BSc (Hons) Pharmaceutical Science

BSc (Hons) Pharmaceutical Science

Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmacy at Lincoln ranked 1st in the UK for overall student satisfaction and academic support according to the National Student Survey 2018 [out of 42 institutions offering the subject].

The Course

Our aim at Lincoln is to produce passionate pharmaceutical scientists who are adept in addressing the healthcare challenges of the future and are well prepared for careers in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

Pharmaceutical Science encompasses a range of scientific disciplines to introduce students to the exciting world of drug discovery, development and management. This course offers an insight into the structure, function and mechanisms of drugs, how different drugs can act on the human body and how their potentially lifesaving effects can be safely harnessed.

At Lincoln, our academic staff include experienced researchers and practitioners. The programme is closely aligned with the pharmaceutical industry and has been developed with input from employers.

The Course

Our aim at Lincoln is to produce passionate pharmaceutical scientists who are adept in addressing the healthcare challenges of the future and are well prepared for careers in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

Pharmaceutical Science encompasses a range of scientific disciplines to introduce students to the exciting world of drug discovery, development and management. This course offers an insight into the structure, function and mechanisms of drugs, how different drugs can act on the human body and how their potentially lifesaving effects can be safely harnessed.

At Lincoln, our academic staff include experienced researchers and practitioners. The programme is closely aligned with the pharmaceutical industry and has been developed with input from employers.

The course includes lectures, seminars, laboratory-based practical classes and lectures from visiting scientists from the pharmaceutical industry. Blackboard, a virtual learning environment is also used to deliver content including various E-learning tools.

The first year introduces core subjects such as chemistry, biochemistry and metabolism, human anatomy and disease. During the second year, students progress to examine the analytical methods relevant to drug development, medicine delivery, immunology, pharmacology and toxicology, in addition to learning key research techniques. The third year introduces advanced subjects, as well as the regulatory and ethical standards that apply to industry professionals.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Analytical Chemistry 1: Molecular Techniques (Core)
Find out more

Analytical Chemistry 1: Molecular Techniques (Core)

This module provides students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the necessary basic theoretical and conceptual principles required in analytical chemistry. It offers a platform upon which students can build as they develop their analytical skills and understanding in later stages of their programme. Furthermore, students are encouraged to develop the practical skills necessary for all future analytical practical applications.

Cell Biology (Core)
Find out more

Cell Biology (Core)

This module aims to provide an introduction to the structure, composition and function of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. From this basis the module considers cell specialisation and division and an introduction to microscopy, histological and microbiological techniques which may be used to safely examine and identify cells and tissues.

Health & Disease (Core)
Find out more

Health & Disease (Core)

This module discuses health and how health is disrupted by disease and disorder. The International Classification of diseases will be discussed and a brief review of national and international disease patterns will be considered.

The module will allow students the opportunity to apply their physiological knowledge towards an understanding of disease. An introduction to pathological processes will be made and the role of nutrition in the prevention and treatment of disease will be discussed. National disease trends will be examined; key disorders such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes and cancer will be examined in depth.

Human Anatomy & Physiology, with Clinical Correlations 2 (Core)
Find out more

Human Anatomy & Physiology, with Clinical Correlations 2 (Core)

The module explores the role of the endocrine system in homeostasis. It is intended to explore the components of the blood and immune system and their various functions. It will enable you to identify the anatomy and understand the physiology of the kidney, urogenital and digestive systems.

Integrative Biochemistry 2 (Core)
Find out more

Integrative Biochemistry 2 (Core)

This module aims to provide students with an overview of biochemistry at the cellular level. The importance of cellular and molecular systems will be covered with a view of highlighting key signalling pathways required to sustain cellular functions. General concepts of biochemical signalling pathways will also be introduced.

Integrative Biochemistry (Core)
Find out more

Integrative Biochemistry (Core)

This module is designed to provide a foundation to develop an understanding and appreciation of biochemistry in the context life processes. The module will focus on basic biochemical principles and introduce the fundamental building blocks of life with the inclusion of concepts relating to the structure and functional properties of biological molecules. The importance of cellular and molecular pathways will be covered with a view of highlighting key metabolic pathways required to sustain cellular functions. Basic concepts of biochemical signalling pathways will also be introduced.

Introduction to Pharmaceutical Science (Core)
Find out more

Introduction to Pharmaceutical Science (Core)

This modules covers what makes a successful drug, the basics of drug discovery and development and utilisation. The concepts of pharmaceutical science are taught along with the types of drugs, their formulation and delivery.

Research Methods for Life Scientists 1 (Core)
Find out more

Research Methods for Life Scientists 1 (Core)

This module aims to introduce the skills and knowledge necessary to assimilate and judge scientific knowledge. Students are introduced to the tools required to search and evaluate the scientific literature relevant to their studies, and some of the key philosophical constructs around which scientific knowledge is based. Students can develop an understanding of hypothesis testing, experimental design, data collection, basic mathematical and statistical concepts and data presentation, and are shown how these methods are put into practice through a series of research seminars.

Analytical Chemistry 2.1: Separation Techniques (Core)
Find out more

Analytical Chemistry 2.1: Separation Techniques (Core)

This module is designed to provide students with the underpinning knowledge related to the analytical process, which is later applied to further modules in the programme. Secondly, it introduces the theoretical principles, instrumentation, automation and application of the principal separation techniques. Thirdly, it presents an essential suite of analytical tools utilised for inorganic analyses and speciation.

Biology of Human Disease (Core)
Find out more

Biology of Human Disease (Core)

The module provides an overview of the biology of some common human diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, haemostatic disorders, neurological disease, gastrointestinal disease and anaemia. It aims to introduce students to the use of laboratory techniques in the investigation of disease, from a theoretical and practical point of view.

Drug Design and Development (Core)
Find out more

Drug Design and Development (Core)

This module will aim to integrate the process of drug discovery and target selection in relation to therapeutic area and how drugs are formulated and delivered to the target. Learning will be in the context of examples of drugs, from discovery to their registration or attrition.

Drug Formulation and Delivery (Core)
Find out more

Drug Formulation and Delivery (Core)

This module aims to integrate the process of drug development in relation to the way in which a dosage forms are formulated and delivered to the target. Learning will be in the context of examples of dosage form, drug delivery route and underlying formulation, particle design, physical chemistry and colloid science.

Fundamentals of Pharmacology & Toxicology (Core)
Find out more

Fundamentals of Pharmacology & Toxicology (Core)

This module is concerned with the study of the mechanisms by which drugs interact with biochemical, cellular and physiological systems.

The module aims to:

  • Give an introduction to pharmacology principles
  • Provide a detailed knowledge of the mechanisms of actions of selected drugs
  • Develop a critical appreciation of the importance and relevance of pharmacology in the treatment of selected diseases
  • Provide an understanding of the basic principles of toxicology and drug overdose therapies.

Immunology (Core)
Find out more

Immunology (Core)

This module provides an overview of the cellular and molecular basis of the immune response in health and human diseases. The structure, function and complex mechanisms of host defence by B- and T-Cells will be discussed. Students will evaluate the role of inflammatory mediators, soluble effectors and cellular cytotoxicity in inflammation and immunity.

Medical Microbiology (Core)
Find out more

Medical Microbiology (Core)

This module provides an overview of medical and veterinary microbiology including virology, mycology and parasitology, both through study of specific organisms, but also through the study of a variety of body systems. The module considers the transmission of infectious disease, including a discussion regarding situations of medical and veterinary environments, and control and treatment of infectious disease.

Pharmacogenetics and Molecular Genetics (Core)
Find out more

Pharmacogenetics and Molecular Genetics (Core)

This module aims to provide an understanding of how genetics impacts on the effectiveness of drug therapy and toxicity. The underlying mechanisms are examined as well as the clinical outcomes.

Advanced Pharmacology (Core)
Find out more

Advanced Pharmacology (Core)

This module looks at advanced aspects of pharmacology, aiming to build an understanding of drug-target engagement in relation to therapy, as well as drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics.

Cellular Pathology (Core)
Find out more

Cellular Pathology (Core)

The module provides an overview of the role of cellular pathology in the diagnosis and monitoring of malignant and non-malignant diseases. This module intends to discuss the normal and abnormal histology and ultra-structural features of human cells and tissues. The module enables students to appraise malignant and non-malignant gynaecological cytology, and the role of electron microscope and immunocytochemistry in pathological differential diagnosis.

Infection Sciences (Core)
Find out more

Infection Sciences (Core)

This module aims to reinforce the underlying concepts and principles of microbiology developed previously. Students can become familiar with diagnostic techniques involved in the field of microbiology, and will have the opportunity to apply their developing knowledge and skills to some contemporary issues and concerns in the field of microbiology.

Pharmaceutical Materials Science (Core)
Find out more

Pharmaceutical Materials Science (Core)

As technology evolves at a rapid pace, this module aims to cover the essentials of cutting edge methods for analysis and delivery and taking into account the problems and issues surrounding manufacturing of active pharmaceutical ingredients.

Pharmaceutical Science Project (Core)
Find out more

Pharmaceutical Science Project (Core)

In this module students have the opportunity to undertake an independent programme of research under supervision from a member of staff. It provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate original and critical thought, as well as to build practical and project-management skills.

A wide range of subject expertise exists within the School, and students are expected to select a project that is relevant to their programme of study. Under the guidance of a supervisor, students can review the literature, identify a hypothesis or hypotheses and design a programme of research to test their hypotheses. They will be expected to manage the project, including obtaining relevant ethical approval and conducting a risk assessment. They will collect and analyse data, recording their activities in a lab notebook. Projects can be conducted in the laboratory or field, as appropriate for their field of study, use mathematical modelling or use pre-collected data to test hypotheses via meta-analysis.

Students may work individually or in groups addressing similar questions, but must write up individually. The project will be written up in the format of a scientific paper following closely the style of a key journal relevant to their area of study, or as a thesis.

Regulation, Quality and Ethics for the Pharmaceutical Scientist (Core)
Find out more

Regulation, Quality and Ethics for the Pharmaceutical Scientist (Core)

This module covers the regulations that surround the pharmaceutical industry, from drug registration to laboratory, clinical and manufacturing standards

Toxicology (Core)
Find out more

Toxicology (Core)

This module covers the major classes of toxicology, the way in which it is studied and the biochemical mechanisms. The module will focus on the toxicology and methods of study relevant to drug development.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Industry Visits

There are opportunities to visit pharmaceutical companies and to learn from industrial scientists and leading experts in the industry through a programme of visiting guest lectures. Visits that are part of the course incur no extra costs to students.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Tuition Fees

2018/19UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,600 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,900 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

- In exceptional circumstances, students who are required to re-take modules can do so on an 'assessment only' basis. This means that students do not attend timetabled teaching events but are required to take the assessments/examinations associated with the module(s). The 'assessment only' fee is half of the £ per credit point fee for each module.

Exceptionally, tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC, including grade C from A Level Biology, Chemistry or Physics. Practical elements must be passed.

BTEC Extended Diploma Applied Science accepted, depending on modules studied: Distinction, Merit, Merit

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall, with Higher Level at grade 4 in Biology, Chemistry or Physics.

Access to Higher Education Diploma in a Science subject accepted: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits, to include 30 at merit or above.

We will also consider extensive, relevant work experience; please email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk with full details for further advice.

In addition, applicants must have at least 3 GCSEs at grade C or above in English, Maths and Science. Level 2 equivalent qualifications such as BTEC First Certificates and Level 2 Functional Skills will be considered.

For applicants who do not meet our standard entry requirements, our Science Foundation Year can provide an alternative route of entry onto our full degree programmes:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/course/sfysfyub/pharmacy/

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

The course includes lectures, seminars, laboratory-based practical classes and lectures from visiting scientists from the pharmaceutical industry. Blackboard, a virtual learning environment is also used to deliver content including various E-learning tools.

The first year introduces core subjects such as chemistry, biochemistry and metabolism, human anatomy and disease. During the second year, students progress to examine the analytical methods relevant to drug development, medicine delivery, immunology, pharmacology and toxicology, in addition to learning key research techniques. The third year introduces advanced subjects, as well as the regulatory and ethical standards that apply to industry professionals.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Analytical Chemistry 1: Molecular Techniques (Core)
Find out more

Analytical Chemistry 1: Molecular Techniques (Core)

This module provides students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the necessary basic theoretical and conceptual principles required in analytical chemistry. It offers a platform upon which students can build as they develop their analytical skills and understanding in later stages of their programme. Furthermore, students are encouraged to develop the practical skills necessary for all future analytical practical applications.

Cell Biology (Core)
Find out more

Cell Biology (Core)

This module aims to provide an introduction to the structure, composition and function of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. From this basis the module considers cell specialisation and division and an introduction to microscopy, histological and microbiological techniques which may be used to safely examine and identify cells and tissues.

Health & Disease (Core)
Find out more

Health & Disease (Core)

This module discuses health and how health is disrupted by disease and disorder. The International Classification of diseases will be discussed and a brief review of national and international disease patterns will be considered.

The module will allow students the opportunity to apply their physiological knowledge towards an understanding of disease. An introduction to pathological processes will be made and the role of nutrition in the prevention and treatment of disease will be discussed. National disease trends will be examined; key disorders such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes and cancer will be examined in depth.

Human Anatomy & Physiology, with Clinical Correlations 2 (Core)
Find out more

Human Anatomy & Physiology, with Clinical Correlations 2 (Core)

The module explores the role of the endocrine system in homeostasis. It is intended to explore the components of the blood and immune system and their various functions. It will enable you to identify the anatomy and understand the physiology of the kidney, urogenital and digestive systems.

Integrative Biochemistry 2 (Core)
Find out more

Integrative Biochemistry 2 (Core)

This module aims to provide students with an overview of biochemistry at the cellular level. The importance of cellular and molecular systems will be covered with a view of highlighting key signalling pathways required to sustain cellular functions. General concepts of biochemical signalling pathways will also be introduced.

Integrative Biochemistry (Core)
Find out more

Integrative Biochemistry (Core)

This module is designed to provide a foundation to develop an understanding and appreciation of biochemistry in the context life processes. The module will focus on basic biochemical principles and introduce the fundamental building blocks of life with the inclusion of concepts relating to the structure and functional properties of biological molecules. The importance of cellular and molecular pathways will be covered with a view of highlighting key metabolic pathways required to sustain cellular functions. Basic concepts of biochemical signalling pathways will also be introduced.

Introduction to Pharmaceutical Science (Core)
Find out more

Introduction to Pharmaceutical Science (Core)

This modules covers what makes a successful drug, the basics of drug discovery and development and utilisation. The concepts of pharmaceutical science are taught along with the types of drugs, their formulation and delivery.

Research Methods for Life Scientists 1 (Core)
Find out more

Research Methods for Life Scientists 1 (Core)

This module aims to introduce the skills and knowledge necessary to assimilate and judge scientific knowledge. Students are introduced to the tools required to search and evaluate the scientific literature relevant to their studies, and some of the key philosophical constructs around which scientific knowledge is based. Students can develop an understanding of hypothesis testing, experimental design, data collection, basic mathematical and statistical concepts and data presentation, and are shown how these methods are put into practice through a series of research seminars.

Analytical Chemistry 2.1: Separation Techniques (Core)
Find out more

Analytical Chemistry 2.1: Separation Techniques (Core)

This module is designed to provide students with the underpinning knowledge related to the analytical process, which is later applied to further modules in the programme. Secondly, it introduces the theoretical principles, instrumentation, automation and application of the principal separation techniques. Thirdly, it presents an essential suite of analytical tools utilised for inorganic analyses and speciation.

Biology of Human Disease (Core)
Find out more

Biology of Human Disease (Core)

The module provides an overview of the biology of some common human diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, haemostatic disorders, neurological disease, gastrointestinal disease and anaemia. It aims to introduce students to the use of laboratory techniques in the investigation of disease, from a theoretical and practical point of view.

Drug Design and Development (Core)
Find out more

Drug Design and Development (Core)

This module will aim to integrate the process of drug discovery and target selection in relation to therapeutic area and how drugs are formulated and delivered to the target. Learning will be in the context of examples of drugs, from discovery to their registration or attrition.

Drug Formulation and Delivery (Core)
Find out more

Drug Formulation and Delivery (Core)

This module aims to integrate the process of drug development in relation to the way in which a dosage forms are formulated and delivered to the target. Learning will be in the context of examples of dosage form, drug delivery route and underlying formulation, particle design, physical chemistry and colloid science.

Fundamentals of Pharmacology & Toxicology (Core)
Find out more

Fundamentals of Pharmacology & Toxicology (Core)

This module is concerned with the study of the mechanisms by which drugs interact with biochemical, cellular and physiological systems.

The module aims to:

  • Give an introduction to pharmacology principles
  • Provide a detailed knowledge of the mechanisms of actions of selected drugs
  • Develop a critical appreciation of the importance and relevance of pharmacology in the treatment of selected diseases
  • Provide an understanding of the basic principles of toxicology and drug overdose therapies.

Immunology (Core)
Find out more

Immunology (Core)

This module provides an overview of the cellular and molecular basis of the immune response in health and human diseases. The structure, function and complex mechanisms of host defence by B- and T-Cells will be discussed. Students will evaluate the role of inflammatory mediators, soluble effectors and cellular cytotoxicity in inflammation and immunity.

Medical Microbiology (Core)
Find out more

Medical Microbiology (Core)

This module provides an overview of medical and veterinary microbiology including virology, mycology and parasitology, both through study of specific organisms, but also through the study of a variety of body systems. The module considers the transmission of infectious disease, including a discussion regarding situations of medical and veterinary environments, and control and treatment of infectious disease.

Pharmacogenetics and Molecular Genetics (Core)
Find out more

Pharmacogenetics and Molecular Genetics (Core)

This module aims to provide an understanding of how genetics impacts on the effectiveness of drug therapy and toxicity. The underlying mechanisms are examined as well as the clinical outcomes.

Advanced Pharmacology (Core)
Find out more

Advanced Pharmacology (Core)

This module looks at advanced aspects of pharmacology, aiming to build an understanding of drug-target engagement in relation to therapy, as well as drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics.

Cellular Pathology (Core)
Find out more

Cellular Pathology (Core)

The module provides an overview of the role of cellular pathology in the diagnosis and monitoring of malignant and non-malignant diseases. This module intends to discuss the normal and abnormal histology and ultra-structural features of human cells and tissues. The module enables students to appraise malignant and non-malignant gynaecological cytology, and the role of electron microscope and immunocytochemistry in pathological differential diagnosis.

Infection Sciences (Core)
Find out more

Infection Sciences (Core)

This module aims to reinforce the underlying concepts and principles of microbiology developed previously. Students can become familiar with diagnostic techniques involved in the field of microbiology, and will have the opportunity to apply their developing knowledge and skills to some contemporary issues and concerns in the field of microbiology.

Pharmaceutical Materials Science (Core)
Find out more

Pharmaceutical Materials Science (Core)

As technology evolves at a rapid pace, this module aims to cover the essentials of cutting edge methods for analysis and delivery and taking into account the problems and issues surrounding manufacturing of active pharmaceutical ingredients.

Pharmaceutical Science Project (Core)
Find out more

Pharmaceutical Science Project (Core)

In this module students have the opportunity to undertake an independent programme of research under supervision from a member of staff. It provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate original and critical thought, as well as to build practical and project-management skills.

A wide range of subject expertise exists within the School, and students are expected to select a project that is relevant to their programme of study. Under the guidance of a supervisor, students can review the literature, identify a hypothesis or hypotheses and design a programme of research to test their hypotheses. They will be expected to manage the project, including obtaining relevant ethical approval and conducting a risk assessment. They will collect and analyse data, recording their activities in a lab notebook. Projects can be conducted in the laboratory or field, as appropriate for their field of study, use mathematical modelling or use pre-collected data to test hypotheses via meta-analysis.

Students may work individually or in groups addressing similar questions, but must write up individually. The project will be written up in the format of a scientific paper following closely the style of a key journal relevant to their area of study, or as a thesis.

Regulation, Quality and Ethics for the Pharmaceutical Scientist (Core)
Find out more

Regulation, Quality and Ethics for the Pharmaceutical Scientist (Core)

This module covers the regulations that surround the pharmaceutical industry, from drug registration to laboratory, clinical and manufacturing standards

Toxicology (Core)
Find out more

Toxicology (Core)

This module covers the major classes of toxicology, the way in which it is studied and the biochemical mechanisms. The module will focus on the toxicology and methods of study relevant to drug development.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Industry Visits

There are opportunities to visit pharmaceutical companies and to learn from industrial scientists and leading experts in the industry through a programme of visiting guest lectures. Visits that are part of the course incur no extra costs to students.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Tuition Fees

2018/19UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,600 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,900 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

- In exceptional circumstances, students who are required to re-take modules can do so on an 'assessment only' basis. This means that students do not attend timetabled teaching events but are required to take the assessments/examinations associated with the module(s). The 'assessment only' fee is half of the £ per credit point fee for each module.

Exceptionally, tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC, to include a minimum grade C in Biology, Chemistry or Physics. Practical elements must be passed

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall to include Higher Level grade 4 in Biology, Chemistry or Physics

BTEC Extended Diploma in Applied Science: Distinction, Merit, Merit.

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English, Maths and Science. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

EU and International students whose first language is not English will require English Language IELTS 6.0 with no less than 5.5 in each element, or equivalent http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/englishrequirements

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry and will consider applicants who have a mix of qualifications.

We also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.

For applicants who do not meet our standard entry requirements, our Science Foundation Year can provide an alternative route of entry onto our full degree programmes:
https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/course/sfysfyub/pharmacy/

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Learn from Experts

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may also be supported in their learning by other students.


Your Future Career

This course aims to prepare graduates for a career in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. Opportunities exist in industrial, commercial and academic research, and in development roles within the medical and food industries. Outside the immediate field of pharmacology, graduates may choose to undertake careers in scientific sales and marketing, science journalism or education. Some graduates may choose to undertake further study at postgraduate level.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.

This course aims to prepare graduates for a career in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. Opportunities exist in industrial, commercial and academic research, and in development roles within the medical and food industries. Outside the immediate field of pharmacology, graduates may choose to undertake careers in scientific sales and marketing, science journalism or education. Some graduates may choose to undertake further study at postgraduate level.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.


Facilties

Our Science and Innovation Park, home to the Joseph Banks Laboratories, provides specialist teaching suites and laboratories for study and research. It is a regional hub for science industry innovation and development.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

Students also make the most of the University's award-winning Great Central Warehouse Library, which provides access to more than 250,000 printed books and over 400,000 electronic books and journals, as well as databases and specialist collections. The Library has a range of different spaces for shared and individual learning.


The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.