Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

Q320

Course Code

ENLCRWUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

Q320

Course Code

ENLCRWUB

BA (Hons) English and Creative Writing BA (Hons) English and Creative Writing

100% of BA (Hons) English and Creative Writing students at Lincoln were satisfied overall with their course according to the National Student Survey 2020.

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

Q320

Course Code

ENLCRWUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

Q320

Course Code

ENLCRWUB

Dr Sarah Stovell - Programme Leader

Dr Sarah Stovell - Programme Leader

Sarah Stovell is the Programme Leader for the joint BA in English and Creative Writing. She is module conveyor for the second-year module Writing and Enterprise and the optional third-year module The Psychological Thriller and Crime Writing. Sarah writes crime fiction and women's fiction and has just accepted a two-book deal for her latest novel, Other Parents.

School Staff List

Welcome to BA (Hons) English and Creative Writing

Study world literature, explore your talents, and build a solid technical foundation as a writer with this joint honours degree.

BA (Hons) English and Creative Writing enables students to consider literature from a variety of theoretical, historical, and cultural perspectives. These include poetry, fiction, and drama, as well as less traditional literary forms, such as non-fiction, audio drama, and graphic novels.

Throughout their studies, students can develop their craft as authors, building their own portfolio of creative writing pieces across a wide range of popular formats.

Teaching on the programme is enhanced by workshops, readings, and masterclasses with visiting authors. This gives students practical experience and enables them to learn from experts in the field. Recent students have enjoyed visits from Poet Laureate Dame Carol Ann Duffy, author and TV presenter Chris Packham, and art historian Andrew Graham-Dixon.

Welcome to BA (Hons) English and Creative Writing

Study world literature, explore your talents, and build a solid technical foundation as a writer with this joint honours degree.

BA (Hons) English and Creative Writing enables students to consider literature from a variety of theoretical, historical, and cultural perspectives. These include poetry, fiction, and drama, as well as less traditional literary forms, such as non-fiction, audio drama, and graphic novels.

Throughout their studies, students can develop their craft as authors, building their own portfolio of creative writing pieces across a wide range of popular formats.

Teaching on the programme is enhanced by workshops, readings, and masterclasses with visiting authors. This gives students practical experience and enables them to learn from experts in the field. Recent students have enjoyed visits from Poet Laureate Dame Carol Ann Duffy, author and TV presenter Chris Packham, and art historian Andrew Graham-Dixon.

How You Study

The course will introduce literary forms and theories, and explore texts and authors from past and present. Students can study the various approaches to creative writing through the close reading of major contemporary authors, examining their techniques and applying them to the production of original, imaginative work.

In the third year, a wide range of optional modules enable students to pursue areas of particular interest, while engaging in individual research and extended creative writing projects.

Throughout the course, there is a focus on employability with the degree aiming to prepare students for a professional writing or publishing career.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

How You Study

This course introduces students to literary forms and theories, enabling them to explore texts and authors from past and present. They are able to study the various approaches to creative writing through the close reading of major contemporary authors, examining their techniques and applying them to the production of original, imaginative work.

In the third year, a wide range of optional modules enables students to pursue areas of particular interest and develop their portfolios while engaging in individual research. This reflects the programme’s clear focus on employability, which aims to prepare students for a professional writing or publishing career.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

The Victorian period saw the publication of some of the most fondly remembered and widely read works in English literature by writers such as Charles Dickens, Charlotte Bronte, Robert Browning, Christina Rossetti and Alfred Tennyson. This historical period witnessed some of the most formative social changes in modern history, including the industrial revolution, mass literacy and railway travel. It was also the era of enormous cultural change in attitudes to class conflict, women’s freedoms, and religious doubt. Literature of the era both reflects these upheavals, and sought to intervene in shaping how the public responded to them. In this module, students will read some of the emblematic texts of the period as well as less well-known works, for example poetry by working-class writers, and the ‘sensation’ novel. These texts will be placed in the contexts of the historical conditions and cultural debates of the period. This module is also designed to equip students with the key skills they need to be critical readers of and effective writers about literature. It will help them to write analytically about literary texts; to access, select and use secondary sources appropriately; to plan and structure persuasive essays; and to develop skills in editing and proofreading.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide students with a critical and theoretical vocabulary that will enable them to explore a range of twentieth century cultural activities. Students will be encouraged to read not only traditionally marginalised literary genres such as romance, crime fiction, science fiction and the comic book but also ‘texts’ from other cultural realms such as film, television, news, fashion, advertising, music TV, radio and magazines.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to a wide range of writing formats offered at the University of Lincoln. Students will be encouraged to try different forms to establish good writing habits, with an emphasis on routine and discipline, and by providing clearly structured creative writing exercises that draw on their reading (textual interventions). The module will establish points of contact between creative and critical writing, and encourage students to develop their ideas while understanding their creative process.

Module Overview

The late Victorian and Edwardian period (leading up to the Great War) is characterised by anxiety – about the self, society and the empire. Writers become preoccupied with decadence (personal and social), crime, sexuality, the changing status of women and the implications of scientific developments. This is also the period that sees the birth of modern literary forms: the short story, science fiction, the detective novel, children's literature, and fiction about the supernatural. These and other themes are examined through the works of writers such as Oscar Wilde, H.G. Wells, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Robert Louis Stevenson and Bram Stoker.

Module Overview

This module introduces students to the core skills and ideas involved in writing stories along with the fundamentals of good research. The module examines the nature of story and narrative, how to create a character, and it introduces the idea of the character in action as a fundamental ingredient in building a dramatic story. Focussing on how to blend fact and fiction, the student will be expected to create a historically accurate sequence that utilises all of the previously considered concepts and in-class writing exercises.

Module Overview

This module is an introduction to poetry writing and allows students to develop as writers and readers of poetry. Students can read a variety of texts and study various poetic forms and techniques by a range of contemporary poets. The close reading and the innovative application of language will enable students to develop their own skills in these areas and help them to craft their own poetry, paying close attention to the mechanics of poetic writing. Emphasis is placed upon journal writing and workshop practice.

Module Overview

This module gives students the freedom to work within whatever genres and written formats they choose and put together a portfolio of their own work. This might take the form of one long piece or of several shorter pieces. The notion of ‘work in progress’ that is developed through to completion will be the basis of this module. Students have the chance to employ the skills gained in previous modules to undertake a more challenging and larger piece of creative work through a series of workshop-based classes that include detailed peer and tutor reviews of students’ work-in-progress.

Module Overview

Fragmentation, uncertainty and conflict characterise a world in aftermath of war, at end of empire, and at the beginning of a period of radical social and cultural change. This module aims to chart the emergence of the contemporary world from these fractured beginnings through an introduction to British literature of the period 1950–2000. From the post-war Windrush migration to the rise of the historical novel at the turn of the millennium, the Angry Young Men to new feminist perspectives and postcolonialism, this module explores relevant theoretical perspectives on the late 20th Century and encourages an appreciation of the relationship between texts and their social, political and cultural contexts.

Module Overview

This module considers the range of theories that we can use when we read and think about literature. Students will have the opportunity to study psychoanalysis, feminism, Marxism and postmodernism, among others, to think about why and how we structure meaning and interpretation in certain ways. We consider questions such as ‘what is an author?’, ‘what is gender?’ and ‘why do certain things frighten us?’ through theorists such as Roland Barthes, Judith Butler and Sigmund Freud.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to give students an insight into careers in the writing industries. It aims to prepare and support them in the process of applying for employment, residencies, grants, internships and other work in the creative industries and also help to prepare them for the realities of life as a contemporary writer.

Module Overview

This module explores apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic texts using a range of novels, short stories, poems and films. Lectures will establish cultural and historical contexts and address issues such as form and genre. The module will explore a range of significant periods from early Judeo-Christian fears regarding the purging moral apocalypse, through Romantic preoccupations with nature and industrialisation, postmodernism and more contemporary concerns about viral or cybernetic apocalypse. We will draw from a range of disciplines including literary theory, psychoanalysis, cultural theory, philosophy and trauma theory.

Module Overview

This module explores the nineteenth-century literature of the USA, chiefly focusing on fiction and poetry. Authors covered include Herman Melville, Emily Dickinson, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Walt Whitman and Willa Cather, among others.

Module Overview

This module covers a broad range of twentieth-century American fiction and poetry. Beginning with Fitzgerald, other authors studied include Ernest Hemingway, Jack Kerouac, Toni Morrison, Thomas Pynchon and David Foster Wallace.

Module Overview

This module examines key British medieval texts, primarily in Middle English, from the High and Late Middle Ages (that is, from approximately the twelfth century to fifteenth century). It explores the breadth of literary activity in the period through a variety of genres--such as debate poetry, ethnographies, beast fables, romance, dream visions, satire, devotional and mystical writings, and mystery plays--and the evolution of a new form of English (the precursor of modern English), revealing that the medieval period is, in truth, a far cry from the misnomer by which it is often identified, the ‘dark ages’.

Module Overview

This module examines one of the most varied literary genres extant, one that, at times, is often relegated to the margins because of its slippery nature. Students will examine early examples of fantasy and trace the genre’s development across a number of key historical epochs, from the classical and medieval periods to the twenty-first century. They will consider especially Tolkien as a pivotal force in the growth of fantasy literature and theory, as well as The Inklings, a group whose works had a profound influence on the evolution of the genre in the twentieth century. A range of subgenres of the fantastic will be explored, which may include high and low fantasy, ironic fantasy, historical fantasy, or magic realism, and, alongside primary texts, they will read selections from modern theoretical and critical texts that articulate different interpretations and approaches to the fantastic.

Module Overview

This module, conceptually, textually, formally, and intellectually challenging, is designed to introduce students to a range of innovative literatures, in a variety of forms, in order both to interrogate the idea of experimental writing, and its own often aggressive interrogation of the expressive potential of literature.

Module Overview

In this module students will have the opportunity to explore the early twentieth century, one of the most creative periods in English literature, when writers like James Joyce, T.S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf and D.H. Lawrence were challenging conventional ways of writing and reading, and rewriting how we experience and understand the world and ourselves. Required reading will include some of the most powerful works from the modern movement between 1910 and 1940 including James Joyce’s Ulysses and T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land.

Module Overview

This module examines literary representations of the world that emerge from the history of European exploration and expansion, and considers literary responses from groups that were marginalized through imperialism. Students will be encouraged to look at the treatment by white writers of issues of race and empire in the early twentieth century. They will also have the opportunity to explore ways in which postcolonial literatures develop strategies of 'writing back' to the imperial centre and re-thinking identity in terms of race, gender and nation. The final section offers a study of postcolonial Britain and some global implications of postcolonial writing.

Module Overview

Students studying Renaissance Literature have the opportunity to look in detail at a range of texts from the late Elizabethan period to the mid-1630s, including work by Shakespeare, John Donne, Ben Jonson and Mary Wroth. They also have the chance to explore the historical and cultural contexts in which these texts were produced, and the effects that they had on the politics and culture of the British Isles in the period. Lectures aim to examine post-Reformation England and late humanism, patronage, gender relations, early modern literary theory, education and philosophy.

Module Overview

Students taking Restoration Literature, the companion module to Renaissance Literature, can study in detail a range of texts written between the era of the English Civil War and the first decade of the eighteenth Century, including work by John Milton; Andrew Marvell; Aphra Behn; and John Wilmot, the 2nd Earl of Rochester. Students have the opportunity to also study the historical and cultural contexts in which these texts were produced. Lectures aim to examine the origins and effects of the civil war, the ethics of rebellion and reform, the Restoration theatre, religious controversies, gender relations, developing philosophical thought and Restoration manners.

Module Overview

This module provides an opportunity for English and Creative Writing students to spend a term at second level studying at one of the University’s partner institutions. During the term abroad students undertake a course load at the partner institution of equivalent standard to that of one term of the programme at Lincoln. Participation in study abroad also offers opportunities for personal student development in the wider sense, taking in cultural, sporting, and social opportunities. In order to participate, students are usually expected to obtain a 2:1 or higher at Level 1, have a good record of attendance and participation, and must complete an application process. A limited number of places will be available each year, and participation is at the discretion of the Module Co-ordinator and the Programme Leader.

Module Overview

While students are introduced to prose fiction writing and essential narrative techniques at level 1, the field of prose writing is much wider than short stories or novels. In areas such as travel, historiography, literary journalism and biography, writers frequently employ similar techniques to those used by novelists to make events and characters more vivid. This module will encourage students to use their creative and technical skills to write non-fiction, including but not limited travel writing, life writing, articles, reviews and journals. Particular attention will be paid to balancing the need to convey factual information with the creative potential of narrative, language and form. This module will allow students to research a field they wish to investigate such as current events, the arts, history or some aspect of science. Students will learn both how to conduct research (through archival research, observations, and interviews) as well as the fundamental techniques of telling a true story. Extended over two semesters, it will enable students to engage more deeply with a chosen field of non-fiction, for example to produce chapters that would contribute to a book as well as features.

Module Overview

This module will explore the role of fiction writing with an initial emphasis on the short story. Many writers begin with the short story. Through writing short stories they are able to experiment, learn the fundamentals of narrative composition, and have the satisfaction of completing something to a high standard in a relatively short period of time. This module will introduce students to the work of a range of fiction writers, whilst helping them to develop their skills in crafting prose. They will be asked to study particular stories each week, but also expected to pursue their own interests in reading. The skills required for writing short stories are also key to working in other forms, so this module will help students to develop as writers, whatever their plans and ambitions may be.

Module Overview

The poetry workshop operates as a series of sessions in which students experiment with a variety of poetic forms with the aim of compiling a collection of their own verse. Students will engage with a number of different poets each week as a stimulus to their own poetic engagement, and will compose and perform their own work as part of a practice of critique.

Module Overview

This module develops students' knowledge of the craft of scriptwriting for a wide range of formats, including but not limited to audio drama, graphic novel and moving image (short film). Students will study, watch and listen to a number of texts appropriate to the format they wish to practice and develop their understanding of the relationship between character, script and production. Attention will be given to the nuts and bolts of scriptwriting - dialogue, pace, setting, and story. These are key to all forms of creative writing and literary analysis, as well as to creating successful script-based texts.

Module Overview

Why have detective narratives proved so enduringly popular? This module will interrogate the iconic figure of the private eye in American popular culture, through the fiction and film of the twentieth and twenty-first century.

Module Overview

Monsters and attics, desolate landscapes, imprisonment and pursuit: the gothic genre emerged in the late eighteenth century to depict our darkest fears and desires. Termed 'the literature of nightmare', gothic departs from a realistic mode of representation and employs a powerful means of symbolic expression. Students are given the opportunity to investigate ways in which the genre has explored psychological and political anxieties, and themes of sexual and social transgression. We consider literary texts from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries, including literature and film, and we give attention to sub-genres such as ‘female gothic’, ‘imperial gothic’ and ‘children’s gothic’.

Module Overview

This module explores what it meant to grow up and to grow old in the nineteenth century, through often contradictory accounts of experiencing age categories from childhood to old age. Students will have the opportunity to examine various constructions of ageing, to reflect on age as a crucial facet of identity. This module considers age as a lens to explore the nineteenth century as a transitional period of growth and expansion as well as decay and decline, through a range of Romantic and Victorian texts.

Module Overview

The dissertation provides students with the opportunity to write an extensive piece of work of 8000 words (or 20 pages/200 lines of poetry) together with a 2000-word critique. The choice of form, style, genre, etc. is up to students' individual preference. Skills developed at level 2 can be further enhanced through the dissertation; these include the structuring of an extended piece from an initial idea, the drafting process, editing, and mastery of the particular genre in which they have chosen to work. This close engagement with literary production as a practical exercise can not only helps students develop an effective writing style but, by placing them in the position of the author, also aims to deepen their understanding of literature in general.

Module Overview

In this module students have the opportunity to research in depth an author or topic of their choosing. Students are expected to commence research over the summer between Levels 2 and 3 and, on their return, have regular, one-to-one meetings with a tutor who is a research specialist in that field. The supervisor offers advice and direction, but primarily this module encourages independent research leading to the production of a 10,000 word dissertation.

Module Overview

This module is designed to examine how terms such as Ireland and Irishness have been constructed and questioned across the last century, a period of immense and often turbulent historical and social change. It aims to explore the representation of place, the nature of nationalism, the changing family unit, gender roles and Ireland's relationship to globalization in Irish poetry, drama and fiction.

Module Overview

This module responds to the recent interest in the representation of lives within literary studies. It discusses a range of life representations (including biography, autobiography, letters, confessions, memoirs, and poems) from the Romantic period to the contemporary moment. Students may consider the origins of autobiography, address Modernist experiments with life representations, and discuss twentieth-century and contemporary innovations, including disability narratives and cross-cultural autobiographies. Themes such as the construction of selfhood, conceptions of memory, the relational self, and the ethics of life writing are addressed.

Module Overview

The first principle of ecological thinking is that it is not only human beings that are meaningful, and that we are neither so separate from, nor so dominant over, the non-human as we tend to think. In this module students can explore what difference it makes to read literature from this perspective. We study literature as part of our complex interaction with our environment, and, perhaps sometimes, as a uniquely valuable one. Students can read texts from ancient Greek pastoral to contemporary dystopias, and from the poet John Clare to the woodland historian Oliver Rackham.

Module Overview

This module enables students to practice advanced techniques and develop innovative strategies for writing poetry. Students will read and reflect upon a range of contemporary works (including emergent forms) in order to further develop their own poetics and poetic practice. Furthermore, the study of poetics as a writerly and speculative discourse will accompany and influence the students' own writing - and the reflection upon the writing - and suggest emergent writing possibilities that students might engage in beyond the module, i.e. various creative environments and cultural economics.

Module Overview

This module will explore the nature of the contemporary through analysis of selected literary texts. The initial date, 1967, has been chosen as it marks a point of transition from a post-war world based upon a liberal consensus to a time of radical uncertainty, extreme and experimental forms of expression, the breakdown of notions of realism in all the arts, sciences and philosophy. Literature, alongside the radicalisation of all intellectual concepts, including reason and common-sense, has played a significant role in debating, illustrating, and disseminating these new ways of thinking both in terms of form and content.

Module Overview

This module considers the genre of modern science fiction and its evolution into one of today’s most popular narrative genres. Analysing a variety of forms – novel, short story, drama, graphic novel and film – students will have the opportunity to examine the socio-historical contexts of some of the most influential narratives of this period. This ranges from the emergence of “scientific romance” in the late nineteenth century, to late twentieth-century forms like cyberpunk and radical fantasy; from the problems of defining “genre fictions” and privileging science fiction over fantasy, to our enduring fascination with alternate histories, non-human agents (robots, animals, genetic hybrids, the environment), ecocatastrophe and post-apocalypse.

Module Overview

This module concentrates on the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, with a particular emphasis on The Canterbury Tales, perhaps Chaucer’s most famous work. Students will have the opportunity to examine the General Prologue and a variety of tales in relation to their historical context and literary antecedents, and, throughout, specific attention will be given to questions of genre (ranging from fable and epic to satire and romance), literary authority, narrative construction, and medieval aesthetics.

Module Overview

This module provides an opportunity for students to study the works of Shakespeare in detail. The dissemination, influence, and adaptation of Shakespeare is unrivalled, and without an understanding of the conventions that the works dissolved and those that they initiated, a full appreciation of the canon of English literature is inevitably lessened. This modules challenges Shakespeare’s status as an icon of tradition and elitism by reading the texts in the light of recent developments in critical theory, and by locating them in the culture of their age. Students will be invited to examine the ways in which different theoretical approaches might have a bearing upon the interpretation of Shakespeare, they will also be conversant with the religious climate of the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, the conditions of performance and play-going in Shakespeare’s theatre, and the significant cultural and historical events of the period.

Module Overview

This module allows students to study the works of the Bard in detail, and to read them in the light of critical theory and literary history. Shakespeare’s plays are a cornerstone of the canon of English literature, but in wider culture they are often treated as inflexible repositories of ‘truth’ and ‘human nature’. This module will resist such approaches, and concentrate instead upon the ways in which the plays address the concerns of their day, as well as how they have been made to signify in other eras. Students can develop an understanding of how Shakespeare’s work dealt with early modern dramatic conventions, politics, and thought; how it addressed questions of history, religion, and race; and how it shaped the culture within which it was written. This module considers Shakespeare’s mature comedies, histories, and tragedies.

Module Overview

This module allows students to pursue an in-depth study of one author’s literary or dramatic works. The author of choice varies from year to year according to academics’ current research interests, but potential authors may include writers of fiction and/or poetry such as Angela Carter, Charlotte Bronte, Iain Banks, Thomas Pynchon, M.R.James, Jane Austen and Sylvia Plath; and dramatists such as Caryl Churchill, Thomas Middleton, Aphra Behn, Ben Johnson and debbie tucker green. Students will explore the writer’s oeuvre in terms of themes, style, and engagement with form and genre traditions, and with contemporary cultural debates. We also address practicalities of authorship such as the role of editors, publishing/performance formats, and different readerships/audiences. Students will also consider the writer’s legacies including the ‘afterlife’ of their works in adaptation. As well as studying texts, students will engage with conceptual debates about the role of the author : is attention to the author’s life an outmoded and over-deterministic approach to the study of a text? or a necessary part of contextualisation? As we scrutinise the figure of the author in biography, literary societies, literary tourism and popular culture, we ask : what purposes does the ‘author’ as a cultural construction serve ? and does this have anything to do with reading?

Module Overview

This module allows students to pursue an in-depth study of one author’s literary or dramatic works. The author of choice varies from year to year according to academics’ current research interests, but potential authors may include writers of fiction and/or poetry such as Angela Carter, Charlotte Bronte, Iain Banks, Thomas Pynchon, M.R.James, Jane Austen and Sylvia Plath; and dramatists such as Caryl Churchill, Thomas Middleton, Aphra Behn, Ben Johnson and debbie tucker green. Students will explore the writer’s oeuvre in terms of themes, style, and engagement with form and genre traditions, and with contemporary cultural debates. We also address practicalities of authorship such as the role of editors, publishing/performance formats, and different readerships/audiences. Students will also consider the writer’s legacies including the ‘afterlife’ of their works in adaptation. As well as studying texts, students will engage with conceptual debates about the role of the author : is attention to the author’s life an outmoded and over-deterministic approach to the study of a text? or a necessary part of contextualisation? As we scrutinise the figure of the author in biography, literary societies, literary tourism and popular culture, we ask : what purposes does the ‘author’ as a cultural construction serve ? and does this have anything to do with reading?

Module Overview

This optional module explores representations of the southern states of America in prose fiction, film, drama and music. In the first section southern stereotypes and ‘resistant’ representations, produced by southerners and others, are examined in relation to social, political and historical contexts. This is followed by a section on African American representations of the south. Finally, a section on music and vernacular traditions explores the influence of the south on American popular music. Students are encouraged to adopt an interdisciplinary approach to examine questions of regional identity in a wide range of texts.

Module Overview

This module explores how childhood is constructed in a wide range of literary texts – texts by adults for adults, by adults for children, and by children themselves. Underpinning the module is the notion of ‘childhood’ as a cultural construct into which writers invest various, even contradictory, meanings. Students have the opportunity to explore texts by adults who idealise or demonise the child to suit their personal and philosophical agendas. Students may then analyse the mixture of didactic and therapeutic agendas in enduring genres of children’s literature such as the fairytale, adventure story and cautionary tale. Finally, we turn to children as authors in a study of juvenilia.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to some of the specific elements of writing contemporary fiction in the field of crime and the psychological thriller. The module will consider the origins of crime fiction in the nineteenth century before concentrating on what has become one of the most popular genres in contemporary publishing.

Module Overview

This module aims to explore new thematic trends, stylistic innovations and cultural developments in post-millennial British fiction, including a focus on globalising processes, transnational migration and digital technology. The module also addresses the development (and rethinking of the concepts) of gender and class in literature of the period and account for the continuing importance of the literary form in an age of digital publishing.

Module Overview

This module will introduce some of the specific elements of writing contemporary fiction for children and young adults. The market for children's literature is an old one, and some historical context of that market will be presented throughout the workshop sessions, but the main focus will be providing practical experience of writing for a wide age range, whether more traditional children's books or the newly emerging young adult market.

Module Overview

This module will introduce some of the specific elements of writing contemporary historical fiction. The field traditionally has been associated with romance writing, but it also encompasses a wide range of titles that frequently deal with aspects of war and violent historical events, and frequently has moved beyond genre writing into different forms of literary fiction.

Module Overview

This module will introduce students to some of the specific elements of writing science fiction and fantasy. Although these two genres only emerged fully during the twentieth century, they have their roots in literature that is as old as the classics in the case of fantasy and the writings of Jonathan Swift and Mary Shelley with regard to science fiction. Frequently a medium for satire and social commentary, this module will explore some of the ways in which science fiction and fantasy authors offer means to develop thought experiments and oblique commentary on contemporary developments.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to a wide range of writing formats offered at the University of Lincoln. Students will be encouraged to try different forms to establish good writing habits, with an emphasis on routine and discipline, and by providing clearly structured creative writing exercises that draw on their reading (textual interventions). The module will establish points of contact between creative and critical writing, and encourage students to develop their ideas while understanding their creative process.

Module Overview

Texts in Time: Medieval to Romantic introduces students to a variety of materials from a range of cultural and historical contexts from the 12th century to 1830, and to methods of reading historically. Students will thus build a foundation on writers and historical periods which they can choose to pursue in greater detail at levels 2 and 3. Students will examine literature in English in a range of forms, such as poetry, drama, fiction, and essays, and the conditions under which these materials were created. There will be a particular emphasis throughout the module on questions concerning the self in society and the cultural tensions that arise when different understandings or definitions of identity clash. The chosen texts will demonstrate and explore understandings of the self in relation to matters such as sex, gender, race, nationality, class, religion, and age.

Module Overview

‘Texts in Time: Victorian to Contemporary’ introduces students to a variety of materials from a range of cultural and historical contexts from 1830 to the present, and to methods of reading historically. Students will thus build a foundation on writers and historical periods which they can choose to pursue in greater detail at levels 2 and 3. Students will examine literature in English in a range of forms, such as poetry, drama, fiction, and essays, and the conditions under which these materials were created. There will be a particular emphasis throughout the module on questions concerning the self in society and the cultural tensions that arise when different understandings or definitions of identity clash. The chosen texts will demonstrate and explore understandings of the self in relation to matters such as sex, gender, race, nationality, class, religion, and age.

Module Overview

This module introduces students to the core skills and ideas involved in writing stories along with the fundamentals of good research. The module examines the nature of story and narrative, how to create a character, and it introduces the idea of the character in action as a fundamental ingredient in building a dramatic story. Focussing on how to blend fact and fiction, the student will be expected to create a historically accurate sequence that utilises all of the previously considered concepts and in-class writing exercises.

Module Overview

This module is an introduction to poetry writing and allows students to develop as writers and readers of poetry. Students can read a variety of texts and study various poetic forms and techniques by a range of contemporary poets. The close reading and the innovative application of language will enable students to develop their own skills in these areas and help them to craft their own poetry, paying close attention to the mechanics of poetic writing. Emphasis is placed upon journal writing and workshop practice.

Module Overview

This module gives students the freedom to work within whatever genres and written formats they choose and put together a portfolio of their own work. This might take the form of one long piece or of several shorter pieces. The notion of ‘work in progress’ that is developed through to completion will be the basis of this module. Students have the chance to employ the skills gained in previous modules to undertake a more challenging and larger piece of creative work through a series of workshop-based classes that include detailed peer and tutor reviews of students’ work-in-progress.

Module Overview

Fragmentation, uncertainty and conflict characterise a world in aftermath of war, at end of empire, and at the beginning of a period of radical social and cultural change. This module aims to chart the emergence of the contemporary world from these fractured beginnings through an introduction to British literature of the period 1950–2000. From the post-war Windrush migration to the rise of the historical novel at the turn of the millennium, the Angry Young Men to new feminist perspectives and postcolonialism, this module explores relevant theoretical perspectives on the late 20th Century and encourages an appreciation of the relationship between texts and their social, political and cultural contexts.

Module Overview

This module considers the range of theories that we can use when we read and think about literature. Students will have the opportunity to study psychoanalysis, feminism, Marxism and postmodernism, among others, to think about why and how we structure meaning and interpretation in certain ways. We consider questions such as ‘what is an author?’, ‘what is gender?’ and ‘why do certain things frighten us?’ through theorists such as Roland Barthes, Judith Butler and Sigmund Freud.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to give students an insight into careers in the writing industries. It aims to prepare and support them in the process of applying for employment, residencies, grants, internships and other work in the creative industries and also help to prepare them for the realities of life as a contemporary writer.

Module Overview

This module explores apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic texts using a range of novels, short stories, poems and films. Lectures will establish cultural and historical contexts and address issues such as form and genre. The module will explore a range of significant periods from early Judeo-Christian fears regarding the purging moral apocalypse, through Romantic preoccupations with nature and industrialisation, postmodernism and more contemporary concerns about viral or cybernetic apocalypse. We will draw from a range of disciplines including literary theory, psychoanalysis, cultural theory, philosophy and trauma theory.

Module Overview

This module explores the nineteenth-century literature of the USA, chiefly focusing on fiction and poetry. Authors covered include Herman Melville, Emily Dickinson, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Walt Whitman and Willa Cather, among others.

Module Overview

This module covers a broad range of twentieth-century American fiction and poetry. Beginning with Fitzgerald, other authors studied include Ernest Hemingway, Jack Kerouac, Toni Morrison, Thomas Pynchon and David Foster Wallace.

Module Overview

This module examines key British medieval texts, primarily in Middle English, from the High and Late Middle Ages (that is, from approximately the twelfth century to fifteenth century). It explores the breadth of literary activity in the period through a variety of genres--such as debate poetry, ethnographies, beast fables, romance, dream visions, satire, devotional and mystical writings, and mystery plays--and the evolution of a new form of English (the precursor of modern English), revealing that the medieval period is, in truth, a far cry from the misnomer by which it is often identified, the ‘dark ages’.

Module Overview

This module examines one of the most varied literary genres extant, one that, at times, is often relegated to the margins because of its slippery nature. Students will examine early examples of fantasy and trace the genre’s development across a number of key historical epochs, from the classical and medieval periods to the twenty-first century. They will consider especially Tolkien as a pivotal force in the growth of fantasy literature and theory, as well as The Inklings, a group whose works had a profound influence on the evolution of the genre in the twentieth century. A range of subgenres of the fantastic will be explored, which may include high and low fantasy, ironic fantasy, historical fantasy, or magic realism, and, alongside primary texts, they will read selections from modern theoretical and critical texts that articulate different interpretations and approaches to the fantastic.

Module Overview

This module, conceptually, textually, formally, and intellectually challenging, is designed to introduce students to a range of innovative literatures, in a variety of forms, in order both to interrogate the idea of experimental writing, and its own often aggressive interrogation of the expressive potential of literature.

Module Overview

In this module students will have the opportunity to explore the early twentieth century, one of the most creative periods in English literature, when writers like James Joyce, T.S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf and D.H. Lawrence were challenging conventional ways of writing and reading, and rewriting how we experience and understand the world and ourselves. Required reading will include some of the most powerful works from the modern movement between 1910 and 1940 including James Joyce’s Ulysses and T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land.

Module Overview

This module examines literary representations of the world that emerge from the history of European exploration and expansion, and considers literary responses from groups that were marginalized through imperialism. Students will be encouraged to look at the treatment by white writers of issues of race and empire in the early twentieth century. They will also have the opportunity to explore ways in which postcolonial literatures develop strategies of 'writing back' to the imperial centre and re-thinking identity in terms of race, gender and nation. The final section offers a study of postcolonial Britain and some global implications of postcolonial writing.

Module Overview

Students studying Renaissance Literature have the opportunity to look in detail at a range of texts from the late Elizabethan period to the mid-1630s, including work by Shakespeare, John Donne, Ben Jonson and Mary Wroth. They also have the chance to explore the historical and cultural contexts in which these texts were produced, and the effects that they had on the politics and culture of the British Isles in the period. Lectures aim to examine post-Reformation England and late humanism, patronage, gender relations, early modern literary theory, education and philosophy.

Module Overview

Students taking Restoration Literature, the companion module to Renaissance Literature, can study in detail a range of texts written between the era of the English Civil War and the first decade of the eighteenth Century, including work by John Milton; Andrew Marvell; Aphra Behn; and John Wilmot, the 2nd Earl of Rochester. Students have the opportunity to also study the historical and cultural contexts in which these texts were produced. Lectures aim to examine the origins and effects of the civil war, the ethics of rebellion and reform, the Restoration theatre, religious controversies, gender relations, developing philosophical thought and Restoration manners.

Module Overview

This module provides an opportunity for English and Creative Writing students to spend a term at second level studying at one of the University’s partner institutions. During the term abroad students undertake a course load at the partner institution of equivalent standard to that of one term of the programme at Lincoln. Participation in study abroad also offers opportunities for personal student development in the wider sense, taking in cultural, sporting, and social opportunities. In order to participate, students are usually expected to obtain a 2:1 or higher at Level 1, have a good record of attendance and participation, and must complete an application process. A limited number of places will be available each year, and participation is at the discretion of the Module Co-ordinator and the Programme Leader.

Module Overview

While students are introduced to prose fiction writing and essential narrative techniques at level 1, the field of prose writing is much wider than short stories or novels. In areas such as travel, historiography, literary journalism and biography, writers frequently employ similar techniques to those used by novelists to make events and characters more vivid. This module will encourage students to use their creative and technical skills to write non-fiction, including but not limited travel writing, life writing, articles, reviews and journals. Particular attention will be paid to balancing the need to convey factual information with the creative potential of narrative, language and form. This module will allow students to research a field they wish to investigate such as current events, the arts, history or some aspect of science. Students will learn both how to conduct research (through archival research, observations, and interviews) as well as the fundamental techniques of telling a true story. Extended over two semesters, it will enable students to engage more deeply with a chosen field of non-fiction, for example to produce chapters that would contribute to a book as well as features.

Module Overview

This module will explore the role of fiction writing with an initial emphasis on the short story. Many writers begin with the short story. Through writing short stories they are able to experiment, learn the fundamentals of narrative composition, and have the satisfaction of completing something to a high standard in a relatively short period of time. This module will introduce students to the work of a range of fiction writers, whilst helping them to develop their skills in crafting prose. They will be asked to study particular stories each week, but also expected to pursue their own interests in reading. The skills required for writing short stories are also key to working in other forms, so this module will help students to develop as writers, whatever their plans and ambitions may be.

Module Overview

The poetry workshop operates as a series of sessions in which students experiment with a variety of poetic forms with the aim of compiling a collection of their own verse. Students will engage with a number of different poets each week as a stimulus to their own poetic engagement, and will compose and perform their own work as part of a practice of critique.

Module Overview

This module develops students' knowledge of the craft of scriptwriting for a wide range of formats, including but not limited to audio drama, graphic novel and moving image (short film). Students will study, watch and listen to a number of texts appropriate to the format they wish to practice and develop their understanding of the relationship between character, script and production. Attention will be given to the nuts and bolts of scriptwriting - dialogue, pace, setting, and story. These are key to all forms of creative writing and literary analysis, as well as to creating successful script-based texts.

Module Overview

Why have detective narratives proved so enduringly popular? This module will interrogate the iconic figure of the private eye in American popular culture, through the fiction and film of the twentieth and twenty-first century.

Module Overview

Monsters and attics, desolate landscapes, imprisonment and pursuit: the gothic genre emerged in the late eighteenth century to depict our darkest fears and desires. Termed 'the literature of nightmare', gothic departs from a realistic mode of representation and employs a powerful means of symbolic expression. Students are given the opportunity to investigate ways in which the genre has explored psychological and political anxieties, and themes of sexual and social transgression. We consider literary texts from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries, including literature and film, and we give attention to sub-genres such as ‘female gothic’, ‘imperial gothic’ and ‘children’s gothic’.

Module Overview

This module explores what it meant to grow up and to grow old in the nineteenth century, through often contradictory accounts of experiencing age categories from childhood to old age. Students will have the opportunity to examine various constructions of ageing, to reflect on age as a crucial facet of identity. This module considers age as a lens to explore the nineteenth century as a transitional period of growth and expansion as well as decay and decline, through a range of Romantic and Victorian texts.

Module Overview

The dissertation provides students with the opportunity to write an extensive piece of work of 8000 words (or 20 pages/200 lines of poetry) together with a 2000-word critique. The choice of form, style, genre, etc. is up to students' individual preference. Skills developed at level 2 can be further enhanced through the dissertation; these include the structuring of an extended piece from an initial idea, the drafting process, editing, and mastery of the particular genre in which they have chosen to work. This close engagement with literary production as a practical exercise can not only helps students develop an effective writing style but, by placing them in the position of the author, also aims to deepen their understanding of literature in general.

Module Overview

In this module students have the opportunity to research in depth an author or topic of their choosing. Students are expected to commence research over the summer between Levels 2 and 3 and, on their return, have regular, one-to-one meetings with a tutor who is a research specialist in that field. The supervisor offers advice and direction, but primarily this module encourages independent research leading to the production of a 10,000 word dissertation.

Module Overview

This module is designed to examine how terms such as Ireland and Irishness have been constructed and questioned across the last century, a period of immense and often turbulent historical and social change. It aims to explore the representation of place, the nature of nationalism, the changing family unit, gender roles and Ireland's relationship to globalization in Irish poetry, drama and fiction.

Module Overview

This module responds to the recent interest in the representation of lives within literary studies. It discusses a range of life representations (including biography, autobiography, letters, confessions, memoirs, and poems) from the Romantic period to the contemporary moment. Students may consider the origins of autobiography, address Modernist experiments with life representations, and discuss twentieth-century and contemporary innovations, including disability narratives and cross-cultural autobiographies. Themes such as the construction of selfhood, conceptions of memory, the relational self, and the ethics of life writing are addressed.

Module Overview

The first principle of ecological thinking is that it is not only human beings that are meaningful, and that we are neither so separate from, nor so dominant over, the non-human as we tend to think. In this module students can explore what difference it makes to read literature from this perspective. We study literature as part of our complex interaction with our environment, and, perhaps sometimes, as a uniquely valuable one. Students can read texts from ancient Greek pastoral to contemporary dystopias, and from the poet John Clare to the woodland historian Oliver Rackham.

Module Overview

This module enables students to practice advanced techniques and develop innovative strategies for writing poetry. Students will read and reflect upon a range of contemporary works (including emergent forms) in order to further develop their own poetics and poetic practice. Furthermore, the study of poetics as a writerly and speculative discourse will accompany and influence the students' own writing - and the reflection upon the writing - and suggest emergent writing possibilities that students might engage in beyond the module, i.e. various creative environments and cultural economics.

Module Overview

This module will explore the nature of the contemporary through analysis of selected literary texts. The initial date, 1967, has been chosen as it marks a point of transition from a post-war world based upon a liberal consensus to a time of radical uncertainty, extreme and experimental forms of expression, the breakdown of notions of realism in all the arts, sciences and philosophy. Literature, alongside the radicalisation of all intellectual concepts, including reason and common-sense, has played a significant role in debating, illustrating, and disseminating these new ways of thinking both in terms of form and content.

Module Overview

This module considers the genre of modern science fiction and its evolution into one of today’s most popular narrative genres. Analysing a variety of forms – novel, short story, drama, graphic novel and film – students will have the opportunity to examine the socio-historical contexts of some of the most influential narratives of this period. This ranges from the emergence of “scientific romance” in the late nineteenth century, to late twentieth-century forms like cyberpunk and radical fantasy; from the problems of defining “genre fictions” and privileging science fiction over fantasy, to our enduring fascination with alternate histories, non-human agents (robots, animals, genetic hybrids, the environment), ecocatastrophe and post-apocalypse.

Module Overview

This module concentrates on the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, with a particular emphasis on The Canterbury Tales, perhaps Chaucer’s most famous work. Students will have the opportunity to examine the General Prologue and a variety of tales in relation to their historical context and literary antecedents, and, throughout, specific attention will be given to questions of genre (ranging from fable and epic to satire and romance), literary authority, narrative construction, and medieval aesthetics.

Module Overview

This module provides an opportunity for students to study the works of Shakespeare in detail. The dissemination, influence, and adaptation of Shakespeare is unrivalled, and without an understanding of the conventions that the works dissolved and those that they initiated, a full appreciation of the canon of English literature is inevitably lessened. This modules challenges Shakespeare’s status as an icon of tradition and elitism by reading the texts in the light of recent developments in critical theory, and by locating them in the culture of their age. Students will be invited to examine the ways in which different theoretical approaches might have a bearing upon the interpretation of Shakespeare, they will also be conversant with the religious climate of the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, the conditions of performance and play-going in Shakespeare’s theatre, and the significant cultural and historical events of the period.

Module Overview

This module allows students to study the works of the Bard in detail, and to read them in the light of critical theory and literary history. Shakespeare’s plays are a cornerstone of the canon of English literature, but in wider culture they are often treated as inflexible repositories of ‘truth’ and ‘human nature’. This module will resist such approaches, and concentrate instead upon the ways in which the plays address the concerns of their day, as well as how they have been made to signify in other eras. Students can develop an understanding of how Shakespeare’s work dealt with early modern dramatic conventions, politics, and thought; how it addressed questions of history, religion, and race; and how it shaped the culture within which it was written. This module considers Shakespeare’s mature comedies, histories, and tragedies.

Module Overview

This module allows students to pursue an in-depth study of one author’s literary or dramatic works. The author of choice varies from year to year according to academics’ current research interests, but potential authors may include writers of fiction and/or poetry such as Angela Carter, Charlotte Bronte, Iain Banks, Thomas Pynchon, M.R.James, Jane Austen and Sylvia Plath; and dramatists such as Caryl Churchill, Thomas Middleton, Aphra Behn, Ben Johnson and debbie tucker green. Students will explore the writer’s oeuvre in terms of themes, style, and engagement with form and genre traditions, and with contemporary cultural debates. We also address practicalities of authorship such as the role of editors, publishing/performance formats, and different readerships/audiences. Students will also consider the writer’s legacies including the ‘afterlife’ of their works in adaptation. As well as studying texts, students will engage with conceptual debates about the role of the author : is attention to the author’s life an outmoded and over-deterministic approach to the study of a text? or a necessary part of contextualisation? As we scrutinise the figure of the author in biography, literary societies, literary tourism and popular culture, we ask : what purposes does the ‘author’ as a cultural construction serve ? and does this have anything to do with reading?

Module Overview

This module allows students to pursue an in-depth study of one author’s literary or dramatic works. The author of choice varies from year to year according to academics’ current research interests, but potential authors may include writers of fiction and/or poetry such as Angela Carter, Charlotte Bronte, Iain Banks, Thomas Pynchon, M.R.James, Jane Austen and Sylvia Plath; and dramatists such as Caryl Churchill, Thomas Middleton, Aphra Behn, Ben Johnson and debbie tucker green. Students will explore the writer’s oeuvre in terms of themes, style, and engagement with form and genre traditions, and with contemporary cultural debates. We also address practicalities of authorship such as the role of editors, publishing/performance formats, and different readerships/audiences. Students will also consider the writer’s legacies including the ‘afterlife’ of their works in adaptation. As well as studying texts, students will engage with conceptual debates about the role of the author : is attention to the author’s life an outmoded and over-deterministic approach to the study of a text? or a necessary part of contextualisation? As we scrutinise the figure of the author in biography, literary societies, literary tourism and popular culture, we ask : what purposes does the ‘author’ as a cultural construction serve ? and does this have anything to do with reading?

Module Overview

This optional module explores representations of the southern states of America in prose fiction, film, drama and music. In the first section southern stereotypes and ‘resistant’ representations, produced by southerners and others, are examined in relation to social, political and historical contexts. This is followed by a section on African American representations of the south. Finally, a section on music and vernacular traditions explores the influence of the south on American popular music. Students are encouraged to adopt an interdisciplinary approach to examine questions of regional identity in a wide range of texts.

Module Overview

This module explores how childhood is constructed in a wide range of literary texts – texts by adults for adults, by adults for children, and by children themselves. Underpinning the module is the notion of ‘childhood’ as a cultural construct into which writers invest various, even contradictory, meanings. Students have the opportunity to explore texts by adults who idealise or demonise the child to suit their personal and philosophical agendas. Students may then analyse the mixture of didactic and therapeutic agendas in enduring genres of children’s literature such as the fairytale, adventure story and cautionary tale. Finally, we turn to children as authors in a study of juvenilia.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to some of the specific elements of writing contemporary fiction in the field of crime and the psychological thriller. The module will consider the origins of crime fiction in the nineteenth century before concentrating on what has become one of the most popular genres in contemporary publishing.

Module Overview

This module aims to explore new thematic trends, stylistic innovations and cultural developments in post-millennial British fiction, including a focus on globalising processes, transnational migration and digital technology. The module also addresses the development (and rethinking of the concepts) of gender and class in literature of the period and account for the continuing importance of the literary form in an age of digital publishing.

Module Overview

This module will introduce some of the specific elements of writing contemporary fiction for children and young adults. The market for children's literature is an old one, and some historical context of that market will be presented throughout the workshop sessions, but the main focus will be providing practical experience of writing for a wide age range, whether more traditional children's books or the newly emerging young adult market.

Module Overview

This module will introduce some of the specific elements of writing contemporary historical fiction. The field traditionally has been associated with romance writing, but it also encompasses a wide range of titles that frequently deal with aspects of war and violent historical events, and frequently has moved beyond genre writing into different forms of literary fiction.

Module Overview

This module will introduce students to some of the specific elements of writing science fiction and fantasy. Although these two genres only emerged fully during the twentieth century, they have their roots in literature that is as old as the classics in the case of fantasy and the writings of Jonathan Swift and Mary Shelley with regard to science fiction. Frequently a medium for satire and social commentary, this module will explore some of the ways in which science fiction and fantasy authors offer means to develop thought experiments and oblique commentary on contemporary developments.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

How you are assessed

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Fees and Scholarships

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

Students are responsible for travel, accommodation, and general living costs while on study abroad.

Entry Requirements 2020-21

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 7.0 overall, with a minimum of 6.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Entry Requirements 2021-22

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 7.0 overall, with a minimum of 6.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Teaching and Learning During Covid-19

At Lincoln, Covid-19 has encouraged us to review our practices and, as a result, to take the opportunity to find new ways to enhance the student experience. We have made changes to our teaching and learning approach and to our campus, to ensure that students and staff can enjoy a safe and positive learning experience. We will continue to follow Government guidance and work closely with the local Public Health experts as the situation progresses, and adapt our teaching and learning accordingly to keep our campus as safe as possible.

Study Abroad

In the second year, students have the option to select the Study Abroad Period English and Creative Writing module. Students can spend a term studying at one of the University’s partner institutions.

In order to participate, students are usually expected to obtain a 2:1 or higher in first year, have a good record of attendance and participation, and must complete an application process. A limited number of places will be available each year, and participation is at the discretion of the module co-ordinator and the Programme Leader. Students are responsible for travel, accommodation, and general living costs while on study abroad.

Research and Teaching

English academics are engaged in research which directly informs their teaching. There are particular strengths in 21st Century literature, 19th Century literature, Gothic studies and drama. Current research projects include studies on Shakespeare, women’s life-writing, literary reactions to early photography, and utopian theatre.

Students have the opportunity to learn from active professional authors, including members of English staff. Their publications include novels, poetry, and prize-winning short stories.

Teaching is enriched by workshops, readings, and masterclasses with visiting contemporary authors. Poet Laureate Dame Carol Ann Duffy is a Visiting Artist at the University of Lincoln.

"The University of Lincoln’s Creative Writing programme is unparalleled, offering a diverse range of modules and exceptional academic support. In comparison to programmes offered by other universities, it is by far the most outstanding I’ve seen."

Jessica Toye, BA (Hons) English and Creative Writing graduate

Career Opportunities

English and Creative Writing graduates may choose to pursue careers in various literary and creative professions, such as publishing, journalism, advertising, public relations, marketing, the civil service, and communications. Students can continue their studies at postgraduate level or take qualifications in teaching.

Lincoln graduates have gone on to work at regional and national media outlets including the BBC, The Daily Mail and Channel 4.

Virtual Open Days

While you may not be able to visit us in person at the moment, you can still find out more about the University of Lincoln and what it is like to live and study here at one of our live Virtual Open Days.

Book Your Place

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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