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Full-time

3-4 Years

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Campus

UOW M KDU - Dual Award

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Validated

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UCAS Code

P210

Course Code

PBRPBRUB

Key Information

Full-time

3-4 Years

Typical Offer

View

Campus

UOW M KDU - Dual Award

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

P210

Course Code

PBRPBRUB

BA (Hons) Communications and Public Relations BA (Hons) Communications and Public Relations

Publicity Studies at Lincoln is ranked 1st in the UK for overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2021 (out of 18 ranking institutions).

Key Information

Full-time

3-4 Years

Campus

UOW M KDU - Dual Award

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

P210

Course Code

PBRPBRUB

Key Information

Full-time

3-4 Years

Campus

UOW M KDU - Dual Award

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

P210

Course Code

PBRPBRUB

Select Year of Entry

Alex Lewczuk - Programme Leader

Alex Lewczuk - Programme Leader

With more than 30 years broadcasting experience, Alex Lewczuk is the founder of the award-winning Siren Radio and Producer of the Bi-Annual Tele Fantasy and Society Symposia, as well as rural correspondent and coordinator of a range of book and country festival events. Alex has first and postgraduate degrees in Biology, Chemistry, Education, and Film Studies.

School Staff List

Welcome to BA (Hons) Communications and Public Relations

Storytelling, crisis management, events, and campaigning form the core of public relations, and our modern approach to communications aims to help students navigate this fast-paced world with confidence.

At Lincoln students can learn about strategic public relations and benefit from an integrated multi-media approach to communications. The course aims to develop written and verbal skills to give students the ability to become confident communicators, prepared to face the challenges of public relations work.

Students can work with multi-media technologies including video, audio, and online material. They have the opportunity to explore how social media can be a volatile but powerful platform to reach large
audiences.

The course is recognised by the Chartered Institute of Public Relations and the University is a partner of the Public Relations Consultants Association.

Welcome to BA (Hons) Communications and Public Relations

Storytelling, crisis management, events, and campaigning form the core of public relations, and our modern approach to communications aims to help students navigate this fast-paced world with confidence.

At Lincoln students can learn about strategic public relations and benefit from an integrated multi-media approach to communications. The course aims to develop written and verbal skills to give students the ability to become confident communicators, prepared to face the challenges of public relations work.

Students can work with multi-media technologies including video, audio, and online material. They have the opportunity to explore how social media can be a volatile but powerful platform to reach large
audiences.

The course is recognised by the Chartered Institute of Public Relations and the University is a partner of the Public Relations Consultants Association.

How You Study

The first year introduces students to the breadth of the public relations disciplines. It covers academic theory and the key components of public relations practice, including copywriting, design, and multi-platform media skills.

This knowledge is developed further in the second year. At this point students can apply their learning to the real world, and explore different applications of PR and communications, such as in the commercial, not-for-profit, and the public sector.

The final year includes modules on PR strategy, and an in-depth study in an area of specific interest.

There are opportunities for further study through additional events and outside speakers as well as free access to the CIPR and PRC webinars that provide industry specific skills training and updates.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

How You Study

The first year introduces students to the breadth of the public relations disciplines. It covers academic theory and the key components of public relations practice, including copywriting, design, and multi-platform media skills.

This knowledge is developed further in the second year. At this point students can apply their learning to the real world, and explore different applications of PR and communications, such as in the commercial, not-for-profit, and the public sector.

The final year includes modules on PR strategy, and an in-depth study in an area of specific interest.

There are opportunities for further study through additional events and outside speakers as well as free access to the CIPR and PRC webinars that provide industry specific skills training and updates.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

Teaching and Learning During Covid-19

Information for Offer Holders Joining Us in Autumn 2021

Letter from Head of School of English and Journalism

We are delighted you are interested in joining us at the University of Lincoln and I am writing to let you know about our planning for the new academic year. You currently have an offer of a place at the University and we want to keep you updated so you can start preparing for your future, should you be successful in meeting any outstanding conditions of your offer.

We fully intend your experience with us at Lincoln will be engaging, supportive and academically challenging. We are determined to provide our students with a safe and exciting campus experience, ensuring you benefit from the best that both face-to-face and online teaching offer. We have kept our focus on friendliness and community spirit at Lincoln and we look forward to your participation in that community.

As you know, the UK Government has published its roadmap for the easing of Coronavirus lockdown restrictions in England. There are still some uncertainties for universities around possible restrictions for the next academic year, particularly in relation to social distancing in large group teaching. We are planning in line with government guidance for both face-to-face and online teaching to ensure you have a good campus experience and can complete all the requirements for your programme. We are fully prepared to adapt and flex our plans if changes in government regulations make this necessary during the year.

Face-to-face teaching and interaction with tutors and course mates are key to students’ learning and the broader student experience. Face-to-face sessions will be prioritised where it is most valuable, particularly for seminars, tutorials, workshops, practical and newsroom activities. Students tell us that there are real benefits to some elements of online learning within a blended approach, such as revisiting recorded materials and developing new digital skills and confidence. At Lincoln we aim to take forward the best aspects of both.

This letter sets out in detail various aspects of the planned experience at Lincoln for your chosen subject area, and we hope the information is helpful as you plan for your future.

Teaching and Learning

Your programme will follow an on-campus, blended-learning model. This will involve a range of different learning styles where you will be able to engage with your tutors and peers in physical and virtual environments.

We are planning the majority of your teaching to be delivered face to face. This means that you will be on campus for sessions like workshops and newsroom activities. We will also be using the benefits of online learning and teaching, particularly for large lectures, which may be delivered as live sessions in which you can interact with others, and/or recorded sessions that you can access whenever you want.

Our efforts to develop your employability within and outside of the curriculum will remain a key focus during your time at Lincoln. As your course progresses, you will be assessed in various ways, including coursework and examinations which may be online.

The spaces on campus where your teaching will take place, including our newsrooms which simulate the journalistic environment, will be managed in ways that maximise your learning experience while also safeguarding your health and wellbeing in line with the latest Government guidance.

Should a change in Government guidance require a return to lockdown, we are ready to move fully online for the required period. We did this twice last year and managed to successfully deliver our curriculum and maintain our sense of community. Any changes of this kind will be communicated by email from myself and/or the university. We will continue working with the National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ) so that the accreditation of your programme is not impacted.

To complete your assignments, you will need a laptop or desktop computer capable of running certain software such as Photoshop and Audition, details of which will be provided by your programme as part of your Welcome Pack. For programmes that require it, we will provide an Adobe Creative Cloud license so that you can access this software at the start of your studies. All students will be provided with full access to Microsoft Office 365.

To support you in your studies, you will be assigned a Personal Tutor – a member of academic staff who is your designated ‘go to’ person for advice and support, both pastoral and academic. You will meet with them regularly in person and/or online. It is important to remember that independent learning is an essential aspect of your programme. Guided reading and other independent engagement remain key to performing well in your studies.

We are very much looking forward to welcoming you on campus in October for your induction events and supporting you as you embark on this new and exciting chapter in your life.  

The University Campus

We are very proud of our beautiful and vibrant campuses at the University of Lincoln and we have used our extensive indoor and outdoor spaces to provide students with access to study and social areas as well as learning resources and facilities, adapting them where necessary in line with government guidance. All the mitigations and safety measures you would expect are in place on our campuses (at Lincoln, Riseholme and Holbeach), such as hand sanitisers, one-way systems, and other social distancing measures where these are required.

Student Wellbeing and Support

The University’s Student Wellbeing Centre and Student Support Centre are fully open for face-to-face and online support. Should you, as one of our applicants, have any questions about coming to Lincoln in October or any other concerns, these specialist teams are here for you. You can contact Student Wellbeing and the Student Support Centre by visiting https://studentservices.lincoln.ac.uk where service details and contact information are available, or if you are in Lincoln you can make an appointment to meet a member of the team.

To enable you to make the most out of your experience in Lincoln and to help you access course materials and other services, we recommend that you have a desktop, laptop or tablet device available during your studies. This will enable you to engage easily with our online learning platforms from your student accommodation or from home. Students can use IT equipment on campus in the Library, our learning lounges, and specialist academic areas; however, there may not always be a space free when you have a timetabled session or an assessment to complete which is why we recommend you have your own device too, if possible. If you are struggling to access IT equipment or reliable internet services, please contact ICT for technical support and Student Support who can assist you with further advice and information.

We are committed to providing you with the best possible start to university life and to helping you to prepare for your time with us. As part of this commitment, you can access our Student Life pre-arrival online support package. This collection of digital resources, advice and helpful tips created by current students is designed to help you prepare for the all-important first steps into higher education, enabling you to learn within a supportive community and to make the most of the new opportunities that the University of Lincoln provides. When you are ready, you can begin by going to studentlife.lincoln.ac.uk/starting.

Students’ Union

Your Students’ Union is here to make sure that you get the most from every aspect of your student experience. They will be providing a huge range of in-person and virtual events and opportunities - you are sure to find something perfect for you! Meet people and find a new hobby by joining one of their 150 sports teams and societies. Grab lunch between teaching or a drink with friends in The Swan, Towers or The Barge. Learn new skills and boost your CV by taking part in training courses and volunteering opportunities in your spare time. Grab a bike from the Cycle Hire and explore the city you will be calling home.

To kick-off the new academic year, your Students’ Union will be bringing you The Official Lincoln Freshers Week 2021, with a huge line-up of social events, club nights, fayres and activities for you enjoy (restrictions permitting). Keep an eye on www.facebook.com/lincolnfreshers21 for line-up and ticket updates, so you don’t miss out.

Most importantly, your Students’ Union will always be there for you when you need it most; making sure that your voice as a student is always heard. The SU Advice Centre can provide independent advice and support on housing, finance, welfare and academic issues. As well as this, your Course Representatives are always on hand to make sure that you are getting the best from your academic experience. To find out more about the Students’ Union’s events, opportunities, support and how to get in contact go to: www.lincolnsu.com.

Student Accommodation

Many applicants will choose to live in dedicated student accommodation on, or close to, campus and you may well have already booked your student residence for the upcoming year. All University-managed student accommodation will have our Residential Wardens in place. Residential Wardens are here to help you settle into your new accommodation and will be offering flatmate and residential support activities throughout the year. If you have booked University accommodation, you will have already heard from us with further details on where you will be living to help you prepare. If you have not yet booked your accommodation, we still have plenty of options available. In the meantime, lots of advice and information can be found on the accommodation pages of our website.

The information detailed in this letter will form part of your agreement with the University of Lincoln. If we do not hear from you to the contrary prior to enrolment, we will assume that you acknowledge and accept the information contained in this letter. Adaptations to how we work may have to be made in line with any future changes in government guidance, and we will communicate these with you as necessary. Please do review the University’s Admissions Terms and Conditions (in particular sections 8 and 9) and Student Complaints Procedure so you understand your rights and the agreement between the University and its students.

We very much hope this information is useful to help you plan for the next step in your academic journey, and we look forward to welcoming you here at Lincoln this Autumn. This is the start of a new phase and will be an exciting time for all of us. If you have any questions, please do email me at jwhittaker@lincoln.ac.uk.

Professor Jason Whittaker

Head of the School of English and Journalism

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Communication in Society 2022-23PBR1032MLevel 42022-23This module offers an introduction to the communication industry, following a theoretical and historical pathway to understand the current workings in mass communications. Students examine the development of various types of media communication and fundamental models and debates that have emerged in the attempt to account for them in a modern, Western cultural context. Access to 'means' of communication, the development of various genres of communication and the impact of digital revolutions on our "information society" are also explored.CoreEffective Copywriting and Design 2022-23PBR1034MLevel 42022-23In this module, students will be expected to develop the critical abilities to judge the effectiveness of public relations writing, through analysis and evaluation of a variety of different texts and their graphical context. Such texts will include newspaper and magazine articles, and other specific public relations examples including brochures, press releases, newsletters, websites, and more. Students will have the opportunity to apply and interpret readability tests to their own writing and that of others, and will consider the legal constraints (including copyright, libel, defamation) on what can properly be stated or alleged.CoreIntegrated Communication 2022-23PBR1029MLevel 42022-23This module encourages students to understand a range of core communication models and theories so that they might analyse the likely impact of media messages on target audiences. A crucial aspect of this module is the discussion of integrated communications and how the disciplines of advertising, marketing and public relations fit together.CoreIntroduction to Public Relations 2022-23PBR1018MLevel 42022-23This module is designed to provide a broad introduction to corporate public relations (PR), including the role of PR within corporate life and in particular, the assurance of an organisations reputation. It is designed for students with no previous experience or knowledge of public relations and the professional activities of practitioners. There are typically two main areas of study: - The context of public relations - The practice of public relations to meet objectives.CoreMultiplatform Media Skills for Public Relations 2022-23PBR1031MLevel 42022-23In this module students are introduced to the editorial and production skills required for multiplatform production in the increasingly converged media environment. Areas include organisational story telling and output production for radio and television with, as the module progresses, increasing attention given to related online content. During the module, students will work in a production workshop environment with all tasks performed under appropriate time constraints. By bringing the professional environment into the workshop the students can experience the pressures of operating as a public relations practitioner across a range of broadcast and web-based media. Core skills of portable recording, editing, story telling and writing for broadcast can be developed through the module, incorporating interviewing techniques, story selection and editing processes, and audio/visual illustration.CorePublic Administration 1: Democracy and Bureaucracy 2022-23JOU1004MLevel 42022-23Students need to understand how legislation is drafted and enacted in the UK and how journalism the Fourth Estate effects a check on Government and Parliament(s). This involves a study of the political, democratic and administrative structure of Parliament, government, local government and EU institutions. The module also examines how local government services are delivered around the UK, in the absence of a uniform structure and the emergence of various experimental models. Issues such as public accountability, consultation, responsibilities and decision-taking mechanisms are also studied.CoreCommunicating in the Public Sphere 2023-24PBR2030MLevel 52023-24Communicating in the Public Sphere is about the process of engaging citizens and voters in the practical as well as the ideological aspects of public administration, it touches on many aspects of political (with a small 'p') communications. An initial grounding in Public Administration for PR practitioners and journalists will have been offered in the first year; this module builds on that. It looks at the relationship between the citizen (voter), the established political order and the media. The PR professional needs not only to have a full grasp of the communications techniques open to the 21st C practitioner but also to be aware of the need for impartiality, balance and openness in dealing with public communications. Well managed, well directed and reliable two-way communications between the politicians and their constituents, via whichever media is appropriate, could be the key to countering the 'democratic deficit' of fewer people voting at elections. As party politics becomes less engaging, citizens and voters are increasingly politically active on issues that motivate them. This module will look at the mainstream communications methods, mechanisms and messages but also at the alternative political communications communities. It addresses issues such as media relationships with officials, representatives, and politicians and examines limitations on, and opportunities for, the reporter to obtain information that institutions prefer the public not to know. Students can look at examples, case studies and reporting trends to assess the function of reporters and media organisations in presenting these important areas of public concern to their audiences.CoreCommunity Engagement 2023-24PBR2014MLevel 52023-24Community engagement is the process by which businesses and individuals build ongoing relationships with the purpose of achieving a collective vision for the benefit of a community. This increasingly important aspect of Public Relations can prove challenging as both persuasion and influence techniques are required. During this module, students will have the opportunity to evaluate current communication techniques used in persuasion, negotiation and counselling (eg neuro-linguistic programming and transactional analysis).CoreEssential Law for Public Relations 2023-24PBR2017MLevel 52023-24Todays Public Relations operates through multiplatforms of sound and vision, thus students need to understand the essential legal and ethical responsibilities associated with multiplatform communication, working with journalists and with the news agenda. Students will have the opportunity to examine a range of different audiences and channels of communication from tweets, blogs, news media and speeches to weighty consultation and strategy documentations to justify policies. Students will also have the chance to develop an understanding of the legal issues around reputation as an essential skill for a PR journalist. A PR professional must have a basic understanding of contract law and of the legal rights and responsibilities of freelancers.CorePublic Relations in Organisational Communications 2023-24PBR2013MLevel 52023-24The module considers the role of Public Relations (PR) in the context of the changing nature of communication between organisations and their publics. The rapidly evolving technological context that is transforming the environment within which communication takes place is of particular concern to communication. Technological change has also had a social impact in terms of individuals' use of media, access to information and social interaction that all have implications for communication. Through completion of the module students can begin to plan and evaluate the contribution of PR within an integrated communications campaign strategy and develop their skills in presenting and defending their ideas within a realistic context.CorePublic Relations Organisations and People 2023-24PBR2015MLevel 52023-24Effective management of PR does not depend on luck; there are Codes of Conduct for practitioners to follow and the typical client / consultant relationship is usually organised into a Contract. This module will look at Public Relations and how it works as a business in its own right, together with how it works as a function of other businesses in order to provide students with a clear image of the establishment, structure and style of a PR consultancy, linked to the professional processes that go on within the business. As well as the world of PR consultancies, this unit will consider and discuss the role of PR within an organisation, considering the similarities and differences between the structure and performance of consultancy and in-house PR resources.CoreResearch Methods 2023-24PBR2016MLevel 52023-24The main aim of this module is to encourage students to consider the relationships between the media and audiences, to ask critical questions relevant for their field of study, and to choose the right method to answer them. It introduces qualitative research methods for communications and guides students through the practical dimensions of conducting a research project into media audiences. In order to help students to understand basic research methods commonly used in communication and media studies and their limits this unit will include discussions on contemporary critiques of these methods, as well as their ethical and philosophical dimensions. Students will examine the multidisciplinary character of these methods and their historical origins in the fields of sociology, anthropology, and psychology. The contribution of literary criticism, history and economy to what is often referred to as "critical analyses" of contemporary cultural production and reception will be also a matter of discussions.CoreCampaign Structures and Components 2023-24PBR2031MLevel 52023-24Effective campaigning and the structural processes of campaign extension are key components of 21st Century PR practice. Building on the Level 1 Effective Copywriting and Design module, this unit will introduce new areas of theory and of practical and creative application. This module considers harnessing a professionally literate visual element to a coherent and integrated PR offer. It will look at such things as speech writing and presentations; exhibitions and events; press conferences and briefings; webcasts and podcasts; news spotting and ambush marketing; and cultural referencing. It will also introduce some of the corporate necessities such as annual reports and prospectuses that students will study in depth in Level 3. This unit will therefore analyse and critique some existing campaigns and corporate endeavours and set workshop tasks and challenges to construct a sense of cultural and promotional values. - Semiotics and visual languages - Press conferences, briefings - Photo calls and media events - Exhibitions and roadshows - News Spotting, Ambush Marketing and viral campaigns - Speech writing and presentation protocols - Consumer culture as a PR reference pointOptionalEvent Management 2023-24SBM2018MLevel 52023-24This module provides an insight into the strategic management of events of all sizes and types. The module provides a framework of the event planning process, using short and long-term strategies and an overview of operational strategies. Students are expected to organise an event of their own in this module and all that it entails. The event is assessed from conception through to operation and evaluation.OptionalIndependent Study (Public Relations) 2024-25PBR3021MLevel 62024-25The dissertation is a major independent piece of work intended to develop a students ability to actively engage with core disciplinary issues. The dissertation focuses on analysis, synthesis and critique and combines critical approaches to public relations with practical application through case studies. Hence, it encourages students to apply key theoretical, conceptual and methodological issues in writing a dissertation. The module challenges the students to pull together the research skills acquired throughout their studies and particularly from the second year module Research Skills and Practice, make use of a body of literature and reflect upon the link between theory and practice.CoreStrategic Corporate Public Relations 2024-25PBR3016MLevel 62024-25This module considers Strategic Corporate Communication as a means of engendering trust and building reputation in key aspects of corporate activity, in particular in Investor Relations. It considers strategically vital concerns of corporate management at the highest level, in particular Corporate Governance and other institutional, social, political and technological issues that have a direct effect on the cost and availability. Modern media techniques and pressures have been to the fore in the recent fiscal crises as has the relationship between commercial and political interests and imperatives. This relationship will be described and developed as part of a wider understanding that strategic communications is not just a commercial or fiscal priority, especially in difficult times.CoreValues, Issues and Crisis Management Counselling 2024-25PBR3017MLevel 62024-25This module offers students the opportunity to develop a theoretical and practical understanding and application of digital communications used within Public Relations including: design and writing for web sites; blogs and social media: and to make them aware of some of the implications of this medium for PR.CoreBrand and Reputation 2024-25PBR3020MLevel 62024-25This module aims to explore what is meant by "brands" and "branding". This module aims to provide a solid understanding and application in the strategies of global brand management and the impact on reputation. Key branding concepts such as brand identity, brand image, brand positioning and brand equity will be explored and supported by brand insights that will provide clear insights and illustrations of branding strategies in action. Key skills and theories of brand management will be presented and discussed within the context of a global brand management environment. Students can gain an appreciation of the role of brand strategy within a corporations operating plan.OptionalCreativity in Public Relations 2024-25PBR3022MLevel 62024-25Creativity is a crucial element in the PR practitioners toolkit as the industries of advertising and PR are becoming more closely aligned. Different ways of attracting the attention of clients, target audiences, stakeholders and journalists need to be embraced as we communicate in increasingly noisy environments. Using traditional and digital/social media to best effective requires a deep understanding of effective writing and what makes eye catching and excellent design. This module aims to bring together elements potentially studied in the first two years and in brand and reputation. This module examines the way PR teams work with creative disciplines designers, writers and creative advertising. Students have the opportunity to attain knowledge and skills to effectively draw up a creative brief and manage its delivery.OptionalDigital Communications 2024-25PBR3018MLevel 62024-25Students have the opportunity look at the history of the internet and at some of the underlying technology and web page design. Furthermore, they can potentially explore content-management systems, SEO, data journalism and database driven websites. Consideration is given to the strategic use of websites and how these can link with blogs, social media and current digital communications tools as part of a long term integrated PR strategy. Image optimisation will be covered involving the use and understanding of software such as Photoshop to ensure efficient and correct use of image data.OptionalInternal Communications 2024-25PBR3019MLevel 62024-25Internal Public Relations involves more than employee communications and is an essential aspect of most (perhaps even all) PR programmes. In particular students have the opportunity to consider ethical aspects of Internal Public Relations and distinguish the role of Internal Public Relations from that of related fields such as Human Resource Management and internal publicity.OptionalRoots of Cultural Conflict: The historical origins of contemporary world challenges 2024-25JOU3010MLevel 62024-25This module provides an opportunity to examine and analyse recent and ongoing international news stories in a cultural and historic context. Themes will include colonialism, conflicting cultural and religious world-views, economic paradigms, construction of national identity, cultural stereotyping, public health initiatives, poverty, the impact of NGOs and foreign aid, and the significance of a free press. The module will begin with a brief overview of western colonialism in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries but will then focus on more recent developments, exploring the nature and consequences of clashes in cultural world views and the impact of globalization.Optional

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Communication in Society 2021-22PBR1032MLevel 42021-22This module offers an introduction to the communication industry, following a theoretical and historical pathway to understand the current workings in mass communications. Students examine the development of various types of media communication and fundamental models and debates that have emerged in the attempt to account for them in a modern, Western cultural context. Access to 'means' of communication, the development of various genres of communication and the impact of digital revolutions on our "information society" are also explored.CoreEffective Copywriting and Design 2021-22PBR1034MLevel 42021-22In this module, students will be expected to develop the critical abilities to judge the effectiveness of public relations writing, through analysis and evaluation of a variety of different texts and their graphical context. Such texts will include newspaper and magazine articles, and other specific public relations examples including brochures, press releases, newsletters, websites, and more. Students will have the opportunity to apply and interpret readability tests to their own writing and that of others, and will consider the legal constraints (including copyright, libel, defamation) on what can properly be stated or alleged.CoreIntegrated Communication 2021-22PBR1029MLevel 42021-22This module encourages students to understand a range of core communication models and theories so that they might analyse the likely impact of media messages on target audiences. A crucial aspect of this module is the discussion of integrated communications and how the disciplines of advertising, marketing and public relations fit together.CoreIntroduction to Public Relations 2021-22PBR1018MLevel 42021-22This module is designed to provide a broad introduction to corporate public relations (PR), including the role of PR within corporate life and in particular, the assurance of an organisations reputation. It is designed for students with no previous experience or knowledge of public relations and the professional activities of practitioners. There are typically two main areas of study: - The context of public relations - The practice of public relations to meet objectives.CoreMultiplatform Media Skills for Public Relations 2021-22PBR1031MLevel 42021-22In this module students are introduced to the editorial and production skills required for multiplatform production in the increasingly converged media environment. Areas include organisational story telling and output production for radio and television with, as the module progresses, increasing attention given to related online content. During the module, students will work in a production workshop environment with all tasks performed under appropriate time constraints. By bringing the professional environment into the workshop the students can experience the pressures of operating as a public relations practitioner across a range of broadcast and web-based media. Core skills of portable recording, editing, story telling and writing for broadcast can be developed through the module, incorporating interviewing techniques, story selection and editing processes, and audio/visual illustration.CorePublic Administration 1: Democracy and Bureaucracy 2021-22JOU1004MLevel 42021-22Students need to understand how legislation is drafted and enacted in the UK and how journalism the Fourth Estate effects a check on Government and Parliament(s). This involves a study of the political, democratic and administrative structure of Parliament, government, local government and EU institutions. The module also examines how local government services are delivered around the UK, in the absence of a uniform structure and the emergence of various experimental models. Issues such as public accountability, consultation, responsibilities and decision-taking mechanisms are also studied.CoreCommunicating in the Public Sphere 2022-23PBR2030MLevel 52022-23Communicating in the Public Sphere is about the process of engaging citizens and voters in the practical as well as the ideological aspects of public administration, it touches on many aspects of political (with a small 'p') communications. An initial grounding in Public Administration for PR practitioners and journalists will have been offered in the first year; this module builds on that. It looks at the relationship between the citizen (voter), the established political order and the media. The PR professional needs not only to have a full grasp of the communications techniques open to the 21st C practitioner but also to be aware of the need for impartiality, balance and openness in dealing with public communications. Well managed, well directed and reliable two-way communications between the politicians and their constituents, via whichever media is appropriate, could be the key to countering the 'democratic deficit' of fewer people voting at elections. As party politics becomes less engaging, citizens and voters are increasingly politically active on issues that motivate them. This module will look at the mainstream communications methods, mechanisms and messages but also at the alternative political communications communities. It addresses issues such as media relationships with officials, representatives, and politicians and examines limitations on, and opportunities for, the reporter to obtain information that institutions prefer the public not to know. Students can look at examples, case studies and reporting trends to assess the function of reporters and media organisations in presenting these important areas of public concern to their audiences.CoreCommunity Engagement 2022-23PBR2014MLevel 52022-23Community engagement is the process by which businesses and individuals build ongoing relationships with the purpose of achieving a collective vision for the benefit of a community. This increasingly important aspect of Public Relations can prove challenging as both persuasion and influence techniques are required. During this module, students will have the opportunity to evaluate current communication techniques used in persuasion, negotiation and counselling (eg neuro-linguistic programming and transactional analysis).CoreEssential Law for Public Relations 2022-23PBR2017MLevel 52022-23Todays Public Relations operates through multiplatforms of sound and vision, thus students need to understand the essential legal and ethical responsibilities associated with multiplatform communication, working with journalists and with the news agenda. Students will have the opportunity to examine a range of different audiences and channels of communication from tweets, blogs, news media and speeches to weighty consultation and strategy documentations to justify policies. Students will also have the chance to develop an understanding of the legal issues around reputation as an essential skill for a PR journalist. A PR professional must have a basic understanding of contract law and of the legal rights and responsibilities of freelancers.CorePublic Relations in Organisational Communications 2022-23PBR2013MLevel 52022-23The module considers the role of Public Relations (PR) in the context of the changing nature of communication between organisations and their publics. The rapidly evolving technological context that is transforming the environment within which communication takes place is of particular concern to communication. Technological change has also had a social impact in terms of individuals' use of media, access to information and social interaction that all have implications for communication. Through completion of the module students can begin to plan and evaluate the contribution of PR within an integrated communications campaign strategy and develop their skills in presenting and defending their ideas within a realistic context.CorePublic Relations Organisations and People 2022-23PBR2015MLevel 52022-23Effective management of PR does not depend on luck; there are Codes of Conduct for practitioners to follow and the typical client / consultant relationship is usually organised into a Contract. This module will look at Public Relations and how it works as a business in its own right, together with how it works as a function of other businesses in order to provide students with a clear image of the establishment, structure and style of a PR consultancy, linked to the professional processes that go on within the business. As well as the world of PR consultancies, this unit will consider and discuss the role of PR within an organisation, considering the similarities and differences between the structure and performance of consultancy and in-house PR resources.CoreResearch Methods 2022-23PBR2016MLevel 52022-23The main aim of this module is to encourage students to consider the relationships between the media and audiences, to ask critical questions relevant for their field of study, and to choose the right method to answer them. It introduces qualitative research methods for communications and guides students through the practical dimensions of conducting a research project into media audiences. In order to help students to understand basic research methods commonly used in communication and media studies and their limits this unit will include discussions on contemporary critiques of these methods, as well as their ethical and philosophical dimensions. Students will examine the multidisciplinary character of these methods and their historical origins in the fields of sociology, anthropology, and psychology. The contribution of literary criticism, history and economy to what is often referred to as "critical analyses" of contemporary cultural production and reception will be also a matter of discussions.CoreCampaign Structures and Components 2022-23PBR2031MLevel 52022-23Effective campaigning and the structural processes of campaign extension are key components of 21st Century PR practice. Building on the Level 1 Effective Copywriting and Design module, this unit will introduce new areas of theory and of practical and creative application. This module considers harnessing a professionally literate visual element to a coherent and integrated PR offer. It will look at such things as speech writing and presentations; exhibitions and events; press conferences and briefings; webcasts and podcasts; news spotting and ambush marketing; and cultural referencing. It will also introduce some of the corporate necessities such as annual reports and prospectuses that students will study in depth in Level 3. This unit will therefore analyse and critique some existing campaigns and corporate endeavours and set workshop tasks and challenges to construct a sense of cultural and promotional values. - Semiotics and visual languages - Press conferences, briefings - Photo calls and media events - Exhibitions and roadshows - News Spotting, Ambush Marketing and viral campaigns - Speech writing and presentation protocols - Consumer culture as a PR reference pointOptionalEvent Management 2022-23SBM2018MLevel 52022-23This module provides an insight into the strategic management of events of all sizes and types. The module provides a framework of the event planning process, using short and long-term strategies and an overview of operational strategies. Students are expected to organise an event of their own in this module and all that it entails. The event is assessed from conception through to operation and evaluation.OptionalIndependent Study (Public Relations) 2023-24PBR3021MLevel 62023-24The dissertation is a major independent piece of work intended to develop a students ability to actively engage with core disciplinary issues. The dissertation focuses on analysis, synthesis and critique and combines critical approaches to public relations with practical application through case studies. Hence, it encourages students to apply key theoretical, conceptual and methodological issues in writing a dissertation. The module challenges the students to pull together the research skills acquired throughout their studies and particularly from the second year module Research Skills and Practice, make use of a body of literature and reflect upon the link between theory and practice.CoreStrategic Corporate Public Relations 2023-24PBR3016MLevel 62023-24This module considers Strategic Corporate Communication as a means of engendering trust and building reputation in key aspects of corporate activity, in particular in Investor Relations. It considers strategically vital concerns of corporate management at the highest level, in particular Corporate Governance and other institutional, social, political and technological issues that have a direct effect on the cost and availability. Modern media techniques and pressures have been to the fore in the recent fiscal crises as has the relationship between commercial and political interests and imperatives. This relationship will be described and developed as part of a wider understanding that strategic communications is not just a commercial or fiscal priority, especially in difficult times.CoreValues, Issues and Crisis Management Counselling 2023-24PBR3017MLevel 62023-24This module offers students the opportunity to develop a theoretical and practical understanding and application of digital communications used within Public Relations including: design and writing for web sites; blogs and social media: and to make them aware of some of the implications of this medium for PR.CoreBrand and Reputation 2023-24PBR3020MLevel 62023-24This module aims to explore what is meant by "brands" and "branding". This module aims to provide a solid understanding and application in the strategies of global brand management and the impact on reputation. Key branding concepts such as brand identity, brand image, brand positioning and brand equity will be explored and supported by brand insights that will provide clear insights and illustrations of branding strategies in action. Key skills and theories of brand management will be presented and discussed within the context of a global brand management environment. Students can gain an appreciation of the role of brand strategy within a corporations operating plan.OptionalCreativity in Public Relations 2023-24PBR3022MLevel 62023-24Creativity is a crucial element in the PR practitioners toolkit as the industries of advertising and PR are becoming more closely aligned. Different ways of attracting the attention of clients, target audiences, stakeholders and journalists need to be embraced as we communicate in increasingly noisy environments. Using traditional and digital/social media to best effective requires a deep understanding of effective writing and what makes eye catching and excellent design. This module aims to bring together elements potentially studied in the first two years and in brand and reputation. This module examines the way PR teams work with creative disciplines designers, writers and creative advertising. Students have the opportunity to attain knowledge and skills to effectively draw up a creative brief and manage its delivery.OptionalDigital Communications 2023-24PBR3018MLevel 62023-24Students have the opportunity look at the history of the internet and at some of the underlying technology and web page design. Furthermore, they can potentially explore content-management systems, SEO, data journalism and database driven websites. Consideration is given to the strategic use of websites and how these can link with blogs, social media and current digital communications tools as part of a long term integrated PR strategy. Image optimisation will be covered involving the use and understanding of software such as Photoshop to ensure efficient and correct use of image data.OptionalInternal Communications 2023-24PBR3019MLevel 62023-24Internal Public Relations involves more than employee communications and is an essential aspect of most (perhaps even all) PR programmes. In particular students have the opportunity to consider ethical aspects of Internal Public Relations and distinguish the role of Internal Public Relations from that of related fields such as Human Resource Management and internal publicity.OptionalRoots of Cultural Conflict: The historical origins of contemporary world challenges 2023-24JOU3010MLevel 62023-24This module provides an opportunity to examine and analyse recent and ongoing international news stories in a cultural and historic context. Themes will include colonialism, conflicting cultural and religious world-views, economic paradigms, construction of national identity, cultural stereotyping, public health initiatives, poverty, the impact of NGOs and foreign aid, and the significance of a free press. The module will begin with a brief overview of western colonialism in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries but will then focus on more recent developments, exploring the nature and consequences of clashes in cultural world views and the impact of globalization.Optional

How you are assessed

Assessment varies according to the module being studied but is generally portfolio, coursework, and practical applications. There will be some assessments by examination and some group assessments.

At final level there are individual tutorials to help students with their dissertations and project work.

Some assessments require the student to build an online personality that will supplement their CVs when seeking work experience and employment.

In the first year, assessment is 76% coursework, 13% practical exams, and 11% written exams. In the second year it is 82% coursework, 11% practical exams, and 7% written exams. In the third year it is 75% coursework and 25% practical exams.

The University of Lincolns policy is to ensure that staff return assessments to students promptly.

Assessment varies according to the module being studied but is generally portfolio, coursework, and practical applications. There will be some assessments by examination and some group assessments.

At final level there are individual tutorials to help students with their dissertations and project work.

Some assessments require the student to build an online personality that will supplement their CVs when seeking work experience and employment.

In the first year, assessment is 76% coursework, 13% practical exams, and 11% written exams. In the second year it is 82% coursework, 11% practical exams, and 7% written exams. In the third year it is 75% coursework and 25% practical exams.

The University of Lincolns policy is to ensure that staff return assessments to students promptly.

Fees and Scholarships

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

Students are responsible for any travel, accommodation, or general living costs while undertaking a work placement.

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

Students are responsible for any travel, accommodation, or general living costs while undertaking a work placement.

Entry Requirements 2022-23

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also be required to have at least three GCSEs at grade C or above (or equivalent), including English.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Entry Requirements 2021-22

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also be required to have at least three GCSEs at grade C or above (or equivalent), including English.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/st.../entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/st...port/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Accreditations

The course is recognised by the Chartered Institute of Public Relations and the University is a partner of the Public Relations Consultants Association. These relationships with the industry’s two main professional bodies aims to ensure that Lincoln students benefit from enhanced opportunities to undertake additional training, and learn from industry experts.

Work Placements

Students have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience by working with Cygnet PR. This is the University’s fully integrated student-run PR agency, which undertakes live projects and briefs for real clients.

In addition to the opportunities available with the University’s Cygnet PR agency, students are encouraged to obtain an industry placement between their second and third years, where they can be supported academically by their tutors. There is also scope for shorter-term placements through the programme. Those who choose to undertake work placements will be responsible for covering any travel, accommodation, or general living costs associated with them.

Study Abroad

Students on the Communications and Public Relations programme have the opportunity to study abroad at our partner institution, the University of Wollongong Malaysia KDU. Find out more about our partner institution.

"I have been lucky enough to receive expert teaching from specialists in the profession and gain real-world experience as a member of Cygnet PR. The opportunities that the agency offers means that I will graduate with life skills that are directly applicable to the industry I wish to enter."

Emma Street BA (Hons) Communications and Public Relations student

Career Opportunities

Recent graduates have secured roles with major agencies such as 33 Digital, Red Consultancy, and Fire PR. They have won places on prestigious graduate schemes at companies such as Sony. Others have gone on to communications roles with organisations including GlaxoSmithKline, HS2 Rail Project, Bank of England, South Yorkshire Police, South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue, Portland Communications (a top 15 agency), Metia Marketing, Ministry of Justice, Eden PR, and Goodfellow Communications.

Visit Us in Person

The best way to find out what it is really like to live and learn at Lincoln is to join us for one of our Open Days. Visiting us in person is important and will help you to get a real feel for what it might be like to study here.

Book Your Place

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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