Key Information

Full-time

4-5 years

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Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

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UCAS Code

VF53

Course Code

PHYPHLUM

Key Information

Full-time

4-5 years

Typical Offer

View

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

VF53

Course Code

PHYPHLUM

MPhys Physics with Philosophy MPhys Physics with Philosophy

Students on this course can apply philosophical theory and ask the fundamental questions designed to investigate, enhance, and expand their knowledge.

Key Information

Full-time

4-5 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

VF53

Course Code

PHYPHLUM

Key Information

Full-time

4-5 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

VF53

Course Code

PHYPHLUM

Select Year of Entry

Dr Fabien Paillusson - Programme Leader

Dr Fabien Paillusson - Programme Leader

Dr Fabien Paillusson's interests lie in theoretical and computational modelling, the foundations of physics, physics and maths education, AI (Machine Learning and Automated Reasoning), logic, and the philosophy of science.

School Staff List

Welcome to MPhys Physics with Philosophy

This joint degree programme introduces fundamental and applied physics, while developing a philosophical understanding of the world we live in and the place we occupy within it.

Combining physics with philosophy offers students the chance to study, reflect on, and understand scientific material. Students can apply philosophical theory and ask the fundamental questions designed to investigate, enhance, and expand knowledge.

Students have the opportunity to learn from, and work alongside, our team of academics who can support and encourage them to apply imagination, creativity, and rigour to the solution of real-world problems. Individual and group projects during the course are designed to develop transferable skills.

Those who choose to enrol on this MPhys programme continue their study for a fourth year at an advanced level. They have the opportunity to examine topics in greater depth and undertake substantial additional project work.

Welcome to MPhys Physics with Philosophy

This joint degree programme introduces fundamental and applied physics, while developing a philosophical understanding of the world we live in and the place we occupy within it.

Combining physics with philosophy offers students the chance to study, reflect on, and understand scientific material. Students can apply philosophical theory and ask the fundamental questions designed to investigate, enhance, and expand knowledge.

Students have the opportunity to learn from, and work alongside, our team of academics who can support and encourage them to apply imagination, creativity, and rigour to the solution of real-world problems. Individual and group projects during the course are designed to develop transferable skills.

Those who choose to enrol on this MPhys programme continue their study for a fourth year at an advanced level. They have the opportunity to examine topics in greater depth and undertake substantial additional project work.

How You Study

The course is designed to provide a thorough grounding in experimental and theoretical physics, alongside the study of philosophy. It is structured to enable students to engage with the core physics curriculum and to examine it from different perspectives more deeply.

Students can develop critical thinking and reflective skills alongside numerical and analytical methods of physics and mathematics, and practical scientific and research techniques. The course also aims to develop a wide range of transferable skills, including logical reasoning, critical analysis, communication, and teamwork.

In the first year modules include Geometrical Optics, Waves and Mechanics; Calculus; and Introduction to Philosophical Logic. Progressing into the second year students can study modules including Differential Equations, Condensed Matter Physics, and Philosophy of Science. The third year offers modules such as Physics of the Universe, Quantum Mechanics, and Contemporary Problems in Philosophy, in addition to a range of optional modules including Methods of Mathematical Physics, Newton's Revolution, and Fluid Dynamics.

The fourth year offers the opportunity to examine topics in greater depth and undertake substantial additional project work.

The course is taught via lectures, problem solving classes, computer based classes and seminars.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

How You Study

The course is designed to provide a thorough grounding in experimental and theoretical physics, alongside the study of philosophy. It is structured to enable students to engage with the core physics curriculum and to examine it from different perspectives more deeply.

Students can develop critical thinking and reflective skills alongside numerical and analytical methods of physics and mathematics, and practical scientific and research techniques. The course also aims to develop a wide range of transferable skills, including logical reasoning, critical analysis, communication, and teamwork.

In the first year modules include Geometrical Optics, Waves and Mechanics; Calculus; and Introduction to Philosophical Logic. Progressing into the second year students can study modules including Differential Equations, Condensed Matter Physics, and Philosophy of Science. The third year offers modules such as Physics of the Universe, Quantum Mechanics, and Contemporary Problems in Philosophy, in addition to a range of optional modules including Methods of Mathematical Physics, Newton's Revolution, and Fluid Dynamics.

The fourth year offers the opportunity to examine topics in greater depth and undertake substantial additional project work.

The course is taught via lectures, problem solving classes, computer based classes and seminars.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

Teaching and Learning During Covid-19

Information for Offer Holders Joining Us in Autumn 2021

Letter from Head of School of Mathematics and Physics

We are delighted you are interested in joining us at the University of Lincoln and I am writing to let you know about our planning for the new academic year. You currently have an offer of a place at the University and we want to keep you updated so you can start preparing for your future,   should you be successful in meeting any outstanding conditions of your offer.

We fully intend your experience with us at Lincoln will be engaging, supportive and academically challenging. We are determined to provide our students with a safe and exciting campus experience, ensuring you benefit from the best that both face-to-face and online teaching offer. We have kept our focus on friendliness and community spirit at Lincoln and we look forward to your participation in that community.

As you know, the UK Government has published its roadmap for the easing of Coronavirus lockdown restrictions in England. There are still some uncertainties for universities around possible restrictions for the next academic year, particularly in relation to social distancing in large group teaching. We are planning in line with government guidance for both face-to-face and online teaching to ensure you have a good campus experience and can complete all the requirements for your programme.  We are fully prepared to adapt and flex our plans if changes in government regulations make this necessary during the year.

Face-to-face teaching and interaction with tutors and course mates are key to students’ learning and the broader student experience. Face-to-face sessions will be prioritised where it is most valuable, particularly for seminars, tutorials, workshops, practicals and lab sessions. Students tell us that there are real benefits to some elements of online learning within a blended approach, such as revisiting recorded materials and developing new digital skills and confidence.  At Lincoln we aim to take forward the best aspects of both.

This letter sets out in detail various aspects of the planned experience at Lincoln for your chosen subject area, and we hope the information is helpful as you plan for your future.

Teaching and Learning

In the School of Mathematics and Physics your teaching will be delivered using a blended approach. You will get regular face-to-face time with your lecturers, alongside your fellow students in a setting that will comply with the public health guidelines at the time. Any on-line provision will make use of a variety of approaches and technologies to facilitate your personal engagement with staff and students. Our digital learning tools have been chosen based on what students have told us they have enjoyed the most over the past year. Your programme of study will be delivered by a combination of lectures, problem solving practicals and laboratory sessions. Physics practical training includes physics laboratory, which is planned to be delivered in face-to-face sessions and supported by dedicated online material. Your degree will also include computer laboratory classes, which will be mostly online with some sessions face-to-face. You will have access to our computer facilities and the library for your self-study in a safe environment.

Our assessment processes will likewise follow government guidelines in relation to social distancing and safety. Most of our assessments are submitted online. Where there are exams, in-class tests, or oral presentations planned, decisions as to whether they go ahead in this form or via an online alternative will depend on safety guidance nearer the assessment period.

During your study you will have a Personal Tutor – a member of academic staff who is your designated ‘go to’ person for advice and support, both pastoral and academic. The School of Mathematics and Physics is a genuine community, built on strong staff-student engagement both within the formal structures of student representation and the Personal Tutoring system, and also through staff commitment to our students. Our staff look forward to welcoming you at our induction events in October. Please get in touch using the e-mail below if you have any further equiries about our plans for your course.

The University Campus

We are very proud of our beautiful and vibrant campuses at the University of Lincoln and we have used our extensive indoor and outdoor spaces to provide students with access to study and social areas as well as learning resources and facilities, adapting them where necessary in line with government guidance. All the mitigations and safety measures you would expect are in place on our campuses (at Lincoln, Riseholme and Holbeach), such as hand sanitisers, one-way systems, and other social distancing measures where these are required.

Student Wellbeing and Support

The University’s Student Wellbeing Centre and Student Support Centre are fully open for face-to-face and online support. Should you, as one of our applicants, have any questions about coming to Lincoln in October or any other concerns, these specialist teams are here for you. You can contact Student Wellbeing and the Student Support Centre by visiting https://studentservices.lincoln.ac.uk where service details and contact information are available, or if you are in Lincoln you can make an appointment to meet a member of the team.

To enable you to make the most out of your experience in Lincoln and to help you access course materials and other services, we recommend that you have a desktop, laptop or tablet device available during your studies. This will enable you to engage easily with our online learning platforms from your student accommodation or from home. Students can use IT equipment on campus in the Library, our learning lounges, and specialist academic areas; however, there may not always be a space free when you have a timetabled session or an assessment to complete which is why we recommend you have your own device too, if possible. If you are struggling to access IT equipment or reliable internet services, please contact ICT for technical support and Student Support who can assist you with further advice and information.

We are committed to providing you with the best possible start to university life and to helping you to prepare for your time with us. As part of this commitment, you can access our Student Life pre-arrival online support package. This collection of digital resources, advice and helpful tips created by current students is designed to help you prepare for the all-important first steps into higher education, enabling you to learn within a supportive community and to make the most of the new opportunities that the University of Lincoln provides. When you are ready, you can begin by going to studentlife.lincoln.ac.uk/starting.

Students’ Union

Your Students’ Union is here to make sure that you get the most from every aspect of your student experience. They will be providing a huge range of in-person and virtual events and opportunities - you are sure to find something perfect for you! Meet people and find a new hobby by joining one of their 150 sports teams and societies. Grab lunch between teaching or a drink with friends in The Swan, Towers or The Barge. Learn new skills and boost your CV by taking part in training courses and volunteering opportunities in your spare time. Grab a bike from the Cycle Hire and explore the city you will be calling home.

To kick-off the new academic year, your Students’ Union will be bringing you The Official Lincoln Freshers Week 2021, with a huge line-up of social events, club nights, fayres and activities for you enjoy (restrictions permitting). Keep an eye on www.facebook.com/lincolnfreshers21 for line-up and ticket updates, so you don’t miss out.

Most importantly, your Students’ Union will always be there for you when you need it most; making sure that your voice as a student is always heard. The SU Advice Centre can provide independent advice and support on housing, finance, welfare and academic issues. As well as this, your Course Representatives are always on hand to make sure that you are getting the best from your academic experience. To find out more about the Students’ Union’s events, opportunities, support and how to get in contact go to: www.lincolnsu.com.

Student Accommodation

Many applicants will choose to live in dedicated student accommodation on, or close to, campus and you may well have already booked your student residence for the upcoming year. All University-managed student accommodation will have our Residential Wardens in place. Residential Wardens are here to help you settle into your new accommodation and will be offering flatmate and residential support activities throughout the year. If you have booked University accommodation, you will have already heard from us with further details on where you will be living to help you prepare. If you have not yet booked your accommodation, we still have plenty of options available. In the meantime, lots of advice and information can be found on the accommodation pages of our website.

The information detailed in this letter will form part of your agreement with the University of Lincoln. If we do not hear from you to the contrary prior to enrolment, we will assume that you acknowledge and accept the information contained in this letter. Adaptations to how we work may have to be made in line with any future changes in government guidance, and we will communicate these with you as necessary. Please do review the University’s Admissions Terms and Conditions (in particular sections 8 and 9) and Student Complaints Procedure so you understand your rights and the agreement between the University and its students.

We very much hope this information is useful to help you plan for the next step in your academic journey, and we look forward to welcoming you here at Lincoln this Autumn. This is the start of a new phase and will be an exciting time for all of us. If you have any questions, please do email me at mathsphysics@lincoln.ac.uk.

Professor Andrei Zvelindovsky

Head of the School of Mathematics and Physics

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Calculus 2022-23MTH1002MLevel 42022-23This module focuses on the concepts of the derivative and the Riemann integral, which are indispensable in modern sciences. Two approaches are used: both intuitive-geometric, and mathematically rigorous, based on the definition of continuous limits. Important results are the Mean Value Theorem, leading to the representation of some functions as power series (the Taylor series), and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus which establishes the relationship between differentiation and integration. Further calculus tools are explored, such as the general properties of the derivative and the Riemann integral, as well as the techniques of integration. In this module, students may deal with many "popular" functions used throughout mathematics.CoreComputer Algebra and Technical Computing 2022-23MTH1006MLevel 42022-23This module presents an introduction to computer packages for analytic formulas manipulation (computer algebra) and technical computing. Students will also have the opportunity to develop skills including; utilising a logbook as a factual record and as reflective self-assessment to support their learning.CoreElectricity, Magnetism, Thermal and Quantum Physics 2022-23PHY1003MLevel 42022-23This module presents a core understanding of the main subjects of physics. Students have the opportunity to learn basic concepts of electricity, magnetism, thermal and quantum physics. Students also have the opportunity to develop problem solving skills using this material. This module is the cornerstone for a number of subsequent modules.CoreGeometrical Optics, Waves and Mechanics 2022-23PHY1002MLevel 42022-23This module will present an introduction to the fundamentals of waves, geometrical optics and mechanics, including their mathematical foundations.CoreIntroduction to Moral Philosophy 2022-23PHL1004MLevel 42022-23This module is designed to introduce students to the three areas of discussion in contemporary moral philosophy. Metaethics is concerned with the nature of morality itself and questions such as Are there moral facts?, If there are moral facts, what is their origin?. Normative ethics is the attempt to provide a general theory that tells us how to live and enables us to determine what is morally right and wrong. Applied ethics involves the application of ethical principles to specific moral issues (e.g., abortion, euthanasia, animal rights) and the evaluation of the answers arrived at through this application. This module aims to introduce students to all three of these branches of ethics.CoreIntroduction to Philosophical Logic 2022-23PHL1002MLevel 42022-23This module introduces some of the basic ideas and concepts of philosophical logic and the technical vocabulary that is required for understanding contemporary philosophical writing. Students are introduced to logical concepts such as validity, soundness, consistency, possibility, necessity, contingency, inductive and deductive forms of argument, necessary and sufficient conditions, the rudiments of formalisation, and a range of logical fallacies. The emphasis will be on using logic to construct and evaluate arguments.CoreLaboratory 1 2022-23PHY1004MLevel 42022-23This module will provide students with the opportunity to learn practical skills needed for physical laboratory experiments. The module provides a structured introduction to laboratory skills development with particular emphasis on measurement uncertainty. This module explores measurement and estimation followed by techniques in data analysis and presentation of data. Students will also have the opportunity to develop practical skills in a set of experiments which examples may include: basic electronic circuits, pendulum, Hooke's law, heat capacity, lenses.CoreLinear Algebra 2022-23MTH1004MLevel 42022-23This module describes vector spaces and matrices. Matrices are regarded as representations of linear mappings between vector spaces. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors are introduced, which lead to diagonalisation and reduction to other canonical forms. Special types of mappings and matrices (orthogonal, symmetric) are also introduced.CoreCondensed Matter Physics 2023-24PHY2001MLevel 52023-24This module describes the basic principles of condensed matter physics, which directly relates to the physics of all materials around us.CoreDifferential Equations 2023-24MTH2004MLevel 52023-24Calculus techniques already provide solutions of simple first-order differential equations. Solution of second-order differential equations can sometimes be achieved by certain manipulations. Students may learn about existence and geometric interpretations of solutions, even when calculus techniques do not yield solutions in a simple form. This is a part of the existence theory of ordinary differential equations and leads to fundamental techniques of the asymptotic and qualitative study of their solutions, including the important question of stability. Fourier series and Fourier transform are introduced. This module provides an introduction to the classical second-order linear partial differential equations and techniques for their solution. The basic concepts and methods are introduced for typical partial differential equations representing the three classes: parabolic, elliptic, and hyperbolic.CoreElectrodynamics 2023-24PHY2002MLevel 52023-24This module provides an introduction to theory of electromagnetic field. It describes Maxwell's equations and their solutions, including electromagnetic wave, such as light, and its propagation in a media.CoreExistentialism and Phenomenology 2023-24PHL2006MLevel 52023-24The aim of this module is to give students a thorough understanding of two intimately related philosophical traditions that came to prominence in the 19th and 20th centuries: existentialism and phenomenology. Each attempts to address the nature and meaning of human existence from the perspective of individual, first-person experience, focusing in particular on fundamental questions of being, meaning, death, nihilism, freedom, responsibility, value, human relations, and religious faith. The module will examine selected existential themes through the writings of thinkers such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, De Beauvoir, and Camus. Since existentialism is as much a artistic phenomenon as a philosophical one, students will also be given the opportunity to explore existentialist ideas in the works of various literary figures, such as Shakespeare, Dostoyevsky, Kafka, and Milan Kundera.CoreGroup Project 2023-24MTH2005MLevel 52023-24This module aims to provide students with the experience of working as part of a team on a project. Students will have the opportunity to produce a set of deliverables relevant to their programme of study. Final deliverables will be negotiated between the group and their supervisor, the module coordinator will be responsible for ensuring that each project covers the learning outcomes of the module. Groups are expected to manage their own processes, and to hold regular meetings both with and without their supervisor. Groups will be allocated by the module coordinator and other members of staff. The process of development of the topic under study and the interaction and management of group members underpins the assessment of skills in the module.CoreIndustrial and Econo-Physics 2023-24PHY2003MLevel 52023-24This module describes how modern physics is used in everyday industrial practice. Examples used in this module will be aligned with the interests of the university's industrial partners and collaborators. The module also introduces how theoretical apparatus developed initially in physics finds its application in the field of economy.CoreLagrangian and Hamiltonian Mechanics 2023-24MTH2007MLevel 52023-24The aim of this module is to introduce students to main notions of theoretical mechanics. Students will have the opportunity to learn relevant mathematical techniques and methods.CorePhilosophy of Science 2023-24PHL2007MLevel 52023-24This module explores a range of philosophical questions relating to the nature of science. How are scientific theories developed? Are scientific theories discovered through a flash of genius or is something more methodical involved? How much of scientific discovery is down to careful observation? Do scientific theories tell us how the world really is? Do the entities scientific theories postulate atoms, electromagnetic waves, and so on really exist? Or are scientific theories merely useful models of reality? Is science independent of its social context? To what extent is scientific inquiry affected by gender, race or politics? Is there such a thing as truth that is not relative to a particular culture, social class or historical era? Drawing on accessible examples from a variety of scientific fields and by answering these and related questions, we shall try to reach an understanding of how science works.CoreContemporary Problems in Philosophy 2024-25PHL3002MLevel 62024-25This module gives students the opportunity to engage with some key issues and contemporary debates in key areas of philosophy, such as epistemological relativism, the nature of consciousness, the nature of causation in science, the nature of the self. The precise topics addressed will vary from year to year and students will have input into the choice of topics. The aim of the module is to explore in-depth some significant contemporary philosophical issues and to enable students to develop and enhance their key philosophical and debating skills.CorePhysics of the Universe 2024-25PHY3006MLevel 62024-25Using the background knowledge from the previous modules, this module aims to equip students with modern physics understanding of the entire Universe at large - from elementary particles till galaxies and their evolution.CorePhysics Project 2024-25PHY3007MLevel 62024-25In this module the students have the opportunity to conduct modern physics research in a research group of the school, university or an external collaborating establishment.CoreQuantum Mechanics 2024-25PHY3004MLevel 62024-25This module provides a rigorous theoretical foundation of quantum physics. Various methods are introduced and examined via application to a set of quantum phenomena. The module aims to provide the core knowledge for understanding of the whole body of modern physics and the world around us.CoreStatistical Mechanics 2024-25PHY3005MLevel 62024-25The module will introduce the concepts of statistical mechanics at equilibrium. Students will have the opportunity to learn the methods used to describe systems of a large number of particles.CoreFluid Dynamics 2024-25MTH3002MLevel 62024-25This module gives a mathematical foundation of ideal and viscous fluid dynamics and their application to describing various flows in nature and technology. Students are taught methods of analysing and solving equations of fluid dynamics using analytic and most modern computational tools.OptionalMethods of Mathematical Physics 2024-25MTH3006MLevel 62024-25The module aims to equip students with methods to analyse and solve various mathematical equations found in physics and technology.OptionalNewton's Revolution 2024-25PHL3004MLevel 62024-25This module examines some of the philosophical issues raised by the Newtonian revolution in the natural sciences, such as: What is the nature of Newtons distinction between absolute and relative space? In what sense can forces be said to exist? What is the ontology of force? Is it sufficient to provide a mathematical definition of force (e.g., f=ma)? Is gravity a special kind of force with its own unique set of properties? What is the nature of action at a distance? Is Newtons view of space metaphysical? This is an interdisciplinary module that situates Newtonian science in its sociocultural context.OptionalPhysics Pedagogy 2024-25PHY3002MLevel 62024-25This module is designed to provide students with an insight into the teaching of science at secondary school level and does this by combining university lectures with an experience of a placement in a secondary school science department. The module is particularly aimed at those considering a career in science teaching and provides students with an opportunity to engage with cutting edge science education research and will examine how this research impacts directly on classroom practice. Students will have the opportunity to gain an insight into some of the key ideas in science pedagogy and how these are implemented in the school science lessons and will develop an understanding about the barriers to learning science that many students experience.OptionalPhysics Masters Project 2025-26PHY9004MLevel 72025-26In this module, students have the opportunity to undertake a substantial project under the supervision of a research-active member of staff. Projects can be undertaken at an external collaborating establishment. Students are expected to conduct independent research in modern physics, working in a research group of the school, the university or in an external collaborating establishment.CoreReading Module In Philosophy of Physics 2025-26PHY9008MLevel 72025-26The reading module allows students to acquire knowledge of a particular area of Philosophy of Physics, and develop the skills needed to study Philosophy of Physics in a more independent manner. The module also provides an opportunity for MPhys students to study certain topics in Philosophy of Physics which may not be covered by any regular lecture modules, thus adding to the flexibility of the scheme of studies. Subject areas for proposed reading module will be announced to students, together with an indicative syllabus. The choice offered will depend on the range of other lecture modules available to MPhys students, as well as on the availability of teaching staff with particular areas of Philosophy of Physics, who could be able to act as moderators. The role of the reading module tutor is to provide students with support for their reading, including the setting of Philosophy of Physics questions that are to be addressed.CoreAdvanced Instrumentation 2025-26PHY9001MLevel 72025-26The aim of this module is to enhance students experimental skills with a range of advanced experimental problems. The module may be conducted at university laboratory facilities or at an external collaborating establishment.OptionalFinancial Kinetics 2025-26MTH9001MLevel 72025-26This module brings together the main ideas and methods of the mathematical theory of financial markets. In addition, the methods of practical calculations of volatilities of traded assets from historical data are discussed. The influence of randomness of the interest rate and volatilities on price of options is studied.OptionalMolecular Modelling 2025-26PHY9002MLevel 72025-26This module introduces modern computational techniques for molecular modelling in condensed matter physics.OptionalNano-Physics 2025-26PHY9003MLevel 72025-26This module covers several sub-disciplines of nano-physics from solid state physics till soft matter physics and their interface. Students have the opportunity to gain insights into theoretical and experimental aspects of nano-physics, one of most rapidly developing field of modern physics.OptionalTheoretical Physics Laboratory 2025-26PHY9005MLevel 72025-26The aim of this module is to enhance students theoretical skills with a range of advanced theoretical physics problems.Optional

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Calculus 2021-22MTH1002MLevel 42021-22This module focuses on the concepts of the derivative and the Riemann integral, which are indispensable in modern sciences. Two approaches are used: both intuitive-geometric, and mathematically rigorous, based on the definition of continuous limits. Important results are the Mean Value Theorem, leading to the representation of some functions as power series (the Taylor series), and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus which establishes the relationship between differentiation and integration. Further calculus tools are explored, such as the general properties of the derivative and the Riemann integral, as well as the techniques of integration. In this module, students may deal with many "popular" functions used throughout mathematics.CoreComputer Algebra and Technical Computing 2021-22MTH1006MLevel 42021-22This module presents an introduction to computer packages for analytic formulas manipulation (computer algebra) and technical computing. Students will also have the opportunity to develop skills including; utilising a logbook as a factual record and as reflective self-assessment to support their learning.CoreElectricity, Magnetism, Thermal and Quantum Physics 2021-22PHY1003MLevel 42021-22This module presents a core understanding of the main subjects of physics. Students have the opportunity to learn basic concepts of electricity, magnetism, thermal and quantum physics. Students also have the opportunity to develop problem solving skills using this material. This module is the cornerstone for a number of subsequent modules.CoreGeometrical Optics, Waves and Mechanics 2021-22PHY1002MLevel 42021-22This module will present an introduction to the fundamentals of waves, geometrical optics and mechanics, including their mathematical foundations.CoreIntroduction to Moral Philosophy 2021-22PHL1004MLevel 42021-22This module is designed to introduce students to the three areas of discussion in contemporary moral philosophy. Metaethics is concerned with the nature of morality itself and questions such as Are there moral facts?, If there are moral facts, what is their origin?. Normative ethics is the attempt to provide a general theory that tells us how to live and enables us to determine what is morally right and wrong. Applied ethics involves the application of ethical principles to specific moral issues (e.g., abortion, euthanasia, animal rights) and the evaluation of the answers arrived at through this application. This module aims to introduce students to all three of these branches of ethics.CoreIntroduction to Philosophical Logic 2021-22PHL1002MLevel 42021-22This module introduces some of the basic ideas and concepts of philosophical logic and the technical vocabulary that is required for understanding contemporary philosophical writing. Students are introduced to logical concepts such as validity, soundness, consistency, possibility, necessity, contingency, inductive and deductive forms of argument, necessary and sufficient conditions, the rudiments of formalisation, and a range of logical fallacies. The emphasis will be on using logic to construct and evaluate arguments.CoreLaboratory 1 2021-22PHY1004MLevel 42021-22This module will provide students with the opportunity to learn practical skills needed for physical laboratory experiments. The module provides a structured introduction to laboratory skills development with particular emphasis on measurement uncertainty. This module explores measurement and estimation followed by techniques in data analysis and presentation of data. Students will also have the opportunity to develop practical skills in a set of experiments which examples may include: basic electronic circuits, pendulum, Hooke's law, heat capacity, lenses.CoreLinear Algebra 2021-22MTH1004MLevel 42021-22This module describes vector spaces and matrices. Matrices are regarded as representations of linear mappings between vector spaces. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors are introduced, which lead to diagonalisation and reduction to other canonical forms. Special types of mappings and matrices (orthogonal, symmetric) are also introduced.CoreCondensed Matter Physics 2022-23PHY2001MLevel 52022-23This module describes the basic principles of condensed matter physics, which directly relates to the physics of all materials around us.CoreDifferential Equations 2022-23MTH2004MLevel 52022-23Calculus techniques already provide solutions of simple first-order differential equations. Solution of second-order differential equations can sometimes be achieved by certain manipulations. Students may learn about existence and geometric interpretations of solutions, even when calculus techniques do not yield solutions in a simple form. This is a part of the existence theory of ordinary differential equations and leads to fundamental techniques of the asymptotic and qualitative study of their solutions, including the important question of stability. Fourier series and Fourier transform are introduced. This module provides an introduction to the classical second-order linear partial differential equations and techniques for their solution. The basic concepts and methods are introduced for typical partial differential equations representing the three classes: parabolic, elliptic, and hyperbolic.CoreElectrodynamics 2022-23PHY2002MLevel 52022-23This module provides an introduction to theory of electromagnetic field. It describes Maxwell's equations and their solutions, including electromagnetic wave, such as light, and its propagation in a media.CoreExistentialism and Phenomenology 2022-23PHL2006MLevel 52022-23The aim of this module is to give students a thorough understanding of two intimately related philosophical traditions that came to prominence in the 19th and 20th centuries: existentialism and phenomenology. Each attempts to address the nature and meaning of human existence from the perspective of individual, first-person experience, focusing in particular on fundamental questions of being, meaning, death, nihilism, freedom, responsibility, value, human relations, and religious faith. The module will examine selected existential themes through the writings of thinkers such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, De Beauvoir, and Camus. Since existentialism is as much a artistic phenomenon as a philosophical one, students will also be given the opportunity to explore existentialist ideas in the works of various literary figures, such as Shakespeare, Dostoyevsky, Kafka, and Milan Kundera.CoreGroup Project 2022-23MTH2005MLevel 52022-23This module aims to provide students with the experience of working as part of a team on a project. Students will have the opportunity to produce a set of deliverables relevant to their programme of study. Final deliverables will be negotiated between the group and their supervisor, the module coordinator will be responsible for ensuring that each project covers the learning outcomes of the module. Groups are expected to manage their own processes, and to hold regular meetings both with and without their supervisor. Groups will be allocated by the module coordinator and other members of staff. The process of development of the topic under study and the interaction and management of group members underpins the assessment of skills in the module.CoreIndustrial and Econo-Physics 2022-23PHY2003MLevel 52022-23This module describes how modern physics is used in everyday industrial practice. Examples used in this module will be aligned with the interests of the university's industrial partners and collaborators. The module also introduces how theoretical apparatus developed initially in physics finds its application in the field of economy.CoreLagrangian and Hamiltonian Mechanics 2022-23MTH2007MLevel 52022-23The aim of this module is to introduce students to main notions of theoretical mechanics. Students will have the opportunity to learn relevant mathematical techniques and methods.CorePhilosophy of Science 2022-23PHL2007MLevel 52022-23This module explores a range of philosophical questions relating to the nature of science. How are scientific theories developed? Are scientific theories discovered through a flash of genius or is something more methodical involved? How much of scientific discovery is down to careful observation? Do scientific theories tell us how the world really is? Do the entities scientific theories postulate atoms, electromagnetic waves, and so on really exist? Or are scientific theories merely useful models of reality? Is science independent of its social context? To what extent is scientific inquiry affected by gender, race or politics? Is there such a thing as truth that is not relative to a particular culture, social class or historical era? Drawing on accessible examples from a variety of scientific fields and by answering these and related questions, we shall try to reach an understanding of how science works.CoreContemporary Problems in Philosophy 2023-24PHL3002MLevel 62023-24This module gives students the opportunity to engage with some key issues and contemporary debates in key areas of philosophy, such as epistemological relativism, the nature of consciousness, the nature of causation in science, the nature of the self. The precise topics addressed will vary from year to year and students will have input into the choice of topics. The aim of the module is to explore in-depth some significant contemporary philosophical issues and to enable students to develop and enhance their key philosophical and debating skills.CorePhysics of the Universe 2023-24PHY3006MLevel 62023-24Using the background knowledge from the previous modules, this module aims to equip students with modern physics understanding of the entire Universe at large - from elementary particles till galaxies and their evolution.CorePhysics Project 2023-24PHY3007MLevel 62023-24In this module the students have the opportunity to conduct modern physics research in a research group of the school, university or an external collaborating establishment.CoreQuantum Mechanics 2023-24PHY3004MLevel 62023-24This module provides a rigorous theoretical foundation of quantum physics. Various methods are introduced and examined via application to a set of quantum phenomena. The module aims to provide the core knowledge for understanding of the whole body of modern physics and the world around us.CoreStatistical Mechanics 2023-24PHY3005MLevel 62023-24The module will introduce the concepts of statistical mechanics at equilibrium. Students will have the opportunity to learn the methods used to describe systems of a large number of particles.CoreFluid Dynamics 2023-24MTH3002MLevel 62023-24This module gives a mathematical foundation of ideal and viscous fluid dynamics and their application to describing various flows in nature and technology. Students are taught methods of analysing and solving equations of fluid dynamics using analytic and most modern computational tools.OptionalMethods of Mathematical Physics 2023-24MTH3006MLevel 62023-24The module aims to equip students with methods to analyse and solve various mathematical equations found in physics and technology.OptionalNewton's Revolution 2023-24PHL3004MLevel 62023-24This module examines some of the philosophical issues raised by the Newtonian revolution in the natural sciences, such as: What is the nature of Newtons distinction between absolute and relative space? In what sense can forces be said to exist? What is the ontology of force? Is it sufficient to provide a mathematical definition of force (e.g., f=ma)? Is gravity a special kind of force with its own unique set of properties? What is the nature of action at a distance? Is Newtons view of space metaphysical? This is an interdisciplinary module that situates Newtonian science in its sociocultural context.OptionalPhysics Pedagogy 2023-24PHY3002MLevel 62023-24This module is designed to provide students with an insight into the teaching of science at secondary school level and does this by combining university lectures with an experience of a placement in a secondary school science department. The module is particularly aimed at those considering a career in science teaching and provides students with an opportunity to engage with cutting edge science education research and will examine how this research impacts directly on classroom practice. Students will have the opportunity to gain an insight into some of the key ideas in science pedagogy and how these are implemented in the school science lessons and will develop an understanding about the barriers to learning science that many students experience.OptionalPhysics Masters Project 2024-25PHY9004MLevel 72024-25In this module, students have the opportunity to undertake a substantial project under the supervision of a research-active member of staff. Projects can be undertaken at an external collaborating establishment. Students are expected to conduct independent research in modern physics, working in a research group of the school, the university or in an external collaborating establishment.CoreReading Module In Philosophy of Physics 2024-25PHY9008MLevel 72024-25The reading module allows students to acquire knowledge of a particular area of Philosophy of Physics, and develop the skills needed to study Philosophy of Physics in a more independent manner. The module also provides an opportunity for MPhys students to study certain topics in Philosophy of Physics which may not be covered by any regular lecture modules, thus adding to the flexibility of the scheme of studies. Subject areas for proposed reading module will be announced to students, together with an indicative syllabus. The choice offered will depend on the range of other lecture modules available to MPhys students, as well as on the availability of teaching staff with particular areas of Philosophy of Physics, who could be able to act as moderators. The role of the reading module tutor is to provide students with support for their reading, including the setting of Philosophy of Physics questions that are to be addressed.CoreAdvanced Instrumentation 2024-25PHY9001MLevel 72024-25The aim of this module is to enhance students experimental skills with a range of advanced experimental problems. The module may be conducted at university laboratory facilities or at an external collaborating establishment.OptionalFinancial Kinetics 2024-25MTH9001MLevel 72024-25This module brings together the main ideas and methods of the mathematical theory of financial markets. In addition, the methods of practical calculations of volatilities of traded assets from historical data are discussed. The influence of randomness of the interest rate and volatilities on price of options is studied.OptionalMolecular Modelling 2024-25PHY9002MLevel 72024-25This module introduces modern computational techniques for molecular modelling in condensed matter physics.OptionalNano-Physics 2024-25PHY9003MLevel 72024-25This module covers several sub-disciplines of nano-physics from solid state physics till soft matter physics and their interface. Students have the opportunity to gain insights into theoretical and experimental aspects of nano-physics, one of most rapidly developing field of modern physics.OptionalTheoretical Physics Laboratory 2024-25PHY9005MLevel 72024-25The aim of this module is to enhance students theoretical skills with a range of advanced theoretical physics problems.Optional

Fees and Scholarships

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Entry Requirements 2022-23

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBB, to include a grade B from both A Level Maths and Physics.

International Baccalaureate: 30 points overall, with Higher Level Grade 5 in Maths and Physics.

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 120 UCAS Tariff points, including 40 points from 15 credits in Maths and 15 credits in Physics

BTEC qualifications may be considered with a grade B in A Level Maths and Physics.Please contact our Admissions team for further information (admissions@lincoln.ac.uk)

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English and Maths. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

For applicants who do not meet our standard entry requirements, our Science Foundation Year can provide an alternative route of entry onto our full degree programmes:https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/course/sfysfyub/

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Entry Requirements 2021-22

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBB, to include a grade B from both A Level Maths and Physics.

International Baccalaureate: 30 points overall, with Higher Level Grade 5 in Maths and Physics.

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 120 UCAS Tariff points, including 40 points from 15 credits in Maths and 15 credits in Physics

BTEC qualifications may be considered with a grade B in A Level Maths and Physics.Please contact our Admissions team for further information (admissions@lincoln.ac.uk)

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English and Maths. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

For applicants who do not meet our standard entry requirements, our Science Foundation Year can provide an alternative route of entry onto our full degree programmes:https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/course/sfysfyub/

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Features

Research Informed

Teaching on this course is conducted by academic members of staff who are active researchers in their fields. This research informs teaching at all levels of the programme. Staff conduct cutting-edge research in fundamental and applied mathematics and physics, ranging from pure mathematics to applied nano-science at the interface between biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics. The School collaborates with top research institutions in Germany, Japan, Norway, the Netherlands, Singapore, Spain, and the USA.

Visiting Speakers

The School of Mathematics and Physics regularly welcomes guest speakers from around the world. Recent visitors to the University of Lincoln have included former vice president of the Royal Astronomical Society Professor Don Kurtz, mathematician and author Professor Marcus du Sautoy OBE, and operations research specialist Ruth Kaufman OBE.

Placements

Students on this course are encouraged to obtain and undertake work placements independently in the UK or overseas during their studies, providing hands-on experience in industry. These can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose the sandwich year option. Placements may be conducted with external research institutions (which can be overseas). The option is subject to availability and selection criteria set by the industry or external institution. When undertaking optional placements, students will be required to cover their transport, accommodation, and general living costs.

Career Opportunities

Graduates may pursue careers in the fields of science, education, finance, business, consultancy, and research and development. This degree promotes skills in creative, critical, and independent thinking. It may prove beneficial in careers requiring flexibility and the ability to formulate a persuasive case. This could include careers in politics and the media, as well as the civil service, among other areas. Some graduates may choose to continue their studies at postgraduate level.

Visit Us in Person

The best way to find out what it is really like to live and learn at Lincoln is to join us for one of our Open Days. Discover our Isaac Newton Building, equipped with laboratories and workshops, as well as specialist robotics facilities and advanced research equipment.

Book Your Place

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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