Key Information

Full-time

3-4 Years

Part-time

6 years

Typical Offer

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Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

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UCAS Code

L311

Course Code

SOPSOLUB

Key Information

Full-time

3-4 Years

Part-time

6 years

Typical Offer

View

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

L311

Course Code

SOPSOLUB

BA (Hons) Social Policy and Sociology BA (Hons) Social Policy and Sociology

Students are able to apply for a study abroad year at one of our partner institutions in the USA, Sweden, Belgium, Germany, or the Netherlands after the second year of their degree.

Key Information

Full-time

3-4 Years

Part-time

6 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

L311

Course Code

SOPSOLUB

Key Information

Full-time

3-4 Years

Part-time

6 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

L311

Course Code

SOPSOLUB

Select Year of Entry

Welcome to BA (Hons) Social Policy and Sociology

Creating effective social policies is key to tackling the big issues we face in society today such as poverty, health inequality, and unemployment.

Social Policy and Sociology at Lincoln draws on these two key disciplines to offer an insight into the diverse social groups, structures, and practices that make up society.

The degree aims to analyse and critique the different social constructions of everyday life. It offers students the opportunity to engage with key debates about social problems and the welfare of citizens, alongside the study of sociological theory and research methods.

Welcome to BA (Hons) Social Policy and Sociology

Creating effective social policies is key to tackling the big issues we face in society today such as poverty, health inequality, and unemployment.

Social Policy and Sociology at Lincoln draws on these two key disciplines to offer an insight into the diverse social groups, structures, and practices that make up society.

The degree aims to analyse and critique the different social constructions of everyday life. It offers students the opportunity to engage with key debates about social problems and the welfare of citizens, alongside the study of sociological theory and research methods.

How You Study

The degree provides an opportunity for students to engage in research-led teaching and gain an insight into innovative academic theories and practices. There is a distinct range of modules, drawing upon the expertise of academics in the School of Social and Political Sciences and the wider university, in order to offer an academically rigorous and contemporary programme.

In the first year, students can build their knowledge base, looking at key social science concepts, social issues, and social justice. As the course progresses, specialist modules are designed to enable students to advance their discipline-specific knowledge. The course aims to develop a range of transferable skills relevant to different career paths.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

How You Study

The degree provides an opportunity for students to engage in research-led teaching and gain an insight into innovative academic theories and practices. There is a distinct range of modules, drawing upon the expertise of academics in the School of Social and Political Sciences and the wider university, in order to offer an academically rigorous and contemporary programme.

In the first year, students can build their knowledge base, looking at key social science concepts, social issues, and social justice. As the course progresses, specialist modules are designed to enable students to advance their discipline-specific knowledge. The course aims to develop a range of transferable skills relevant to different career paths.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

Teaching and Learning During Covid-19

Information for Offer Holders Joining Us in Autumn 2021

Letter from Head of School of Social and Political Sciences

We are delighted you are interested in joining us at the University of Lincoln and I am writing to let you know about our planning for the new academic year. You currently have an offer of a place at the University and we want to keep you updated so you can start preparing for your future, should you be successful in meeting any outstanding conditions of your offer.

We fully intend your experience with us at Lincoln to be engaging, supportive and academically challenging. We are determined to provide our students with a safe and exciting campus experience, ensuring that you benefit from the best that both face-to-face and online teaching offer. We have kept our focus on friendliness and community spirit at Lincoln and we look forward to your participation in that community.

As you know, the UK Government has published its roadmap for the easing of Coronavirus lockdown restrictions in England. There are still some uncertainties for universities around possible restrictions for the next academic year, particularly in relation to social distancing in large group teaching. We are planning in line with government guidance for both face-to-face and online teaching to ensure that you have a good campus experience and can complete all the requirements for your programme.  We are fully prepared to adapt and flex our plans if changes in government regulations make this necessary during the year.

Face-to-face teaching and interaction with tutors and course mates are key to students’ learning and the broader student experience. Face-to-face sessions will be prioritised where it is most valuable, particularly for seminars, tutorials, workshops, practicals and lab sessions. Students tell us that there are real benefits to some elements of online learning within a blended approach, such as revisiting recorded materials and developing new digital skills and confidence.  At Lincoln we aim to take forward the best aspects of both.

This letter sets out in detail various aspects of the planned experience at Lincoln for your chosen subject area, and we hope the information is helpful as you plan for your future.

Teaching and Learning

Your programme of study is typically delivered by a combination of lectures and seminars. Lectures are when all of the students on a module are taught together in one group; seminars are smaller groups allowing for more discussion, debate, and engagement with tasks. Face-to-face sessions will be prioritised where it is most valuable, particularly for seminars, tutorials and workshop-based teaching. We aim to record all our lecture-based sessions, so that students can return to the content afterwards, for example, when preparing for a seminar or for an assessment task. The principle of a mix of face-to-face and online provision will be maintained across your programme of study.

Students in the School are assessed by a range of methods, including coursework and exams. Most of our assessments are submitted online as standard in normal circumstances. Where there are exams, in-class tests, or oral assessments planned, decisions as to whether they go ahead in this form or in an online variant (for example, ‘take home’ exams) will depend on circumstances regarding the pandemic nearer the assessment period.

In addition to formal teaching sessions on modules of study, every student in the School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Lincoln is allocated a Personal Tutor, who is available to support students as they progress through university. As well as tutors providing responsive support, personal tutoring sessions are also timetabled. Our plan is that face-to-face personal tutoring will be in place, supplemented by online ‘drop in’ sessions.

The School of Social and Political Sciences runs occasional study trips, related to specific modules and programmes of study. Again, our intention is that these will go ahead in 2021-22, so long as restrictions allow.

The School of Social and Political Sciences is a genuine community, built on strong staff-student engagement both within the formal structures of student representation and the Personal Tutoring system, and also through staff commitment to our students. This community ideal remains central to our work, and has been particularly important during the pandemic. Communication with our students is a priority for us, and is a two-way process. We will keep you informed —for example, by email from myself as Head of School, or from the University leadership— of any changes that pandemic-related developments require. In addition, we take the student voice seriously. Whether through individual students contacting their tutors, or via the more formal engagement that takes place between student reps and School staff on a very regular basis. We listen to and respond to our students.

The University Campus

We are very proud of our beautiful and vibrant campuses at the University of Lincoln and we have used our extensive indoor and outdoor spaces to provide students with access to study and social areas as well as learning resources and facilities, adapting them where necessary in line with government guidance. All the mitigations and safety measures you would expect are in place on our campuses (at Lincoln, Riseholme, and Holbeach), such as hand sanitisers, one-way systems, and other social distancing measures where these are required.

Student Wellbeing and Support

The University’s Student Wellbeing Centre and Student Support Centre are fully open for face-to-face and online support.  Should you, as one of our applicants, have any questions about coming to Lincoln in October or any other concerns, these specialist teams are here for you. You can contact Student Wellbeing and the Student Support Centre by visiting https://studentservices.lincoln.ac.uk where service details and contact information are available, or if you are in Lincoln you can make an appointment to meet a member of the team.

To enable you to make the most of your experience in Lincoln and to help you access course materials and other services, we recommend that you have a desktop, laptop or tablet device available during your studies. This will enable you to engage easily with our online learning platforms from your student accommodation or from home. Students can use IT equipment on campus in the Library, our learning lounges, and specialist academic areas; however, there may not always be a space free when you have a timetabled session or an assessment to complete which is why we recommend you have your own device too if possible. If you are struggling to access IT equipment or reliable internet services, please contact ICT for technical support and Student Support who can assist you with further advice and information.

We are committed to providing you with the best possible start to university life and to helping you to prepare for your time with us. As part of this commitment, you can access our Student Life pre-arrival online support package. This collection of digital resources, advice and helpful tips created by current students is designed to help you prepare for the all-important first steps into higher education, enabling you to learn within a supportive community and to make the most of the new opportunities that the University of Lincoln provides. When you are ready, you can begin by going to studentlife.lincoln.ac.uk/starting.

Students Union

Your Students’ Union is here to make sure that you get the most from every aspect of your student experience. They will be providing a huge range of in-person and virtual events and opportunities — you are sure to find something perfect for you! Meet people and find a new hobby by joining one of their 150 sports teams and societies. Grab lunch between teaching or a drink with friends in The Swan, Towers or The Barge. Learn new skills and boost your CV by taking part in training courses and volunteering opportunities in your spare time. Grab a bike from the Cycle Hire and explore the city you will be calling home!

To kick-off the new academic year, your Students’ Union will be bringing you The Official Lincoln Freshers Week 2021, with a huge line-up of social events, club nights, fayres and activities for you enjoy (restrictions permitting). Keep an eye on www.facebook.com/lincolnfreshers21 for line-up and ticket updates, so you don’t miss out.

Most importantly, your Students’ Union will always be there for you when you need it most; making sure that your voice as a student is always heard. The SU Advice Centre can provide independent advice and support on housing, finance, welfare and academic issues. As well as this, your Course Reps are always on hand to make sure that you are getting the best from your academic experience. To find out more about the Students’ Union’s events, opportunities, support and how to get in contact go to: www.lincolnsu.com

Student Accommodation

Many applicants will choose to live in dedicated student accommodation on, or close to, campus and you may well have already booked your student residence for the upcoming year. All University-managed student accommodation will have our Residential Wardens in place. Residential Wardens are here to help you settle into your new accommodation and will be offering flatmate and residential support activities throughout the year. If you have booked University accommodation, you will have already heard from us with further details on where you will be living to help you prepare. If you have not yet booked your accommodation, we still have plenty of options available. In the meantime, lots of advice and information can be found on the accommodation pages of our website: https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studentlife/accommodation/

The information detailed in this letter will form part of your agreement with the University of Lincoln. If we do not hear from you to the contrary prior to enrolment, we will assume that you acknowledge and accept the information contained in this letter. Adaptations to how we work may have to be made in line with any future changes in government guidance, and we will communicate these with you as necessary. Please do review the University’s Admissions Terms and Conditions (in particular sections 8 and 9) and Student Complaints Procedure so you understand your rights and the  agreement between the University and its students.

We very much hope that this information is useful to help you plan for the next step in your academic journey, and we look forward to welcoming you here at Lincoln this autumn. This is the start of a new phase and will be an exciting time for all of us. If you have any questions, please do email me at ebacon@lincoln.ac.uk

Very best wishes,

Edwin Bacon

Head of School of Social and Political Sciences

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Applying Research (Social Sciences) 2022-23SOS1004MLevel 42022-23This module aims to enable students to both recognise and also understand the different methodologies employed in social research and to apply these to their own research project and critique of methods. Overall, the aim of this module is to set out methodological skills, and involve students in their application, and to encourage critical reflection on a variety of levels.CoreKey Social Science Concepts 2022-23SOS1005MLevel 42022-23This module aims to give students the opportunity to develop a knowledge and understanding of key social science thinkers and concepts pertinent to all of the disciplines taught within the School. Throughout, students will be encouraged to think critically about the ideas presented and to examine social problems in the light of a range of academic perspectives.CoreSocial Issues and Social Justice 2022-23SOP1001MLevel 42022-23This foundation module aims to examine some key contexts and practices of social policy in the UK. It aims to provide an overview of contemporary British society and some of its pressing issues and challenges. It explores how social policy, as a broad framework of welfare, justice and rights agendas and interventions has sought to address these issues and challenges. This is set in a historical and comparative context. The module highlights the importance of understanding how social policies are framed, made and implemented and how these can be analysed within understandings of societal inequality and poverty.CoreSociological Imagination 2022-23SOS1006MLevel 42022-23This module is designed to introduce students to sociology by offering the opportunity to consider some of the key themes, theories and concepts which are important to the study of this subject. Students can explore the historical development of sociology, including the role of the early important sociologists such as Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, George Herbert Mead and C. Wrights Mills, amongst others. The different and significant sociological perspectives will also be examined and discussed alongside some of the major themes explored within sociology.Core(Re)Reading the Sociological Canon I 2023-24SOS2007MLevel 52023-24This module aims to analyse some of the seminal works which have been significant to the academic development of sociology. Students will have the opportunity to explore a variety of classical and contemporary texts, with the aim of providing them with an in-depth understanding of sociological themes and theories across time.Core(Re)reading the Sociological Canon II 2023-24SOS2008MLevel 52023-24This module aims to analyse some of the seminal works which have been significant to the academic development of sociology. This module will seek to examine a series of articles and books which are of sociological significance and have emerged from the early 20th Century into the 21st Century.CoreComparative Politics and Policy 2023-24POL2001MLevel 52023-24This module is based on the belief that comparative methodology can be a useful tool for social and political analysis. The module begins with a consideration of the development of comparative approaches, the use of a range of comparative techniques and the validity of comparison. It proceeds to an examination of some basic concepts that can help provide an understanding of the bases upon which governments are built and operate. Students then have the opportunity to apply the analytical and theoretical tools from the early parts of the module to consider a variety of features of contemporary politics and policy, particularly in the context of democratic transition in different regions of the world.CoreDebating Welfare States 2023-24SOP2012MLevel 52023-24This module aims to enable students to analyse the priorities and developments of welfare states over time, and through analysis of these developments, equip students with the tools to interpret key contemporary social, political and economic trends.CoreIdeology into Practice 2023-24SOP2001MLevel 52023-24This module aims to examine the impact (and sometimes the lack of impact) of ideology on practice in social policy. Whilst the focus of the module is on the experience of the United Kingdom, comparison with other states will be made where appropriate.CoreResearching in Social Science 2023-24SOS2012MLevel 52023-24Building on the level 1 module Applying Research, this module seeks to systematically scrutinise examples of research undertaken in the subject area of Social Policy/Sociology. The module has two main aims. First, to enable students to understand, in concrete terms, what constitutes research in Social Policy/Sociology and how the research process leads to the production of specific research outputs including dissertations, theses, published academic articles and research monographs. Second, the module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop the knowledge base necessary for the production of research proposals and outputs.CoreChallenges of European Politics 2023-24IST2011MLevel 52023-24This module seeks to introduce students to politics at the European level through an analysis of challenges in European politics and policy making. Beginning with the history of European integration and the first attempts to secure peace through economic interdependency, the module focuses on the development of the EU institutions and the ways in which policy-makers, bureaucrats, intellectuals and civil society actors have attempted to resolve problems of cooperation in an ever larger Union.OptionalConceptualising Sex Work 2023-24SOS2003MLevel 52023-24This module aims to explore the cultural, practical and theoretical developments relating to sex work, drawing upon national and international examples. Taking a comparative approach, this module seeks to understand how scholars conceptualise sex work within different competing feminist frameworks and how these ideas reflect, or are at odds with, popular public and political discourse.OptionalCriminology in the Professions 2023-24CRI2002MLevel 52023-24This is a vocationally oriented module where students have the opportunity to reflect upon the relevance of criminological knowledge and skills in a variety of employment options. The aim of the module is to set out how the methodological, academic and practical skills gained from a degree can be applied to professional development, culminating in the production of a professional development file.OptionalIdeas and Issues in Political Economy 2023-24IST2012MLevel 52023-24OptionalModel United Nations 2023-24IST2003MLevel 52023-24This module is designed to provide an introduction to the activities of the United Nations, as well as an understanding of the practices of international diplomacy and governance. The module will aim to use a discussion of contemporary international issues to explore some of the protocol and procedures of diplomacy. It will also seek to provide students with an introduction to issues of international organisation and international law and treaty-making. All of this is designed to assist students in preparing for their role as a 'diplomat' at a Model United Nations conference.OptionalNations and Nationalism 2023-24POL2069MLevel 52023-24This module explores the sources of our most basic and powerful feelings of political loyalty and attachment our ideas about who we are, why we are and who has the right to rule over us. The module introduces students to the competing approaches to understanding nations and nationalism by examining the ways in which nationalism can influence state development, economic relations and democratic practice.The module also engages students in the intersection between nations and other key categories in social science such as: political mobilisation, conflict, culture, gender, religion and globalisation.OptionalPolicing Crime and Deviance 2023-24CRI2004MLevel 52023-24This module aims to examine core questions about the increasingly diverse forms of policing of crime and deviance. It considers how and why we have policed different forms of crime and deviance and why those changes have occurred and the competing character of many of the positions involved.OptionalPolitical Parties 2023-24POL2005MLevel 52023-24This module aims to address a variety of issues relating to political parties in the United Kingdom. The political science literature covers a wide variety of topics around parties. Amongst those which are examined in this module are the following; the historical development of parties; the role of parties in terms of mobilisation of support, electioneering and campaigning, recruitment of personnel; representation of the electorate and issue-based politics; and the partisan divide. These will be examined primarily within the context of a discussion of the three major parties within the British political system including their development, their ideological tenets and their contemporary positions. However, towards the end of the module these will be set against the position of other parties within the UK including the Scottish National Party, Plaid Cymru and the Northern Irish parties, to which will be added a comparative perspective, drawing upon the roles and experiences of parties in Western Europe.OptionalPolitics and Society in Contemporary China 2023-24POL2006MLevel 52023-24OptionalPsychology in the Criminal Justice Process 2023-24CRI2005MLevel 52023-24This module is designed as an introduction to how psychology might contribute to our understanding of the various actors and organisations within the criminal justice process. Students are expected to critically compare and contrast the theories and methodologies employed in creating psychological knowledges, with those commonly used in the discipline of criminology and in this context, they will be expected to recognise both the contributions and problems presented by the use of psychological knowledges in the criminal justice process. Students will also be expected to undertake their own research project around a psychological theme; apply a statistical analysis to the data they collect and then consider how their results might impact on a relevant criminal justice issue.OptionalSocial Engagement 2023-24SOP2011MLevel 52023-24This module encourages students to undertake one or more external activities relevant to their programme of study, and to engage in a critical reflection of the nature of this activity and how it relates to society as a whole and to their personal development as individuals. Relevant activities may involve significant interaction with an organisation outside the University providing an appropriate experience additional to the students programme of studies, such as voluntary work or mentoring within a service-providing organisation. Please note that students will be expected to play a significant role in initiating and arranging their programme of experience and to take responsibility for the frequency and form of experience. There may be additional costs in the form of transportation and accommodation depending on where students wish to pursue experience. The experience will be required to consist of a minimum of 30 hours.OptionalSociology of Education 2023-24SOS2019MLevel 52023-24This module will introduce students to a range of key themes, theories and perspectives that critically reflect on the nature and purpose of education. The module will provide students with an overview of the history of education (formal and informal), including the development of education policies in the UK, but also extends beyond this to consider a range of international perspectives. The module will also introduce students to a range of sociological theories and perspectives that examine the nature and purpose of education in society. The module will also engage with issues of (in)equality in education and will examine concepts such as class, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, disability citizenship and intersectionality. Furthermore, the module will also explore alternative approaches to education globally, including informal education provision, digital education, the home schooling movement and more liberatory, critical and popular pedagogies.OptionalSociology of Law 2023-24SOS2013MLevel 52023-24OptionalSociology of Religion 2023-24SOS2014MLevel 52023-24OptionalStudy Abroad 2023-24CRI2009MLevel 52023-24OptionalThe Vigilant State: intelligence and national security 2023-24POL2007MLevel 52023-24OptionalThinking Politics 2023-24POL2003MLevel 52023-24This modules seeks to examine the historical background to the various strands of political thought and ideas. In doing this, it aims to build upon some of the major ideas and concepts introduced at level one, by illustrating linkages between political theories and other aspects of politics. In particular, reference is made to key thinkers who have left their intellectual imprint on political ideas and beliefs.OptionalUnderstanding Domestic Abuse 2023-24CRI2010MLevel 52023-24This module will critically examine the nature, extent and impact of domestic violence and abuse (DVA). Taking a criminological approach, the module will explore a wide range of academic, policy and practitioner perspectives. Students will explore the recent development of domestic violence and abuse as a criminological problem within a changing political landscape. This will include understanding a survivors journey in the context of victimology and examining the legal, criminal justice and community responses. The module will also explore the emerging literature on primary and secondary prevention perpetrator programmes.OptionalUnderstanding the City 2023-24SOP2009MLevel 52023-24Over half the planets population now lives in an urban area and urbanisation across the globe looks set to continue spreading inexorably. However, cities are contradictory sites of human development patterned by opportunity, inequality, exploitation and conflict. These traits pose challenges for the meeting of human welfare needs and for our understandings of contemporary life within cities. This module aims to enable students to analyse the emergence of cities across time and space, and through analysis of the city, enable students the opportunity to develop the tools to interpret key contemporary sociological, political and policy trends.OptionalWelfare Policy and Work 2023-24SOP2010MLevel 52023-24The module is designed to examine the ways in which the state, through its social security and labour market policies, has affected the lives of those in paid work and those outside it. A particular focus of the course is on the emerging all-party consensus on welfare policy, in which mainstream politicians agree that benefits should no longer be paid to people of working age who refuse work or training, and that governments must ensure that jobs pay more than out-of-work benefits.OptionalWork and Society 2023-24SOS2015MLevel 52023-24This module seeks to explore the relationship between work and society, drawing on different classical and contemporary sociological theories of work. It aims to examine key areas within the sociology of work such as concepts of work, work-place inequalities, resistance and the reality and challenges of engaging in paid work in the 21st Century.OptionalYouth Justice 2023-24CRI2006MLevel 52023-24This module aims to provide students with an opportunity to explore the youth justice system in depth, including the theoretical and historical contexts of youth justice, contemporary policy and practice developments and the salience of political agendas in constructing responses to young peoples offending behaviour.OptionalYouth, Culture and Resistance 2023-24SOS2001MLevel 52023-24This module seeks to prompt a sociological enquiry into youth cultures, addressing issues of identity and meaning within the behaviour, consumption and lifestyles of young people. Reflecting upon contemporary narratives of youth as dangerous or out of control, the module aims to investigate the plurality of youth cultures, and the diversity of young peoples cultural practices.OptionalAnalysing the Policy Process 2024-25SOP3005MLevel 62024-25Aiming to build upon Understanding the Policy Process, this module is designed to support students not only to continue to develop their knowledge of a range of perspectives on the policy process but, in addition, to use these to analyse a case study relevant to their degree programme.CoreContemporary Social Theories and Approaches 2024-25SOS3007MLevel 62024-25CoreIndependent Study 2024-25SOP3009MLevel 62024-25This Level 3 Module will build upon the skills and knowledge gained during Level 2s research modules. At Level 3, students will work with their supervisors to produce a research project. The Independent Study module will be guided by a clear process of refining research proposals, working with supervisors, initiation of lines of enquiry; implementation and monitoring of research activities over the academic year. Therefore, the Independent Study module will be guided by a clearly demarcated process of: research proposal; refinement; supervisor allocation; critical comment; initiation of lines of enquiry; implementation and monitoring of research activities over the academic year. Therein student progress will be reviewed in relation to research undertaken, clarity of objectives, report/dissertation plan and the work/chapters undertaken thus far. The teaching support will be ongoing over the academic year; but will be primarily geared to assisting the student on issues/problems such as research methods and ethical considerations, managing and presenting research materials and suitable theoretical approaches in their chosen research area, rather than reviewing and substantively commenting upon written chapters.CoreUnderstanding the Policy Process 2024-25SOP3004MLevel 62024-25This module is designed to focus upon the processes of policy making and implementation at both practical and theoretical levels. It aims to provide students with an introduction to a variety of models of policy making and seeks to discuss the complexities of the distribution of power and decision making, primarily, but not limited to, the field of social policy.CoreBody Politics 2024-25SOS3002MLevel 62024-25This module aims to introduce students to different paradigms of the 'body' and 'embodiment'. Recent research suggests that our understandings and our relationship with our own and other bodies has been and is continuing to undergo radical changes. This module will seek to explore these ongoing developments in Western and non-Western cultures and societies.OptionalCare or control? Welfare institutions in Britain before the welfare state 2024-25SOP3035MLevel 62024-25This module focuses on welfare institutionalisation in Britain before the emergence of the welfare state. Through a series of case studies, the module explores why and how people entered welfare institutions and considers the extent to which they were caring and controlling. Students can benefit from an cross-disciplinary approach as this module addresses themes across Social Policy, Criminology, Sociology and Politics.OptionalChildren, Families and the State 2024-25SOS3004MLevel 62024-25This module aims to examine the nature of family policy as it has developed for different family forms and for different purposes, and seeks to consider why an understanding of family policy is important in the twenty-first century. This is set in historical, ideological and comparative contexts.OptionalCommunity and Conflict 1 2024-25SOP3006MLevel 62024-25OptionalCommunity and Conflict 2 2024-25SOP3007MLevel 62024-25OptionalCounter-Terrorism Studies 2024-25POL3085MLevel 62024-25Throughout this module students will have the opportunity to explore how state agencies respond to real and perceived threats of extremism and terrorism. This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of the extent to which the state and the media frame extremism and terrorism.OptionalCrimes of the Powerful 2024-25CRI3076MLevel 62024-25This module critically examines the deviant activities of the powerful and their impact on the struggle for social justice. In contrast to much of orthodox criminology, which tends to focus its attention downwards, and onto the actions of the poor, dispossessed and relatively powerless, this module shifts the gaze upwards, and onto the harmful activities of states, corporations and similarly powerful collectives. Drawing from a myriad of human rights frameworks, a critical stance is taken towards the concepts of crime, power and legitimacy to understand and explain the deviant activities of these elites, and illuminate potential avenues for prevention, protection and redress.OptionalDrugs and Society 2024-25SOL3001MLevel 62024-25OptionalGender and Violence 2024-25SOS3006MLevel 62024-25This module explores the issue of gender-based violence (GBV) in contemporary society. GBV is understood as behaviour or attitudes underpinned by inequitable power relations that hurt, threaten or undermine people because of their gender or (perceived) sexuality. The module starts by addressing the definitions and conceptual boundaries utilised in understanding GBV, and key theoretical perspectives on GBV, taking an in-depth look at debates in GBV scholarship, such as issues around intersectionality, patriarchy and patriarchal bargain, e.g., whether this is a useful concept and how far it can explain (global) gendered power relations. These issues will be developed through case studies of specific forms of GBV such as domestic violence and sexual coercion and rape. These case studies will explore specific forms of GBV in the context of the broader theoretical debates, as well as the current knowledge base on incidence, prevalence and responses to GBV. The module will also explore theoretical, methodological and ethical considerations when researching GBV.OptionalGlobal Civil Society 2024-25IST3004MLevel 62024-25This module will aim to address the historical origins of global civil society (e.g. the anti-slavery movement), together with diverse and competing contemporary meanings of global civil and uncivil society.OptionalGlobal Governance 2024-25IST3005MLevel 62024-25This module explores the concept and practice of global governance. International Relations scholars are increasingly concerned with how international organisations work and how they might work better. Of particular interest is the governance of issues that are inherently global; that is, those that transcend national borders. Examples include health, the environment, poverty, trade, finance, security, conflict and crime. The module begins with the historical development of international institutions and key theories of global governance. It then examines present day international organisations, in terms of their power, efficacy and impact. The final part of the module assesses whether current governance arrangements are addressing global challenges sufficiently well or whether there is potential and scope for improvement.OptionalHuman Rights (Social Sciences) 2024-25SOS3152MLevel 62024-25This module is designed to introduce students to human rights at both the conceptual and practical level. It aims to explore the theoretical arguments around the source of human rights and identifies some of the problems and possibilities which emerge from such readings.OptionalMulticulturalism and Britishness 2024-25POL3003MLevel 62024-25This module is designed to explore political challenges and debates around the presence of culturally diverse populations in the United Kingdom and aims to examine the role this presence plays in understandings of British and English identities.OptionalNew Social Movements 2024-25POL3004MLevel 62024-25OptionalParliamentary Studies 2024-25POL3005MLevel 62024-25This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop an in-depth knowledge of how the UK Parliament works, in theory and in practice. It will aim to examine Parliaments twin relationships with the Executive and with the citizen, and situate these within broader theories and debates about democratic accountability and the nature of representation. The module also aims to bring students into closer contact with Parliament through handling Parliamentary materials and by facilitating contact with Parliamentarians through, for example an external speaker series, and when possible an optional visit to Parliament. Please note that where opportunities arise to take part in a trip to Parliament, students are expected to cover their own transportation and meal costs.OptionalPolice Studies 2024-25CRI3005MLevel 62024-25This module aims to build upon the more general analysis of policing in Policing Crime and Deviance. The aim is to instil a more focused, substantial and critical understanding of the place of policing within the contemporary complex myriad of social controls, as well as the specific organisational and political challenges faced by the police in the 21st Century.OptionalPolitical Transformations of Russia and China 2024-25POL3006MLevel 62024-25OptionalPsychology, Crime and Criminology 2024-25CRI3002MLevel 62024-25OptionalRace and Racism 2024-25SOS3155MLevel 62024-25This interdisciplinary module will explore the issues of race, racism, race relations and racial conflict, and resistance to racism in the contemporary UK and worldwide. Although the main focus of this module is on the UK, examples from different parts of the world and a comparative lens will enable us to examine these issues from a global perspective. Beginning with colonial discourses of the racial other and the history of colonialism, slavery and indentured labour, this module will examine various theoretical and conceptual debates on race and racism, and critically assess how changing conceptualisations of race and racism arise in specific socio-political and historical contexts. The module will also provide students with the chance to assess the continued significance of race and racism in the contemporary world. Students can benefit from an cross-disciplinary approach that addresses themes across Sociology, Criminology, Politics, International Relations, and Social Policy.OptionalSociology of Health and Illness 2024-25SOL3002MLevel 62024-25OptionalTerrorism and Extremism in the United Kingdom 2024-25CRI3009MLevel 62024-25The aims of the module are to: 1.Introduce students to the historical, contemporary and contentious debates concerning how the British state has and should respond to terrorism and extremism. 2.Encourage students to apply criminological and other relevant subject knowledge generated in different contexts to the study of terrorism and extremism in the United Kingdom. 3.Enable students to practice and demonstrate transferable skills in critical thinking, presentation, and oral and written communication.OptionalThe Developing World 2024-25IST3007MLevel 62024-25This module takes the politics, economics and societies of the developing world as its subject matter. The module aims to explore a range of contemporary issues confronting the developing world and the module seeks to use case studies extensively throughout, in order to illuminate theory and to demonstrate the broader relevance of the issues under discussion to the study of international relations.OptionalThe Politics of Global Health 2024-25IST3008MLevel 62024-25OptionalThe Politics of Masculinity 2024-25POL3001MLevel 62024-25This module is designed to explore the politics of masculinity in contemporary society. Overall, the module will aim to make the familiar strange and enable students to question their own assumptions, as well as popular and common sense notions of gender.OptionalWar Crimes and Genocide 2024-25SOS3062MLevel 62024-25This module is constructed as an attempt to understand the anatomy of war crimes and genocide their origins, ideological basis, socio-political contexts, the techniques and technologies used and relevant theoretical perspectives.Optional

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Applying Research (Social Sciences) 2021-22SOS1004MLevel 42021-22This module aims to enable students to both recognise and also understand the different methodologies employed in social research and to apply these to their own research project and critique of methods. Overall, the aim of this module is to set out methodological skills, and involve students in their application, and to encourage critical reflection on a variety of levels.CoreKey Social Science Concepts 2021-22SOS1005MLevel 42021-22This module aims to give students the opportunity to develop a knowledge and understanding of key social science thinkers and concepts pertinent to all of the disciplines taught within the School. Throughout, students will be encouraged to think critically about the ideas presented and to examine social problems in the light of a range of academic perspectives.CoreSocial Issues and Social Justice 2021-22SOP1001MLevel 42021-22This foundation module aims to examine some key contexts and practices of social policy in the UK. It aims to provide an overview of contemporary British society and some of its pressing issues and challenges. It explores how social policy, as a broad framework of welfare, justice and rights agendas and interventions has sought to address these issues and challenges. This is set in a historical and comparative context. The module highlights the importance of understanding how social policies are framed, made and implemented and how these can be analysed within understandings of societal inequality and poverty.CoreSociological Imagination 2021-22SOS1006MLevel 42021-22This module is designed to introduce students to sociology by offering the opportunity to consider some of the key themes, theories and concepts which are important to the study of this subject. Students can explore the historical development of sociology, including the role of the early important sociologists such as Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, George Herbert Mead and C. Wrights Mills, amongst others. The different and significant sociological perspectives will also be examined and discussed alongside some of the major themes explored within sociology.Core(Re)Reading the Sociological Canon I 2022-23SOS2007MLevel 52022-23This module aims to analyse some of the seminal works which have been significant to the academic development of sociology. Students will have the opportunity to explore a variety of classical and contemporary texts, with the aim of providing them with an in-depth understanding of sociological themes and theories across time.Core(Re)reading the Sociological Canon II 2022-23SOS2008MLevel 52022-23This module aims to analyse some of the seminal works which have been significant to the academic development of sociology. This module will seek to examine a series of articles and books which are of sociological significance and have emerged from the early 20th Century into the 21st Century.CoreComparative Politics and Policy 2022-23POL2001MLevel 52022-23This module is based on the belief that comparative methodology can be a useful tool for social and political analysis. The module begins with a consideration of the development of comparative approaches, the use of a range of comparative techniques and the validity of comparison. It proceeds to an examination of some basic concepts that can help provide an understanding of the bases upon which governments are built and operate. Students then have the opportunity to apply the analytical and theoretical tools from the early parts of the module to consider a variety of features of contemporary politics and policy, particularly in the context of democratic transition in different regions of the world.CoreDebating Welfare States 2022-23SOP2012MLevel 52022-23This module aims to enable students to analyse the priorities and developments of welfare states over time, and through analysis of these developments, equip students with the tools to interpret key contemporary social, political and economic trends.CoreIdeology into Practice 2022-23SOP2001MLevel 52022-23This module aims to examine the impact (and sometimes the lack of impact) of ideology on practice in social policy. Whilst the focus of the module is on the experience of the United Kingdom, comparison with other states will be made where appropriate.CoreResearching in Social Science 2022-23SOS2012MLevel 52022-23Building on the level 1 module Applying Research, this module seeks to systematically scrutinise examples of research undertaken in the subject area of Social Policy/Sociology. The module has two main aims. First, to enable students to understand, in concrete terms, what constitutes research in Social Policy/Sociology and how the research process leads to the production of specific research outputs including dissertations, theses, published academic articles and research monographs. Second, the module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop the knowledge base necessary for the production of research proposals and outputs.CoreChallenges of European Politics 2022-23IST2011MLevel 52022-23This module seeks to introduce students to politics at the European level through an analysis of challenges in European politics and policy making. Beginning with the history of European integration and the first attempts to secure peace through economic interdependency, the module focuses on the development of the EU institutions and the ways in which policy-makers, bureaucrats, intellectuals and civil society actors have attempted to resolve problems of cooperation in an ever larger Union.OptionalConceptualising Sex Work 2022-23SOS2003MLevel 52022-23This module aims to explore the cultural, practical and theoretical developments relating to sex work, drawing upon national and international examples. Taking a comparative approach, this module seeks to understand how scholars conceptualise sex work within different competing feminist frameworks and how these ideas reflect, or are at odds with, popular public and political discourse.OptionalCriminology in the Professions 2022-23CRI2002MLevel 52022-23This is a vocationally oriented module where students have the opportunity to reflect upon the relevance of criminological knowledge and skills in a variety of employment options. The aim of the module is to set out how the methodological, academic and practical skills gained from a degree can be applied to professional development, culminating in the production of a professional development file.OptionalIdeas and Issues in Political Economy 2022-23IST2012MLevel 52022-23OptionalModel United Nations 2022-23IST2003MLevel 52022-23This module is designed to provide an introduction to the activities of the United Nations, as well as an understanding of the practices of international diplomacy and governance. The module will aim to use a discussion of contemporary international issues to explore some of the protocol and procedures of diplomacy. It will also seek to provide students with an introduction to issues of international organisation and international law and treaty-making. All of this is designed to assist students in preparing for their role as a 'diplomat' at a Model United Nations conference.OptionalNations and Nationalism 2022-23POL2069MLevel 52022-23This module explores the sources of our most basic and powerful feelings of political loyalty and attachment our ideas about who we are, why we are and who has the right to rule over us. The module introduces students to the competing approaches to understanding nations and nationalism by examining the ways in which nationalism can influence state development, economic relations and democratic practice.The module also engages students in the intersection between nations and other key categories in social science such as: political mobilisation, conflict, culture, gender, religion and globalisation.OptionalPolicing Crime and Deviance 2022-23CRI2004MLevel 52022-23This module aims to examine core questions about the increasingly diverse forms of policing of crime and deviance. It considers how and why we have policed different forms of crime and deviance and why those changes have occurred and the competing character of many of the positions involved.OptionalPolitical Parties 2022-23POL2005MLevel 52022-23This module aims to address a variety of issues relating to political parties in the United Kingdom. The political science literature covers a wide variety of topics around parties. Amongst those which are examined in this module are the following; the historical development of parties; the role of parties in terms of mobilisation of support, electioneering and campaigning, recruitment of personnel; representation of the electorate and issue-based politics; and the partisan divide. These will be examined primarily within the context of a discussion of the three major parties within the British political system including their development, their ideological tenets and their contemporary positions. However, towards the end of the module these will be set against the position of other parties within the UK including the Scottish National Party, Plaid Cymru and the Northern Irish parties, to which will be added a comparative perspective, drawing upon the roles and experiences of parties in Western Europe.OptionalPolitics and Society in Contemporary China 2022-23POL2006MLevel 52022-23OptionalPsychology in the Criminal Justice Process 2022-23CRI2005MLevel 52022-23This module is designed as an introduction to how psychology might contribute to our understanding of the various actors and organisations within the criminal justice process. Students are expected to critically compare and contrast the theories and methodologies employed in creating psychological knowledges, with those commonly used in the discipline of criminology and in this context, they will be expected to recognise both the contributions and problems presented by the use of psychological knowledges in the criminal justice process. Students will also be expected to undertake their own research project around a psychological theme; apply a statistical analysis to the data they collect and then consider how their results might impact on a relevant criminal justice issue.OptionalSocial Engagement 2022-23SOP2011MLevel 52022-23This module encourages students to undertake one or more external activities relevant to their programme of study, and to engage in a critical reflection of the nature of this activity and how it relates to society as a whole and to their personal development as individuals. Relevant activities may involve significant interaction with an organisation outside the University providing an appropriate experience additional to the students programme of studies, such as voluntary work or mentoring within a service-providing organisation. Please note that students will be expected to play a significant role in initiating and arranging their programme of experience and to take responsibility for the frequency and form of experience. There may be additional costs in the form of transportation and accommodation depending on where students wish to pursue experience. The experience will be required to consist of a minimum of 30 hours.OptionalSociology of Education 2022-23SOS2019MLevel 52022-23This module will introduce students to a range of key themes, theories and perspectives that critically reflect on the nature and purpose of education. The module will provide students with an overview of the history of education (formal and informal), including the development of education policies in the UK, but also extends beyond this to consider a range of international perspectives. The module will also introduce students to a range of sociological theories and perspectives that examine the nature and purpose of education in society. The module will also engage with issues of (in)equality in education and will examine concepts such as class, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, disability citizenship and intersectionality. Furthermore, the module will also explore alternative approaches to education globally, including informal education provision, digital education, the home schooling movement and more liberatory, critical and popular pedagogies.OptionalSociology of Law 2022-23SOS2013MLevel 52022-23OptionalSociology of Religion 2022-23SOS2014MLevel 52022-23OptionalStudy Abroad 2022-23CRI2009MLevel 52022-23OptionalThe Vigilant State: intelligence and national security 2022-23POL2007MLevel 52022-23OptionalThinking Politics 2022-23POL2003MLevel 52022-23This modules seeks to examine the historical background to the various strands of political thought and ideas. In doing this, it aims to build upon some of the major ideas and concepts introduced at level one, by illustrating linkages between political theories and other aspects of politics. In particular, reference is made to key thinkers who have left their intellectual imprint on political ideas and beliefs.OptionalUnderstanding Domestic Abuse 2022-23CRI2010MLevel 52022-23This module will critically examine the nature, extent and impact of domestic violence and abuse (DVA). Taking a criminological approach, the module will explore a wide range of academic, policy and practitioner perspectives. Students will explore the recent development of domestic violence and abuse as a criminological problem within a changing political landscape. This will include understanding a survivors journey in the context of victimology and examining the legal, criminal justice and community responses. The module will also explore the emerging literature on primary and secondary prevention perpetrator programmes.OptionalUnderstanding the City 2022-23SOP2009MLevel 52022-23Over half the planets population now lives in an urban area and urbanisation across the globe looks set to continue spreading inexorably. However, cities are contradictory sites of human development patterned by opportunity, inequality, exploitation and conflict. These traits pose challenges for the meeting of human welfare needs and for our understandings of contemporary life within cities. This module aims to enable students to analyse the emergence of cities across time and space, and through analysis of the city, enable students the opportunity to develop the tools to interpret key contemporary sociological, political and policy trends.OptionalWelfare Policy and Work 2022-23SOP2010MLevel 52022-23The module is designed to examine the ways in which the state, through its social security and labour market policies, has affected the lives of those in paid work and those outside it. A particular focus of the course is on the emerging all-party consensus on welfare policy, in which mainstream politicians agree that benefits should no longer be paid to people of working age who refuse work or training, and that governments must ensure that jobs pay more than out-of-work benefits.OptionalWork and Society 2022-23SOS2015MLevel 52022-23This module seeks to explore the relationship between work and society, drawing on different classical and contemporary sociological theories of work. It aims to examine key areas within the sociology of work such as concepts of work, work-place inequalities, resistance and the reality and challenges of engaging in paid work in the 21st Century.OptionalYouth Justice 2022-23CRI2006MLevel 52022-23This module aims to provide students with an opportunity to explore the youth justice system in depth, including the theoretical and historical contexts of youth justice, contemporary policy and practice developments and the salience of political agendas in constructing responses to young peoples offending behaviour.OptionalYouth, Culture and Resistance 2022-23SOS2001MLevel 52022-23This module seeks to prompt a sociological enquiry into youth cultures, addressing issues of identity and meaning within the behaviour, consumption and lifestyles of young people. Reflecting upon contemporary narratives of youth as dangerous or out of control, the module aims to investigate the plurality of youth cultures, and the diversity of young peoples cultural practices.OptionalAnalysing the Policy Process 2023-24SOP3005MLevel 62023-24Aiming to build upon Understanding the Policy Process, this module is designed to support students not only to continue to develop their knowledge of a range of perspectives on the policy process but, in addition, to use these to analyse a case study relevant to their degree programme.CoreContemporary Social Theories and Approaches 2023-24SOS3007MLevel 62023-24CoreIndependent Study 2023-24SOP3009MLevel 62023-24This Level 3 Module will build upon the skills and knowledge gained during Level 2s research modules. At Level 3, students will work with their supervisors to produce a research project. The Independent Study module will be guided by a clear process of refining research proposals, working with supervisors, initiation of lines of enquiry; implementation and monitoring of research activities over the academic year. Therefore, the Independent Study module will be guided by a clearly demarcated process of: research proposal; refinement; supervisor allocation; critical comment; initiation of lines of enquiry; implementation and monitoring of research activities over the academic year. Therein student progress will be reviewed in relation to research undertaken, clarity of objectives, report/dissertation plan and the work/chapters undertaken thus far. The teaching support will be ongoing over the academic year; but will be primarily geared to assisting the student on issues/problems such as research methods and ethical considerations, managing and presenting research materials and suitable theoretical approaches in their chosen research area, rather than reviewing and substantively commenting upon written chapters.CoreUnderstanding the Policy Process 2023-24SOP3004MLevel 62023-24This module is designed to focus upon the processes of policy making and implementation at both practical and theoretical levels. It aims to provide students with an introduction to a variety of models of policy making and seeks to discuss the complexities of the distribution of power and decision making, primarily, but not limited to, the field of social policy.CoreBody Politics 2023-24SOS3002MLevel 62023-24This module aims to introduce students to different paradigms of the 'body' and 'embodiment'. Recent research suggests that our understandings and our relationship with our own and other bodies has been and is continuing to undergo radical changes. This module will seek to explore these ongoing developments in Western and non-Western cultures and societies.OptionalCare or control? Welfare institutions in Britain before the welfare state 2023-24SOP3035MLevel 62023-24This module focuses on welfare institutionalisation in Britain before the emergence of the welfare state. Through a series of case studies, the module explores why and how people entered welfare institutions and considers the extent to which they were caring and controlling. Students can benefit from an cross-disciplinary approach as this module addresses themes across Social Policy, Criminology, Sociology and Politics.OptionalChildren, Families and the State 2023-24SOS3004MLevel 62023-24This module aims to examine the nature of family policy as it has developed for different family forms and for different purposes, and seeks to consider why an understanding of family policy is important in the twenty-first century. This is set in historical, ideological and comparative contexts.OptionalCommunity and Conflict 1 2023-24SOP3006MLevel 62023-24OptionalCommunity and Conflict 2 2023-24SOP3007MLevel 62023-24OptionalCounter-Terrorism Studies 2023-24POL3085MLevel 62023-24Throughout this module students will have the opportunity to explore how state agencies respond to real and perceived threats of extremism and terrorism. This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of the extent to which the state and the media frame extremism and terrorism.OptionalCrimes of the Powerful 2023-24CRI3076MLevel 62023-24This module critically examines the deviant activities of the powerful and their impact on the struggle for social justice. In contrast to much of orthodox criminology, which tends to focus its attention downwards, and onto the actions of the poor, dispossessed and relatively powerless, this module shifts the gaze upwards, and onto the harmful activities of states, corporations and similarly powerful collectives. Drawing from a myriad of human rights frameworks, a critical stance is taken towards the concepts of crime, power and legitimacy to understand and explain the deviant activities of these elites, and illuminate potential avenues for prevention, protection and redress.OptionalDrugs and Society 2023-24SOL3001MLevel 62023-24OptionalGender and Violence 2023-24SOS3006MLevel 62023-24This module explores the issue of gender-based violence (GBV) in contemporary society. GBV is understood as behaviour or attitudes underpinned by inequitable power relations that hurt, threaten or undermine people because of their gender or (perceived) sexuality. The module starts by addressing the definitions and conceptual boundaries utilised in understanding GBV, and key theoretical perspectives on GBV, taking an in-depth look at debates in GBV scholarship, such as issues around intersectionality, patriarchy and patriarchal bargain, e.g., whether this is a useful concept and how far it can explain (global) gendered power relations. These issues will be developed through case studies of specific forms of GBV such as domestic violence and sexual coercion and rape. These case studies will explore specific forms of GBV in the context of the broader theoretical debates, as well as the current knowledge base on incidence, prevalence and responses to GBV. The module will also explore theoretical, methodological and ethical considerations when researching GBV.OptionalGlobal Civil Society 2023-24IST3004MLevel 62023-24This module will aim to address the historical origins of global civil society (e.g. the anti-slavery movement), together with diverse and competing contemporary meanings of global civil and uncivil society.OptionalGlobal Governance 2023-24IST3005MLevel 62023-24This module explores the concept and practice of global governance. International Relations scholars are increasingly concerned with how international organisations work and how they might work better. Of particular interest is the governance of issues that are inherently global; that is, those that transcend national borders. Examples include health, the environment, poverty, trade, finance, security, conflict and crime. The module begins with the historical development of international institutions and key theories of global governance. It then examines present day international organisations, in terms of their power, efficacy and impact. The final part of the module assesses whether current governance arrangements are addressing global challenges sufficiently well or whether there is potential and scope for improvement.OptionalHuman Rights (Social Sciences) 2023-24SOS3152MLevel 62023-24This module is designed to introduce students to human rights at both the conceptual and practical level. It aims to explore the theoretical arguments around the source of human rights and identifies some of the problems and possibilities which emerge from such readings.OptionalMulticulturalism and Britishness 2023-24POL3003MLevel 62023-24This module is designed to explore political challenges and debates around the presence of culturally diverse populations in the United Kingdom and aims to examine the role this presence plays in understandings of British and English identities.OptionalNew Social Movements 2023-24POL3004MLevel 62023-24OptionalParliamentary Studies 2023-24POL3005MLevel 62023-24This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop an in-depth knowledge of how the UK Parliament works, in theory and in practice. It will aim to examine Parliaments twin relationships with the Executive and with the citizen, and situate these within broader theories and debates about democratic accountability and the nature of representation. The module also aims to bring students into closer contact with Parliament through handling Parliamentary materials and by facilitating contact with Parliamentarians through, for example an external speaker series, and when possible an optional visit to Parliament. Please note that where opportunities arise to take part in a trip to Parliament, students are expected to cover their own transportation and meal costs.OptionalPolice Studies 2023-24CRI3005MLevel 62023-24This module aims to build upon the more general analysis of policing in Policing Crime and Deviance. The aim is to instil a more focused, substantial and critical understanding of the place of policing within the contemporary complex myriad of social controls, as well as the specific organisational and political challenges faced by the police in the 21st Century.OptionalPolitical Transformations of Russia and China 2023-24POL3006MLevel 62023-24OptionalPsychology, Crime and Criminology 2023-24CRI3002MLevel 62023-24OptionalRace and Racism 2023-24SOS3155MLevel 62023-24This interdisciplinary module will explore the issues of race, racism, race relations and racial conflict, and resistance to racism in the contemporary UK and worldwide. Although the main focus of this module is on the UK, examples from different parts of the world and a comparative lens will enable us to examine these issues from a global perspective. Beginning with colonial discourses of the racial other and the history of colonialism, slavery and indentured labour, this module will examine various theoretical and conceptual debates on race and racism, and critically assess how changing conceptualisations of race and racism arise in specific socio-political and historical contexts. The module will also provide students with the chance to assess the continued significance of race and racism in the contemporary world. Students can benefit from an cross-disciplinary approach that addresses themes across Sociology, Criminology, Politics, International Relations, and Social Policy.OptionalSociology of Health and Illness 2023-24SOL3002MLevel 62023-24OptionalTerrorism and Extremism in the United Kingdom 2023-24CRI3009MLevel 62023-24The aims of the module are to: 1.Introduce students to the historical, contemporary and contentious debates concerning how the British state has and should respond to terrorism and extremism. 2.Encourage students to apply criminological and other relevant subject knowledge generated in different contexts to the study of terrorism and extremism in the United Kingdom. 3.Enable students to practice and demonstrate transferable skills in critical thinking, presentation, and oral and written communication.OptionalThe Developing World 2023-24IST3007MLevel 62023-24This module takes the politics, economics and societies of the developing world as its subject matter. The module aims to explore a range of contemporary issues confronting the developing world and the module seeks to use case studies extensively throughout, in order to illuminate theory and to demonstrate the broader relevance of the issues under discussion to the study of international relations.OptionalThe Politics of Global Health 2023-24IST3008MLevel 62023-24OptionalThe Politics of Masculinity 2023-24POL3001MLevel 62023-24This module is designed to explore the politics of masculinity in contemporary society. Overall, the module will aim to make the familiar strange and enable students to question their own assumptions, as well as popular and common sense notions of gender.OptionalWar Crimes and Genocide 2023-24SOS3062MLevel 62023-24This module is constructed as an attempt to understand the anatomy of war crimes and genocide their origins, ideological basis, socio-political contexts, the techniques and technologies used and relevant theoretical perspectives.Optional

Facilities

Students also make the most of the University's Great Central Warehouse Library, which is home to more than 260,000 printed books and approximately 750,000 electronic books and journals, alongside databases, and specialist collections. The Library has a range of different spaces for shared and individual learning.

Entry Requirements 2022-23

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 104 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Entry Requirements 2021-22

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 104 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Fees and Scholarships

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

How you are assessed

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that may be used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests.

The University of Lincolns policy is to ensure that staff return assessments to students promptly.

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that may be used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests.

The University of Lincolns policy is to ensure that staff return assessments to students promptly.

Study Abroad

Students on this course are able to apply for a study abroad year at one of our partner institutions in the USA, Sweden, Belgium, Germany, or the Netherlands after the second year of their degree. This enables students to experience their subject from a new perspective and to explore different cultures and societies. A limited number of places are available and are allocated competitively, subject to academic criteria.

During the year abroad students will not pay a tuition fee to either the University of Lincoln or their host university, but they will be expected to cover their travel, accommodation, and general living costs.

 

 

"What I enjoy about this course is that it allows me to explore important, relevant and contemporary issues within society. It helps me understand the world we live in and encourages me to think of solutions for social problems."

Danielle Izzard, BA (Hons) Social Policy and Sociology

Research Areas and Topics

The various challenges surrounding the Covid-19 pandemic means that social policy has never been a more important academic discipline and area of study.

Our academic team have a range of unique specialisms and are able to address contemporary issues such as the global pandemic. Individual specialisms seek to understand the dynamics of policy making and change in ways that are both conceptual and applied.

You can find out more about staff research groups online: https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/socialsciences/research/

Dr Anna Tarrant - Programme Leader

Dr Anna Tarrant - Programme Leader

Anna Tarrant is an Associate Professor in Sociology and a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow, Round 2. Based in the School of Social and Political Sciences, her research has broadly focused on men’s care responsibilities and support needs, particularly in low-income families.

School Staff List

Visit Us in Person

The best way to find out what it is really like to live and learn at Lincoln is to join us for one of our Open Days. Visiting us in person is important and will help you to get a real feel for what it might be like to study here.

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Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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