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MSc Physics

MSc Physics

Staff in the School of Mathematics and Physics conduct research in fundamental and applied mathematics and physics, ranging from pure mathematics to applied nano-science at the interface between biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics.

The Course

Physics is a fundamental science which underpins our understanding of the world around us, from distant galaxies to the smallest particles. Physics challenges our thinking and changes our lives through developments in new technologies, healthcare, and how we live.

The MSc Physics at Lincoln combines training in fundamental and applied physics while also focusing on personal and professional development. It aims to develop broad problem-solving skills, and includes a substantial research component.

The programme is structured around three core areas; students choose four taught modules designed to provide in-depth teaching of cutting-edge physics ideas, mathematical methods, and techniques; personal and professional development and entrepreneurial physics training; and an extended individual research project that begins in the second term and will be targeted to fit with students' ambitions for the future.

The Course

Physics is a fundamental science which underpins our understanding of the world around us, from distant galaxies to the smallest particles. Physics challenges our thinking and changes our lives through developments in new technologies, healthcare, and how we live.

The MSc Physics at Lincoln combines training in fundamental and applied physics while focusing on personal and professional development. It aims to develop broad problem-solving skills, and includes a substantial research component.

The programme is structured around three core areas: students choose four taught modules designed to provide in-depth teaching of cutting-edge physics ideas, mathematical methods, and techniques; personal and professional development and entrepreneurial physics training; and an extended individual research project that begins in the second term and will be targeted to fit with students' ambitions for the future.

Teaching on this programme comprises lectures, tutorials, seminars, workshops, laboratories, group research, and projects. In the first term lectures are widely used to introduce fundamental concepts in theoretical and experimental physics.

The programme is structured around three core areas:

  • A choice of four taught modules designed to provide in-depth teaching of cutting-edge physics ideas, mathematical methods, and techniques. These are based around the research interests of staff members and focused in the first term on preparing students to undertake a research project.

  • A focus on personal and professional development, and an entrepreneurial outlook, in line with the University's values of developing leadership for the 21st Century in higher education. Students will have regular meetings with a mentor to discuss their progress and target skills and qualification acquisition as well as research topics to equip them for employment in their chosen area. Additionally, an entrepreneurial physics module will encourage students to think beyond traditional academic limits and aims to provide the tools to start or join a small specialist company. The course also includes a module on financial kinetics.

  • An extended individual research project feeds into the 'Student as Producer' ethos of the School of Mathematics and Physics. The project begins in the second term and will be targeted to fit with students' ambitions for the future.


In the final term, students also receive training designed to develop the skills and knowledge required in a start-up business including intellectual property awareness and project planning.

Entrepreneurial Physics (Core)
Find out more

Entrepreneurial Physics (Core)

The module aims to develop the skills to bridge the gap between science and business. This double module follows the Master's project module. The students can develop the results of their physics Master's project into an entrepreneurial idea.

Materials Modelling (Option)
Find out more

Materials Modelling (Option)

This module introduces modern computational techniques for material modelling in condensed matter physics. It is driven by the research interests of the teaching staff - including biophysics and energy applications.

Professional and Personal Development (Core)
Find out more

Professional and Personal Development (Core)

This module is designed to allow systematic personal and professional development in a specialist area of physics to enhance employability. Students can develop and execute a personal learning plan designed using a process of self-reflection around 5 development themes:
personal development; professional skills development; technical skills development; research interests; career development.

Advanced Instrumentation (Option)
Find out more

Advanced Instrumentation (Option)

The aim of this module is to enhance students’ experimental skills with a range of advanced experimental problems. The module may be conducted at university laboratory facilities or at an external collaborating establishment.

Financial Kinetics (Option)
Find out more

Financial Kinetics (Option)

This module brings together the main ideas and methods of the mathematical theory of financial markets. The methods of practical calculations of volatilities of traded assets from historical data are discussed, alongside study of the influence of randomness of the interest rate and volatilities on price of options.

Nano-Physics (Option)
Find out more

Nano-Physics (Option)

This module covers several sub-disciplines of nanophysics from solid state physics to soft matter physics and their interface. Students have the opportunity to gain insights into theoretical and experimental aspects of nanophysics, one of the most rapidly developing fields of modern physics.

Physics Masters Project (Core)
Find out more

Physics Masters Project (Core)

In this module, students have the opportunity to undertake a substantial project under the supervision of a research-active member of staff. Projects can be undertaken at an external collaborating establishment. Students are expected to conduct independent research in modern physics, working within a research group of the School of Mathematics and Physics, the wider University, or in an external collaborating establishment.

Theoretical Physics Laboratory (Option)
Find out more

Theoretical Physics Laboratory (Option)

The aim of this module is to enhance students’ theoretical skills with a range of advanced theoretical physics problems. This is achieved via interactive workshops, where the students are introduced to new concepts and technical elements and individually undertake steps towards solution of extended problems under the guidance of a member of staff.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

 2020/21 Entry*
Home/EU £7,700

Home/EU
(including Alumni Scholarship 20% reduction )**

£6,160
International £16,000
International
(Including International Alumni / Global Postgraduate Scholarship £2,000 reduction)**
£14,000
   
 Part-time Home/EU £43 per credit point
 Part-time International £89 per credit point

 

Loans

A Postgraduate Master's Loan can help with course fees and living costs while you study. Individuals** will be able to borrow up to £10,906 for the purpose of completing an eligible postgraduate Master's qualification. The amount available will depend on the start date of your course.

Scholarships

As a postgraduate student you may be eligible for scholarships in addition to those shown above.

Guidance for Part-time Postgraduate Fees

To complete a standard Master's Taught programme, you must complete 180 credit points.

Full time students will be invoiced for the programme in full upon initial enrolment.

For part-time students, tuition fees are payable each credit point enrolled. To calculate your part-time fees, multiply the part-time fee per credit point by the number of credits you intend to complete within that academic year. This is usually between 60 and 90 credit points per year.

For example, if the fee per credit point for your programme is £49, and you enrol on 60 credits, the tuition fee payable for that academic year will be £2,940.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

Exceptionally tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For further information and for details about funding your study, scholarships and bursaries, please see our Postgraduate Fees & Funding pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/postgraduateprogrammes/feesandfunding/].

Other Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for travel and accommodation will be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional, you will normally be required to pay your own transport, accommodation and general living costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost.

First or upper second class honours degree in Physics or a closely related subject, or equivalent experience.

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/

Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-session English and Academic Study Skills courses. These specialist courses are designed to help students meet the English language requirements for their intended programme of study:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/pre-sessionalenglishandacademicstudyskills/

Teaching on this programme comprises lectures, tutorials, seminars, workshops, laboratories, group research, and projects. In the first term lectures are widely used to introduce fundamental concepts in theoretical and experimental physics.

The programme is structured around three core areas:

  • A choice of four taught modules designed to provide in-depth teaching of cutting-edge physics ideas, mathematical methods, and techniques. These are based around the research interests of staff members and focused in the first term on preparing students to undertake a research project.

  • A focus on personal and professional development, and an entrepreneurial outlook, in line with the University's values of developing leadership for the 21st Century in higher education. Students will have regular meetings with a mentor to discuss their progress and target skills and qualification acquisition as well as research topics to equip them for employment in their chosen area. Additionally, an entrepreneurial physics module will encourage students to think beyond traditional academic limits and aims to provide the tools to start or join a small specialist company. The course also includes a module on financial kinetics.

  • An extended individual research project feeds into the 'Student as Producer' ethos of the School of Mathematics and Physics. The project begins in the second term and will be targeted to fit with students' ambitions for the future.


In the final term, students also receive training designed to develop the skills and knowledge required in a start-up business including intellectual property awareness and project planning.

Entrepreneurial Physics (Core)
Find out more

Entrepreneurial Physics (Core)

The module aims to develop the skills to bridge the gap between science and business. This double module follows the Master's project module. The students can develop the results of their physics Master's project into an entrepreneurial idea.

Materials Modelling (Option)
Find out more

Materials Modelling (Option)

This module introduces modern computational techniques for material modelling in condensed matter physics. It is driven by the research interests of the teaching staff - including biophysics and energy applications.

Professional and Personal Development (Core)
Find out more

Professional and Personal Development (Core)

This module is designed to allow systematic personal and professional development in a specialist area of physics to enhance employability. Students can develop and execute a personal learning plan designed using a process of self-reflection around 5 development themes:
personal development; professional skills development; technical skills development; research interests; career development.

Advanced Instrumentation (Option)
Find out more

Advanced Instrumentation (Option)

The aim of this module is to enhance students’ experimental skills with a range of advanced experimental problems. The module may be conducted at university laboratory facilities or at an external collaborating establishment.

Financial Kinetics (Option)
Find out more

Financial Kinetics (Option)

This module brings together the main ideas and methods of the mathematical theory of financial markets. In addition, the methods of practical calculations of volatilities of traded assets from historical data are discussed. The influence of randomness of the interest rate and volatilities on price of options is studied.

Nano-Physics (Option)
Find out more

Nano-Physics (Option)

This module covers several sub-disciplines of nano-physics from solid state physics till soft matter physics and their interface. Students have the opportunity to gain insights into theoretical and experimental aspects of nano-physics, one of most rapidly developing field of modern physics.

Physics Masters Project (Core)
Find out more

Physics Masters Project (Core)

In this module, students have the opportunity to undertake a substantial project under the supervision of a research-active member of staff. Projects can be undertaken at an external collaborating establishment. Students are expected to conduct independent research in modern physics, working in a research group of the school, the university or in an external collaborating establishment.

Theoretical Physics Laboratory (Option)
Find out more

Theoretical Physics Laboratory (Option)

The aim of this module is to enhance students’ theoretical skills with a range of advanced theoretical physics problems.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

 2020/21 Entry*
Home/EU £7,700

Home/EU
(including Alumni Scholarship 20% reduction )**

£6,160
International £16,000
International
(Including International Alumni / Global Postgraduate Scholarship £2,000 reduction)**
£14,000
   
 Part-time Home/EU £43 per credit point
 Part-time International £89 per credit point

 

Loans

A Postgraduate Master's Loan can help with course fees and living costs while you study. Individuals** will be able to borrow up to £10,906 for the purpose of completing an eligible postgraduate Master's qualification. The amount available will depend on the start date of your course.

Scholarships

As a postgraduate student you may be eligible for scholarships in addition to those shown above.

Guidance for Part-time Postgraduate Fees

To complete a standard Master's Taught programme, you must complete 180 credit points.

Full time students will be invoiced for the programme in full upon initial enrolment.

For part-time students, tuition fees are payable each credit point enrolled. To calculate your part-time fees, multiply the part-time fee per credit point by the number of credits you intend to complete within that academic year. This is usually between 60 and 90 credit points per year.

For example, if the fee per credit point for your programme is £49, and you enrol on 60 credits, the tuition fee payable for that academic year will be £2,940.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

Exceptionally tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For further information and for details about funding your study, scholarships and bursaries, please see our Postgraduate Fees & Funding pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/postgraduateprogrammes/feesandfunding/].

Other Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for travel and accommodation will be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional, you will normally be required to pay your own transport, accommodation and general living costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost.

First or upper second class honours degree in Physics or a closely related subject, or equivalent experience.

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/

Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-session English and Academic Study Skills courses. These specialist courses are designed to help students meet the English language requirements for their intended programme of study:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/pre-sessionalenglishandacademicstudyskills/

Learn from Experts

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may also be supported in their learning by other students.

Matt Watkins PL

Dr Matt Watkins

Programme Leader

Dr Matt Watkins is the programme leader for MSc Physics. His research focus is on developing tools and protocols to model interfaces of electrolytes and solids, applied to areas including microelectronics and electrochemistry.


Your Future Career

Career and Personal Development

This programme is designed to equip graduates with the knowledge and skills which may open up a range of career paths in academia, industry, or within start-up businesses.

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual, support and careers advice during your time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing your programme, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and online resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice, and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities. The service works closely with local, national, and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages here http://bit.ly/1lAS1Iz.

Career and Personal Development

This programme is designed to equip graduates with the knowledge and skills which may open up a range of career paths in academia, industry, or within start-up businesses.

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual, support and careers advice during your time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing your programme, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and online resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice, and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities. The service works closely with local, national, and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages here http://bit.ly/1lAS1Iz.


Facilities

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our students. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

The School of Mathematics and Physics forms part of the new Isaac Newton Building, which comprises additional spaces such as workshops and computer laboratories. The School also hosts its own supercomputer.

Students can study and research in the University's Great Central Warehouse Library, which provides more than 250,000 printed books and approximately 400,000 electronic books and journals, as well as databases and specialist collections. The Library has a range of different spaces for shared and individual learning.


The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.