Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Part-time

2 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

PERARTMR

Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Part-time

2 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

PERARTMR

MRes Performing Arts (Drama, Dance, Music) MRes Performing Arts (Drama, Dance, Music)

The School of Fine and Performing Arts is a centre of creativity with a purpose-built arts venue, studios, and gallery. It is home to a vibrant artistic community where students and staff work alongside one another to explore new synergies between fine and performing arts.

Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Part-time

2 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

PERARTMR

Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Part-time

2 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

PERARTMR

Professor Ananda Breed  - Programme Leader

Professor Ananda Breed - Programme Leader

Ananda Breed is Professor in Theatre at the University of Lincoln, and author and co-editor of several books on performance. She has worked as a consultant for IREX and UNICEF and conducted applied arts workshops in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Indonesia, Japan, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Palestine, Rwanda, and Turkey. She is Principal Investigator of Arts and Humanities Research Council Global Challenges Research Fund project Mobile Arts for Peace (MAP) Informing the National Curriculum and Youth Policy for Peacebuilding in Kyrgyzstan, Rwanda, Indonesia and Nepal (2020-2024).

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Welcome to MRes Performing Arts (Drama, Dance, Music)

The MRes Performing Arts (Drama, Dance, Music) aims to provide a recognised research award in preparation for PhD study in associated areas, and is designed for students seeking to develop a foundation for doctoral study.

This course is an ideal starting point towards further research in to the performing arts. It aims to provide the critical and methodological tools necessary for scholarly research, while enabling focused study in a chosen performing arts discipline and engagement with different perspectives on performance.

Students on this Master's programme can benefit from the resources of Lincoln Performing Arts Centre, studios, gallery, and a vibrant artistic community.

Welcome to MRes Performing Arts (Drama, Dance, Music)

The MRes Performing Arts (Drama, Dance, Music) aims to provide a recognised research award in preparation for PhD study in associated areas, and is designed for students seeking to develop a foundation for doctoral study.

This course is an ideal starting point towards further research in to the performing arts. It aims to provide the critical and methodological tools necessary for scholarly research, while enabling focused study in a chosen performing arts discipline and engagement with different perspectives on performance.

Students on this Master's programme can benefit from the resources of Lincoln Performing Arts Centre, studios, gallery, and a vibrant artistic community.

How You Study

Students can work alongside colleagues in performing arts, whose disciplinary backgrounds vary in drama, dance, music, or similar fields. This provides an opportunity to engage with people who have similar but subtly different perspectives on performance, and can therefore introduce associated discipline areas in the performing arts.

Taught modules are offered through seminars, and include tutor-delivered content followed by discussion, workshop activity, and exercises.

Contact hours on this programme may vary depending on each individual module and the stage of study. Postgraduate study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in seminars. As a general guide, for every hour spent in class, students are expected to at least spend two to three hours in independent study. Please contact the Programme Leader for more information.

The final research project will be an extended period of independent study leading to a practice-as-research output (practice and short dissertation) or a dissertation.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs. For research programmes this includes research fees and research support fees.

Find out More

How You Study

Students can work alongside colleagues in performing arts, whose disciplinary backgrounds vary in drama, dance, music, or similar fields. This provides an opportunity to engage with people who have similar but subtly different perspectives on performance, and can therefore introduce associated discipline areas in the performing arts.

Taught modules are offered through seminars, and include tutor-delivered content followed by discussion, workshop activity, and exercises.

Contact hours on this programme may vary depending on each individual module and the stage of study. Postgraduate study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in seminars. As a general guide, for every hour spent in class, students are expected to at least spend two to three hours in independent study. Please contact the Programme Leader for more information.

The final research project will be an extended period of independent study leading to a practice-as-research output (practice and short dissertation) or a dissertation.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs. For research programmes this includes research fees and research support fees.

Find out More

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

This module considers a number of theoretical and philosophical perspectives that relate to the study of performing arts disciplines. In particular, it introduces students to a range of critical debates and issues regarding gender, ethnicity, sexuality, ethics, politics, cultural materialism, historicity, and authenticity. It will explore how these debates relate to drama, dance and music, and it will consider texts, practices, and performances in relation to these critical dynamics. In particular, it will consider how issues of identity become embodied in performance, how ethical considerations relate to artistic composition and performance, and how cultural dynamics relate to performance texts and practices across the arts. Students will be encouraged to explore texts, practices and performances in their own discipline area, and will share their findings and perspectives to enable cross-disciplinary perspectives to emerge. Not only will this enable students to become proficient critical thinkers at a postgraduate level, but it will also equip students with lateral, interrogative and adaptive intellectual skills that are transferable to a variety of careers.

Module Overview

Research projects require planning in advance in order that a systematic approach can be taken and an appropriate methodology used. This module will guide students through the ins and outs of designing and planning a research project, from establishing a question to delivering the results. Each student will prepare and submit a project proposal serving as the foundation for the research they will undertake in their final project of the programme. This will equip them with fundamental skills in conception, design and preparation that could be transferred to a range of other future careers.

Module Overview

This module provides students with a range of research methods and skills necessary for the undertaking of scholarly research in the performing arts, including practice as research in performance, practice-based research in Drama, Dance, Music or a combination thereof, and more traditional research methods common to the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. A series of tutor-led seminars, presentations, practice-based surgeries and tutorials will allow students to examine and explore the varied and multiple methods involved in researching in the performing arts. Students will be introduced to a variety of research material and resources, including archives, libraries, online resources, and ephemera. Exercises will allow students to rehearse different modes of research such as archival exploration, ethnographic interviews, discourse analysis, and online research. Within this model, students will be able to focus on approaches related to their discipline. Full use will be made of the facilities and resources within the school, including its fully-equipped specialist performance theatre and its rehearsal studios ideal for exploring practice as research in performance; its specialist dance studios ideal for movement-based practice and examining choreography; and its extensive music archive, part of Lincoln Cathedral archive, ideal for advancing skills in musicological research. The module will provide a strong foundation from which to develop a career as a researcher, and by extending the knowledge practices of approaches and methodologies of enquiry, it will equip students with the transferable skills to be able to work in a variety of industries.

Module Overview

Advanced (ethno)musicology explores advanced theories and concepts within the research areas of musicology, ethnomusicology, musical analysis and musical instrument studies. The module aims to deliver theories and concepts that build on their knowledge of music and expand their capacity for researching and thinking critically and theoretically about music. Students can consider these concepts and apply them to music and/or musical and cultural movements, helping to understand how theory develops an advanced understanding of music and an advanced ability to research music.

Module Overview

As the culmination of their programme students will undertake a research project. Working independently, students will be allocated a staff supervisor with whom they will have regular meetings. They will carry out the programme of study designed in the module ‘Designing your Research Project’. The module is designed to give students the opportunity to pursue self-initiated research in Drama, Dance, Music or a combination of performing arts-based activities. The project will result in a 20,000-word written dissertation. The work should exhibit a coherent implementation of research methodology and pre-production planning, and show evidence of original research. A level of technical competence which is commensurate to postgraduate standards is also expected.

Module Overview

This module focuses on student-led research processes and provides students with the opportunity to further examine, experiment with, and reflect on their choreographic practices. Students will have the opportunity to examine, interpret, adopt and adapt choreographic concepts leading to the re-writing and re-authoring of an iconic choreographic work of their choosing. In order to do this, students are expected to identify and examine the recurring themes and understand their developments within the context of 20th and 21st Century choreography. Students are expected to generate appropriate methodologies for choreographic development and develop the necessary skills of critical discernment to navigate the re-authoring process.

Module Overview

As the culmination of their programme students undertake a practice-as-research (PaR) final project. Students are expected to work independently and will be allocated a staff supervisor with whom they will have regular meetings. They will carry out the programme of study designed in the module ‘Designing your Research Project’. The module is designed to give students the opportunity to pursue self-initiated practice-based research in Drama, Dance, Music or a combination of performing arts-based activities. The project will result in a piece of practical work, plus a 2,000-word critical reflection. The work should exhibit a coherent implementation of research methodology and pre-production planning, and show evidence of original research. A level of technical competence which is commensurate to postgraduate standards is also expected, in both written and practical work.

Module Overview

How do we write for theatre? How do we perform writing and how does our writing perform? How does what we write reflect who we are and the world in which we live? How might we give voice to the unspoken and speak truth to power? How might we find the words that events make us speak? How might words paint a thousand pictures? Taking questions such as these, students have the chance to write a new piece of theatre and reflect on that process with a view to becoming a critical theatre-maker.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

This module considers a number of theoretical and philosophical perspectives that relate to the study of performing arts disciplines. In particular, it introduces students to a range of critical debates and issues regarding gender, ethnicity, sexuality, ethics, politics, cultural materialism, historicity, and authenticity. It will explore how these debates relate to drama, dance and music, and it will consider texts, practices, and performances in relation to these critical dynamics. In particular, it will consider how issues of identity become embodied in performance, how ethical considerations relate to artistic composition and performance, and how cultural dynamics relate to performance texts and practices across the arts. Students will be encouraged to explore texts, practices and performances in their own discipline area, and will share their findings and perspectives to enable cross-disciplinary perspectives to emerge. Not only will this enable students to become proficient critical thinkers at a postgraduate level, but it will also equip students with lateral, interrogative and adaptive intellectual skills that are transferable to a variety of careers.

Module Overview

Research projects require planning in advance in order that a systematic approach can be taken and an appropriate methodology used. This module will guide students through the ins and outs of designing and planning a research project, from establishing a question to delivering the results. Each student will prepare and submit a project proposal serving as the foundation for the research they will undertake in their final project of the programme. This will equip them with fundamental skills in conception, design and preparation that could be transferred to a range of other future careers.

Module Overview

This module provides students with a range of research methods and skills necessary for the undertaking of scholarly research in the performing arts, including practice as research in performance, practice-based research in Drama, Dance, Music or a combination thereof, and more traditional research methods common to the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. A series of tutor-led seminars, presentations, practice-based surgeries and tutorials will allow students to examine and explore the varied and multiple methods involved in researching in the performing arts. Students will be introduced to a variety of research material and resources, including archives, libraries, online resources, and ephemera. Exercises will allow students to rehearse different modes of research such as archival exploration, ethnographic interviews, discourse analysis, and online research. Within this model, students will be able to focus on approaches related to their discipline. Full use will be made of the facilities and resources within the school, including its fully-equipped specialist performance theatre and its rehearsal studios ideal for exploring practice as research in performance; its specialist dance studios ideal for movement-based practice and examining choreography; and its extensive music archive, part of Lincoln Cathedral archive, ideal for advancing skills in musicological research. The module will provide a strong foundation from which to develop a career as a researcher, and by extending the knowledge practices of approaches and methodologies of enquiry, it will equip students with the transferable skills to be able to work in a variety of industries.

Module Overview

Advanced (ethno)musicology explores advanced theories and concepts within the research areas of musicology, ethnomusicology, musical analysis and musical instrument studies. The module aims to deliver theories and concepts that build on their knowledge of music and expand their capacity for researching and thinking critically and theoretically about music. Students can consider these concepts and apply them to music and/or musical and cultural movements, helping to understand how theory develops an advanced understanding of music and an advanced ability to research music.

Module Overview

As the culmination of their programme students will undertake a research project. Working independently, students will be allocated a staff supervisor with whom they will have regular meetings. They will carry out the programme of study designed in the module ‘Designing your Research Project’. The module is designed to give students the opportunity to pursue self-initiated research in Drama, Dance, Music or a combination of performing arts-based activities. The project will result in a 20,000-word written dissertation. The work should exhibit a coherent implementation of research methodology and pre-production planning, and show evidence of original research. A level of technical competence which is commensurate to postgraduate standards is also expected.

Module Overview

This module focuses on student-led research processes and provides students with the opportunity to further examine, experiment with, and reflect on their choreographic practices. Students will have the opportunity to examine, interpret, adopt and adapt choreographic concepts leading to the re-writing and re-authoring of an iconic choreographic work of their choosing. In order to do this, students are expected to identify and examine the recurring themes and understand their developments within the context of 20th and 21st Century choreography. Students are expected to generate appropriate methodologies for choreographic development and develop the necessary skills of critical discernment to navigate the re-authoring process.

Module Overview

As the culmination of their programme students undertake a practice-as-research (PaR) final project. Students are expected to work independently and will be allocated a staff supervisor with whom they will have regular meetings. They will carry out the programme of study designed in the module ‘Designing your Research Project’. The module is designed to give students the opportunity to pursue self-initiated practice-based research in Drama, Dance, Music or a combination of performing arts-based activities. The project will result in a piece of practical work, plus a 2,000-word critical reflection. The work should exhibit a coherent implementation of research methodology and pre-production planning, and show evidence of original research. A level of technical competence which is commensurate to postgraduate standards is also expected, in both written and practical work.

Module Overview

How do we write for theatre? How do we perform writing and how does our writing perform? How does what we write reflect who we are and the world in which we live? How might we give voice to the unspoken and speak truth to power? How might we find the words that events make us speak? How might words paint a thousand pictures? Taking questions such as these, students have the chance to write a new piece of theatre and reflect on that process with a view to becoming a critical theatre-maker.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

How you are assessed

A range of assessment modes are utilised, each of which aim to equip students with an appropriate skill or skills for ongoing research work. These may include essays, oral presentations, viva voces, and project plans.

The final project will consist of either a practice-as-research package (practice and short dissertation) or a standard dissertation.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days of the submission date.

A range of assessment modes are utilised, each of which aim to equip students with an appropriate skill or skills for ongoing research work. These may include essays, oral presentations, viva voces, and project plans.

The final project will consist of either a practice-as-research package (practice and short dissertation) or a standard dissertation.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days of the submission date.

Fees and Scholarships

Postgraduate study is an investment in yourself and your future, and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

There are more ways than ever before to fund your postgraduate study, whether you want to do a taught or research course. For those wishing to undertake a Master's course, you can apply for a loan as a contribution towards the course and living costs. Loans are also available to those who wish to undertake doctoral study. The University offers a number of scholarships and funded studentships for those interested in postgraduate study. Learn how Master's and PhD loans, scholarships, and studentships can help you fund your studies on our Postgraduate Fees and Funding pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for travel and accommodation will be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional, you will normally be required to pay your own transport, accommodation and general living costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost.

Postgraduate study is an investment in yourself and your future, and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

There are more ways than ever before to fund your postgraduate study, whether you want to do a taught or research course. For those wishing to undertake a Master's course, you can apply for a loan as a contribution towards the course and living costs. Loans are also available to those who wish to undertake doctoral study. The University offers a number of scholarships and funded studentships for those interested in postgraduate study. Learn how Master's and PhD loans, scholarships, and studentships can help you fund your studies on our Postgraduate Fees and Funding pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for travel and accommodation will be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional, you will normally be required to pay your own transport, accommodation and general living costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost.

Entry Requirements 2020-21

First or upper second class honours degree.

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.5. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-session English and Academic Study Skills courses. https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/pre-sessionalenglishandacademicstudyskills/ . These specialist courses are designed to help students meet the English language requirements for their intended programme of study.

Entry Requirements 2021-22

First or upper second class honours degree.

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.5. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-session English and Academic Study Skills courses. https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/pre-sessionalenglishandacademicstudyskills/ . These specialist courses are designed to help students meet the English language requirements for their intended programme of study.

Teaching and Learning During Covid-19

At Lincoln, Covid-19 has encouraged us to review our practices and, as a result, to take the opportunity to find new ways to enhance the student experience. We have made changes to our teaching and learning approach and to our campus, to ensure that students and staff can enjoy a safe and positive learning experience. We will continue to follow Government guidance and work closely with the local Public Health experts as the situation progresses, and adapt our teaching and learning accordingly to keep our campus as safe as possible.

Research Areas, Projects and Topics

Specialist areas of research expertise in the School of Fine and Performing Arts include:

  • Contemporary theatre-making
  • Contemporary British playwriting
  • Musical theatre
  • Asian performance
  • Practice as research
  • Choreography
  • Contemporary composition
  • Ethnomusicology
  • Popular music

Features

The programme covers a broad spectrum of performing arts subjects (Drama, Dance, Music), incorporating interdisciplinary and mixed-method insight.

Students will have the opportunity to shape their own focus of study in terms two and three, firstly by selecting a specialist elective (a module chosen from other Master's programmes in Drama, Dance, and Music), and secondly by designing and conducting a dissertation or practice-as-research project.

How to Apply

Applications are made through the University's online application system. We look for existing interest and experience in a performing arts discipline or disciplines, an interest in furthering studies through research, and the potential to continue studying toward an MPhil or PhD. Alongside your application you should submit a piece of academic writing critically exploring an enquiry related to the Performing Arts. This should be around 2,000 words.

Interviews take place by telephone or in person, and applicants are welcome to visit our campus to see our facilities.

Career and Personal Development

This Master's course offers the opportunity for further research in the performing arts. Graduates may use this course as a platform for further study, progression to doctoral study, or for a career in research and academia.

Postgraduate Events

Find out more about how postgraduate study can help further your career, develop your knowledge, or even prepare you to start your own business at one of our postgraduate events.

Find out More

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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