expected to complete an extended independent study. At this stage, it is expected that the majority of students' studies will be determined by their interests and career aspirations.

Teaching takes place in large lecture rooms, smaller seminars and workshops and in small groups, depending on the level and the topic. In addition, staff use the intranet to provide materials to support teaching and have regular drop in sessions for students. Most modules involve two hours a week timetabled teaching time. Students are expected to contribute to small group sessions and to undertake independent study.

There are dedicated Psychology Labs for student projects as well as the research labs that students may use as part of their final year research project.

Course materials are posted to an online virtual learning environment to supplement face to face teaching and to support onsite and remote study.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

Studying Psychology with a Work Experience Option

For those students considering studying with us in 2022, there is an option for undergraduate Psychology students to undertake a year out in a work placement between their second and third year of study. Work experience could help to boost your confidence, help you decide your future career, apply learned knowledge in a real-world setting and develop important skills to enhance future employment. There are a range of sectors to gain experience in including business, education, health care, and the civil service. 

You don't need to decide right away when applying through UCAS on whether or not you would like to take this option and you will be able to organise a work placement year after you enrol. 

The University has strong links with both local and national organisations and while students will be responsible for organising their own work placement year, support will be available from a specialist academic tutor alongside the University's Careers and Employability Service.

For students who wish to complete their full-time degree within the standard 3-year duration, there will be a range of opportunities to arrange work experience alongside their studies. 

Teaching and Learning During Covid-19

Information for Offer Holders Joining Us in Autumn 2021

Letter from Head of Psychology

We are delighted you are interested in joining us at the University of Lincoln and I am writing to let you know about our planning for the new academic year. You currently have an offer of a place at the University and we want to keep you updated so you can start preparing for your future, should you be successful in meeting any outstanding conditions of your offer.

We fully intend your experience with us at Lincoln will be engaging, supportive and academically challenging. We are determined to provide our students with a safe and exciting campus experience, ensuring you benefit from the best that both face-to-face and online teaching offer. We have kept our focus on friendliness and community spirit at Lincoln and we look forward to your participation in that community.

As you know, the UK Government has published its roadmap for the easing of Coronavirus lockdown restrictions in England. There are still some uncertainties for universities around possible restrictions for the next academic year, particularly in relation to social distancing in large group teaching. We are planning in line with government guidance for both face-to-face and online teaching to ensure you have a good campus experience and can complete all the requirements for your programme.  We are fully prepared to adapt and flex our plans if changes in government regulations make this necessary during the year. 

Face-to-face teaching and interaction with tutors and course mates are key to students’ learning and the broader student experience. Face-to-face sessions will be prioritised where it is most valuable, particularly for seminars, tutorials, workshops, practicals and lab sessions. Students tell us that there are real benefits to some elements of online learning within a blended approach, such as revisiting recorded materials and developing new digital skills and confidence.  At Lincoln we aim to take forward the best aspects of both.

This letter sets out in detail various aspects of the planned experience at Lincoln for your chosen subject area, and we hope the information is helpful as you plan for your future.

Teaching and Learning

At any one time you will be taking four credit bearing Psychology modules. Your programme of study is typically delivered by a combination of lectures, workshops and seminars. Our workshops and seminars involve smaller groups of students, allowing for more discussion, debate, and engagement with tasks and it is these sessions where face to face sessions will be prioritised. Whilst the pattern may vary across modules, the principle of a mix of face-to-face and online provision will be maintained across your programme of study.

All of the learning outcomes of your modules will be met by taking a blended learning approach. You will get regular face-to-face time with your lecturers, alongside your fellow students in a socially-distanced setting. Any on-line provision will make use of a variety of approaches and technologies to facilitate personal engagement with lecturers and fellow students in this mode too. Our digital learning tools have been chosen based on what students have told us they enjoy using and have found engaging.

Two other aspects remain and are key to our provision. Firstly, you will have a Personal Tutor – a member of academic staff who is your designated ‘go to’ person for advice and support, both pastoral and academic. Typically students would have weekly face-to-face group meetings with their academic tutor and we plan to keep these sessions face-to-face.  Secondly, independent learning continues to be an essential aspect of learning in psychology, and guided reading and other independent engagement remains key, this year as any, to performing well in your studies. Your tutorial sessions will help you adjust to the learning expectations at university.

Our assessment processes will likewise follow government guidelines in relation to social distancing and safety. Where there are exams or in-class tests are planned, decisions as to whether they go ahead in this form or in an online variant (for example, ‘take home’ exams) will depend on circumstances regarding the pandemic nearer the assessment period.

Regardless of any necessary amendments to delivery or assessment, our programmes will still confer eligibility for Graduate Basis for Chartership with the British Psychological Society (provided students graduate with a 2.2 and pass the 3rd year dissertation module).

We have an established Peer Mentoring scheme within the school, and you will be put in touch with a current 2nd or 3rd year student who will act as your mentor. They will introduce you to a group of students from your cohort, and will answer any queries or concerns about student life at Lincoln and studying in Psychology. Our staff will welcome you via induction events in October, and you will soon be engaging with your studies.

The School of Psychology is an academic community, built on shared experience, partnership and engagement. Despite a blended approach, these important elements of who we are will remain.

The University Campus

We are very proud of our beautiful and vibrant campuses at the University of Lincoln and we have used our extensive indoor and outdoor spaces to provide students with access to study and social areas as well as learning resources and facilities, adapting them where necessary in line with government guidance. All the mitigations and safety measures you would expect are in place on our campuses (at Lincoln, Riseholme and Holbeach), such as hand sanitisers, one-way systems, and other social distancing measures where these are required.

Student Wellbeing and Support

The University’s Student Wellbeing Centre and Student Support Centre are fully open for face-to-face and online support.  Should you, as one of our applicants, have any questions about coming to Lincoln in October or any other concerns, these specialist teams are here for you. You can contact Student Wellbeing and the Student Support Centre by visiting https://studentservices.lincoln.ac.uk where service details and contact information are available, or if you are in Lincoln you can make an appointment to meet a member of the team.

To enable you to make the most out of your experience in Lincoln and to help you access course materials and other services, we recommend that you have a desktop, laptop or tablet device available during your studies. This will enable you to engage easily with our online learning platforms from your student accommodation or from home. Students can use IT equipment on campus in the Library, our learning lounges, and specialist academic areas; however, there may not always be a space free when you have a timetabled session or an assessment to complete which is why we recommend you have your own device too if possible. If you are struggling to access IT equipment or reliable internet services, please contact ICT for technical support and Student Support who can assist you with further advice and information.

We are committed to providing you with the best possible start to university life and to helping you to prepare for your time with us. As part of this commitment, you can access our Student Life pre-arrival online support package. This collection of digital resources, advice and helpful tips created by current students is designed to help you prepare for the all-important first steps into higher education, enabling you to learn within a supportive community and to make the most of the new opportunities that the University of Lincoln provides. When you are ready, you can begin by going to studentlife.lincoln.ac.uk/starting.

Students Union

Your Students’ Union is here to make sure that you get the most from every aspect of your student experience. They will be providing a huge range of in-person and virtual events and opportunities - you are sure to find something perfect for you! Meet people and find a new hobby by joining one of their 150 sports teams and societies. Grab lunch between teaching or a drink with friends in The Swan, Towers or The Barge. Learn new skills and boost your CV by taking part in training courses and volunteering opportunities in your spare time. Grab a bike from the Cycle Hire and explore the city you will be calling home!

To kick-off the new academic year, your Students’ Union will be bringing you The Official Lincoln Freshers Week 2021, with a huge line-up of social events, club nights, fayres and activities for you enjoy (restrictions permitting). Keep an eye on www.facebook.com/lincolnfreshers21 for line-up and ticket updates, so you don’t miss out.

Most importantly, your Students’ Union will always be there for you when you need it most; making sure that your voice as a student is always heard. The SU Advice Centre can provide independent advice and support on housing, finance, welfare and academic issues. As well as this, your Course Reps are always on hand to make sure that you are getting the best from your academic experience. To find out more about the Students’ Union’s events, opportunities, support and how to get in contact go to: www.lincolnsu.com

Student Accommodation

Many applicants will choose to live in dedicated student accommodation on, or close to, campus and you may well have already booked your student residence for the upcoming year. All University-managed student accommodation will have our Residential Wardens in place. Residential Wardens are here to help you settle into your new accommodation and will be offering flatmate and residential support activities throughout the year. If you have booked University accommodation, you will have already heard from us with further details on where you will be living to help you prepare. If you have not yet booked your accommodation, we still have plenty of options available. In the meantime, lots of advice and information can be found on the accommodation pages of our website: https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studentlife/accommodation/

The information detailed in this letter will form part of your agreement with the University of Lincoln. If we do not hear from you to the contrary prior to enrolment, we will assume that you acknowledge and accept the information contained in this letter. Adaptations to how we work may have to be made in line with any future changes in government guidance, and we will communicate these with you as necessary. Please do review the University’s Admissions Terms and Conditions (in particular sections 8 and 9) and Student Complaints Procedure so you understand your rights and the  agreement between the University and its students.

We very much hope this information is useful to help you plan for the next step in your academic journey, and we look forward to welcoming you into our community at Lincoln this Autumn. This is the start of a new phase and will be an exciting time for all of us. If you have any questions, please do email me at kmiller@lincoln.ac.uk. 

Very best wishes,

Dr Kirsty Miller

Head of School of Psychology

Accreditations and Memberships

The course is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) as conferring eligibility for the Graduate Basis for Chartered membership (GBC) the first step towards becoming a chartered psychologist. The BPS is the main professional body representing psychology and psychologists in the UK.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Brain, Behaviour & Cognition 2022-23PSY1160MLevel 42022-23This module aims to introduce students to a wide range of topics outlining the structure and functions of the brain and nervous system, and the relationship between these brain structures and the behaviours, both covert and overt, resulting from them. The module serves as the foundation for the second year core module in cognition, and a number of elective modules expand on ideas introduced here.CoreConceptual & Historical Issues in Psychology 2022-23PSY1161MLevel 42022-23This module considers the history of psychology, critical psychology, the criteria that we can use to determine whether theories in psychology are scientific or not, and the interaction between psychology and society.CoreDeveloping Individual in Society 2022-23PSY1162MLevel 42022-23This module provides an introduction to three major areas of psychological theory and research, Developmental, Social and Individual psychology. The topics are covered in Semesters A and B respectively and grouped thematically. Content across all topics is embedded in the context of major, relevant general, developmental, social and individual differences theories.CoreFoundations of Clinical Psychology 2022-23PSY1166MLevel 42022-23This is an introductory module to practice and research in Clinical Psychology. Initially, the focus of the module will be on understanding the social and political contextual factors in the practice of clinical psychology including historical developments, ethical considerations, cultural and social influences on the conceptualisation of Mental Disorder. After setting the context, the module will focus on the process of knowledge generation in clinical psychology. The module will aim to develop an understanding of the epistemological strengths and limitations of multiple clinical research methods. The aim is to introduce students to the nature and scope of clinical practice, by debating some of the key issues in clinical practice and becoming familiar with research approaches that are integral to understanding and treating mental disorder. This module is designed to provide undergraduates with foundational knowledge of clinical psychology that will prepare them for more advanced modules in the programme.CoreResearch Skills I 2022-23PSY1164MLevel 42022-23An appreciation of research methods is critical for an understanding of an empirical discipline like psychology. This module introduces students to some of the basic concepts underlying the quantitative treatment of research data. The module aims to provide the foundations for research in psychology that students will be able to build on during their degree and beyond.CoreResearch Skills II 2022-23PSY1165MLevel 42022-23This module aims to build on the foundations of research methods and statistics from Research Skills I and works to prepare students for more independent and advanced study in Research Skills III and IV. The module provides an introduction to, and experience of, survey and qualitative methods in Psychology, covering study design, data collection, analysis, interpretation and reporting. Students are introduced to the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of non-experimental research and have the opportunity to consider practical applications.CoreCognition 2023-24PSY2006MLevel 52023-24The module extends the investigations of cognition that began in the first year. Topics critical to our understanding of cognition are considered in more depth, with consideration of both classic and current research into cognitive processes from both a cognitive and cognitive neuroscience approach. Topics covered will be from areas that are critical to our understanding of human cognition and may include a selection from the following areas: memory, attention, recognition, language, decision making, thinking etc. By covering a range of topics within cognitive psychology students can develop a comprehensive understanding of how our cognitive processes function and develop an appreciation of the role of empirical evidence in guiding the formation and assessment of different psychological theories. Teaching will cover different topics and links will between different areas to develop students appreciation of how a wider perspective can enhance our understanding of an area.CoreDevelopmental Psychology 2023-24PSY2004MLevel 52023-24This module aims to examine the concepts, theories, research methods and influencing factors in child development relevant to the period from birth to pre-adolescence.CoreMental Health and Disorder 2023-24PSY2173MLevel 52023-24This module aims to provide an introduction to a range of mental health disorders with regard to their historical context, classification and aetiology. Based on established theoretical and research context, this module will give students the opportunity to critically examine a range of theories regarding the nature of mental health problems through the use of primary research sources, with the aim of broadening their potential understanding regarding the complexity of this topic and current debate issues in the field.CorePsychological Assessment & Psychometrics 2023-24PSY2174MLevel 52023-24The module aims to provide an introduction into psychological assessments using psychometrics, including questionnaires and scales. Based on the established theoretical and research context, this module will consider a range of assessment tools used in psychology to assess an individuals behaviour or behavioural disposition, and provide an introduction into psychometric test development. The modules also aims to provide students with the opportunity to administer, score, and interpret psychological tests.CoreResearch Skills III 2023-24PSY2175MLevel 52023-24This module aims to build on and develop the experimental research skills that were acquired at Research Skills I. Students are introduced to a range of statistical and non-statistical topics. In parallel, a series of workshops are designed to teach the practical skills associated with experimental design and analysis, and students can also carry out a research project in small groups supervised by members of staff.CoreResearch Skills IV 2023-24PSY2176MLevel 52023-24This module aims to build and develop non-experimental research skills that were acquired at Level 1 (Research Skills I&II). These will include research design, analysis and data handling. In lectures, students are introduced to a range of statistical and non-statistical topics. In parallel, a series of workshops will teach students practical skills associated with non-experimental design and analysis, and students will also carry out a research project in small groups supervised by members of staff.CoreSocial Psychology 2023-24PSY2003MLevel 52023-24This module seeks to explore some of the central issues of social psychology, including how people deal with social information, such as the causes of behaviour and social categories, and how groups function and interact.CoreUnderstanding Mental Health & Wellbeing 2023-24PSY2177MLevel 52023-24This module aims to build on the content presented in the Mental Health and Disorder module by broadening the understanding of mental health and psychological well-being. Based on the established theoretical and research context, this module will consider an additional range of psychological disorders in terms of their assessment, aetiology, research background, and impact on the individuals functioning and the environment they interact in.CoreInternational Study 2023-24PSY2179MLevel 52023-24The School believes that an option to study overseas is a valuable educational opportunity for our students. The optional year is intended to: - Enable students to benefit from studying within a cross cultural environment; - Expose students to a wider academic and cultural experience; - Enhance their future employment opportunities; - Increasing their cultural and professional mobility. This module is optional for students within the School of Psychology. Study Abroad is a year long module which enables students to spend a year studying abroad at one of the Universitys approved partner institutions. Eligible students must have completed their second year of study to a satisfactory standard and successfully completed the application process for the year abroad. During the year spent abroad, students share classes with local students and study on a suite of locally-delivered taught modules which have been approved in advance by the University. Upon their return, as part of the assessment for this modules, students are required to critically reflect upon their experience of living and studying in a different cultural environment and the skills acquired.OptionalApproaches to Treatment and Therapy 2024-25PSY3019MLevel 62024-25This module aims to develop an understanding of problem formulation used in clinical psychology with a view to undertaking a comprehensive assessment. Students can critically examine a range of psychological research and theories used in the treatment, therapy and support of people with mental health problems. The module will cover the relevant evidence for working with different psychological interventions. It aims to develop an understanding of traditional paradigms of treatment and therapy as well as examining some more recent innovations. Students will have an opportunity to expand their knowledge of problem formulation.CoreCounselling Skills and Theory 2024-25PSY3015MLevel 62024-25This module is designed to introduce students to counselling theories and aims to help to develop introductory communication and counselling skills. A Person-Centred approach to counselling skills will be used and an important aspect of this module will be providing students with the opportunity of development of learning through self-reflection.CoreIndependent Study (Psychology) 2024-25PSY3121MLevel 62024-25This module expects students to carry out empirical research culminating in the production of a dissertation. The Independent Study is designed to test a students ability to identify an appropriate research question and to design and implement an appropriate study. The role of the supervisor is to guide them through these processes.CoreAddictions 2024-25PSY3017MLevel 62024-25OptionalAdvanced Multivariate Statistics 2024-25PSY3006MLevel 62024-25The aim of this module is to provide a comprehensive introduction to advanced multivariate techniques. The module seeks to explore the theoretical rationale underpinning each analysis.OptionalAutistic Spectrum Disorders 2024-25PSY3012MLevel 62024-25This module aims to examine the developmental disability of Autism (and Autistic Spectrum Disorders). It aims to cover a range of approaches to understanding Autism, from diagnosis and etiology.OptionalClinical and Experimental Neuropsychology 2024-25PSY3010MLevel 62024-25This module aims to draw on aspects of cognitive and clinical neuropsychology to examine the consequences of brain dysfunction. A particular focus will be upon the interdependence of clinical and experimental neuropsychology, and it is within this context that the role of neuropsychology in research, diagnosis and patient management can be explored.OptionalCognitive Neuroscience of Visual Attention 2024-25PSY3164MLevel 62024-25This module aims to build on the cognition of visual attention taught in year two. It aims to teach the developing understanding of the biological basis of visual attention. Features, i.e. lines, curve and areas are computed early in the visual system. This is not a passive process. Attention can be shown to influence, at a neurological level, the features that are computed. The module considers how this early processing leads to the representation of real world objects. The locus and functions of top down attentional biasing will also be examined.OptionalCross-Cultural Psychology 2024-25PSY3125MLevel 62024-25This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to discuss concepts, theories and research methods in cross-cultural psychology, including analysis of psychological definitions of culture and cultural variables. Specific topics in social and developmental psychology are considered from a cross-cultural perspective, for example, cultural values, social roles and relationships, family organisation, and selected topics in child development.OptionalDevelopmental Psychopathology 2024-25PSY3007MLevel 62024-25This module aims to emphasise the importance of a developmental framework for understanding how children come to exhibit adaptive and maladaptive behaviour. The module will seek to address the changing nature of problems, influences and risk factors over the course of development.OptionalDiscourse 2024-25PSY3009MLevel 62024-25This module aims to develop students' knowledge of the development, theory and applications of the Discourse approach, which is a growing field within psychology. The module aims to introduce the Discourse perspective, in which language is seen as a means for people to do social actions: from blamings and invitations, to the establishment and maintenance of social relationships.OptionalFantasy Neuroscience 2024-25PSY3165MLevel 62024-25This module is designed to introduce the background, theories and techniques of Social cognitive neuroscience. SCN seeks to understand socioemotional phenomena in terms of interactions between the social (socioemotional cues, contexts, experiences, and behaviors), cognitive (information processing mechanisms), and neural (brain bases) levels of analysis.OptionalFrom Molecules to Mind 2024-25PSY3181MLevel 62024-25This module explores contemporary research and understanding of the mind and brain through examining both molecular (neurotransmitter and drug function) and psychological (processes of sensation, memory, mood, consciousness) evidence.OptionalIntroduction to Cognitive Behavioural Therapy 2024-25PSY3177MLevel 62024-25This module aims to introduce you to Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) theory and practice and help you to develop introductory therapy skills. Students can learn about the evidence base for CBT for a number of presenting mental health difficulties such as depression and anxiety. The module also looks at the strengths and weaknesses of CBT as a therapeutic approach. It offers an introduction to the therapeutic process from the assessment of a persons mental health difficulty, through to CBT formulations of the presenting problem, some initial insight into CBT interventions, and finally evaluating therapy. Students are taught within the reflective scientist-practitioner framework, which informs undergraduate psychology degrees at the University.OptionalInvestigative and Courtroom Psychology 2024-25PSY3178MLevel 62024-25The module aims to introduce some of the key areas in Forensic Psychology that occur during the pre-conviction stage of a criminal investigation. Specifically, the module will focus on the police investigation and courtroom stage of the criminal process. It will explore a variety of established theoretical work and research within these domains and consider how this knowledge can be used to inform several key areas of the criminal investigation. The module will highlight the applied importance of Psychology to significant issues in the real-world.OptionalOccupational Psychology 2024-25PSY3173MLevel 62024-25This module is designed to provide a broad overview of this sub-field, which can be divided into three main areas; job related issues, inter and intra psychological issues, and workplace psychology. Theories from mainstream psychology aim to form the basis for a detailed discussion of key topics in occupational psychology.OptionalPatterns of Action 2024-25PSY3168MLevel 62024-25OptionalPerception and Visual Art 2024-25PSY3174MLevel 62024-25This module presents a broad overview of these findings and theoretical perspectives, and considers how they help us to deepen our understanding of visual art. Students critically evaluate scientific approaches to understanding art during seminar discussions, and are encouraged to find and bring relevant examples of visual art to the discussion.OptionalPsychodynamic Therapy: Theory and Practice. 2024-25PSY3013MLevel 62024-25OptionalPsychology of Music 2024-25PSY3180MLevel 62024-25This is a module designed to help students to develop their knowledge of human interactions and responses to music. Over the course of the module, students will consider the ways in which we engage with, listen to, perform, and learn about music. This course will aim to provide a better understanding on the role of music in attachment, emotion regulation, social affiliation, the neurological overlap between music and language processing, and the development of humans as a species who enjoy music. Through explaining the research underlying the Psychology of Music we also aim to provide an understanding of how this field builds on and connects with other areas in psychology.OptionalPsychopharmacology: Drugs, Brain and Behaviour 2024-25PSY3021MLevel 62024-25This module aims to explore the science behind the effects that drugs have on mood, sensation, thinking and behaviour. The history and actions of medications currently in use for the treatment of mental health disorders will be described along with an overview of the known actions and effects of illicit drug compounds.OptionalRisk Perception, Assessment and Management 2024-25PSY3003MLevel 62024-25This module is designed to give students the opportunity to develop a critical awareness and understanding of psychological issues typically related to the assessment, perception, communication, management and governing of risk as it affects professional practices in such areas as public health, politics, the environment, science and technology, corporate communication, and clinical/forensic psychology.OptionalSleep, Cognition and Well-Being 2024-25PSY3179MLevel 62024-25This module examines the potential benefits of sleep, focusing in particular on two areas. First, the role of sleep in memory and cognition will be looked at in depth, which is an important and growing body of literature. This will be followed by a wider examination of some of the other benefits of sleep for well-being, which may include effects on mood, physical health and aspects of behaviour. The module may also briefly touch upon the question of how and when sleep goes wrong and what consequences this may have for different groups of people. The module will introduce you not only to the way in which cognition and well-being benefit from sleep, but also the experimental paradigms used to demonstrate this. The aims of the module are to consider in depth the potential role of sleep in both cognition and well-being, and develop the skills and knowledge that will enable the critique of the different approaches taken in this field leading to the ability to interpret and integrate current research findings and design original further research studies.OptionalSleep, Dreaming and Circadian Rhythms 2024-25PSY3175MLevel 62024-25This module aims to build on the module, Brain Behaviour & Cognition. It applies that background knowledge to the topic of Sleep, Dreaming and Circadian Rhythms. The module aims to introduce students to the neurobiology of sleep and dreams. It also aims to integrate current understanding of key issues in sleep research such as the purpose of sleep and the role of dreams.OptionalVision Research 2024-25PSY3131MLevel 62024-25This module aims to represent advances in vision research through the research contributions made by staff delivering the module. Emphasis is placed on methodology and the results they generate and how these are used to in turn to both inform and challenge conventional theory.Optional

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Brain, Behaviour & Cognition 2021-22PSY1160MLevel 42021-22This module aims to introduce students to a wide range of topics outlining the structure and functions of the brain and nervous system, and the relationship between these brain structures and the behaviours, both covert and overt, resulting from them. The module serves as the foundation for the second year core module in cognition, and a number of elective modules expand on ideas introduced here.CoreConceptual & Historical Issues in Psychology 2021-22PSY1161MLevel 42021-22This module considers the history of psychology, critical psychology, the criteria that we can use to determine whether theories in psychology are scientific or not, and the interaction between psychology and society.CoreDeveloping Individual in Society 2021-22PSY1162MLevel 42021-22This module provides an introduction to three major areas of psychological theory and research, Developmental, Social and Individual psychology. The topics are covered in Semesters A and B respectively and grouped thematically. Content across all topics is embedded in the context of major, relevant general, developmental, social and individual differences theories.CoreFoundations of Clinical Psychology 2021-22PSY1166MLevel 42021-22This is an introductory module to practice and research in Clinical Psychology. Initially, the focus of the module will be on understanding the social and political contextual factors in the practice of clinical psychology including historical developments, ethical considerations, cultural and social influences on the conceptualisation of Mental Disorder. After setting the context, the module will focus on the process of knowledge generation in clinical psychology. The module will aim to develop an understanding of the epistemological strengths and limitations of multiple clinical research methods. The aim is to introduce students to the nature and scope of clinical practice, by debating some of the key issues in clinical practice and becoming familiar with research approaches that are integral to understanding and treating mental disorder. This module is designed to provide undergraduates with foundational knowledge of clinical psychology that will prepare them for more advanced modules in the programme.CoreResearch Skills I 2021-22PSY1164MLevel 42021-22An appreciation of research methods is critical for an understanding of an empirical discipline like psychology. This module introduces students to some of the basic concepts underlying the quantitative treatment of research data. The module aims to provide the foundations for research in psychology that students will be able to build on during their degree and beyond.CoreResearch Skills II 2021-22PSY1165MLevel 42021-22This module aims to build on the foundations of research methods and statistics from Research Skills I and works to prepare students for more independent and advanced study in Research Skills III and IV. The module provides an introduction to, and experience of, survey and qualitative methods in Psychology, covering study design, data collection, analysis, interpretation and reporting. Students are introduced to the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of non-experimental research and have the opportunity to consider practical applications.CoreCognition 2022-23PSY2006MLevel 52022-23The module extends the investigations of cognition that began in the first year. Topics critical to our understanding of cognition are considered in more depth, with consideration of both classic and current research into cognitive processes from both a cognitive and cognitive neuroscience approach. Topics covered will be from areas that are critical to our understanding of human cognition and may include a selection from the following areas: memory, attention, recognition, language, decision making, thinking etc. By covering a range of topics within cognitive psychology students can develop a comprehensive understanding of how our cognitive processes function and develop an appreciation of the role of empirical evidence in guiding the formation and assessment of different psychological theories. Teaching will cover different topics and links will between different areas to develop students appreciation of how a wider perspective can enhance our understanding of an area.CoreDevelopmental Psychology 2022-23PSY2004MLevel 52022-23This module aims to examine the concepts, theories, research methods and influencing factors in child development relevant to the period from birth to pre-adolescence.CoreMental Health and Disorder 2022-23PSY2173MLevel 52022-23This module aims to provide an introduction to a range of mental health disorders with regard to their historical context, classification and aetiology. Based on established theoretical and research context, this module will give students the opportunity to critically examine a range of theories regarding the nature of mental health problems through the use of primary research sources, with the aim of broadening their potential understanding regarding the complexity of this topic and current debate issues in the field.CorePsychological Assessment & Psychometrics 2022-23PSY2174MLevel 52022-23The module aims to provide an introduction into psychological assessments using psychometrics, including questionnaires and scales. Based on the established theoretical and research context, this module will consider a range of assessment tools used in psychology to assess an individuals behaviour or behavioural disposition, and provide an introduction into psychometric test development. The modules also aims to provide students with the opportunity to administer, score, and interpret psychological tests.CoreResearch Skills III 2022-23PSY2175MLevel 52022-23This module aims to build on and develop the experimental research skills that were acquired at Research Skills I. Students are introduced to a range of statistical and non-statistical topics. In parallel, a series of workshops are designed to teach the practical skills associated with experimental design and analysis, and students can also carry out a research project in small groups supervised by members of staff.CoreResearch Skills IV 2022-23PSY2176MLevel 52022-23This module aims to build and develop non-experimental research skills that were acquired at Level 1 (Research Skills I&II). These will include research design, analysis and data handling. In lectures, students are introduced to a range of statistical and non-statistical topics. In parallel, a series of workshops will teach students practical skills associated with non-experimental design and analysis, and students will also carry out a research project in small groups supervised by members of staff.CoreSocial Psychology 2022-23PSY2003MLevel 52022-23This module seeks to explore some of the central issues of social psychology, including how people deal with social information, such as the causes of behaviour and social categories, and how groups function and interact.CoreUnderstanding Mental Health & Wellbeing 2022-23PSY2177MLevel 52022-23This module aims to build on the content presented in the Mental Health and Disorder module by broadening the understanding of mental health and psychological well-being. Based on the established theoretical and research context, this module will consider an additional range of psychological disorders in terms of their assessment, aetiology, research background, and impact on the individuals functioning and the environment they interact in.CoreInternational Study 2022-23PSY2179MLevel 52022-23The School believes that an option to study overseas is a valuable educational opportunity for our students. The optional year is intended to: - Enable students to benefit from studying within a cross cultural environment; - Expose students to a wider academic and cultural experience; - Enhance their future employment opportunities; - Increasing their cultural and professional mobility. This module is optional for students within the School of Psychology. Study Abroad is a year long module which enables students to spend a year studying abroad at one of the Universitys approved partner institutions. Eligible students must have completed their second year of study to a satisfactory standard and successfully completed the application process for the year abroad. During the year spent abroad, students share classes with local students and study on a suite of locally-delivered taught modules which have been approved in advance by the University. Upon their return, as part of the assessment for this modules, students are required to critically reflect upon their experience of living and studying in a different cultural environment and the skills acquired.OptionalApproaches to Treatment and Therapy 2023-24PSY3019MLevel 62023-24This module aims to develop an understanding of problem formulation used in clinical psychology with a view to undertaking a comprehensive assessment. Students can critically examine a range of psychological research and theories used in the treatment, therapy and support of people with mental health problems. The module will cover the relevant evidence for working with different psychological interventions. It aims to develop an understanding of traditional paradigms of treatment and therapy as well as examining some more recent innovations. Students will have an opportunity to expand their knowledge of problem formulation.CoreCounselling Skills and Theory 2023-24PSY3015MLevel 62023-24This module is designed to introduce students to counselling theories and aims to help to develop introductory communication and counselling skills. A Person-Centred approach to counselling skills will be used and an important aspect of this module will be providing students with the opportunity of development of learning through self-reflection.CoreIndependent Study (Psychology) 2023-24PSY3121MLevel 62023-24This module expects students to carry out empirical research culminating in the production of a dissertation. The Independent Study is designed to test a students ability to identify an appropriate research question and to design and implement an appropriate study. The role of the supervisor is to guide them through these processes.CoreAddictions 2023-24PSY3017MLevel 62023-24OptionalAdvanced Multivariate Statistics 2023-24PSY3006MLevel 62023-24The aim of this module is to provide a comprehensive introduction to advanced multivariate techniques. The module seeks to explore the theoretical rationale underpinning each analysis.OptionalAutistic Spectrum Disorders 2023-24PSY3012MLevel 62023-24This module aims to examine the developmental disability of Autism (and Autistic Spectrum Disorders). It aims to cover a range of approaches to understanding Autism, from diagnosis and etiology.OptionalClinical and Experimental Neuropsychology 2023-24PSY3010MLevel 62023-24This module aims to draw on aspects of cognitive and clinical neuropsychology to examine the consequences of brain dysfunction. A particular focus will be upon the interdependence of clinical and experimental neuropsychology, and it is within this context that the role of neuropsychology in research, diagnosis and patient management can be explored.OptionalCognitive Neuroscience of Visual Attention 2023-24PSY3164MLevel 62023-24This module aims to build on the cognition of visual attention taught in year two. It aims to teach the developing understanding of the biological basis of visual attention. Features, i.e. lines, curve and areas are computed early in the visual system. This is not a passive process. Attention can be shown to influence, at a neurological level, the features that are computed. The module considers how this early processing leads to the representation of real world objects. The locus and functions of top down attentional biasing will also be examined.OptionalCross-Cultural Psychology 2023-24PSY3125MLevel 62023-24This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to discuss concepts, theories and research methods in cross-cultural psychology, including analysis of psychological definitions of culture and cultural variables. Specific topics in social and developmental psychology are considered from a cross-cultural perspective, for example, cultural values, social roles and relationships, family organisation, and selected topics in child development.OptionalDevelopmental Psychopathology 2023-24PSY3007MLevel 62023-24This module aims to emphasise the importance of a developmental framework for understanding how children come to exhibit adaptive and maladaptive behaviour. The module will seek to address the changing nature of problems, influences and risk factors over the course of development.OptionalDiscourse 2023-24PSY3009MLevel 62023-24This module aims to develop students' knowledge of the development, theory and applications of the Discourse approach, which is a growing field within psychology. The module aims to introduce the Discourse perspective, in which language is seen as a means for people to do social actions: from blamings and invitations, to the establishment and maintenance of social relationships.OptionalFantasy Neuroscience 2023-24PSY3165MLevel 62023-24This module is designed to introduce the background, theories and techniques of Social cognitive neuroscience. SCN seeks to understand socioemotional phenomena in terms of interactions between the social (socioemotional cues, contexts, experiences, and behaviors), cognitive (information processing mechanisms), and neural (brain bases) levels of analysis.OptionalFrom Molecules to Mind 2023-24PSY3181MLevel 62023-24This module explores contemporary research and understanding of the mind and brain through examining both molecular (neurotransmitter and drug function) and psychological (processes of sensation, memory, mood, consciousness) evidence.OptionalIntroduction to Cognitive Behavioural Therapy 2023-24PSY3177MLevel 62023-24This module aims to introduce you to Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) theory and practice and help you to develop introductory therapy skills. Students can learn about the evidence base for CBT for a number of presenting mental health difficulties such as depression and anxiety. The module also looks at the strengths and weaknesses of CBT as a therapeutic approach. It offers an introduction to the therapeutic process from the assessment of a persons mental health difficulty, through to CBT formulations of the presenting problem, some initial insight into CBT interventions, and finally evaluating therapy. Students are taught within the reflective scientist-practitioner framework, which informs undergraduate psychology degrees at the University.OptionalInvestigative and Courtroom Psychology 2023-24PSY3178MLevel 62023-24The module aims to introduce some of the key areas in Forensic Psychology that occur during the pre-conviction stage of a criminal investigation. Specifically, the module will focus on the police investigation and courtroom stage of the criminal process. It will explore a variety of established theoretical work and research within these domains and consider how this knowledge can be used to inform several key areas of the criminal investigation. The module will highlight the applied importance of Psychology to significant issues in the real-world.OptionalOccupational Psychology 2023-24PSY3173MLevel 62023-24This module is designed to provide a broad overview of this sub-field, which can be divided into three main areas; job related issues, inter and intra psychological issues, and workplace psychology. Theories from mainstream psychology aim to form the basis for a detailed discussion of key topics in occupational psychology.OptionalPatterns of Action 2023-24PSY3168MLevel 62023-24OptionalPerception and Visual Art 2023-24PSY3174MLevel 62023-24This module presents a broad overview of these findings and theoretical perspectives, and considers how they help us to deepen our understanding of visual art. Students critically evaluate scientific approaches to understanding art during seminar discussions, and are encouraged to find and bring relevant examples of visual art to the discussion.OptionalPsychodynamic Therapy: Theory and Practice. 2023-24PSY3013MLevel 62023-24OptionalPsychology of Music 2023-24PSY3180MLevel 62023-24This is a module designed to help students to develop their knowledge of human interactions and responses to music. Over the course of the module, students will consider the ways in which we engage with, listen to, perform, and learn about music. This course will aim to provide a better understanding on the role of music in attachment, emotion regulation, social affiliation, the neurological overlap between music and language processing, and the development of humans as a species who enjoy music. Through explaining the research underlying the Psychology of Music we also aim to provide an understanding of how this field builds on and connects with other areas in psychology.OptionalPsychopharmacology: Drugs, Brain and Behaviour 2023-24PSY3021MLevel 62023-24This module aims to explore the science behind the effects that drugs have on mood, sensation, thinking and behaviour. The history and actions of medications currently in use for the treatment of mental health disorders will be described along with an overview of the known actions and effects of illicit drug compounds.OptionalRisk Perception, Assessment and Management 2023-24PSY3003MLevel 62023-24This module is designed to give students the opportunity to develop a critical awareness and understanding of psychological issues typically related to the assessment, perception, communication, management and governing of risk as it affects professional practices in such areas as public health, politics, the environment, science and technology, corporate communication, and clinical/forensic psychology.OptionalSleep, Cognition and Well-Being 2023-24PSY3179MLevel 62023-24This module examines the potential benefits of sleep, focusing in particular on two areas. First, the role of sleep in memory and cognition will be looked at in depth, which is an important and growing body of literature. This will be followed by a wider examination of some of the other benefits of sleep for well-being, which may include effects on mood, physical health and aspects of behaviour. The module may also briefly touch upon the question of how and when sleep goes wrong and what consequences this may have for different groups of people. The module will introduce you not only to the way in which cognition and well-being benefit from sleep, but also the experimental paradigms used to demonstrate this. The aims of the module are to consider in depth the potential role of sleep in both cognition and well-being, and develop the skills and knowledge that will enable the critique of the different approaches taken in this field leading to the ability to interpret and integrate current research findings and design original further research studies.OptionalSleep, Dreaming and Circadian Rhythms 2023-24PSY3175MLevel 62023-24This module aims to build on the module, Brain Behaviour & Cognition. It applies that background knowledge to the topic of Sleep, Dreaming and Circadian Rhythms. The module aims to introduce students to the neurobiology of sleep and dreams. It also aims to integrate current understanding of key issues in sleep research such as the purpose of sleep and the role of dreams.OptionalVision Research 2023-24PSY3131MLevel 62023-24This module aims to represent advances in vision research through the research contributions made by staff delivering the module. Emphasis is placed on methodology and the results they generate and how these are used to in turn to both inform and challenge conventional theory.Optional

Entry Requirements 2022-23

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: ABB

International Baccalaureate: 32 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Distinction, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 128 UCAS Tariff points.

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English and Maths or Statistics. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Entry Requirements 2021-22

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: ABB, to include a science related subject: Psychology, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Maths, Geography, Economics. General Studies and Critical Thinking are accepted.

International Baccalaureate: 32 points overall, with 5 at Higher Level in a science related subject. (Psychology, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Applied Science, Maths, Geography or Economics).

BTEC Extended Diploma in Social Sciences, Applied Science, Health and Social Care or Forensic & Criminal Investigation accepted: Distinction, Distinction, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 128 UCAS Tariff points, including 15 credits in a science related subject.(Psychology, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Applied Science, Maths, Geography or Economics).

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English and Maths or Statistics. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Fees and Scholarships

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

"As a social researcher, I still draw on the knowledge I learned in my degree. Studying Psychology at Lincoln has helped me to specialise in behavioural research."

Ammar Mesari, BSc (Hons) Psychology with Clinical Psychology graduate

How you are assessed

The aims of the module assessments are to provide a measure of the development and attainment of course outcomes, including the attainment of high-level intellectual skills such as critical analysis and evaluation.

Accordingly, the nature of the assessment varies across the three levels of the course. The assessments at levels one and two aim to focus on the acquisition and understanding of knowledge and skills. In contrast, the level three assessments place far greater emphasis on the ability to apply, analyse, and evaluate knowledge.

BSc (Hons) Psychology with Mental Health students currently receive feedback within a 20 working day period.

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that may be used include coursework, such as written assignments, research reports, research diaries, research or clinical proposals, or dissertations; practical exams, such as oral and poster presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations, essay-based examinations, or in-class tests (including multiple-choice tests and short-answer questions).

The University of Lincolns policy is to ensure that staff return assessments to students promptly.

The aims of the module assessments are to provide a measure of the development and attainment of course outcomes, including the attainment of high-level intellectual skills such as critical analysis and evaluation.

Accordingly, the nature of the assessment varies across the three levels of the course. The assessments at levels one and two aim to focus on the acquisition and understanding of knowledge and skills. In contrast, the level three assessments place far greater emphasis on the ability to apply, analyse, and evaluate knowledge.

BSc (Hons) Psychology with Clinical Psychology students currently receive feedback within a 20 working day period.

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that may be used include coursework, such as written assignments, research reports, research diaries, research or clinical proposals, or dissertations; practical exams, such as oral and poster presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations, essay-based examinations, or in-class tests (including multiple-choice tests and short-answer questions).

The University of Lincolns policy is to ensure that staff return assessments to students promptly.

Work Opportunities Hub

The Work Opportunities Hub is available to support all students within the College of Social Science who are seeking to enhance their studies by engaging with a variety of work settings. This may be as part of their programme or as an activity during term time or holidays. Students are responsible for their own travel, accommodation and general living costs while on placement.

Study Abroad

Students who successfully complete their second year have the option to study abroad for a year at a partner institution. Those who choose to do so are responsible for covering their own travel, accommodation, and general living costs.

Visit Us in Person

The best way to find out what it is really like to live and learn at Lincoln is to join us for one of our Open Days. Visiting us in person is important and will help you to get a real feel for what it might be like to study here.

Book Your Place

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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