Key Information

Full-time

3-4 Years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

PP52

Course Code

PBRJOUUB

Key Information

Full-time

3-4 Years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

PP52

Course Code

PBRJOUUB

BA (Hons) Journalism and Public Relations BA (Hons) Journalism and Public Relations

Journalism, Publishing, and Public Relations at Lincoln is ranked 7th overall in the UK in the Guardian University Guide 2020.

Key Information

Full-time

3-4 Years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

PP52

Course Code

PBRJOUUB

Key Information

Full-time

3-4 Years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

PP52

Course Code

PBRJOUUB

Teaching and Learning During COVID-19

The current COVID-19 pandemic has meant that at Lincoln we are making changes to our teaching and learning approach and to our campus, to ensure that students and staff can enjoy a safe and positive learning experience here at Lincoln.

From autumn 2020 our aim is to provide an on-campus learning experience. Our intention is that teaching will be delivered through a mixture of face-to-face and online sessions. There will be social activities in place for students - all in line with appropriate social distancing and fully adhering to any changes in government guidance as our students' safety is our primary concern.

We want to ensure that your Lincoln experience is as positive, exciting and enjoyable as possible as you embark on the next phase of your life. COVID-19 has encouraged us to review our practices and, as a result, to take the opportunity to find new ways to enhance the Lincoln experience. It has challenged us to find innovative new approaches to supporting students' learning and social interactions. These learning experiences, which blend digital and face-to-face, will be vital in helping to prepare our students for a 21st Century workplace.

Of course at Lincoln, personal tutoring is key to our delivery, providing every student with a dedicated tutor to support them throughout their time here at the University. Smaller class sizes mean our academic staff can engage with each student as an individual, and work with them to enhance their strengths. In this environment we hope that students have more opportunities for discussion and engagement and get to know each other better.

Course learning outcomes are vital to prepare you for your future and we aim to utilise this mix of face-to-face and online teaching to deliver these. Students benefit from and enjoy fieldtrips and placements and, whilst it is currently hard to predict the availability of these, we are working hard and with partners and will aspire to offer these wherever possible - obviously in compliance with whatever government guidance is in place at the time.

We are utilising a range of different digital tools for teaching including our dedicated online managed learning environment. All lectures for larger groups will be delivered online using interactive software and a range of different formats. We aim to make every contact count and seminars and small group sessions will maximise face-to-face interaction. Practicals, workshops, studio sessions and performance-based sessions are planned to be delivered face-to-face, in a socially distanced way with appropriate PPE.

The University of Lincoln is a top 20 TEF Gold University and we have won awards for our approach to teaching and learning, our partnerships and industry links, and the opportunities these provide for our students. Our aim is that our online and socially distanced delivery during this COVID-19 pandemic is engaging and that students can interact with their tutors and each other and contribute to our academic community.

As and when restrictions start to lift, we aim to deliver an increasing amount of face-to-face teaching and external engagements, depending on each course. Safety will continue to be our primary focus and we will respond to any changing circumstances as they arise to ensure our community is supported. More information about the specific approaches for each course will be shared when teaching starts.

Of course as you start a new academic year it will be challenging but we will be working with you every step of the way. For all our students new and established, we look forward to welcoming you to our vibrant community this Autumn. If you have any questions please visit our FAQs or contact us on 01522 886644.

Alex Anthony-Lewczuk - Programme Leader

Alex Anthony-Lewczuk - Programme Leader

Alex is Programme Leader for the BA (Hons) Journalism and Public Relations. His research interests include community radio, rural events, science fiction, and science in society.

School Staff List

Welcome to BA (Hons) Journalism and Public Relations

The BA (Hons) Journalism and Public Relations degree combines the craft of journalism - spotting a story, researching and writing - with the core skills of public relations such as choosing the angle, exercising good judgement and ensuring a story reaches the right audience.

At Lincoln, students have access to fully equipped news production facilities which they can use to produce content for print and broadcast media in both a journalistic and a public relations context.

The course covers topics that are essential for communications professionals. It aims to develop students’ analytical techniques and problem-solving abilities, as well as the cross-disciplinary skills needed for a career in journalism or public relations.

Welcome to BA (Hons) Journalism and Public Relations

The BA (Hons) Journalism and Public Relations degree combines the craft of journalism - spotting a story, researching, and writing -with the core skills of public relations, such as choosing the angle, exercising good judgement and ensuring a story reaches the right audience.

At Lincoln, students have access to fully equipped news production facilities which they can use to produce content for print and broadcast media in both a journalistic and a public relations context.

The course covers topics that are essential for communications professionals. It aims to develop students’ analytical techniques and problem-solving abilities, as well as the cross-disciplinary skills needed for a career in journalism or public relations.

How You Study

A combination of journalism and public relations-focused modules offers students the opportunity to develop an understanding of how the two disciplines are intertwined.

In the first and second years, students can study effective copywriting and design, integrated communication, and the fundamentals of journalism, including media law. In their final year, students can focus on their own areas of interest by selecting from a range of optional modules.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

How You Study

A combination of journalism and public relations-focused modules offers students the opportunity to develop an understanding of how the two disciplines are intertwined.

In the first and second years, students can study effective copywriting and design, integrated communication, and the fundamentals of journalism, including media law. In their final year, students can focus on their own areas of interest by selecting from a range of optional modules.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

In this module, students will be expected to develop the critical abilities to judge the effectiveness of public relations writing, through analysis and evaluation of a variety of different texts and their graphical context. Such texts will include newspaper and magazine articles, and other specific public relations examples including brochures, press releases, newsletters, websites, and more. Students will have the opportunity to apply and interpret readability tests to their own writing and that of others, and will consider the legal constraints (including copyright, libel, defamation) on what can properly be stated or alleged.

Module Overview

This module will be a blend of practice and theory and aims to create a progression through the key journalistic skills needed to tell stories on the most appropriate platform using traditional, digital and mobile media. This module aims to develop a rounded awareness of the media and to give students the skills and insight that equip them to develop further in levels two and three. The focus is on newsgathering and storytelling skills. The way design influences different media is also analysed.

Module Overview

Journalism students are required to abide by the law, in terms of newsgathering and research methods, data collection and retention, use of communication networks, publishing and broadcasting material to audiences. This module aims to introduce students to the legal system, to the operation of the courts, and examines the impact of legislation and codes of practice on the work of journalists.

Module Overview

This module encourages students to understand a range of core communication models and theories so that they might analyse the likely impact of media messages on target audiences. A crucial aspect of this module is the discussion of integrated communications and how the disciplines of advertising, marketing and public relations fit together.

Module Overview

Journalism is a key activity not simply in the communication of news and current affairs, but as a primary definer of social, political and psychological contexts in which we live and work as citizens in the twenty-first century. This module introduces students to key cultural, commercial and technological developments that have shaped the modern media, exploring those developments in terms of their history as well as the social impacts of modern mass communications.

Module Overview

This module is designed to provide a broad introduction to corporate public relations (PR), including the role of PR within corporate life and in particular, the assurance of an organisation’s reputation. It is designed for students with no previous experience or knowledge of public relations and the professional activities of practitioners. There are typically two main areas of study: - The context of public relations - The practice of public relations to meet objectives.

Module Overview

The module considers the role of Public Relations (PR) in the context of the changing nature of communication between organisations and their publics. The rapidly evolving technological context that is transforming the environment within which communication takes place is of particular concern to communication. Technological change has also had a social impact in terms of individuals' use of media, access to information and social interaction that all have implications for communication. Through completion of the module students can begin to plan and evaluate the contribution of PR within an integrated communications campaign strategy and develop their skills in presenting and defending their ideas within a realistic context.

Module Overview

Effective management of PR does not depend on luck; there are Codes of Conduct for practitioners to follow and the typical client / consultant relationship is usually organised into a Contract. This module will look at Public Relations and how it works as a business in its own right, together with how it works as a function of other businesses in order to provide students with a clear image of the establishment, structure and style of a PR consultancy, linked to the professional processes that go on within the business. As well as the world of PR consultancies, this unit will consider and discuss the role of PR within an organisation, considering the similarities and differences between the structure and performance of consultancy and in-house PR resources.

Module Overview

This module is designed to equip students with the understanding of research design and methods for undertaking research. The module gives students the opportunity to develop their observational, analytical and writing skills. It has vocational relevance in enabling students to select a relevant research topic for in-depth analysis and evaluation in their final year.

Module Overview

Community engagement is the process by which businesses and individuals build ongoing relationships with the purpose of achieving a collective vision for the benefit of a community. This increasingly important aspect of Public Relations can prove challenging as both persuasion and influence techniques are required. During this module, students will have the opportunity to evaluate current communication techniques used in persuasion, negotiation and counselling (eg neuro-linguistic programming and transactional analysis).

Module Overview

This module aims to highlight the importance of human rights issues to the practice of journalism and aims to develop students’ awareness of the range of ethical issues facing journalists.

Module Overview

This module provides an insight into the strategic management of events of all sizes and types. The module provides a framework of the event planning process, using short and long-term strategies and an overview of operational strategies. Students are expected to organise an event of their own in this module and all that it entails. The event is assessed from conception through to operation and evaluation.

Module Overview

This module extends the study of the history of journalism into the twentieth century. It provides students with the opportunity to critically consider the historical background to some of the issues which feature in contemporary news agendas – for example students may have the opportunity to discuss the reporting of war; changes in the National Health Service; critique of ‘care in the community’ relating to mental health, the export of American culture and ‘Globalisation’; the impact of ethnicity on politics and culture particularly in terms of EU debates; etc. Appropriate emphasis will be placed upon the role of the press in recording these social and political developments.

Module Overview

The role of the media as a 'mirror' of society means that journalists encounter cross-cultural issues in their newsgathering and news processing functions. This module aims to prepare students to write stories with cultural sensitivity, care and compassion.

Module Overview

This module gives the students the opportunity to specialise in a medium of their choice. In consultation with tutors, students will be able to produce radio or television bulletins, features and magazine programmes, a web site with multimedia content or print magazines and newspapers. More advanced skills appropriate to each medium will be taught and workshops will be tutor led and supervised as required. Materials produced will be outward facing where appropriate.

Module Overview

This module aims to build on legal and administrative knowledge gleaned in Essential Law at Level One. It examines how criminal and civil legislation affecting print, online and broadcast journalists has developed; identifies areas of conflict and uncertainty; and requires students to apply knowledge of legislation and case law to given scenarios, including responses to actions in the civil courts.

Module Overview

The dissertation is a major independent piece of work intended to develop a student’s ability to actively engage with core disciplinary issues. The dissertation focuses on analysis, synthesis and critique and combines critical approaches to public relations with practical application through case studies. Hence, it encourages students to apply key theoretical, conceptual and methodological issues in writing a dissertation. The module challenges the students to pull together the research skills acquired throughout their studies and particularly from the second year module ‘Research Skills and Practice’, make use of a body of literature and reflect upon the link between theory and practice.

Module Overview

This module aims to explore what is meant by "brands" and "branding". This module aims to provide a solid understanding and application in the strategies of global brand management and the impact on reputation. Key branding concepts such as brand identity, brand image, brand positioning and brand equity will be explored and supported by brand insights that will provide clear insights and illustrations of branding strategies in action. Key skills and theories of brand management will be presented and discussed within the context of a global brand management environment. Students can gain an appreciation of the role of brand strategy within a corporation’s operating plan.

Module Overview

This module aims to enable students to appreciate trends and changes within the main media industries (press, radio, TV, cinema, music and the internet) on a comparative basis between countries and between platforms. The module offers an opportunity to understand how the media has reached the state it is now in, and what trends are likely to continue in the future.

Module Overview

Creativity is a crucial element in the PR practitioners toolkit as the industries of advertising and PR are becoming more closely aligned. Different ways of attracting the attention of clients, target audiences, stakeholders and journalists need to be embraced as we communicate in increasingly noisy environments. Using traditional and digital/social media to best effective requires a deep understanding of effective writing and what makes eye catching and excellent design. This module aims to bring together elements potentially studied in the first two years and in brand and reputation. This module examines the way PR teams work with creative disciplines – designers, writers and creative advertising. Students have the opportunity to attain knowledge and skills to effectively draw up a creative brief and manage its delivery.

Module Overview

Students have the opportunity look at the history of the internet and at some of the underlying technology and web page design. Furthermore, they can potentially explore content-management systems, SEO, data journalism and database driven websites. Consideration is given to the strategic use of websites and how these can link with blogs, social media and current digital communications tools as part of a long term integrated PR strategy. Image optimisation will be covered involving the use and understanding of software such as Photoshop to ensure efficient and correct use of image data.

Module Overview

Internal Public Relations involves more than employee communications and is an essential aspect of most (perhaps even all) PR programmes. In particular students have the opportunity to consider ethical aspects of Internal Public Relations and distinguish the role of Internal Public Relations from that of related fields such as Human Resource Management and internal publicity.

Module Overview

This module examines broadcasting structures in the UK and in other countries. It aims to develop students’ critical understanding of models of national broadcasting and the implications for media policy and mass media's role in society. The module aims to introduce students to the fundamental contexts of national, cultural and economic systems which inform the development of media policy debates.

Module Overview

Students undertake a dissertation topic of their choice within their chosen field of study and are expected to apply theoretical concepts to their research. They will be allocated an individual tutor to support their work but students are expected to demonstrate a high degree of personal commitment and to work on their own initiative.

Module Overview

The purpose of this module is to examine and critically compare the different representations of journalists to be found in film and assess the relation between these portrayals and continuing moral and political issues faced by the profession. The module expects students to study movies in which journalists are portrayed as leading characters.

Module Overview

This module explores the history of war reporting and the ways in which journalists have represented conflicts. It also considers the reasons why some conflicts are marginalised, ignored altogether or given extensive coverage by the mainstream media. It studies theoretical aspects and practical implications of conflict-sensitive reporting.

Module Overview

This module is designed for students who have an interest in the theory and practice of political reporting, building on teaching at earlier levels of the programme relating to British and European political institutions. It focuses on two areas: political theory and the practice of political reporting. Increasingly, journalists need a critical understanding of the underlying concepts for political acting such as liberty, justice, rights, law, and how they are realised in our contemporary democracies. The module will discuss the crisis of our modern democracy and the concept of post-democracy. It will also reflect on the essential role the media hold within our democracies. The practical element will focus on the sourcing of political stories and on various models of political storytelling. It will further look at how digital journalism and the social media have changed political journalism.

Module Overview

Work experience is seen as essential in today's competitive jobs market. This module aims to give students the opportunity to experience the industries that can be linked to their studies, gain vital skills which may prepare them for the job market and also establish and maintain links with industry professionals who may help them in their chosen career.

Module Overview

This module considers Strategic Corporate Communication as a means of engendering trust and building reputation in key aspects of corporate activity, in particular in Investor Relations. It considers strategically vital concerns of corporate management at the highest level, in particular Corporate Governance and other institutional, social, political and technological issues that have a direct effect on the cost and availability. Modern media techniques and pressures have been to the fore in the recent fiscal crises as has the relationship between commercial and political interests and imperatives. This relationship will be described and developed as part of a wider understanding that strategic communications is not just a commercial or fiscal priority, especially in difficult times.

Module Overview

This module offers students the opportunity to develop a theoretical and practical understanding and application of digital communications used within Public Relations including: design and writing for web sites; blogs and social media: and to make them aware of some of the implications of this medium for PR.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

In this module, students will be expected to develop the critical abilities to judge the effectiveness of public relations writing, through analysis and evaluation of a variety of different texts and their graphical context. Such texts will include newspaper and magazine articles, and other specific public relations examples including brochures, press releases, newsletters, websites, and more. Students will have the opportunity to apply and interpret readability tests to their own writing and that of others, and will consider the legal constraints (including copyright, libel, defamation) on what can properly be stated or alleged.

Module Overview

This module will be a blend of practice and theory and aims to create a progression through the key journalistic skills needed to tell stories on the most appropriate platform using traditional, digital and mobile media. This module aims to develop a rounded awareness of the media and to give students the skills and insight that equip them to develop further in levels two and three. The focus is on newsgathering and storytelling skills. The way design influences different media is also analysed.

Module Overview

Journalism students are required to abide by the law, in terms of newsgathering and research methods, data collection and retention, use of communication networks, publishing and broadcasting material to audiences. This module aims to introduce students to the legal system, to the operation of the courts, and examines the impact of legislation and codes of practice on the work of journalists.

Module Overview

This module encourages students to understand a range of core communication models and theories so that they might analyse the likely impact of media messages on target audiences. A crucial aspect of this module is the discussion of integrated communications and how the disciplines of advertising, marketing and public relations fit together.

Module Overview

Journalism is a key activity not simply in the communication of news and current affairs, but as a primary definer of social, political and psychological contexts in which we live and work as citizens in the twenty-first century. This module introduces students to key cultural, commercial and technological developments that have shaped the modern media, exploring those developments in terms of their history as well as the social impacts of modern mass communications.

Module Overview

This module is designed to provide a broad introduction to corporate public relations (PR), including the role of PR within corporate life and in particular, the assurance of an organisation’s reputation. It is designed for students with no previous experience or knowledge of public relations and the professional activities of practitioners. There are typically two main areas of study: - The context of public relations - The practice of public relations to meet objectives.

Module Overview

The module considers the role of Public Relations (PR) in the context of the changing nature of communication between organisations and their publics. The rapidly evolving technological context that is transforming the environment within which communication takes place is of particular concern to communication. Technological change has also had a social impact in terms of individuals' use of media, access to information and social interaction that all have implications for communication. Through completion of the module students can begin to plan and evaluate the contribution of PR within an integrated communications campaign strategy and develop their skills in presenting and defending their ideas within a realistic context.

Module Overview

Effective management of PR does not depend on luck; there are Codes of Conduct for practitioners to follow and the typical client / consultant relationship is usually organised into a Contract. This module will look at Public Relations and how it works as a business in its own right, together with how it works as a function of other businesses in order to provide students with a clear image of the establishment, structure and style of a PR consultancy, linked to the professional processes that go on within the business. As well as the world of PR consultancies, this unit will consider and discuss the role of PR within an organisation, considering the similarities and differences between the structure and performance of consultancy and in-house PR resources.

Module Overview

This module is designed to equip students with the understanding of research design and methods for undertaking research. The module gives students the opportunity to develop their observational, analytical and writing skills. It has vocational relevance in enabling students to select a relevant research topic for in-depth analysis and evaluation in their final year.

Module Overview

Community engagement is the process by which businesses and individuals build ongoing relationships with the purpose of achieving a collective vision for the benefit of a community. This increasingly important aspect of Public Relations can prove challenging as both persuasion and influence techniques are required. During this module, students will have the opportunity to evaluate current communication techniques used in persuasion, negotiation and counselling (eg neuro-linguistic programming and transactional analysis).

Module Overview

This module aims to highlight the importance of human rights issues to the practice of journalism and aims to develop students’ awareness of the range of ethical issues facing journalists.

Module Overview

This module provides an insight into the strategic management of events of all sizes and types. The module provides a framework of the event planning process, using short and long-term strategies and an overview of operational strategies. Students are expected to organise an event of their own in this module and all that it entails. The event is assessed from conception through to operation and evaluation.

Module Overview

This module extends the study of the history of journalism into the twentieth century. It provides students with the opportunity to critically consider the historical background to some of the issues which feature in contemporary news agendas – for example students may have the opportunity to discuss the reporting of war; changes in the National Health Service; critique of ‘care in the community’ relating to mental health, the export of American culture and ‘Globalisation’; the impact of ethnicity on politics and culture particularly in terms of EU debates; etc. Appropriate emphasis will be placed upon the role of the press in recording these social and political developments.

Module Overview

The role of the media as a 'mirror' of society means that journalists encounter cross-cultural issues in their newsgathering and news processing functions. This module aims to prepare students to write stories with cultural sensitivity, care and compassion.

Module Overview

This module gives the students the opportunity to specialise in a medium of their choice. In consultation with tutors, students will be able to produce radio or television bulletins, features and magazine programmes, a web site with multimedia content or print magazines and newspapers. More advanced skills appropriate to each medium will be taught and workshops will be tutor led and supervised as required. Materials produced will be outward facing where appropriate.

Module Overview

This module aims to build on legal and administrative knowledge gleaned in Essential Law at Level One. It examines how criminal and civil legislation affecting print, online and broadcast journalists has developed; identifies areas of conflict and uncertainty; and requires students to apply knowledge of legislation and case law to given scenarios, including responses to actions in the civil courts.

Module Overview

The dissertation is a major independent piece of work intended to develop a student’s ability to actively engage with core disciplinary issues. The dissertation focuses on analysis, synthesis and critique and combines critical approaches to public relations with practical application through case studies. Hence, it encourages students to apply key theoretical, conceptual and methodological issues in writing a dissertation. The module challenges the students to pull together the research skills acquired throughout their studies and particularly from the second year module ‘Research Skills and Practice’, make use of a body of literature and reflect upon the link between theory and practice.

Module Overview

This module aims to explore what is meant by "brands" and "branding". This module aims to provide a solid understanding and application in the strategies of global brand management and the impact on reputation. Key branding concepts such as brand identity, brand image, brand positioning and brand equity will be explored and supported by brand insights that will provide clear insights and illustrations of branding strategies in action. Key skills and theories of brand management will be presented and discussed within the context of a global brand management environment. Students can gain an appreciation of the role of brand strategy within a corporation’s operating plan.

Module Overview

This module aims to enable students to appreciate trends and changes within the main media industries (press, radio, TV, cinema, music and the internet) on a comparative basis between countries and between platforms. The module offers an opportunity to understand how the media has reached the state it is now in, and what trends are likely to continue in the future.

Module Overview

Creativity is a crucial element in the PR practitioners toolkit as the industries of advertising and PR are becoming more closely aligned. Different ways of attracting the attention of clients, target audiences, stakeholders and journalists need to be embraced as we communicate in increasingly noisy environments. Using traditional and digital/social media to best effective requires a deep understanding of effective writing and what makes eye catching and excellent design. This module aims to bring together elements potentially studied in the first two years and in brand and reputation. This module examines the way PR teams work with creative disciplines – designers, writers and creative advertising. Students have the opportunity to attain knowledge and skills to effectively draw up a creative brief and manage its delivery.

Module Overview

Students have the opportunity look at the history of the internet and at some of the underlying technology and web page design. Furthermore, they can potentially explore content-management systems, SEO, data journalism and database driven websites. Consideration is given to the strategic use of websites and how these can link with blogs, social media and current digital communications tools as part of a long term integrated PR strategy. Image optimisation will be covered involving the use and understanding of software such as Photoshop to ensure efficient and correct use of image data.

Module Overview

Internal Public Relations involves more than employee communications and is an essential aspect of most (perhaps even all) PR programmes. In particular students have the opportunity to consider ethical aspects of Internal Public Relations and distinguish the role of Internal Public Relations from that of related fields such as Human Resource Management and internal publicity.

Module Overview

This module examines broadcasting structures in the UK and in other countries. It aims to develop students’ critical understanding of models of national broadcasting and the implications for media policy and mass media's role in society. The module aims to introduce students to the fundamental contexts of national, cultural and economic systems which inform the development of media policy debates.

Module Overview

Students undertake a dissertation topic of their choice within their chosen field of study and are expected to apply theoretical concepts to their research. They will be allocated an individual tutor to support their work but students are expected to demonstrate a high degree of personal commitment and to work on their own initiative.

Module Overview

The purpose of this module is to examine and critically compare the different representations of journalists to be found in film and assess the relation between these portrayals and continuing moral and political issues faced by the profession. The module expects students to study movies in which journalists are portrayed as leading characters.

Module Overview

This module explores the history of war reporting and the ways in which journalists have represented conflicts. It also considers the reasons why some conflicts are marginalised, ignored altogether or given extensive coverage by the mainstream media. It studies theoretical aspects and practical implications of conflict-sensitive reporting.

Module Overview

This module is designed for students who have an interest in the theory and practice of political reporting, building on teaching at earlier levels of the programme relating to British and European political institutions. It focuses on two areas: political theory and the practice of political reporting. Increasingly, journalists need a critical understanding of the underlying concepts for political acting such as liberty, justice, rights, law, and how they are realised in our contemporary democracies. The module will discuss the crisis of our modern democracy and the concept of post-democracy. It will also reflect on the essential role the media hold within our democracies. The practical element will focus on the sourcing of political stories and on various models of political storytelling. It will further look at how digital journalism and the social media have changed political journalism.

Module Overview

Work experience is seen as essential in today's competitive jobs market. This module aims to give students the opportunity to experience the industries that can be linked to their studies, gain vital skills which may prepare them for the job market and also establish and maintain links with industry professionals who may help them in their chosen career.

Module Overview

This module considers Strategic Corporate Communication as a means of engendering trust and building reputation in key aspects of corporate activity, in particular in Investor Relations. It considers strategically vital concerns of corporate management at the highest level, in particular Corporate Governance and other institutional, social, political and technological issues that have a direct effect on the cost and availability. Modern media techniques and pressures have been to the fore in the recent fiscal crises as has the relationship between commercial and political interests and imperatives. This relationship will be described and developed as part of a wider understanding that strategic communications is not just a commercial or fiscal priority, especially in difficult times.

Module Overview

This module offers students the opportunity to develop a theoretical and practical understanding and application of digital communications used within Public Relations including: design and writing for web sites; blogs and social media: and to make them aware of some of the implications of this medium for PR.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

How you are assessed

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Fees and Scholarships

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

Please note that students will be expected to cover any travel, accommodation, and general living costs associated with their placement.

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

Please note that students will be expected to cover any travel, accommodation, and general living costs associated with their placement.

Entry Requirements 2020-21

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English and Maths. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 7.0 overall, with a minimum of 6.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Entry Requirements 2021-22

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 7.0 overall, with a minimum of 6.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Accreditations

This course is recognised by the Chartered Institute of Public Relations and recognised for excellence by the European Journalism Training Association. The University of Lincoln is a Member of the European Public Relations Education and Research Association (EUPRERA). Relationships with industry bodies can enable students and graduates to benefit from industry contacts, work experience and internship opportunities.

Industry Recognition

This course is recognised by the Chartered Institute of Public Relations and recognised for excellence by the European Journalism Training Association. The University of Lincoln is also a Member of the European Public Relations Education and Research Association (EUPRERA).

Work Placements

Gaining industry experience is an important element of this programme. Students are supported in finding work placements in regional or national organisations. Please note that students will be expected to cover any travel, accommodation, and general living costs associated with their placement.

There are a number of extracurricular activities available for students to develop their skills. The University is home to Cygnet PR, a student-run PR agency through which students can experience working on live projects for external clients, as well as the University’s student magazine, print, and web publications, and its community and student radio stations, Siren Radio, and Brayford Radio.

"My lecturers bring such a wide depth of knowledge to my learning. I also love the variety - I could be listening to a lecture on court reporting in the morning and then writing a press release for a new drinks brand in the afternoon."

Megan Winzer, BA (Hons) Journalism and Public Relations student

Career Opportunities

Graduates may choose to pursue a career in either journalism or PR. There are potential roles in print, broadcast, online media, public relations, advertising, corporate communications, publishing, and freelance copywriting. Some students also go on to study further at postgraduate level.

Virtual Open Days

While you may not be able to visit us in person at the moment, you can still find out more about the University of Lincoln and what it is like to live and study here at one of our live Virtual Open Days.

Book Your Place

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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