Key Information

Full-time

2 years

Part-time

3-5 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

ARCARCMC

MArch Master of Architecture

This professional programme is prescribed by the Architects Registration Board (ARB) and validated by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA).

Key Information

Full-time

2 years

Part-time

3-5 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

ARCARCMC

Teaching and Learning During COVID-19

The current COVID-19 pandemic has meant that at Lincoln we are making changes to our teaching and learning approach and to our campus, to ensure that students and staff can enjoy a safe and positive learning experience here at Lincoln.

From autumn 2020 our aim is to provide an on-campus learning experience. Our intention is that teaching will be delivered through a mixture of face-to-face and online sessions. There will be social activities in place for students - all in line with appropriate social distancing and fully adhering to any changes in government guidance as our students' safety is our primary concern.

We want to ensure that your Lincoln experience is as positive, exciting and enjoyable as possible as you embark on the next phase of your life. COVID-19 has encouraged us to review our practices and, as a result, to take the opportunity to find new ways to enhance the Lincoln experience. It has challenged us to find innovative new approaches to supporting students' learning and social interactions. These learning experiences, which blend digital and face-to-face, will be vital in helping to prepare our students for a 21st Century workplace.

Of course at Lincoln, personal tutoring is key to our delivery, providing every student with a dedicated tutor to support them throughout their time here at the University. Smaller class sizes mean our academic staff can engage with each student as an individual, and work with them to enhance their strengths. In this environment we hope that students have more opportunities for discussion and engagement and get to know each other better.

Course learning outcomes are vital to prepare you for your future and we aim to utilise this mix of face-to-face and online teaching to deliver these. Students benefit from and enjoy fieldtrips and placements and, whilst it is currently hard to predict the availability of these, we are working hard and with partners and will aspire to offer these wherever possible - obviously in compliance with whatever government guidance is in place at the time.

We are utilising a range of different digital tools for teaching including our dedicated online managed learning environment. All lectures for larger groups will be delivered online using interactive software and a range of different formats. We aim to make every contact count and seminars and small group sessions will maximise face-to-face interaction. Practicals, workshops, studio sessions and performance-based sessions are planned to be delivered face-to-face, in a socially distanced way with appropriate PPE.

The University of Lincoln is a top 20 TEF Gold University and we have won awards for our approach to teaching and learning, our partnerships and industry links, and the opportunities these provide for our students. Our aim is that our online and socially distanced delivery during this COVID-19 pandemic is engaging and that students can interact with their tutors and each other and contribute to our academic community.

As and when restrictions start to lift, we aim to deliver an increasing amount of face-to-face teaching and external engagements, depending on each course. Safety will continue to be our primary focus and we will respond to any changing circumstances as they arise to ensure our community is supported. More information about the specific approaches for each course will be shared when teaching starts.

Of course as you start a new academic year it will be challenging but we will be working with you every step of the way. For all our students new and established, we look forward to welcoming you to our vibrant community this Autumn. If you have any questions please visit our FAQs or contact us on 01522 886644.

Peter Baldwin - Programme Leader

Peter Baldwin - Programme Leader

Peter Baldwin is a Registered and Chartered Architect. He is a Senior Lecturer and Programme Leader in the Lincoln School of Architecture and the Built Environment. Peter's practice and research focus on the role of Narrative in the experience, perception, and shaping of space. This research permeates his teaching practice and is frequently the generator for the theme and interpretation of briefs within the design studio.

School Staff List Make an Enquiry

Welcome to MArch Master of Architecture

The MArch Master of Architecture (RIBA part II) encourages critical reflection on personal aims, achievements, and design philosophy within a framework of structured theoretical debate and individual research. There is an emphasis on developing professional skills through individual study, group work, and studio activities.

This vocational programme offers flexibility to tailor learning within a framework that satisfies the requirements of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and the Architects Registration Board (ARB).

Students may utilise laboratories and workshops to employ traditional model-making techniques, as well as digital fabrication technologies.

After successful completion of the programme, students may choose to progress to the Postgraduate Diploma in Professional Practice and Management in Architecture (ARB/RIBA Part 3) as a pathway to becoming a registered architect.

How You Study

This programme utilises a range of teaching methods, which can include project-based learning, seminars, and group work.

Level one modules:

  • Introductory Design Project
  • Design Project A: Cities
  • Design Project B: Building
  • Technical Specialism
  • Research: Methods and Project

At Level One, research and design are tackled in parallel, and you can choose your research and design topics from a range of studios with varied and distinct agendas and specialism.

Level two modules:

  • Critical Theory
  • Comprehensive Design: Concept
  • Comprehensive Design: Brief and Context
  • Comprehensive Design: Project
  • Technical Appraisal
  • Professional Practice

Level two deals with aspects of professional practice and the production of a final comprehensive design project, integrating aspects of technology, sustainability, research, and cultural awareness in the design process.

Contact Time

Students on this programme should expect approximately 16 hours of contact time per week. Part-time students should expect to attend one day per week.

Postgraduate level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour spent in class, students are expected to spend at least three hours in independent study. For more detailed information please contact the Programme Leader.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs. For research programmes this includes research fees and research support fees.

Find out More

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

This module aims to establish the theoretical and physical context for the final thesis design, the cultural, social and economic boundary conditions and analyses design parameters. This is designed to enable students to develop a detailed design brief of adequate complexity and ambition for the Comprehensive Design Project.

Module Overview

This module constitutes the concept stage of the final thesis design project and aims to develop a design concept for Comprehensive Design Project, through experimentation and explorative design enquiry. In parallel with its related technology module Technical Awareness, it seeks to establish the ambition, frame of reference and theoretical area of investigation for the final thesis design. Students have the opportunity to experiment with methodologies and formulate a personal agenda and strategy for a year-long project. Material aspects of design and construction are addressed on a conceptual and experimental level and placed in an individual philosophical context, with emphasis on exploitation of synergies within the group through the exchange of ideas and design skills.

Module Overview

This module aims to build upon site and concept investigations performed during design modules Comprehensive Design: Brief and Context and Comprehensive Design: Concept. It looks to address technological issues as identified in Technical Awareness, and forms the basis for Technical Appraisal. In combination, these modules form a year-long final thesis project, which forms the culmination of design teaching.

Module Overview

This module gives students the opportunity to investigate the social and cultural context of architecture, view their own design and design-related research in a theoretical context, and explore and question the relationship between social and cultural theories and architectural projects and architects’ research. A series of lectures and seminars explore the function and use of theory in architectural and design investigations. Through selected readings, lectures and seminar discussions, a variety of social and cultural perspectives will be considered. Students are expected to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of competing theories, their potential for their own work performed in design and research studios, and their application through the work of others.

Module Overview

In this module, students are required to think large scale and holistically, to demonstrate the capacity to have a systemic understanding of their project parameters, scale and the intention of their urban investigations. Within these project parameters students are expected to set out and explore a technological and environmental position including techniques and materials which impacts upon and form part of their of their design project. Projects developed within studio groups typically identify boundary conditions of an architectural project, addressing urban / regional, national and global issues through design. This includes issues of sustainability (cultural and physical), historic and social, as well as physical cause and effect relationships shaping the world, and dynamic properties of societies shaping cities and landscape. Individual or groups of students are required to explore these issues through design, resulting in a strategy for intervention which informs a physical and conceptual master plan and generic design brief. This may form the basis for development at building scale during Project B.

Module Overview

This module is designed to address issues raised during Design Project A and develops them at building scale. Typically, this results in a complex proposal for a single or series of buildings drawing upon the systemic and conceptual work undertaken at larger scale during Design Project A.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to postgraduate level study and its intellectual and creative requirements, looks to re-familiarises them with project-based learning in a studio context, and challenges their perceptions of design theory and practice. Creative exploration of ideas, formulation of individual philosophical and cultural points of reference, and a willingness to critically appraise their own and their peers’ work and working methods encountered during previous study and time spent in practice, are core requirements for successful negotiation of the course. Experimentation, by means of an iterative and integrated design process, can enable students to make, and communicate visually, connections between design and a philosophical and theoretical framework, and focus general interest towards clear study goals and objectives.

Module Overview

This module consists of two elements: Professional Practice (Written Examination and Written Assignment) and Personal Development Plan. The principal aims of the Professional Practice elements are that students will have the opportunity to: - Develop a critical understanding of the standards and expectation of professional practice - Appreciate the complexities of operating a practice - Be able to evaluate alternative procedures and practices involved in running a project - Be able to satisfy client demands through effective communication at all stages The Personal Development Plan is fundamental in providing coherence and rationale to students' programme of study. The emphasis is on the personal monitoring of development through being critically aware of past achievements and future aims. Students have the chance to organise their own programme of study based on their own appraisal of personal and academic objectives and personal strengths.

Module Overview

This module constitutes the main research component of the programme and is taught in the context of parallel research studio groups, along within defined fields of research and following group and project specific research methodologies. The module incorporates two distinct parts: - Research Methods, which aims to introduce the strands of research on offer by the research studios, outlines appropriate methodologies for the chosen subjects of study and their theoretical basis, and guides students towards informed choices between research studio groups. - Research Project, during which a research studio tutor directs the group towards establishing the area of group enquiry and points it at related research. They advise students on extending their reading in a chosen direction, and guide students through a research process towards, initially, formulation of a structured research proposal and programme informed by individual research interest. Subsequently substantial individual research should be evidenced through written and verbal presentation.

Module Overview

This module constitutes the technology component of the Comprehensive Design Project. It is designed to enable students to identify the technical requirements of their building projects, critically analyse and choose from a range of technologies, and develop an integrated technical resolution of their projects. Expanding upon Technical Awareness, the module re-visits ambitions and pre-design research and evaluates their suitability for their building design.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

How you are assessed

Formative assessment is continuous throughout the course. It includes defined interim submissions along with end of module assessment and feedback. Summative assessment takes place at the end of the year.

Level One

During this stage the Research: Methods and Project module is assessed via written submissions. The Design modules are usually assessed by means of exhibition of work and a verbal presentation or the submission of a design portfolio.

Level Two

At this stage the Critical Theory and Professional Practice modules are usually assessed through written submissions, and the Comprehensive Design and Technical Appraisal modules are usually examined through an exhibition of project work and verbal presentation.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days of the submission date.

Fees and Scholarships

Postgraduate study is an investment in yourself and your future, and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

There are more ways than ever before to fund your postgraduate study, whether you want to do a taught or research course. For those wishing to undertake a Master's course, you can apply for a loan as a contribution towards the course and living costs. Loans are also available to those who wish to undertake doctoral study. The University offers a number of scholarships and funded studentships for those interested in postgraduate study. Learn how Master's and PhD loans, scholarships, and studentships can help you fund your studies on our Postgraduate Fees and Funding pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for travel and accommodation will be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional, you will normally be required to pay your own transport, accommodation and general living costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost.

Entry Requirements 2020-21

First or upper second class honours degree in a relevant subject and preferably experience in practice.

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.5 overall, with a minimum of 6.0 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-session English and Academic Study Skills courses. https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/pre-sessionalenglishandacademicstudyskills/ . These specialist courses are designed to help students meet the English language requirements for their intended programme of study.

Accreditations

This Master's of Architecture meets all the criteria for validation held in common by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) for validation and the Architects Registration Board (ARB) for the prescription at Part 2. It meets all points of the European Union Directive (EC2005/36) and is accredited by the Commonwealth Association of Architects.

Features

Workshops and Demonstrations

There are extensive model-making workshops throughout the course, offering students the opportunity of making both full-size and scale developmental and presentational models using traditional workshop techniques, as well as digital fabrication facilities. This is complemented by a wide range of computer programmes and access to video and photography facilities for exploring spatial qualities and advancing technical competence.

Study Visits

Study visits are organised by the studios and may include project site visits, excursions to exhibitions, lectures, debates, cultural events, or meetings with professionals. At least one visit is organised each year within the School which is open to all courses and stages.

In recent years, groups have travelled around the UK, to Cambridge and Edinburgh, to European destinations including Brussels, Venice, Barcelona, and Paris, as well as further afield to India and Sri Lanka. In one study trip, students spent a week in Poland studying urban housing problems alongside a group from the Wroclaw University of Technology.

Please see the Fees tab for more information on the potential additional costs associated which these trips.

How to Apply

Students who have previously studied at the University of Lincoln and achieved a 2.1 grade or above do not need to submit a portfolio and will likely be offered an automatic place on the MArch.

All other students (regardless of grades) will need to submit a portfolio for review (PDF or online) and/or attend an interview.

Portfolios should demonstrate a range of practical skills, such as pencil drawing techniques, computer-aided design drawing, photography, model making, perspective drawing or technical drawing. The portfolio should include final-level degree work showing the full development of projects, including the brief, site analysis, research or precedent studies, conceptual development, design resolution, plans, elevations, and sections. If you include professional projects please indicate your contribution to each scheme. Please contact us for further information.

Postgraduate Events

Find out more about how postgraduate study can help further your career, develop your knowledge, or even prepare you to start your own business at one of our postgraduate events.

Find out More

Career Opportunities

After successful completion of the programme, students may choose to progress to the Postgraduate Diploma in Professional Practice and Management in Architecture (ARB/RIBA Part 3) to pursue becoming a registered architect.

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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