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MA Music

MA Music

The School of Fine and Performing Arts is a centre of creativity with a purpose-built arts venue, studios and gallery. It is home to a vibrant artistic community where students and staff work alongside one another to explore new synergies between fine and performing arts.

The Course

MA Music embraces the diversity of music scholarship, combining historical, ethnographic, analytical, critical and practice-based approaches. Through taught and practical modules, students can develop methods and skills to be applied to their field of interest which may encompass ethnomusicology, musicology, composition and performance.

This MA is designed to pave the way for professional work in the music industries or further research.

The Course

MA Music embraces the diversity of music scholarship, combining historical, ethnographic, analytical, critical, and practice-based approaches.

The programme is designed to pave the way for professional work in the music industries, developing skills that will help in a variety of music-based careers such as writing, performing, composing, and teaching, or in further research.

Through taught and practical modules, students can develop methods and skills to be applied to their field of interest which may encompass ethnomusicology, musicology, composition, and performance.

Students have the opportunity to participate in a series of research and practice-based talks where scholars and practitioners are invited to share their work. Past events have included Tower Talks, Critical Encounters, and the annual music conference.

Research areas, projects and topics may include:

  • Performance
  • Composition
  • Musicology
  • Ethnomusicology
  • Contemporary music
  • Popular music
  • Musical theatre
  • Musical instruments
  • Collaboration
  • The music industries.
Students can work alongside colleagues specialising in different areas of music including performance, composition, musicology, ethnomusicology, opera, musical theatre, musical instruments and popular music. Taught modules will be offered through seminars, which can include tutor-delivered content followed by discussion, workshop activity and exercises.

Contact hours on this programme may vary depending on each individual module and the stage of study. Postgraduate study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in seminars. As a general guide, for every hours in class students are expected to at least spend two to three hours in independent study. Please contact the programme leader for more information.

The final research project will be an extended period of independent study leading to a practice-as-research output (practice and short dissertation) or a dissertation.

Advanced (ethno)musicology (Core)
Find out more

Advanced (ethno)musicology (Core)

Advanced (ethno)musicology explores advanced theories and concepts within the research areas of musicology, ethnomusicology, musical analysis and musical instrument studies. The module aims to deliver theories and concepts that build on their knowledge of music and expand their capacity for researching and thinking critically and theoretically about music. Students can consider these concepts and apply them to music and/or musical and cultural movements, helping to understand how theory develops an advanced understanding of music and an advanced ability to research music.

Collaborative Project (Core)
Find out more

Collaborative Project (Core)

This module provides students with the opportunity to collaborate with practitioners and researchers in fields outside of their own disciplines to create new work that is shaped by the collaborative partnerships formed and the processes undertaken. Students can be exposed to different collaborative practices, concepts and techniques that build on and enhance their knowledge. They can practically engage with these ideas and techniques and have the opportunity to apply them to their own work.

Final Project (Core)
Find out more

Final Project (Core)

The Final Project gives students the opportunity to pursue a substantial piece of independent research which can incorporate forms of musical practice, such as composition and performance, or take the form of a written dissertation. Students can work with a supervisor to agree the form of their project, which can involve collaboration with other musicians, artists or outside organisations, and may be presented as live work, recorded artefacts or as a written/notated text. The work should exhibit a coherent implementation of appropriate research and/or practical methodologies, and show evidence of original research in both the practical output and written element. A high level of technical competence is expected in all areas of work produced.

Individual Project (Core)
Find out more

Individual Project (Core)

In this module, students can develop an individual research project in line with their personal research interests. This may be in any music-related field including, but not limited to, musicology, ethnomusicology, composition, performance, and musical analysis, and will result in a project-based output in a format appropriate to their project. Students can be assigned a staff supervisor who they will work with to develop and carry out their project. Over the course of a semester, the student can plan, research, discuss and share the project both with their assigned supervisor as and the module group.

Research and Fieldwork (Core)
Find out more

Research and Fieldwork (Core)

This module aims to provide practical, theoretical and contextual grounding of a variety of research and fieldwork methodologies within the fields of, but not limited to, musicology, ethnomusicology, composition and performance. Students can be introduced to research techniques including developing research issues, questions and problems; developing and carrying out appropriate fieldwork including focus groups, interviews and archival work; analysing and understanding data; and carrying out a literature review and presenting a bibliography. These will be directly applicable both in the module and throughout the different projects carried out during the MA.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Assessments take place through a combination of portfolios, dissertations, presentations and practical projects that may include formats such as performances, compositions and websites depending on your chosen area of interest.

Your final project will consist of either a practice-as-research package (practice and short dissertation) or a standard dissertation, developed with a supervisor that has expertise in your area of interest.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

At Lincoln, MA Music sits within the School of Fine and Performing Arts, which incorporates students and staff in areas of theatre and drama, dance and fine art. This combination of subjects, skills and associated facilities make Lincoln fertile ground for collaboration and interdisciplinary work.

The wider College of Arts features those working in audio production, film production, animation, photography, architecture, design and many more creative disciplines with which MA Music students can interact. Being part of a rich arts community gives Lincoln students the opportunity to build professional connections for their future career.

 2020/21 Entry*
Home/EU £7,700

Home/EU
(including Alumni Scholarship 20% reduction )**

£6,160
International £16,000
International
(Including International Alumni / Global Postgraduate Scholarship £2,000 reduction)**
£14,000
   
 Part-time Home/EU £43 per credit point
 Part-time International £89 per credit point

 

Loans

A Postgraduate Master's Loan can help with course fees and living costs while you study. Individuals** will be able to borrow up to £10,906 for the purpose of completing an eligible postgraduate Master's qualification. The amount available will depend on the start date of your course.

Scholarships

As a postgraduate student you may be eligible for scholarships in addition to those shown above.

Guidance for Part-time Postgraduate Fees

To complete a standard Master's Taught programme, you must complete 180 credit points.

Full time students will be invoiced for the programme in full upon initial enrolment.

For part-time students, tuition fees are payable each credit point enrolled. To calculate your part-time fees, multiply the part-time fee per credit point by the number of credits you intend to complete within that academic year. This is usually between 60 and 90 credit points per year.

For example, if the fee per credit point for your programme is £49, and you enrol on 60 credits, the tuition fee payable for that academic year will be £2,940.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

Exceptionally tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For further information and for details about funding your study, scholarships and bursaries, please see our Postgraduate Fees & Funding pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/postgraduateprogrammes/feesandfunding/].

Other Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for travel and accommodation will be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional, you will normally be required to pay your own transport, accommodation and general living costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost.

First or upper second class honours degree in a relevant subject or equivalent professional experience.

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-session English and Academic Study Skills courses. https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/pre-sessionalenglishandacademicstudyskills/ . These specialist courses are designed to help students meet the English language requirements for their intended programme of study.


We are looking for students who have completed a first degree and want to learn more, as well as those who have been working in the arts and would like to enrich their work with further study. We are happy to welcome applicants with a very defined area of specialism and those wishing to explore a broader area of topics. We look for enthusiasm and a commitment to pursue your next stage of study, wherever you are starting from. At interview we may ask to see some of your work or to hear about your experience.

Research areas, projects and topics may include:

  • Performance
  • Composition
  • Musicology
  • Ethnomusicology
  • Contemporary music
  • Popular music
  • Musical theatre
  • Musical instruments
  • Collaboration
  • The music industries.
Students can work alongside colleagues specialising in different areas of music, including performance, composition, musicology, ethnomusicology, opera, musical theatre, musical instruments, and popular music. Taught modules will be offered through seminars, which can include tutor-delivered content followed by discussion, workshop activity, and exercises.

Contact hours on this programme vary depending on the module being delivered and the stage of study. Postgraduate level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour spent in class, students are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study. For more detailed information please contact the Programme Leader.

The final research project will be an extended period of independent study leading to a practice-as-research output (practice and short dissertation) or a dissertation.

Advanced (ethno)musicology (Core)
Find out more

Advanced (ethno)musicology (Core)

Advanced (ethno)musicology explores advanced theories and concepts within the research areas of musicology, ethnomusicology, musical analysis and musical instrument studies. The module aims to deliver theories and concepts that build on their knowledge of music and expand their capacity for researching and thinking critically and theoretically about music. Students can consider these concepts and apply them to music and/or musical and cultural movements, helping to understand how theory develops an advanced understanding of music and an advanced ability to research music.

Collaborative Project (Core)
Find out more

Collaborative Project (Core)

This module provides students with the opportunity to collaborate with practitioners and researchers in fields outside of their own disciplines to create new work that is shaped by the collaborative partnerships formed and the processes undertaken. Students can be exposed to different collaborative practices, concepts and techniques that build on and enhance their knowledge. They can practically engage with these ideas and techniques and have the opportunity to apply them to their own work.

Final Project (Core)
Find out more

Final Project (Core)

The Final Project gives students the opportunity to pursue a substantial piece of independent research which can incorporate forms of musical practice, such as composition and performance, or take the form of a written dissertation. Students can work with a supervisor to agree the form of their project, which can involve collaboration with other musicians, artists or outside organisations, and may be presented as live work, recorded artefacts or as a written/notated text. The work should exhibit a coherent implementation of appropriate research and/or practical methodologies, and show evidence of original research in both the practical output and written element. A high level of technical competence is expected in all areas of work produced.

Individual Project (Core)
Find out more

Individual Project (Core)

In this module, students can develop an individual research project in line with their personal research interests. This may be in any music-related field including, but not limited to, musicology, ethnomusicology, composition, performance, and musical analysis, and will result in a project-based output in a format appropriate to their project. Students can be assigned a staff supervisor who they will work with to develop and carry out their project. Over the course of a semester, the student can plan, research, discuss and share the project both with their assigned supervisor as and the module group.

Research and Fieldwork (Core)
Find out more

Research and Fieldwork (Core)

This module aims to provide practical, theoretical and contextual grounding of a variety of research and fieldwork methodologies within the fields of, but not limited to, musicology, ethnomusicology, composition and performance. Students can be introduced to research techniques including developing research issues, questions and problems; developing and carrying out appropriate fieldwork including focus groups, interviews and archival work; analysing and understanding data; and carrying out a literature review and presenting a bibliography. These will be directly applicable both in the module and throughout the different projects carried out during the MA.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Assessments take place through a combination of portfolios, dissertations, presentations, and practical projects that may include formats such as performances, compositions, and websites depending on the student’s chosen area of interest.

Their final projects will consist of either a practice-as-research package (practice and short dissertation) or a standard dissertation, developed with a supervisor that has expertise in that area.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days of the submission date.

All applicants will be invited to an interview. Students can prepare for their interview by reviewing the modules and thinking about how they would like to shape the personal and collaborative projects according to specific interests.

Students may be asked about their musical background, reasons for choosing this particular course, and how they imagine themselves developing over the year. The interview will last between 15 and 30 minutes and applicants will receive a follow-up email from the University with the result.

Students will be invited to participate in an annual conference organised by the music department, alongside undergraduate students and members of staff.

The School of Fine and Performing Arts organises Critical Encounters, a series of research and practice-based talks where scholars and practitioners are invited to share their work. Students have the opportunity to attend these talks and expand their horizons.

The College of Arts organises regular postgraduate gatherings called ‘Tower Talks’ where MA students are invited to share their ideas, projects, and research. Students will be invited to all Tower Talks enabling them to meet fellow MA students and present their own work during the year.

 2020/21 Entry*
Home/EU £7,700

Home/EU
(including Alumni Scholarship 20% reduction )**

£6,160
International £16,000
International
(Including International Alumni / Global Postgraduate Scholarship £2,000 reduction)**
£14,000
   
 Part-time Home/EU £43 per credit point
 Part-time International £89 per credit point

 

Loans

A Postgraduate Master's Loan can help with course fees and living costs while you study. Individuals** will be able to borrow up to £10,906 for the purpose of completing an eligible postgraduate Master's qualification. The amount available will depend on the start date of your course.

Scholarships

As a postgraduate student you may be eligible for scholarships in addition to those shown above.

Guidance for Part-time Postgraduate Fees

To complete a standard Master's Taught programme, you must complete 180 credit points.

Full time students will be invoiced for the programme in full upon initial enrolment.

For part-time students, tuition fees are payable each credit point enrolled. To calculate your part-time fees, multiply the part-time fee per credit point by the number of credits you intend to complete within that academic year. This is usually between 60 and 90 credit points per year.

For example, if the fee per credit point for your programme is £49, and you enrol on 60 credits, the tuition fee payable for that academic year will be £2,940.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

Exceptionally tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For further information and for details about funding your study, scholarships and bursaries, please see our Postgraduate Fees & Funding pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/postgraduateprogrammes/feesandfunding/].

Other Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for travel and accommodation will be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional, you will normally be required to pay your own transport, accommodation and general living costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost.

First or upper second class honours degree in a relevant subject or equivalent professional experience.

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-session English and Academic Study Skills courses. https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/pre-sessionalenglishandacademicstudyskills/ . These specialist courses are designed to help students meet the English language requirements for their intended programme of study.


We are looking for students who have completed a first degree and want to learn more, as well as those who have been working in the arts and would like to enrich their work with further study. We are happy to welcome applicants with a very defined area of specialism and those wishing to explore a broader area of topics. We look for enthusiasm and a commitment to pursue your next stage of study, wherever you are starting from. At interview we may ask to see some of your work or to hear about your experience.

Learn from Experts

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may also be supported in their learning by other students.

Dr Cassandre Balosso-Bardin

Programme Leader

Cassandre specialises in Ethnomusicology, more specifically Mediterranean music and bagpipes. She is the founder and director of the International Bagpipe Organisation. Cassandre is a prolific performer working around the world and at festivals including the Proms.
Contact: cbalossobardin@lincoln.ac.uk


Your Future Career

Career and Personal Development

MA Music at Lincoln gives you the opportunity to enrich your understanding of a range of subjects and develop skills that will help you in careers in music, including as writers, performers, composers and teachers. Careers in the arts might include those in arts administration, management, venue operation and more, whilst the critical skills developed in an MA demonstrate a high level of competency to future employers in many fields. Students who complete an MA may also wish to pursue further postgraduate research up to doctoral level.

Career and Personal Development

MA Music at Lincoln aims to provide a deeper understanding of a range of subjects, and advance skills that will help build a career in music. Potential roles include writers, performers, composers, and teachers.

A career in the arts varies from arts administration to management, venue operation, and more. The critical skills developed during a Master’s degree demonstrate a high level of competency to future employers in many fields, and students who complete the programme may also wish to pursue further postgraduate research up to doctoral level.


Facilities

Music students have access to industry-standard audio edit suites, production studios, a Mac lab, recording studios and a sound theatre for work with film. A suite of fully equipped sound-proofed rehearsal rooms is available for individual practice and group sessions.

Several performance spaces, including the 450-seat Lincoln Performing Arts Centre, the University’s gallery space Project Space Plus and The Platform at the Engine Shed complete the wide range of facilities across campus.

Students can study and research in the University's Great Central Warehouse Library, which provides more than 250,000 printed books and approximately 400,000 electronic books and journals, as well as databases and specialist collections. The Library has a range of different spaces for shared and individual learning.


The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.