Key Information

Full-time

3-4 Years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

L245

Course Code

ISTPOLUB

Key Information

Full-time

3-4 Years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

L245

Course Code

ISTPOLUB

BA (Hons) International Relations and Politics BA (Hons) International Relations and Politics

The course gives students the chance to examine complex political issues, such as global inequality, religion and sectarianism, conflict, and democratisation, which affect the world today.

Key Information

Full-time

3-4 Years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

L245

Course Code

ISTPOLUB

Key Information

Full-time

3-4 Years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

L245

Course Code

ISTPOLUB

Teaching and Learning During COVID-19

The current COVID-19 pandemic has meant that at Lincoln we are making changes to our teaching and learning approach and to our campus, to ensure that students and staff can enjoy a safe and positive learning experience here at Lincoln.

From autumn 2020 our aim is to provide an on-campus learning experience. Our intention is that teaching will be delivered through a mixture of face-to-face and online sessions. There will be social activities in place for students - all in line with appropriate social distancing and fully adhering to any changes in government guidance as our students' safety is our primary concern.

We want to ensure that your Lincoln experience is as positive, exciting and enjoyable as possible as you embark on the next phase of your life. COVID-19 has encouraged us to review our practices and, as a result, to take the opportunity to find new ways to enhance the Lincoln experience. It has challenged us to find innovative new approaches to supporting students' learning and social interactions. These learning experiences, which blend digital and face-to-face, will be vital in helping to prepare our students for a 21st Century workplace.

Of course at Lincoln, personal tutoring is key to our delivery, providing every student with a dedicated tutor to support them throughout their time here at the University. Smaller class sizes mean our academic staff can engage with each student as an individual, and work with them to enhance their strengths. In this environment we hope that students have more opportunities for discussion and engagement and get to know each other better.

Course learning outcomes are vital to prepare you for your future and we aim to utilise this mix of face-to-face and online teaching to deliver these. Students benefit from and enjoy fieldtrips and placements and, whilst it is currently hard to predict the availability of these, we are working hard and with partners and will aspire to offer these wherever possible - obviously in compliance with whatever government guidance is in place at the time.

We are utilising a range of different digital tools for teaching including our dedicated online managed learning environment. All lectures for larger groups will be delivered online using interactive software and a range of different formats. We aim to make every contact count and seminars and small group sessions will maximise face-to-face interaction. Practicals, workshops, studio sessions and performance-based sessions are planned to be delivered face-to-face, in a socially distanced way with appropriate PPE.

The University of Lincoln is a top 20 TEF Gold University and we have won awards for our approach to teaching and learning, our partnerships and industry links, and the opportunities these provide for our students. Our aim is that our online and socially distanced delivery during this COVID-19 pandemic is engaging and that students can interact with their tutors and each other and contribute to our academic community.

As and when restrictions start to lift, we aim to deliver an increasing amount of face-to-face teaching and external engagements, depending on each course. Safety will continue to be our primary focus and we will respond to any changing circumstances as they arise to ensure our community is supported. More information about the specific approaches for each course will be shared when teaching starts.

Of course as you start a new academic year it will be challenging but we will be working with you every step of the way. For all our students new and established, we look forward to welcoming you to our vibrant community this Autumn. If you have any questions please visit our FAQs or contact us on 01522 886644.

Dr Simon Obendorf - Programme Leader

Dr Simon Obendorf - Programme Leader

Dr Obendorf is the Programme Leader for the International Relations and Politics undergraduate degree. Dr Obendorf teaches modules including Internationalising Cultural Studies, The Colonial Present, Body Politics and The Developing World.

School Staff List

Welcome to BA (Hons) International Relations and Politics

From European politics to global conflicts, this degree examines some of the most important issues of our time in a way that aims to stimulate understanding and debate.

The joint programme enables students to explore British politics, international diplomacy, and the emergence of global institutions. It gives students the chance to examine complex political issues, such as global inequality, religion and sectarianism, conflict, and democratisation, which affect the world today.

Through the study of national, comparative, international, and global politics, students are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the themes driving contemporary international relations and politics.

There are opportunities to study abroad for a year at one of our partner institutions in the USA, Belgium, Germany, or the Netherlands during the third year of the degree.

Welcome to BA (Hons) International Relations and Politics

From European politics and global conflicts, to policies tackling challenging and sometimes controversial issues, these degrees enable students to examine some of the most important issues of our time.

Lincoln’s BA (Hons) International Relations and Politics degree enables students to explore
British politics, international diplomacy, and the emergence of global institutions. It gives them the chance to examine complex political issues, such as global inequality, religion and sectarianism, conflict, and democratisation, which affect the world today.

Through the study of national, comparative, international, and global politics, students are
encouraged to develop an appreciation of the themes driving contemporary international relations and politics.

How You Study

In the first year, core modules focus on the British government in relation to politics and international relations, introducing the key concepts that underpin both disciplines.

In the second and third years, students can build on this foundation and develop further knowledge of both subjects through core modules on topics such as British political parties, politics and international relations theory, and global governance.

On the Model United Nations module, students consider international diplomacy and practise negotiating skills in a simulated United Nations General Assembly. They are able to conduct in-depth analysis of the institutions of British government through modules like Parliamentary Studies, which is co-taught with the Houses of Parliament.

Optional modules enable students to study subjects of special interest, such as intelligence and national security, contemporary Chinese politics, international relations in the Middle East, human rights, genocide, war crimes, and multiculturalism.

Studying International Relations and Politics at Lincoln aims to combine directed and independent learning. Each module is usually delivered my means of a weekly lecture and an associated weekly seminar. The seminars aim to provide an opportunity for students to discuss issues raised in the lecture and engage in critical reflection on set readings. Students also have the opportunity to meet with module leaders in tutorial sessions. As well as directed study, students are expected to undertake independent learning utilising traditional library resources as well as a wide range of electronic resources

There is a strong emphasis on skills development on this course and students can learn how to collect and analyse data, draft policy proposals, produce oral and written presentations, and work at a high level of individuality and as part of a team.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

How You Study

In the first year, core modules focus on the British government in relation to politics and international relations, introducing the key concepts that underpin both disciplines.

In the second and third years, students can build on this foundation and develop further knowledge of both subjects through core modules on topics such as British political parties, politics and international relations theory, and global governance.

On the Model United Nations module, students consider international diplomacy and practise negotiating skills in a simulated United Nations General Assembly. They are able to conduct in-depth analysis of the institutions of British government through modules like Parliamentary Studies, which is co-taught with the Houses of Parliament.

Optional modules enable students to study subjects of special interest, such as intelligence and national security, international relations in the Middle East, human rights, genocide, war crimes, and multiculturalism.

Studying International Relations and Politics at Lincoln aims to combine directed and independent learning. Each module is usually delivered my means of a weekly lecture and an associated weekly seminar. The seminars aim to provide an opportunity for students to discuss issues raised in the lecture and engage in critical reflection on set readings. You will also have the opportunity to meet with module leaders in tutorial sessions. As well as directed study, you are expected to undertake independent learning utilising traditional library resources as well as a wide range of electronic resources.

There is a strong emphasis on skills development on this course and students can learn how to collect and analyse data, draft policy proposals, produce oral and written presentations, and work at a high level of individuality, and as part of a team.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

This module aims to enable students to both recognise and also understand the different methodologies employed in social research and to apply these to their own research project and critique of methods. Overall, the aim of this module is to set out methodological skills, and involve students in their application, and to encourage critical reflection on a variety of levels.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to core issues of relevance to international relations study. These include global inequality, international political economy, globalization and emerging transnational civil societies. The module is intended to expose students to the breadth of issues and approaches relevant to the study of international relations and international politics more broadly.

Module Overview

This module is designed to introduce students to the key components of the British political system, and the relationship between domestic and international politics through an examination of the distribution of power within the British political system. It seeks to explain the various factors and actors, both domestic and foreign, which serve to shape and define the political process in Britain. In Semester A, the module aims to examine the distribution of power through an examination of the key institutions and actors in the British political process. In Semester B the focus is broadened to examine Britain’s role in the world. The focus will shift outwards from the relationship between the constituent parts of the United Kingdom to an examination of the key international relationships - with Empire, the United States, East Asia and with Europe - which have shaped and defined British politics, economics and security.

Module Overview

This module aims to give students the opportunity to develop a knowledge and understanding of key social science thinkers and concepts pertinent to all of the disciplines taught within the School. Throughout, students will be encouraged to think critically about the ideas presented and to examine social problems in the light of a range of academic perspectives.

Module Overview

This module is designed to provide an introduction to the activities of the United Nations, as well as an understanding of the practices of international diplomacy and governance. The module will aim to use a discussion of contemporary international issues to explore some of the protocol and procedures of diplomacy. It will also seek to provide students with an introduction to issues of international organisation and international law and treaty-making. All of this is designed to assist students in preparing for their role as a 'diplomat' at a Model United Nations conference.

Module Overview

This module aims to address a variety of issues relating to political parties in the United Kingdom. The political science literature covers a wide variety of topics around parties. Amongst those which are examined in this module are the following; the historical development of parties; the role of parties in terms of mobilisation of support, electioneering and campaigning, recruitment of personnel; representation of the electorate and issue-based politics; and the partisan divide. These will be examined primarily within the context of a discussion of the three major parties within the British political system including their development, their ideological tenets and their contemporary positions. However, towards the end of the module these will be set against the position of other parties within the UK including the Scottish National Party, Plaid Cymru and the Northern Irish parties, to which will be added a comparative perspective, drawing upon the roles and experiences of parties in Western Europe.

Module Overview

Aiming to build upon the level 1 module, ‘Applying Research’, this module is designed to focus more deeply on the nature of research undertaken in the subject areas of Politics and International Relations. The main aim of the module is to give students the opportunity to develop an understanding of what constitutes research in Politics and International Relations and how the research process leads to the production of specific research outputs including dissertations, theses, published academic articles and research monographs.

Module Overview

This module is designed to place theory at the centre of the study of world politics. It aims to provides a critical overview of the disciplinary literature of international relations from both mainstream and critical perspectives. The module aims to provide students with the opportunity to both understand and critically employ the concepts, approaches and methods of International Relations theory, and to develop an understanding of their contested nature and the problematic character of inquiry in the discipline.

Module Overview

This modules seeks to examine the historical background to the various strands of political thought and ideas. In doing this, it aims to build upon some of the major ideas and concepts introduced at level one, by illustrating linkages between political theories and other aspects of politics. In particular, reference is made to key thinkers who have left their intellectual imprint on political ideas and beliefs.

Module Overview

This module aims to analyse some of the seminal works which have been significant to the academic development of sociology. Students will have the opportunity to explore a variety of classical and contemporary texts, with the aim of providing them with an in-depth understanding of sociological themes and theories across time.

Module Overview

This module aims to analyse some of the seminal works which have been significant to the academic development of sociology. This module will seek to examine a series of articles and books which are of sociological significance and have emerged from the early 20th Century into the 21st Century.

Module Overview

The motivation of many students entering a politics/IR degree programme is an interest in engaging with politics, as opposed to simply studying it. Many of our students have ambitions to work in politics-related roles and wish to improve their prospects. This module seeks to improve employability by providing an awareness of the practice of politics in a range of job roles, as well as developing awareness of, and improving competence in, relevant modes of political behaviour, and exploring personal motivations and values. It will not restrict this focus, however, to employability and professional politics alone. Much political activity takes place outside of or alongside a career, and the module will pay due attention to politics as a voluntary activity too. There is an increasing awareness across the political science community of the need to respond to student interests with regard to the practice of politics. A growing literature on this topic, including by the module co-ordinator, offers helpful ideas, as well as providing testimony to the positive student response where such modules have been introduced.

Module Overview

This module seeks to introduce students to politics at the European level through an analysis of challenges in European politics and policy making. Beginning with the history of European integration and the first attempts to secure peace through economic interdependency, the module focuses on the development of the EU institutions and the ways in which policy-makers, bureaucrats, intellectuals and civil society actors have attempted to resolve problems of cooperation in an ever larger Union.

Module Overview

This module is based on the belief that comparative methodology can be a useful tool for social and political analysis. The module begins with a consideration of the development of comparative approaches, the use of a range of comparative techniques and the validity of comparison. It proceeds to an examination of some basic concepts that can help provide an understanding of the bases upon which governments are built and operate. Students then have the opportunity to apply the analytical and theoretical tools from the early parts of the module to consider a variety of features of contemporary politics and policy, particularly in the context of democratic transition in different regions of the world.

Module Overview

This module aims to explore the cultural, practical and theoretical developments relating to sex work, drawing upon national and international examples. Taking a comparative approach, this module seeks to understand how scholars conceptualise sex work within different competing feminist frameworks and how these ideas reflect, or are at odds with, popular public and political discourse.

Module Overview

This module aims to explore the subject of crime through a range of literature. Crime and criminals have prompted some of the most innovative literature in history and by attempting to examine a few of these students will have the opportunity to think about crime in a new way, to engage with fiction and the opportunity to understand crime and criminality from a humanistic and philosophical perspective.

Module Overview

This module aims to enable students to analyse the priorities and developments of welfare states over time, and through analysis of these developments, equip students with the tools to interpret key contemporary social, political and economic trends.

Module Overview

This module examines the impact of difference and diversity in social policy, with a particular concern around social exclusion. It begins with an introduction to the concepts of 'diversity', 'difference' and 'exclusion' and then moves on to consider the relationship between social policy and a variety of forms of diversity and difference, particularly in the context of new thinking around social exclusion that has emerged since the 1990s. The module explores the origins and meanings of key concepts such as 'diversity' and 'social exclusion', the relationship of these key concepts with others, such as poverty, social class and the 'underclass', and the impact and lack of impact of policies on social groups such as young people, families, women, black and ethnic minorities and disabled people.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to the area of foreign policy analysis. It is designed to explore competing explanations for state behaviour and the conduct of inter-state relations in the international domain. The module encourages students to consider the contested role of human agency in global affairs in contrast to disciplinary international relations’ preoccupation with structural considerations. A range of historical and contemporary case studies are used to illuminate the issues under discussion.

Module Overview

This module will seek to examine the key components of the US political system, and the main challenges facing democratic politics in modern America. The module aims to provide a detailed historical and theoretical appreciation of the development of US democracy. It will give students the opportunity to examine the principal institutions and actors in the US political system including the President, Congress, the Supreme Court, political parties, interest groups and the media. It will also aim to trace the impact of key ideas such as constitutionalism, federalism and exceptionalism. Finally the module will aim to examine the impact of wider societal factors on US political life, such as shifting demographics and the role of religion.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide an introduction to the development of key ideas, principles and institutions in political economy. Taking a broadly historical approach, the module is structured around giving students the opportunity to develop an understanding of the development of political economy both by examining the scientific contributions of, and issues addressed by its key figures, while placing such contributions in historical context. Overall the module seeks to provide students with an understanding of the key principles, ideas and controversies in the history of political economy with a view to understanding their relevance to the current era.

Module Overview

This module aims to examine the impact (and sometimes the lack of impact) of ideology on practice in social policy. Whilst the focus of the module is on the experience of the United Kingdom, comparison with other states will be made where appropriate.

Module Overview

This module aims to complement the study of topics such as human rights and police powers by providing students with the opportunity to examine a number of similar themes but from the less-explored point of view of the State and the exercise of its powers to protect itself. The module also aims to consider the law relating to the intelligence services and surveillance, and seeks to introduce students to certain International Law principles and issues and their impact in the UK. The examination of topical case studies aims to enable students to analyse and apply relevant law and constitutional principles to contemporary issues of UK security, and to develop awareness of their practical and everyday function.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce a range of critical approaches within media and cultural studies frameworks to examine the contemporary distribution, reception and impact of cultural forms across national boundaries. It is designed to consider how popular cultures are constructed, marketed and then consumed by their audiences. By the conclusion of the module students will have had the opportunity to gain knowledge of significant debates in the academic cultural studies as well as the critical skills necessary for them to carry out their own small-scale studies of examples.

Module Overview

This module explores the sources of our most basic and powerful feelings of political loyalty and attachment – our ideas about who we are, why we are and who has the right to rule over us. The module introduces students to the competing approaches to understanding nations and nationalism by examining the ways in which nationalism can influence state development, economic relations and democratic practice.The module also engages students in the intersection between nations and other key categories in social science such as: political mobilisation, conflict, culture, gender, religion and globalisation.

Module Overview

This module aims to examine core questions about the increasingly diverse forms of policing of crime and deviance. It considers how and why we have policed different forms of crime and deviance and why those changes have occurred and the competing character of many of the positions involved.

Module Overview

This module is designed to offer students the opportunity to develop an up-to-date and in-depth understanding of the social, political and economic issues facing contemporary China. Using a key text, this module starts with a broad sweep of China’s modern history, from the imperial era to the present, with the aim of providing essential context for understanding the current political and social environment. The module ends with an analysis of China’s future, challenges and prospects, in the decades to come.

Module Overview

This module is designed as an introduction to how psychology might contribute to our understanding of the various actors and organisations within the criminal justice process. Students are expected to critically compare and contrast the theories and methodologies employed in creating psychological knowledges, with those commonly used in the discipline of criminology and in this context, they will be expected to recognise both the contributions and problems presented by the use of psychological knowledges in the criminal justice process. Students will also be expected to undertake their own research project around a psychological theme; apply a statistical analysis to the data they collect and then consider how their results might impact on a relevant criminal justice issue.

Module Overview

This module encourages students to undertake one or more external activities relevant to their programme of study, and to engage in a critical reflection of the nature of this activity and how it relates to society as a whole and to their personal development as individuals. Relevant activities may involve significant interaction with an organisation outside the University providing an appropriate experience additional to the student’s programme of studies, such as voluntary work or mentoring within a service-providing organisation. Please note that students will be expected to play a significant role in initiating and arranging their programme of experience and to take responsibility for the frequency and form of experience. There may be additional costs in the form of transportation and accommodation depending on where students wish to pursue experience. The experience will be required to consist of a minimum of 30 hours.

Module Overview

This module is designed to provide students with the opportunity to study the relationship between law and society that is law as a social institution and law as a form of social regulation. It aims to explore both classical and contemporary theoretical contributions to the sociology of law and some specific issues which may be analysed include; law and social control, law and social change, the institutions and practices of law and the influence of social categories on the application of law.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to the principle theories and methods of research in the sociology of religion. Religion will be defined and situated within broader social structures and students will have the opportunity to explore the processes and the changing influence of religion in western society since the early nineteenth century.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide students with an introduction to the study of intelligence. It aims to focus on the basic concepts in intelligence by seeking to establish first what is meant by intelligence, before examining the various elements of intelligence - collection, analysis, counterintelligence and associated activities such as covert political action.

Module Overview

This course aims to provide students with an advanced and comprehensive overview of international security in the 21st century. Specifically, it seeks to understand the issues, actors and solutions that drive security agendas in various parts of the world. Through a detailed study of key debates and key issues in the study and practice of security, the module engages with the following three questions: Security for whom and from what?; Security by whom?; Security of what and where? Emphasis will be placed on the philosophical and political connotations of certain security problems, the impact of security actors in the meaning and practice of security, and the ‘constructed’ nature of our understanding of certain contemporary security challenges.

Module Overview

This module will critically examine the nature, extent and impact of domestic violence and abuse (DVA). Taking a criminological approach, the module will explore a wide range of academic, policy and practitioner perspectives. Students will explore the recent development of domestic violence and abuse as a criminological problem within a changing political landscape. This will include understanding a survivor’s journey in the context of victimology and examining the legal, criminal justice and community responses. The module will also explore the emerging literature on primary and secondary prevention perpetrator programmes.

Module Overview

Over half the planet’s population now lives in an urban area and urbanisation across the globe looks set to continue spreading inexorably. However, cities are contradictory sites of human development patterned by opportunity, inequality, exploitation and conflict. These traits pose challenges for the meeting of human welfare needs and for our understandings of contemporary life within cities. This module aims to enable students to analyse the emergence of cities across time and space, and through analysis of the city, enable students the opportunity to develop the tools to interpret key contemporary sociological, political and policy trends.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the history, institutions, policies and general workings of the European Union.

Module Overview

The module is designed to examine the ways in which the state, through its social security and labour market policies, has affected the lives of those in paid work and those outside it. A particular focus of the course is on the emerging all-party consensus on welfare policy, in which mainstream politicians agree that benefits should no longer be paid to people of working age who refuse work or training, and that governments must ensure that jobs pay more than out-of-work benefits.

Module Overview

This module seeks to explore the relationship between work and society, drawing on different classical and contemporary sociological theories of work. It aims to examine key areas within the sociology of work such as concepts of work, work-place inequalities, resistance and the reality and challenges of engaging in paid work in the 21st Century.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide students with an opportunity to explore the youth justice system in depth, including the theoretical and historical contexts of youth justice, contemporary policy and practice developments and the salience of political agendas in constructing responses to young people’s offending behaviour.

Module Overview

This module seeks to prompt a sociological enquiry into youth cultures, addressing issues of identity and meaning within the behaviour, consumption and lifestyles of young people. Reflecting upon contemporary narratives of youth as dangerous or out of control, the module aims to investigate the plurality of youth cultures, and the diversity of young people’s cultural practices.

Module Overview

This module will aim to address the historical origins of global civil society (e.g. the anti-slavery movement), together with diverse and competing contemporary meanings of global civil and ‘uncivil’ society.

Module Overview

Students are expected to prepare and submit an Independent Study Proposal during semester B at Intermediate Level and appropriate supervisors will be allocated at this stage. The Independent Study preparation will be focused through the Research in Social Policy and Research in Politics and International Relations modules, which aim to familiarise students with real and active models of research in relevant areas.

Module Overview

Aiming to build upon Understanding the Policy Process, this module is designed to support students not only to continue to develop their knowledge of a range of perspectives on the policy process but, in addition, to use these to analyse a case study relevant to their degree programme.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to different paradigms of the 'body' and 'embodiment'. Recent research suggests that our understandings and our relationship with our own and other ‘bodies’ has been and is continuing to undergo radical changes. This module will seek to explore these ongoing developments in Western and non-Western cultures and societies.

Module Overview

This module serves as an introduction to the international politics of Central Asia. The module explores Central Asia’s domestic post-Soviet transition and analyses the tension between tradition and modernity, the legacies of Soviet rule, political and economic transformation, the rise of absurdist dictatorships, nation-building, clan politics and conflict, protest and revolution. Students will also examine Central Asia in global context by assessing the challenges faced by the region. This includes addressing the region’s geo-strategic significance to international security. It will explore issues such as political Islam and the threat of terrorism, energy security, organised crime and migration, the so-called ‘New Great Game’ for power and influence in the region between Russia the US, EU and China, the international security challenges related to the region’s proximity to Afghanistan, Iran and Pakistan and the issue of regional cooperation through Eurasian Economic Union and the Shanghai Organisation Cooperation. There are few places in the UK where students have the opportunity to study the politics and international relations of Central Asia. Thus, students will have a unique opportunity to gain knowledge and understanding of this fascinating and vital region for global politics.

Module Overview

This module aims to examine the nature of family policy as it has developed for different family forms and for different purposes, and seeks to consider why an understanding of family policy is important in the twenty-first century. This is set in historical, ideological and comparative contexts.

Module Overview

This module is all about communities, in particular, communities that are poor, disadvantaged, isolated or 'socially excluded'. In recent years, interest has been re-awakened in the whole idea of community and in what sorts of policies might be most effective in helping communities and solving their problems. This module aims to look critically at all these beliefs and seeks to come to conclusions about their validity.

Module Overview

Community and Conflict II aims to focus on the application of theory, concepts and perspectives developed in Community and Conflict I to particular areas of public policy making including policy implementation.

Module Overview

Throughout this module students will have the opportunity to explore how state agencies respond to real and perceived threats of extremism and terrorism. This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of the extent to which the state and the media frame extremism and terrorism.

Module Overview

This module critically examines the deviant activities of the powerful and their impact on the struggle for social justice. In contrast to much of orthodox criminology, which tends to focus its attention ‘downwards’, and onto the actions of the poor, dispossessed and relatively powerless, this module shifts the gaze ‘upwards’, and onto the harmful activities of states, corporations and similarly powerful collectives. Drawing from a myriad of human rights frameworks, a critical stance is taken towards the concepts of crime, power and legitimacy to understand and explain the deviant activities of these ‘elites’, and illuminate potential avenues for prevention, protection and redress.

Module Overview

This module seeks to emphasise the significance of emotions in everyday social life and to challenge some of the essentialist explanations of human emotion by exploring ‘emotions’ as social constructs. In doing so, the module aims to explore the role emotions play in social action, considering, for example, how we form personal relationships, make sense of death, dying and falling in love. Furthermore, this module will also consider how emotions are ‘gendered’, ‘racialised’ and explore the role they play in the workplace, and in laws and governance.

Module Overview

This module explores the concept and practice of global governance. International Relations scholars are increasingly concerned with how international organisations work and how they might work better. Of particular interest is the governance of issues that are inherently global; that is, those that transcend national borders. Examples include health, the environment, poverty, trade, finance, security, conflict and crime. The module begins with the historical development of international institutions and key theories of global governance. It then examines present day international organisations, in terms of their power, efficacy and impact. The final part of the module assesses whether current governance arrangements are addressing global challenges sufficiently well or whether there is potential and scope for improvement.

Module Overview

This module is designed to introduce students to human rights at both the conceptual and practical level. It aims to explore the theoretical arguments around the source of human rights and identifies some of the problems and possibilities which emerge from such readings.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to introduce students to the dynamic, constantly evolving area of international law. Students will have the opportunity to study legal rules which operate in a much broader theatre than national law, with the aim of helping them develop a greater understanding of a changing world order. The module seeks to examine both theoretical and practical applications of International Law and aims to provide students with ample scope for research and independent study.

Module Overview

The module aims to enhance the knowledge of Modern Middle East and its international relations through the creation of links between different approaches of IR and regional cases. In this context, it aims to inform the students about the realities of decision making at the foreign policy level but also look at the relations between state and non-state entities on both the regional and international level. The thematic division of the module helps the students acquire knowledge in a range of topical issues of critical importance for the international relations of the Middle Eastern region.

Module Overview

This module is designed to explore political challenges and debates around the presence of culturally diverse populations in the United Kingdom and aims to examine the role this presence plays in understandings of British and English identities.

Module Overview

This module seeks to understand the significance of new social movements, examining political participation and protest outside of ‘mainstream’ traditional politics.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop an in-depth knowledge of how the UK Parliament works, in theory and in practice. It will aim to examine Parliament’s twin relationships with the Executive and with the citizen, and situate these within broader theories and debates about democratic accountability and the nature of representation. The module also aims to bring students into closer contact with Parliament through handling Parliamentary materials and by facilitating contact with Parliamentarians through, for example an external speaker series, and when possible an optional visit to Parliament. Please note that where opportunities arise to take part in a trip to Parliament, students are expected to cover their own transportation and meal costs.

Module Overview

This module aims to locate the theory, practice and history of punishment and penal policy in the context of social control in general. As well as aiming to address the philosophy of punishment, in terms of core concepts of justice, desert, deterrence, retribution, rehabilitation and reparation, it seeks to examine the way in which social control is a fundamental aspect of social relations.

Module Overview

This module aims to build upon the more general analysis of policing in Policing Crime and Deviance. The aim is to instil a more focused, substantial and critical understanding of the place of policing within the contemporary complex myriad of social controls, as well as the specific organisational and political challenges faced by the police in the 21st Century.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide an opportunity for students to sharpen their analytical skills and broaden their knowledge by exposing them to the wide-ranging debates on the problems of transition from Communism. More generally, it aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop the intellectual ability to interpret current and future developments in Russia and China.

Module Overview

This module aims to examine both the role of psychology in prisons and the psychological effects of imprisonment. Historically, imprisonment was used to punish those who had broken the law by punishing the body; in comparison imprisonment today has multiple aims, to punish, to deter and to rehabilitate. However, these aims are often compromised due to negative experiences encountered within prison and their psychological effects.

Module Overview

This module aims to focus upon the relationship between Criminology and Psychology, how each approaches the problems of criminal or deviant conduct, and their distinctive contributions to criminal justice. A key aim is to provide students with the opportunity to analyse the extent to which psychology contributes or detracts from criminological projects.

Module Overview

This interdisciplinary module will explore the issues of race, racism, race relations and racial conflict, and resistance to racism in the contemporary UK and worldwide. Although the main focus of this module is on the UK, examples from different parts of the world and a comparative lens will enable us to examine these issues from a global perspective. Beginning with colonial discourses of the ‘racial other’ and the history of colonialism, slavery and indentured labour, this module will examine various theoretical and conceptual debates on race and racism, and critically assess how changing conceptualisations of race and racism arise in specific socio-political and historical contexts. The module will also provide students with the chance to assess the continued significance of race and racism in the contemporary world. Students can benefit from an cross-disciplinary approach that addresses themes across Sociology, Criminology, Politics, International Relations, and Social Policy.

Module Overview

The aims of the module are to: 1. Introduce students to the historical, contemporary and contentious debates concerning how the British state has and should respond to terrorism and extremism. 2. Encourage students to apply criminological and other relevant subject knowledge generated in different contexts to the study of terrorism and extremism in the United Kingdom. 3. Enable students to practice and demonstrate transferable skills in critical thinking, presentation, and oral and written communication.

Module Overview

This international relations module seeks to explore the ways in which the contemporary international order can be explained as deriving from the global experience of European colonialism and imperialism. It aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop a knowledge of the nature, politics and consequences of the Western imperial penetration.

Module Overview

This module takes the politics, economics and societies of the developing world as its subject matter. The module aims to explore a range of contemporary issues confronting the developing world and the module seeks to use case studies extensively throughout, in order to illuminate theory and to demonstrate the broader relevance of the issues under discussion to the study of international relations.

Module Overview

This module is designed to cover a variety of issues relating to the politics of energy and climate change. It seeks to provide students with a history of energy and climate change policy, an exploration of theoretical approaches and political implications, and also an opportunity to develop a comparative perspective through the examination of examples of EU and global energy and climate change policy and the way in which this is now intrinsically global.

Module Overview

This module aims to examine the concepts that shape debates in (and are shaped by) global health, including global health governance and global health diplomacy. It then seeks provide students with the opportunity to critically assesses programmes and strategies designed to address global health challenges such as pandemics, infectious and non-communicable diseases, reproductive health, biosecurity and inequalities of health.

Module Overview

This module is designed to explore the politics of masculinity in contemporary society. Overall, the module will aim to ‘make the familiar strange’ and enable students to question their own assumptions, as well as popular and common sense notions of gender.

Module Overview

This module explores how different Western European states have responded to the challenges of increasing immigration. It examines the causes and dynamics of migration (labour and family) and refugee migration flows to, and within, Western Europe since World War II. It compares nation-state responses with respect to entry controls and philosophies of integration, examining the influence that interest groups, supranational institutions like the EU, and party politics (including populist radical-right politics) have on these policies. It particularly examines the UK within this comparative international context, using Lincolnshire as a case study with which students can explore academic and policy debates in this field. The module focuses on building students’ analytical skills and improving their understanding of the relative benefits and drawbacks of single-case and comparative approaches in assessing migration issues

Module Overview

This module is designed to focus upon the processes of policy making and implementation at both practical and theoretical levels. It aims to provide students with an introduction to a variety of models of policy making and seeks to discuss the complexities of the distribution of power and decision making, primarily, but not limited to, the field of social policy.

Module Overview

This module is constructed as an attempt to understand the ‘anatomy’ of war crimes and genocide – their origins, ideological basis, socio-political contexts, the techniques and technologies used and relevant theoretical perspectives.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

This module aims to enable students to both recognise and also understand the different methodologies employed in social research and to apply these to their own research project and critique of methods. Overall, the aim of this module is to set out methodological skills, and involve students in their application, and to encourage critical reflection on a variety of levels.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to core issues of relevance to international relations study. These include global inequality, international political economy, globalization and emerging transnational civil societies. The module is intended to expose students to the breadth of issues and approaches relevant to the study of international relations and international politics more broadly.

Module Overview

This module is designed to introduce students to the key components of the British political system, and the relationship between domestic and international politics through an examination of the distribution of power within the British political system. It seeks to explain the various factors and actors, both domestic and foreign, which serve to shape and define the political process in Britain. In Semester A, the module aims to examine the distribution of power through an examination of the key institutions and actors in the British political process. In Semester B the focus is broadened to examine Britain’s role in the world. The focus will shift outwards from the relationship between the constituent parts of the United Kingdom to an examination of the key international relationships - with Empire, the United States, East Asia and with Europe - which have shaped and defined British politics, economics and security.

Module Overview

This module aims to give students the opportunity to develop a knowledge and understanding of key social science thinkers and concepts pertinent to all of the disciplines taught within the School. Throughout, students will be encouraged to think critically about the ideas presented and to examine social problems in the light of a range of academic perspectives.

Module Overview

This module aims to address a variety of issues relating to political parties in the United Kingdom. The political science literature covers a wide variety of topics around parties. Amongst those which are examined in this module are the following; the historical development of parties; the role of parties in terms of mobilisation of support, electioneering and campaigning, recruitment of personnel; representation of the electorate and issue-based politics; and the partisan divide. These will be examined primarily within the context of a discussion of the three major parties within the British political system including their development, their ideological tenets and their contemporary positions. However, towards the end of the module these will be set against the position of other parties within the UK including the Scottish National Party, Plaid Cymru and the Northern Irish parties, to which will be added a comparative perspective, drawing upon the roles and experiences of parties in Western Europe.

Module Overview

Aiming to build upon the level 1 module, ‘Applying Research’, this module is designed to focus more deeply on the nature of research undertaken in the subject areas of Politics and International Relations. The main aim of the module is to give students the opportunity to develop an understanding of what constitutes research in Politics and International Relations and how the research process leads to the production of specific research outputs including dissertations, theses, published academic articles and research monographs.

Module Overview

This module is designed to place theory at the centre of the study of world politics. It aims to provides a critical overview of the disciplinary literature of international relations from both mainstream and critical perspectives. The module aims to provide students with the opportunity to both understand and critically employ the concepts, approaches and methods of International Relations theory, and to develop an understanding of their contested nature and the problematic character of inquiry in the discipline.

Module Overview

This modules seeks to examine the historical background to the various strands of political thought and ideas. In doing this, it aims to build upon some of the major ideas and concepts introduced at level one, by illustrating linkages between political theories and other aspects of politics. In particular, reference is made to key thinkers who have left their intellectual imprint on political ideas and beliefs.

Module Overview

This module aims to analyse some of the seminal works which have been significant to the academic development of sociology. Students will have the opportunity to explore a variety of classical and contemporary texts, with the aim of providing them with an in-depth understanding of sociological themes and theories across time.

Module Overview

This module aims to analyse some of the seminal works which have been significant to the academic development of sociology. This module will seek to examine a series of articles and books which are of sociological significance and have emerged from the early 20th Century into the 21st Century.

Module Overview

The motivation of many students entering a politics/IR degree programme is an interest in engaging with politics, as opposed to simply studying it. Many of our students have ambitions to work in politics-related roles and wish to improve their prospects. This module seeks to improve employability by providing an awareness of the practice of politics in a range of job roles, as well as developing awareness of, and improving competence in, relevant modes of political behaviour, and exploring personal motivations and values. It will not restrict this focus, however, to employability and professional politics alone. Much political activity takes place outside of or alongside a career, and the module will pay due attention to politics as a voluntary activity too. There is an increasing awareness across the political science community of the need to respond to student interests with regard to the practice of politics. A growing literature on this topic, including by the module co-ordinator, offers helpful ideas, as well as providing testimony to the positive student response where such modules have been introduced.

Module Overview

This module seeks to introduce students to politics at the European level through an analysis of challenges in European politics and policy making. Beginning with the history of European integration and the first attempts to secure peace through economic interdependency, the module focuses on the development of the EU institutions and the ways in which policy-makers, bureaucrats, intellectuals and civil society actors have attempted to resolve problems of cooperation in an ever larger Union.

Module Overview

This module is based on the belief that comparative methodology can be a useful tool for social and political analysis. The module begins with a consideration of the development of comparative approaches, the use of a range of comparative techniques and the validity of comparison. It proceeds to an examination of some basic concepts that can help provide an understanding of the bases upon which governments are built and operate. Students then have the opportunity to apply the analytical and theoretical tools from the early parts of the module to consider a variety of features of contemporary politics and policy, particularly in the context of democratic transition in different regions of the world.

Module Overview

This module aims to explore the cultural, practical and theoretical developments relating to sex work, drawing upon national and international examples. Taking a comparative approach, this module seeks to understand how scholars conceptualise sex work within different competing feminist frameworks and how these ideas reflect, or are at odds with, popular public and political discourse.

Module Overview

This module aims to explore the subject of crime through a range of literature. Crime and criminals have prompted some of the most innovative literature in history and by attempting to examine a few of these students will have the opportunity to think about crime in a new way, to engage with fiction and the opportunity to understand crime and criminality from a humanistic and philosophical perspective.

Module Overview

This module aims to enable students to analyse the priorities and developments of welfare states over time, and through analysis of these developments, equip students with the tools to interpret key contemporary social, political and economic trends.

Module Overview

This module examines the impact of difference and diversity in social policy, with a particular concern around social exclusion. It begins with an introduction to the concepts of 'diversity', 'difference' and 'exclusion' and then moves on to consider the relationship between social policy and a variety of forms of diversity and difference, particularly in the context of new thinking around social exclusion that has emerged since the 1990s. The module explores the origins and meanings of key concepts such as 'diversity' and 'social exclusion', the relationship of these key concepts with others, such as poverty, social class and the 'underclass', and the impact and lack of impact of policies on social groups such as young people, families, women, black and ethnic minorities and disabled people.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to the area of foreign policy analysis. It is designed to explore competing explanations for state behaviour and the conduct of inter-state relations in the international domain. The module encourages students to consider the contested role of human agency in global affairs in contrast to disciplinary international relations’ preoccupation with structural considerations. A range of historical and contemporary case studies are used to illuminate the issues under discussion.

Module Overview

This module will seek to examine the key components of the US political system, and the main challenges facing democratic politics in modern America. The module aims to provide a detailed historical and theoretical appreciation of the development of US democracy. It will give students the opportunity to examine the principal institutions and actors in the US political system including the President, Congress, the Supreme Court, political parties, interest groups and the media. It will also aim to trace the impact of key ideas such as constitutionalism, federalism and exceptionalism. Finally the module will aim to examine the impact of wider societal factors on US political life, such as shifting demographics and the role of religion.

Module Overview

This module aims to examine the impact (and sometimes the lack of impact) of ideology on practice in social policy. Whilst the focus of the module is on the experience of the United Kingdom, comparison with other states will be made where appropriate.

Module Overview

This module aims to complement the study of topics such as human rights and police powers by providing students with the opportunity to examine a number of similar themes but from the less-explored point of view of the State and the exercise of its powers to protect itself. The module also aims to consider the law relating to the intelligence services and surveillance, and seeks to introduce students to certain International Law principles and issues and their impact in the UK. The examination of topical case studies aims to enable students to analyse and apply relevant law and constitutional principles to contemporary issues of UK security, and to develop awareness of their practical and everyday function.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce a range of critical approaches within media and cultural studies frameworks to examine the contemporary distribution, reception and impact of cultural forms across national boundaries. It is designed to consider how popular cultures are constructed, marketed and then consumed by their audiences. By the conclusion of the module students will have had the opportunity to gain knowledge of significant debates in the academic cultural studies as well as the critical skills necessary for them to carry out their own small-scale studies of examples.

Module Overview

This module explores the sources of our most basic and powerful feelings of political loyalty and attachment – our ideas about who we are, why we are and who has the right to rule over us. The module introduces students to the competing approaches to understanding nations and nationalism by examining the ways in which nationalism can influence state development, economic relations and democratic practice.The module also engages students in the intersection between nations and other key categories in social science such as: political mobilisation, conflict, culture, gender, religion and globalisation.

Module Overview

This module aims to examine core questions about the increasingly diverse forms of policing of crime and deviance. It considers how and why we have policed different forms of crime and deviance and why those changes have occurred and the competing character of many of the positions involved.

Module Overview

This module is designed as an introduction to how psychology might contribute to our understanding of the various actors and organisations within the criminal justice process. Students are expected to critically compare and contrast the theories and methodologies employed in creating psychological knowledges, with those commonly used in the discipline of criminology and in this context, they will be expected to recognise both the contributions and problems presented by the use of psychological knowledges in the criminal justice process. Students will also be expected to undertake their own research project around a psychological theme; apply a statistical analysis to the data they collect and then consider how their results might impact on a relevant criminal justice issue.

Module Overview

This module encourages students to undertake one or more external activities relevant to their programme of study, and to engage in a critical reflection of the nature of this activity and how it relates to society as a whole and to their personal development as individuals. Relevant activities may involve significant interaction with an organisation outside the University providing an appropriate experience additional to the student’s programme of studies, such as voluntary work or mentoring within a service-providing organisation. Please note that students will be expected to play a significant role in initiating and arranging their programme of experience and to take responsibility for the frequency and form of experience. There may be additional costs in the form of transportation and accommodation depending on where students wish to pursue experience. The experience will be required to consist of a minimum of 30 hours.

Module Overview

This course aims to provide students with an advanced and comprehensive overview of international security in the 21st century. Specifically, it seeks to understand the issues, actors and solutions that drive security agendas in various parts of the world. Through a detailed study of key debates and key issues in the study and practice of security, the module engages with the following three questions: Security for whom and from what?; Security by whom?; Security of what and where? Emphasis will be placed on the philosophical and political connotations of certain security problems, the impact of security actors in the meaning and practice of security, and the ‘constructed’ nature of our understanding of certain contemporary security challenges.

Module Overview

This module will critically examine the nature, extent and impact of domestic violence and abuse (DVA). Taking a criminological approach, the module will explore a wide range of academic, policy and practitioner perspectives. Students will explore the recent development of domestic violence and abuse as a criminological problem within a changing political landscape. This will include understanding a survivor’s journey in the context of victimology and examining the legal, criminal justice and community responses. The module will also explore the emerging literature on primary and secondary prevention perpetrator programmes.

Module Overview

Over half the planet’s population now lives in an urban area and urbanisation across the globe looks set to continue spreading inexorably. However, cities are contradictory sites of human development patterned by opportunity, inequality, exploitation and conflict. These traits pose challenges for the meeting of human welfare needs and for our understandings of contemporary life within cities. This module aims to enable students to analyse the emergence of cities across time and space, and through analysis of the city, enable students the opportunity to develop the tools to interpret key contemporary sociological, political and policy trends.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the history, institutions, policies and general workings of the European Union.

Module Overview

The module is designed to examine the ways in which the state, through its social security and labour market policies, has affected the lives of those in paid work and those outside it. A particular focus of the course is on the emerging all-party consensus on welfare policy, in which mainstream politicians agree that benefits should no longer be paid to people of working age who refuse work or training, and that governments must ensure that jobs pay more than out-of-work benefits.

Module Overview

This module seeks to explore the relationship between work and society, drawing on different classical and contemporary sociological theories of work. It aims to examine key areas within the sociology of work such as concepts of work, work-place inequalities, resistance and the reality and challenges of engaging in paid work in the 21st Century.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide students with an opportunity to explore the youth justice system in depth, including the theoretical and historical contexts of youth justice, contemporary policy and practice developments and the salience of political agendas in constructing responses to young people’s offending behaviour.

Module Overview

This module seeks to prompt a sociological enquiry into youth cultures, addressing issues of identity and meaning within the behaviour, consumption and lifestyles of young people. Reflecting upon contemporary narratives of youth as dangerous or out of control, the module aims to investigate the plurality of youth cultures, and the diversity of young people’s cultural practices.

Module Overview

This module will aim to address the historical origins of global civil society (e.g. the anti-slavery movement), together with diverse and competing contemporary meanings of global civil and ‘uncivil’ society.

Module Overview

Students are expected to prepare and submit an Independent Study Proposal during semester B at Intermediate Level and appropriate supervisors will be allocated at this stage. The Independent Study preparation will be focused through the Research in Social Policy and Research in Politics and International Relations modules, which aim to familiarise students with real and active models of research in relevant areas.

Module Overview

Aiming to build upon Understanding the Policy Process, this module is designed to support students not only to continue to develop their knowledge of a range of perspectives on the policy process but, in addition, to use these to analyse a case study relevant to their degree programme.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to different paradigms of the 'body' and 'embodiment'. Recent research suggests that our understandings and our relationship with our own and other ‘bodies’ has been and is continuing to undergo radical changes. This module will seek to explore these ongoing developments in Western and non-Western cultures and societies.

Module Overview

This module serves as an introduction to the international politics of Central Asia. The module explores Central Asia’s domestic post-Soviet transition and analyses the tension between tradition and modernity, the legacies of Soviet rule, political and economic transformation, the rise of absurdist dictatorships, nation-building, clan politics and conflict, protest and revolution. Students will also examine Central Asia in global context by assessing the challenges faced by the region. This includes addressing the region’s geo-strategic significance to international security. It will explore issues such as political Islam and the threat of terrorism, energy security, organised crime and migration, the so-called ‘New Great Game’ for power and influence in the region between Russia the US, EU and China, the international security challenges related to the region’s proximity to Afghanistan, Iran and Pakistan and the issue of regional cooperation through Eurasian Economic Union and the Shanghai Organisation Cooperation. There are few places in the UK where students have the opportunity to study the politics and international relations of Central Asia. Thus, students will have a unique opportunity to gain knowledge and understanding of this fascinating and vital region for global politics.

Module Overview

This module aims to examine the nature of family policy as it has developed for different family forms and for different purposes, and seeks to consider why an understanding of family policy is important in the twenty-first century. This is set in historical, ideological and comparative contexts.

Module Overview

Throughout this module students will have the opportunity to explore how state agencies respond to real and perceived threats of extremism and terrorism. This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of the extent to which the state and the media frame extremism and terrorism.

Module Overview

This module critically examines the deviant activities of the powerful and their impact on the struggle for social justice. In contrast to much of orthodox criminology, which tends to focus its attention ‘downwards’, and onto the actions of the poor, dispossessed and relatively powerless, this module shifts the gaze ‘upwards’, and onto the harmful activities of states, corporations and similarly powerful collectives. Drawing from a myriad of human rights frameworks, a critical stance is taken towards the concepts of crime, power and legitimacy to understand and explain the deviant activities of these ‘elites’, and illuminate potential avenues for prevention, protection and redress.

Module Overview

This module seeks to emphasise the significance of emotions in everyday social life and to challenge some of the essentialist explanations of human emotion by exploring ‘emotions’ as social constructs. In doing so, the module aims to explore the role emotions play in social action, considering, for example, how we form personal relationships, make sense of death, dying and falling in love. Furthermore, this module will also consider how emotions are ‘gendered’, ‘racialised’ and explore the role they play in the workplace, and in laws and governance.

Module Overview

This module explores the concept and practice of global governance. International Relations scholars are increasingly concerned with how international organisations work and how they might work better. Of particular interest is the governance of issues that are inherently global; that is, those that transcend national borders. Examples include health, the environment, poverty, trade, finance, security, conflict and crime. The module begins with the historical development of international institutions and key theories of global governance. It then examines present day international organisations, in terms of their power, efficacy and impact. The final part of the module assesses whether current governance arrangements are addressing global challenges sufficiently well or whether there is potential and scope for improvement.

Module Overview

This module is designed to introduce students to human rights at both the conceptual and practical level. It aims to explore the theoretical arguments around the source of human rights and identifies some of the problems and possibilities which emerge from such readings.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to introduce students to the dynamic, constantly evolving area of international law. Students will have the opportunity to study legal rules which operate in a much broader theatre than national law, with the aim of helping them develop a greater understanding of a changing world order. The module seeks to examine both theoretical and practical applications of International Law and aims to provide students with ample scope for research and independent study.

Module Overview

The module aims to enhance the knowledge of Modern Middle East and its international relations through the creation of links between different approaches of IR and regional cases. In this context, it aims to inform the students about the realities of decision making at the foreign policy level but also look at the relations between state and non-state entities on both the regional and international level. The thematic division of the module helps the students acquire knowledge in a range of topical issues of critical importance for the international relations of the Middle Eastern region.

Module Overview

This module is designed to explore political challenges and debates around the presence of culturally diverse populations in the United Kingdom and aims to examine the role this presence plays in understandings of British and English identities.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop an in-depth knowledge of how the UK Parliament works, in theory and in practice. It will aim to examine Parliament’s twin relationships with the Executive and with the citizen, and situate these within broader theories and debates about democratic accountability and the nature of representation. The module also aims to bring students into closer contact with Parliament through handling Parliamentary materials and by facilitating contact with Parliamentarians through, for example an external speaker series, and when possible an optional visit to Parliament. Please note that where opportunities arise to take part in a trip to Parliament, students are expected to cover their own transportation and meal costs.

Module Overview

This module aims to locate the theory, practice and history of punishment and penal policy in the context of social control in general. As well as aiming to address the philosophy of punishment, in terms of core concepts of justice, desert, deterrence, retribution, rehabilitation and reparation, it seeks to examine the way in which social control is a fundamental aspect of social relations.

Module Overview

This module aims to build upon the more general analysis of policing in Policing Crime and Deviance. The aim is to instil a more focused, substantial and critical understanding of the place of policing within the contemporary complex myriad of social controls, as well as the specific organisational and political challenges faced by the police in the 21st Century.

Module Overview

This module aims to examine both the role of psychology in prisons and the psychological effects of imprisonment. Historically, imprisonment was used to punish those who had broken the law by punishing the body; in comparison imprisonment today has multiple aims, to punish, to deter and to rehabilitate. However, these aims are often compromised due to negative experiences encountered within prison and their psychological effects.

Module Overview

This interdisciplinary module will explore the issues of race, racism, race relations and racial conflict, and resistance to racism in the contemporary UK and worldwide. Although the main focus of this module is on the UK, examples from different parts of the world and a comparative lens will enable us to examine these issues from a global perspective. Beginning with colonial discourses of the ‘racial other’ and the history of colonialism, slavery and indentured labour, this module will examine various theoretical and conceptual debates on race and racism, and critically assess how changing conceptualisations of race and racism arise in specific socio-political and historical contexts. The module will also provide students with the chance to assess the continued significance of race and racism in the contemporary world. Students can benefit from an cross-disciplinary approach that addresses themes across Sociology, Criminology, Politics, International Relations, and Social Policy.

Module Overview

The aims of the module are to: 1. Introduce students to the historical, contemporary and contentious debates concerning how the British state has and should respond to terrorism and extremism. 2. Encourage students to apply criminological and other relevant subject knowledge generated in different contexts to the study of terrorism and extremism in the United Kingdom. 3. Enable students to practice and demonstrate transferable skills in critical thinking, presentation, and oral and written communication.

Module Overview

This international relations module seeks to explore the ways in which the contemporary international order can be explained as deriving from the global experience of European colonialism and imperialism. It aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop a knowledge of the nature, politics and consequences of the Western imperial penetration.

Module Overview

This module takes the politics, economics and societies of the developing world as its subject matter. The module aims to explore a range of contemporary issues confronting the developing world and the module seeks to use case studies extensively throughout, in order to illuminate theory and to demonstrate the broader relevance of the issues under discussion to the study of international relations.

Module Overview

This module is designed to cover a variety of issues relating to the politics of energy and climate change. It seeks to provide students with a history of energy and climate change policy, an exploration of theoretical approaches and political implications, and also an opportunity to develop a comparative perspective through the examination of examples of EU and global energy and climate change policy and the way in which this is now intrinsically global.

Module Overview

This module is designed to explore the politics of masculinity in contemporary society. Overall, the module will aim to ‘make the familiar strange’ and enable students to question their own assumptions, as well as popular and common sense notions of gender.

Module Overview

This module explores how different Western European states have responded to the challenges of increasing immigration. It examines the causes and dynamics of migration (labour and family) and refugee migration flows to, and within, Western Europe since World War II. It compares nation-state responses with respect to entry controls and philosophies of integration, examining the influence that interest groups, supranational institutions like the EU, and party politics (including populist radical-right politics) have on these policies. It particularly examines the UK within this comparative international context, using Lincolnshire as a case study with which students can explore academic and policy debates in this field. The module focuses on building students’ analytical skills and improving their understanding of the relative benefits and drawbacks of single-case and comparative approaches in assessing migration issues

Module Overview

This module is designed to focus upon the processes of policy making and implementation at both practical and theoretical levels. It aims to provide students with an introduction to a variety of models of policy making and seeks to discuss the complexities of the distribution of power and decision making, primarily, but not limited to, the field of social policy.

Module Overview

This module is constructed as an attempt to understand the ‘anatomy’ of war crimes and genocide – their origins, ideological basis, socio-political contexts, the techniques and technologies used and relevant theoretical perspectives.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

How you are assessed

Students are assessed in the form of essays, reports, presentations and reviews, and examinations. Assessment varies from module to module depending on the subject of study.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Students are assessed in the form of essays, reports, presentations and reviews, and examinations. Assessment varies from module to module depending on the subject of study.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Fees and Scholarships

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

The cost of optional study abroad trips fluctuates according to demand, currency movements and cost of travel, accommodation, and visa expenses.

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Entry Requirements 2020-21

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry and will consider applicants who have a mix of qualifications.

We also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

University preparation courses for International students:

The University of Lincoln International Study Centre offers university preparation courses for international students who do not meet the direct entry requirements for their chosen degree course. Upon successful completion, students can progress to degree level study at the University of Lincoln.

Please visit http://www.lincolnisc.com/ for more information.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Entry Requirements 2021-22

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry and will consider applicants who have a mix of qualifications.

We also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

University preparation courses for International students:

The University of Lincoln International Study Centre offers university preparation courses for international students who do not meet the direct entry requirements for their chosen degree course. Upon successful completion, students can progress to degree level study at the University of Lincoln.

Please visit http://www.lincolnisc.com/ for more information.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

"I have fallen in love with the University and the city, and have made friends here that I will cherish for life. I know that I will look back on my time here fondly as I have made so many amazing memories."

Grace Corn, BA (Hons) International Relations and Politics graduate

Virtual Open Days

While you may not be able to visit us in person at the moment, you can still find out more about the University of Lincoln and what it is like to live and study here at one of our live Virtual Open Days.

Book Your Place

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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