Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Part-time

2 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

ENLLITMA

MA English Literature

The School of English and Journalism is one of the first institutions in Europe to be awarded a 'Recognised for Excellence' accolade by the European Journalism Training Association (EJTA).

Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Part-time

2 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

ENLLITMA

Teaching and Learning During COVID-19

The current COVID-19 pandemic has meant that at Lincoln we are making changes to our teaching and learning approach and to our campus, to ensure that students and staff can enjoy a safe and positive learning experience here at Lincoln.

From autumn 2020 our aim is to provide an on-campus learning experience. Our intention is that teaching will be delivered through a mixture of face-to-face and online sessions. There will be social activities in place for students - all in line with appropriate social distancing and fully adhering to any changes in government guidance as our students' safety is our primary concern.

We want to ensure that your Lincoln experience is as positive, exciting and enjoyable as possible as you embark on the next phase of your life. COVID-19 has encouraged us to review our practices and, as a result, to take the opportunity to find new ways to enhance the Lincoln experience. It has challenged us to find innovative new approaches to supporting students' learning and social interactions. These learning experiences, which blend digital and face-to-face, will be vital in helping to prepare our students for a 21st Century workplace.

Of course at Lincoln, personal tutoring is key to our delivery, providing every student with a dedicated tutor to support them throughout their time here at the University. Smaller class sizes mean our academic staff can engage with each student as an individual, and work with them to enhance their strengths. In this environment we hope that students have more opportunities for discussion and engagement and get to know each other better.

Course learning outcomes are vital to prepare you for your future and we aim to utilise this mix of face-to-face and online teaching to deliver these. Students benefit from and enjoy fieldtrips and placements and, whilst it is currently hard to predict the availability of these, we are working hard and with partners and will aspire to offer these wherever possible - obviously in compliance with whatever government guidance is in place at the time.

We are utilising a range of different digital tools for teaching including our dedicated online managed learning environment. All lectures for larger groups will be delivered online using interactive software and a range of different formats. We aim to make every contact count and seminars and small group sessions will maximise face-to-face interaction. Practicals, workshops, studio sessions and performance-based sessions are planned to be delivered face-to-face, in a socially distanced way with appropriate PPE.

The University of Lincoln is a top 20 TEF Gold University and we have won awards for our approach to teaching and learning, our partnerships and industry links, and the opportunities these provide for our students. Our aim is that our online and socially distanced delivery during this COVID-19 pandemic is engaging and that students can interact with their tutors and each other and contribute to our academic community.

As and when restrictions start to lift, we aim to deliver an increasing amount of face-to-face teaching and external engagements, depending on each course. Safety will continue to be our primary focus and we will respond to any changing circumstances as they arise to ensure our community is supported. More information about the specific approaches for each course will be shared when teaching starts.

Of course as you start a new academic year it will be challenging but we will be working with you every step of the way. For all our students new and established, we look forward to welcoming you to our vibrant community this Autumn. If you have any questions please visit our FAQs or contact us on 01522 886644.

Dr Kristian Shaw - Programme Leader

Dr Kristian Shaw - Programme Leader

Kristian Shaw is a Senior Lecturer in English Literature in the College of Arts, specialising in contemporary British and American and postcolonial literature. His research concerns the effects of globalisation, transnationalism, and information technology on twenty-first century literature and culture. His current monograph examines, BrexLit (Bloomsbury) examines politics in contemporary British fiction.

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Welcome to MA English Literature

From medievalism to twenty-first century literature, this Master's enables students to develop a deeper level of critical understanding, and the opportunity to enhance writing, communication, and research skills.

The programme examines the diversity and variety of the subject, and is designed to equip students with the high-level skills necessary for further research or career progression. Optional modules include period coverage from the Medieval period to the Renaissance to the contemporary moment.

Students can develop their own areas of interest in a particular period, genre, or theme, and are able to gain experience of public speaking by presenting their own research at twice-yearly MA symposia at the Wren library in Lincoln Cathedral.

Current research in the School of English and Journalism has particular strengths in 21st Century literature, 19th Century literature, women’s writing, politics, Gothic literature, utopianism, American fiction, eco-criticism, and drama.

Students on this course have the opportunity to participate in twice-yearly symposia in the Wren library in Lincoln Cathedral.

How You Study

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs. For research programmes this includes research fees and research support fees.

Find out More

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

This introductory core module supports students to identify and understand the key themes, debates, and critical approaches currently being explored in contemporary literary studies. It will examine how genres, concepts, and themes transcend particular historical periods and disciplines stretching from the Medieval period to the twenty-first century. Students can develop a critical understanding of literary theory, including the status and practices of the discipline itself.

Module Overview

This module engages with the symbolism of the road in American literature and offers an opportunity to engage with a diversity of forms, from novels and films to popular song. Ranging from the nineteenth century to the twenty-first century, the module will demonstrate the role played by counter-cultures and literary transients in shaping American culture.

Module Overview

This module offers an opportunity to engage with American fiction and some of its socio-historical, political, and ideological contexts from the late 1990s to the present day. An initial concern is to examine critical distinctions between ‘canonical/literary’ texts and so-called ‘popular’ genres. The module explores aspects of canon-formation in American fiction, and examines a selection of texts by both new and established writers, in some cases at the point where they are first published in paperback. The module will be contextualised by an examination of the ‘Great American Novel’ in the run-up to the millennium, considering the importance of the short story in American fiction, and exploring the impact of recent key events. The module will take a thematic approach, locating American cultural production in regional, national, and global contexts, with a particular emphasis on writing in the 21st Century. Authors studied include Marilynne Robinson, Philip Roth, Anne Tyler, Lionel Shriver, and Cormac McCarthy.

Module Overview

This module explores the representation of haunted locations – of the human experience of environments which provoke, or symbolise, psychological and social disturbances. Place has always had central significance in the Gothic genre, ‘the literature of nightmare’, which is dominated by desolate landscapes, and claustrophobic interiors. Gothic texts of all periods and cultural contexts use ‘place’ as a trope through which to focalise themes of alienation, repression, monstrosity, and mental fragmentation. These locations work as spatial metaphors, giving form to the fear, violence, and ideological contradictions which haunt the realms which we would prefer to regard as familiar and safe settings for our lives. This module considers an exciting range of texts (including novels, short stories and films), from the Victorian era to the present day. We consider the way the Gothic genre dramatises anxieties that centre on the home, the city, the railway, the colony/ex-colony, and the frontier. Issues considered through study of these include childhood, gender relations, urbanisation, technology, mental illness, the sublime, constructions of ‘race’, imperialism, and the phenomenon of Gothic tourism with a focus on Lincoln itself.

Module Overview

One of the subjects that literature documents is the relationship of humanity to its environment. This module looks at literary representations of that relationship from an ‘ecocritical’ perspective—that is to say from a criticism that is influenced by environmentalism and ecological thinking. The first principle of ecological thinking is that there is more to life and the world than humanity, and that we are neither so separate from, nor so dominant over, the non-human as Christian and post-Christian Humanism has taught us to think. The module explores what difference it makes to read literature from this perspective. The course examines literature as part of our complex interaction with our environment, and in some ways and on some occasions, as a uniquely valuable one. The module offers an introduction to the interaction between environmentalism and literary criticism in the last fifty years and aims to examine the main currents of thought and areas of debate in contemporary ecocriticism. The module will look at texts ancient and contemporary, literary and popular, fictional and factual, including Paradise Lost and Middlemarch, work from the Roman Horace to the Victorian Gerard Manley Hopkins, and from romantics like Wordsworth, Clare and Thoreau, to contemporaries like Rick Bass, JM Coetzee and Iain Sinclair. Amongst the thinkers and theorists the module examines are Heidegger, Kate Soper, Michel Serres, Peter Singer, Robert Pogue Harrison, and John Gray.

Module Overview

This module is designed to examine the history of the book and print culture over the long nineteenth century, from social, cultural, and economic standpoints. Questions addressed include: How were Victorian texts written, revised, illustrated, published, printed, distributed, and sold? How did copyright debates over the century affect literary productions? What was the impact of serialisation and the periodical press on both the publishing industry and the reader or consumer? What place did the book-as-object have within Victorian material culture? How do Victorian texts themselves depict reading, writing, and the book? How does reading texts alongside images qualify reading and interpretation? The module considers a range of printed materials, including but not limited to books, periodicals, newspapers, illustrations, and printed ephemera. It provides opportunities to use the extensive and unique resources of the Tennyson Research Centre, conservation labs, and online resources such as Victorian periodical facsimiles. Students are also expected to read a novel in serialised form in a periodical, discussing one or two ‘numbers’ each week, to recapture and explore the experience of reading serially.

Module Overview

This module aims to explore some of the poetic and artistic riches of the era 1800 to 1870, in relation to political, social, and artistic contexts. Romanticism established terms for exploring the self, representing nature, extolling feeling and imagination, and using poetry in the cause of social reform. This legacy Victorian writers inherited, revised, and tested to its limits. Poets both withdrew from, and engaged with, society, offering new constructions of class relations, gender roles, and religious faith, and debated the role of the poet in a modern society. While the emphasis of the module is on literature, it will also consider elements of art history which shared these preoccupations. Artists also reimagined the landscape, social relations, subjective/objective reality, and the role of the artist in the modern world. Works of well-known poets such as William Wordsworth, Robert Browning, and Elizabeth Barrett Browning are read alongside those with a less established critical tradition, such as John Clare, Ernest Jones, and Augusta Webster. We also consider landscape artists such as Peter de Wint and John Constable, and the works of pre-Raphaelite artists responding to poetry by John Keats and Alfred Tennyson. Trips are offered to the Usher Gallery in Lincoln, the Clare Centre at Helpston, and/or a relevant national exhibition.

Module Overview

In the nineteenth century, the novel reached maturity as a form and, arguably, its zenith. This module addresses some of the riches of fiction of this era in which we encounter the roots of our own modernity. Writers turned to the novel to explore pressing social and philosophical concerns in the wake of radical cultural change and a newly empowered bourgeoisie. Whether they present panoramas of community or focus on the trials and triumphs of a single protagonist, nineteenth-century novels explore the pains and pleasures of the individual attempting to find belonging in an often alienating environment. While realism is the dominant mode, other generic influences include Gothic, naturalism, expressionism, and satire, and texts include historical fictions as well as those set in the contemporaneous moment. The module takes an international approach, including examples from North America as well as British classics, and potentially works (in translation) from non-anglophone settings including Russia, France, and Scandinavia.

Module Overview

The woman writer achieved a new prominence during the nineteenth century and played a central role in the literary culture of the period. Across a diverse range of genres and forms, writers explored contemporary debates regarding conceptions of gender, women’s role in public life, and models of female authorship. Beginning with the radical writers of the 1790s, this modules aims to consider women’s interventions in contemporary political argument, poetry and historical writing, and their exploitation of a language of feeling to claim a distinctive voice in the public sphere. A selection of Victorian women poets are explored, with a focus on their representation of the conflict between inner and outer life.

Module Overview

This module aims to explore some of the extraordinarily exciting, diverse and abundant range of short stories, novels, life writing, drama, performance and poetry produced by women in the 21st Century. The module begins firstly with the consideration of the contemporary revival of feminist theory and politics and attempt to think through the variety of ways in which feminism is meaningful in a post-millennial context. Secondly, the module will attempt to trace and examine ways in which women writers engage with and represent the 21st Century, and specifically their negotiation of personal identity, motherhood, ageing, sex and sexuality, as well as local/ global politics, war, race, class, religion, region and nation. Thirdly, you can study ways in which contemporary women’s writing utilises, negotiates and challenges traditions of literary and dramatic form to find new and radical ways of writing the 21st Century.

Module Overview

In this module you have the opportunity to identify key features and characteristics of the literary utopia and trace the development of the genre from More's Utopia to the trio of late 19th Century classic utopias, Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward, William Morris’s News from Nowhere and HG Wells’s A Modern Utopia through to the 20th and 21st Centuries. The module considers the classic dystopias of the early 20th Century and the re-emergence of the utopian novel in the form of the ‘critical utopia’. 21st century utopias and dystopias form a focus for thinking about the significance of utopia and utopian writing today. Plays will be considered as stage utopias/dystopias, and the question of utopia and form will be scrutinised.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

How you are assessed

Fees and Scholarships

Postgraduate study is an investment in yourself and your future, and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

There are more ways than ever before to fund your postgraduate study, whether you want to do a taught or research course. For those wishing to undertake a Master's course, you can apply for a loan as a contribution towards the course and living costs. Loans are also available to those who wish to undertake doctoral study. The University offers a number of scholarships and funded studentships for those interested in postgraduate study. Learn how Master's and PhD loans, scholarships, and studentships can help you fund your studies on our Postgraduate Fees and Funding pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost.

Entry Requirements 2020-21

First or upper class second honours degree.

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/st.../entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 7.0 overall, with a minimum of 6.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page.
https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/st...port/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-session English and Academic Study Skills courses.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/st...nalenglishandacademicstudyskills/

These specialist courses are designed to help students meet the English language requirements for their intended programme of study.

Research Areas, Projects and Topics

Specialist areas of staff expertise include:

  • 21st Century literature
  • Postcolonial studies
  • Contemporary politics
  • Renaissance literature and drama
  • Utopian studies
  • Women’s writing (18th Century – present)
  • Life writing
  • American literature
  • Creative writing
  • Ecocriticism
  • Gothic studies
  • 18th and 19th Century literature

Presentations

Students on this course have the opportunity to participate in twice-yearly symposia, where they can present papers based on their research to current students and staff. Presenting 20-minute papers in panels in a conference-style setting enables students to develop their research skills, preparing them for PhD study and other professional work.

Facilities

Students can study and research in the University's Great Central Warehouse Library, which provides more than 250,000 printed books and approximately 400,000 electronic books and journals, as well as databases and specialist collections. The Library has a range of different spaces for shared and individual learning.

Days Taught

Wednesday. Students on this course can expect to receive 140 hours of contact time over the duration of the programme. Postgraduate-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two to three hours in independent study.

Career and Personal Development

This course is designed to develop strong communication and critical-thinking skills which can be transferable to a diverse range of careers. The programme aims to provide training for roles in journalism, teaching, research, publishing, and media. Students are able to develop skills in research, communication, writing, presentation, and independent learning. Some graduates choose to continue their studies at doctoral level.

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing your course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual and website resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities.
The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Postgraduate Events

Find out more about how postgraduate study can help further your career, develop your knowledge, or even prepare you to start your own business at one of our postgraduate events.

Find out More

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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