Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Part-time

6 years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

P300

Course Code

MDSMDSUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Part-time

6 years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

P300

Course Code

MDSMDSUB

BA (Hons) Media Studies BA (Hons) Media Studies

Media Studies has never been more relevant or stimulating. We live, work, play, and communicate with each other in a world saturated by media.

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Part-time

6 years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

P300

Course Code

MDSMDSUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Part-time

6 years

Typical Offer

BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 3 A levels)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

P300

Course Code

MDSMDSUB

Rob Coley - Programme Leader

Rob Coley - Programme Leader

Rob Coley is programme leader for BA (Hons) Media Studies. He is coauthor (with LSFM colleague Dean Lockwood) of 'Cloud Time: The Inception of the Future' (Zero, 2012), 'Photography in the Middle: Dispatches on Media Ecologies' and 'Aesthetics' (Punctum, 2016), and editor of a special 'drone culture' edition of the journal Culture Machine. Individually, his work has been published in journals including Theory, Culture and Society, Cultural Politics, Philosophy of Photography, and Journal of Popular Television.

School Staff List

Welcome to BA (Hons) Media Studies

BA (Hons) Media Studies offers students the opportunity to examine the transformative role of 21st Century media in today’s digital society, and to develop advanced critical and creative skills relevant to this new world.

Media Studies is a young discipline, very open to speculation, experimentation, and creativity. These values are important in our increasingly media-saturated society where media have become inseparable from many of the major contexts and concerns of our
time.

The subject is entangled in complex ways with economic, social, cultural, psychological, and environmental realms. This programme aims to teach students how to think critically in new ways about the changing world and our influence on future developments.

The Lincoln School of Film and Media is home to a creative community of ambitious students, experienced staff and researchers, and inspiring visiting speakers.

Welcome to BA (Hons) Media Studies

BA (Hons) Media Studies enables students to explore the transformative role of 21st Century media in today’s digital society, and develop critical and creative skills relevant to this new world.

Media studies has never been more relevant or stimulating. Digital, networked media now form a ubiquitous and inextricable part of our everyday lives, holding an unprecedented power to drive opinions, debates, and movements. We live, work, play, and communicate with each other in a world saturated by media.

This programme engages critically and speculatively with the full depth and breadth of 21st Century media. This includes everyday devices like smartphones and computers (and the various platforms accessible by them, including social media and games), through to more traditional media such as film and television (and the ways in which they have been transformed by digital processes like streaming).

Today, these technologies are so entangled with our economic, social, cultural, psychological, technical, and environmental realms that basic skills now include not only reading, writing, and arithmetic, but also knowledge of, and competency in, media and communication.

The Lincoln School of Film and Media is home to a creative community of ambitious students, experienced staff and researchers, and inspiring visiting speakers.

How You Study

Media Studies at Lincoln blends the study of media theory with practical application. It places an emphasis on critical thinking and creativity. Teaching and learning activities can include written and audio-visual essays, contributions to group blogs, participation in student symposia, and a portfolio of practice-based work.

The first-year modules introduce seminal perspectives and new directions in media studies, where students can develop an understanding of the field’s changing priorities and the new skills these advances demand. This is taken further in the second year, where modules focus on the themes of visuality and aesthetics, digital and auditory cultures, and the logics and practices of gaming.

In the third year, students are able to embark on a major independent research project. They can develop a creative portfolio, and engage in advanced studies of the political and philosophical contexts of contemporary media. At the end of this final year, all students across The Lincoln School of Film and Media can celebrate with a major degree show of their work.

Teaching and learning activities on this programme can include written and audiovisual essays, contributions to group blogs, participation in student symposia, screenings, reading groups, and a portfolio of practice-based work.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

How You Study

Media Studies at Lincoln blends the study of media theory with practical application. It places an emphasis on critical thinking and creativity. Teaching and learning activities can include written and audio-visual essays, contributions to group blogs, participation in student symposia, and a portfolio of practice-based work.

The first-year modules introduce seminal perspectives and new directions in media studies, where students can develop an understanding of the field’s changing priorities and the new skills these advances demand. This is taken further in the second year, with modules focusing on the themes of visuality and aesthetics, digital and auditory cultures, and the logics and practices of gaming.

In the third year, students are able to embark on a major independent research project. They can develop a creative portfolio, and engage in advanced studies of the political and philosophical contexts of contemporary media. At the end of this final year, all students across The Lincoln School of Film and Media can celebrate with a major degree show of their work.

Teaching and learning activities on this programme can include written and audiovisual essays, contributions to group blogs, participation in student symposia, screenings, reading groups, and a portfolio of practice-based work.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

This module will introduce a range of core creative design and visual communication skills. Students will be required to demonstrate an understanding of these core skills by producing a portfolio of work that engages with topical issues and debates in visual digital cultures.

Module Overview

In an era of democratized technology, distribution platforms and funding streams, contemporary media practitioners have opportunities to fund, produce and exhibit their work like no generation before them. This power must, though, be employed creatively - technological devolution demands multi-skilled practitioners. Accordingly, this module will introduce some core technical skills and practices that will enable students to engage creatively with the media culture of the 21st century. Here, the emphasis will be on principles of cinematography, editing, and sound design. Students will be required to demonstrate an understanding of these technical practices by producing a portfolio of work that responds to issues and debates surround contemporary media culture.

Module Overview

This module introduces students to a critical discussion of digital cultures and their social, political, historical, economic and material contexts. Divided into four sections, this module will extend and deepen student’s understandings of the digital worlds they inhabit. ‘Digital (pre)histories’ introduces students to technical paradigms and technological developments that have been key to the formation of contemporary digital culture. ‘Digital materialities’ explores the material basis of our seemingly ‘immaterial’ digital worlds and its geo-political implications. ‘Digital politics and labour’ considers the role of the digital in the world of work, as well as the digital as work. The final segment, ‘Digital identities and societies’ considers the way in which identity and social life are thought of with and through the digital.

Module Overview

This module provides students with an introduction to some of the major works in critical theory credited with influencing the development of Media Studies as a discipline. In doing so, it supports students in developing academic skills in the close reading of primary sources and the writing of critical responses based on such readings – skills that will underpin student work throughout the BA Media Studies programme. However, rather than cleave entirely to a familiar canon, this module begins to problematize the accepted boundaries of what constitutes ‘media’ and remains reflexive in its engagement with established theories, concepts and debates. Students will explore the radical and experimental traditions of Media Studies in order to begin to map links between such energies and the media culture of the present.

Module Overview

Set in the context of a recurrent tension between ‘old’ and ‘new’ in digital culture, this module begins with the question of the digital, rather than approaching it in accordance with a familiar historical narrative. Here, students will develop the skills and methods introduced in Media Reading Group: 1, engaging in close reading and discussion of selected texts deemed to have made significant contribution to Media Studies in the 21st century. Students will be asked to consider what particular critical insight these texts might offer to our present circumstances, and how the theories, concepts and debates raised by these works might respond to the radical and experimental energies of the discipline.

Module Overview

As this module suggests, media increasingly theorizes itself in terms of both content and form. For example, media artefacts today frequently foreground their interfaces, or the structural and performative elements of storytelling. They often quite openly acknowledge their created status (‘laying bare the device’, as this is sometimes expressed). ‘If media tends to theorize itself today,’ Rombes has commented, ‘then what is the role of the critic, of the academic? One strategy might be to come at the topic indirectly, from odd and unexpected angles, through a variety of objects and texts…whose characteristics speak to our new era, where theory comes not from the academics, but from the very objects of academic critique’.

Module Overview

Following on from Media Theorizes Itself and Introduction to Digital Cultures, this module examines the contemporary media landscape as a site upon which truth is constructed, knowledge formed, and power entrenched. Asking how media studies might respond to the explosion of social media, participatory media, online video, etc., and in particular how this upsurge in ‘post-broadcast media’ has brought to the fore the very question of what ‘truth’ is, and how it might determined, the module seeks to interrogate how norms, values, power structures, and inequalities are both reflected and reproduced across a wide variety of media texts, considering the tangled web of lies, secrets, myths, conspiracies, and affects that saturate media content, and the ways in which these complicate traditional modes of textual analysis.

Module Overview

This module sets out to explore some of the ways in which we make, sense, and transform ourselves and our worlds through our sonic and auditory cultures. We will focus on a number of important phenomena in our consideration of sonic practices, ways of hearing and contemporary scholarship on the auditory dimensions of media. Designed to engage both Media Studies and Sound and Music Production students in their respective fields, we will move from discussions of sound in relation to the affective capacities of the body through discussion of audition in relation to space and place (focused through the concept of the ‘soundscape’). We will consider discussions of sound and technology and explore concepts and phenomena of ‘noise’ and ‘silence’ in sonic and musical experience. This module encourages collaborative research in the spirit of ‘Student as Producer’, the organizing principle of teaching and learning in the university.

Module Overview

The convergence of traditional media processes, coupled with the ubiquity of mobile and networked technology, has brought forth a dynamic participatory culture that blurs established distinctions between production and consumption. Building on the experience of Contemporary Media Practice 1 and 2, in this module students will explore how these emerging forms of media practice can respond to some of the key critical debates in digital culture. Specifically, the module will see students working both individually and in partnership with others on a series of trans-media projects that in some way address key social, political and cultural concerns of the 21st century.

Module Overview

Play is a ubiquitous activity, and games (in all their forms) have a long history and an influence that stretches beyond the game-space itself. In recent times, computers (and other trends within media and society) have lead to an exponential growth in the cultural, social and commercial importance of games, which have likewise become more sophisticated, becoming an important media form which has affected other media and culture generally. This critical studies theory module will aim to consider, evaluate and analyse the phenomena of games and game cultures in the 21st century.

Module Overview

This module teaches students how to research, plan, and write an undergraduate dissertation. Each session is dedicated to one stage of the planning, researching, and writing stage. We will look at how to formulate a research question, and how to narrow it down to a suitable project; we will explore research methods, focusing on the function on methodology in the context of a research; then, we will concentrate on the structure of a dissertation, and the particular features of all of its components. At the end of the module students will be aware of what is expected from their final dissertations, and will be equipped with the necessary tools to approach this task.

Module Overview

This module explores the relationship between technologies, bodies, and identities in contemporary digital societies. Based on an understanding of the body as a site of power and resistance, it is concerned with the intersection of class, race, and gender, as affective and political experiences that contribute to the formation and negotiation of identities. Away from a simplistic notion of the body as a "natural given", we think through the body to challenge our understanding of culture and to access a series of key debates in media studies. This module seeks to interrogate the embodied and affective relationships that we have with and through new technologies, and to highlight their political and economic implications.

Module Overview

In the 21st century we no longer believe that a single unified world can be visualized from a privileged position. Any sense of distance from the world has collapsed. We are conscious of living in a time of continual change and transformation as opposed to a state of equilibrium. After all, the early 21st century has been marked by rising urbanism, the movements of people, the crisis of global warming, the dominance of ever more complex logistical networks, the emergence of new cultures of speed, experiments with new modes of warfare, etc. This is a confusing situation – simultaneously liberating, exciting, anarchic and dangerous. We are traversed and overwhelmed by these affective forces. This innovative module, in which students collaborate to produce film essays, presents an opportunity to reassess aesthetic theories and practices – our modes of visualizing - in order to confront the conditions of the present.

Module Overview

The module aims to introduce you to a range of conceptual and theoretical approaches to the study of horror in popular culture. It explores the history of the genre and selected subgenres as well as contemporary manifestations, both supernatural, and realist horror. The module looks at the horror genre in terms of various social, cultural and national contexts. Students can study psychoanalytical approaches to these fictions as well as approaches such as affect theory which attempt to go beyond psychoanalysis. Through lectures, screenings and discussions, students are encouraged to apply these approaches to the analysis of selected media texts and subgenres.

Module Overview

The Minnesota State University Moorhead USA Exchange Programme is an optional module. As part of the three-year course, some students may study for the duration of the first term of the second year at Minnesota State University, Moorhead, USA. During the term abroad, students share classes and modules with local students. Not only can students live and socialise in another culture, providing opportunities to study their respective countries, they may also have an opportunity to examine US media industry practice through optional internships for exchange students. The Moorhead-Fargo twin cities may also offer practical opportunities for students to engage with USA production companies including NBC, Fox, ABC, CBS, and Prairie Public TV, all of whom have local bases.

Module Overview

A broad look at audio-culture from the twentieth century to the present, offering challenge and insight to Film & TV specialists. Vision is often privileged, resulting in a relative paucity of language for discussing sound. This problem is addressed, looking at texts from key theorists and practitioners, considering sound not in addition to vision, but independently, in music, radio, art and daily life.

Module Overview

This module extends an opportunity to students to comprehensively explore the inherent promise and challenge of designing for digital contexts and concerns (in all their social, economic and cultural complexity) without dismissing still pertinent issues relating to analogue forms. In this, it seeks to reinforce a research-engaged ethos which looks outwards to the world at large and acknowledges a diversity of interests. It will not rigidly prescribe specific themes for study but will encourage students to take responsibility and negotiate them with tutors.

Module Overview

Philosophical approaches have begun to contribute to the transformation of Media Studies. In this, we are not dealing simply with the crystallization and institution of a specialist philosophy of media, but rather the bringing together of the two disciplines into a mutually reinvigorating speculative encounter which allows a more expansive, more inclusive and more adventurous rethinking of both. This module, reflecting on the various ‘turns’ in theory in recent years – vital, affective, material, speculative, nonhuman - provides an opportunity to explore concepts and ideas which have emerged from within the ferment of this encounter from a range of exciting thinkers and theoretical perspectives.

Module Overview

The dissertation is the culmination of each student’s undergraduate investigation into the theories and debates surrounding practices of contemporary mediation. It takes the form of an extended essay.

Module Overview

Is the founding principle of the internet freedom, as so many once thought, or is it, in fact, control? This module looks at the politics of digital culture and the new capitalism of networked information technologies. Power, it can be argued, has increasingly come to lie in code, in protocols and algorithm. A new logic of control, simultaneously operating in both centralized and dispersed modes, has replaced hierarchical systems of power. What are the implications of networks as the core organizational structure for contemporary media, culture and life?

Module Overview

This module provides an opportunity to explore the entanglements of human bodies with media devices and processes. With and through media technologies, we transform the body and our understanding of bodily life. Today, this has become so obvious that the distinction between ourselves, machines and other species has been rendered problematic. Some insist on the need to defend the body against the encroachment of media and cybernetic systems. But perhaps the body has always already been mediated? Seizing upon this problematic, theorists, artists and media practitioners have converged upon a preoccupation with speculation upon the present and future condition of the mediatized human body.

Module Overview

This is an ecologically minded module, one that explores media and mediation in the context of contemporary environmental concerns. It foregrounds a variety of geo-centred attempts to rethink the materiality of media and emphasizes the radical consequences of such endeavours. Working collaboratively to produce audiovisual essays, students will explore how the material reality of mediation exposes us to spaces and times beyond human perception.

Module Overview

When studying contemporary media, the rapid pace of technological change can pose a problem for those of us hoping to find some clarity or surety within a dense and often overwhelming media landscape. To study the media of today effectively, therefore, we must also look to the media of the past. In this module, we will accordingly unearth various examples of forgotten, neglected, or underappreciated pre-twentieth century media, discovering how concepts, problems, and debates that still define the discourse surrounding media design and usage today have their origins in much older technological systems, whilst simultaneously challenging the assumptions that have underpinned traditional histories of media.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

This module will introduce a range of core creative design and visual communication skills. Students will be required to demonstrate an understanding of these core skills by producing a portfolio of work that engages with topical issues and debates in visual digital cultures.

Module Overview

In an era of democratized technology, distribution platforms and funding streams, contemporary media practitioners have opportunities to fund, produce and exhibit their work like no generation before them. This power must, though, be employed creatively - technological devolution demands multi-skilled practitioners. Accordingly, this module will introduce some core technical skills and practices that will enable students to engage creatively with the media culture of the 21st century. Here, the emphasis will be on principles of cinematography, editing, and sound design. Students will be required to demonstrate an understanding of these technical practices by producing a portfolio of work that responds to issues and debates surround contemporary media culture.

Module Overview

This module introduces students to a critical discussion of digital cultures and their social, political, historical, economic and material contexts. Divided into four sections, this module will extend and deepen student’s understandings of the digital worlds they inhabit. ‘Digital (pre)histories’ introduces students to technical paradigms and technological developments that have been key to the formation of contemporary digital culture. ‘Digital materialities’ explores the material basis of our seemingly ‘immaterial’ digital worlds and its geo-political implications. ‘Digital politics and labour’ considers the role of the digital in the world of work, as well as the digital as work. The final segment, ‘Digital identities and societies’ considers the way in which identity and social life are thought of with and through the digital.

Module Overview

This module provides students with an introduction to some of the major works in critical theory credited with influencing the development of Media Studies as a discipline. In doing so, it supports students in developing academic skills in the close reading of primary sources and the writing of critical responses based on such readings – skills that will underpin student work throughout the BA Media Studies programme. However, rather than cleave entirely to a familiar canon, this module begins to problematize the accepted boundaries of what constitutes ‘media’ and remains reflexive in its engagement with established theories, concepts and debates. Students will explore the radical and experimental traditions of Media Studies in order to begin to map links between such energies and the media culture of the present.

Module Overview

Set in the context of a recurrent tension between ‘old’ and ‘new’ in digital culture, this module begins with the question of the digital, rather than approaching it in accordance with a familiar historical narrative. Here, students will develop the skills and methods introduced in Media Reading Group: 1, engaging in close reading and discussion of selected texts deemed to have made significant contribution to Media Studies in the 21st century. Students will be asked to consider what particular critical insight these texts might offer to our present circumstances, and how the theories, concepts and debates raised by these works might respond to the radical and experimental energies of the discipline.

Module Overview

As this module suggests, media increasingly theorizes itself in terms of both content and form. For example, media artefacts today frequently foreground their interfaces, or the structural and performative elements of storytelling. They often quite openly acknowledge their created status (‘laying bare the device’, as this is sometimes expressed). ‘If media tends to theorize itself today,’ Rombes has commented, ‘then what is the role of the critic, of the academic? One strategy might be to come at the topic indirectly, from odd and unexpected angles, through a variety of objects and texts…whose characteristics speak to our new era, where theory comes not from the academics, but from the very objects of academic critique’.

Module Overview

Following on from Media Theorizes Itself and Introduction to Digital Cultures, this module examines the contemporary media landscape as a site upon which truth is constructed, knowledge formed, and power entrenched. Asking how media studies might respond to the explosion of social media, participatory media, online video, etc., and in particular how this upsurge in ‘post-broadcast media’ has brought to the fore the very question of what ‘truth’ is, and how it might determined, the module seeks to interrogate how norms, values, power structures, and inequalities are both reflected and reproduced across a wide variety of media texts, considering the tangled web of lies, secrets, myths, conspiracies, and affects that saturate media content, and the ways in which these complicate traditional modes of textual analysis.

Module Overview

This module sets out to explore some of the ways in which we make, sense, and transform ourselves and our worlds through our sonic and auditory cultures. We will focus on a number of important phenomena in our consideration of sonic practices, ways of hearing and contemporary scholarship on the auditory dimensions of media. Designed to engage both Media Studies and Sound and Music Production students in their respective fields, we will move from discussions of sound in relation to the affective capacities of the body through discussion of audition in relation to space and place (focused through the concept of the ‘soundscape’). We will consider discussions of sound and technology and explore concepts and phenomena of ‘noise’ and ‘silence’ in sonic and musical experience. This module encourages collaborative research in the spirit of ‘Student as Producer’, the organizing principle of teaching and learning in the university.

Module Overview

The convergence of traditional media processes, coupled with the ubiquity of mobile and networked technology, has brought forth a dynamic participatory culture that blurs established distinctions between production and consumption. Building on the experience of Contemporary Media Practice 1 and 2, in this module students will explore how these emerging forms of media practice can respond to some of the key critical debates in digital culture. Specifically, the module will see students working both individually and in partnership with others on a series of trans-media projects that in some way address key social, political and cultural concerns of the 21st century.

Module Overview

Play is a ubiquitous activity, and games (in all their forms) have a long history and an influence that stretches beyond the game-space itself. In recent times, computers (and other trends within media and society) have lead to an exponential growth in the cultural, social and commercial importance of games, which have likewise become more sophisticated, becoming an important media form which has affected other media and culture generally. This critical studies theory module will aim to consider, evaluate and analyse the phenomena of games and game cultures in the 21st century.

Module Overview

This module teaches students how to research, plan, and write an undergraduate dissertation. Each session is dedicated to one stage of the planning, researching, and writing stage. We will look at how to formulate a research question, and how to narrow it down to a suitable project; we will explore research methods, focusing on the function on methodology in the context of a research; then, we will concentrate on the structure of a dissertation, and the particular features of all of its components. At the end of the module students will be aware of what is expected from their final dissertations, and will be equipped with the necessary tools to approach this task.

Module Overview

This module explores the relationship between technologies, bodies, and identities in contemporary digital societies. Based on an understanding of the body as a site of power and resistance, it is concerned with the intersection of class, race, and gender, as affective and political experiences that contribute to the formation and negotiation of identities. Away from a simplistic notion of the body as a "natural given", we think through the body to challenge our understanding of culture and to access a series of key debates in media studies. This module seeks to interrogate the embodied and affective relationships that we have with and through new technologies, and to highlight their political and economic implications.

Module Overview

In the 21st century we no longer believe that a single unified world can be visualized from a privileged position. Any sense of distance from the world has collapsed. We are conscious of living in a time of continual change and transformation as opposed to a state of equilibrium. After all, the early 21st century has been marked by rising urbanism, the movements of people, the crisis of global warming, the dominance of ever more complex logistical networks, the emergence of new cultures of speed, experiments with new modes of warfare, etc. This is a confusing situation – simultaneously liberating, exciting, anarchic and dangerous. We are traversed and overwhelmed by these affective forces. This innovative module, in which students collaborate to produce film essays, presents an opportunity to reassess aesthetic theories and practices – our modes of visualizing - in order to confront the conditions of the present.

Module Overview

The module aims to introduce you to a range of conceptual and theoretical approaches to the study of horror in popular culture. It explores the history of the genre and selected subgenres as well as contemporary manifestations, both supernatural, and realist horror. The module looks at the horror genre in terms of various social, cultural and national contexts. Students can study psychoanalytical approaches to these fictions as well as approaches such as affect theory which attempt to go beyond psychoanalysis. Through lectures, screenings and discussions, students are encouraged to apply these approaches to the analysis of selected media texts and subgenres.

Module Overview

The Minnesota State University Moorhead USA Exchange Programme is an optional module. As part of the three-year course, some students may study for the duration of the first term of the second year at Minnesota State University, Moorhead, USA. During the term abroad, students share classes and modules with local students. Not only can students live and socialise in another culture, providing opportunities to study their respective countries, they may also have an opportunity to examine US media industry practice through optional internships for exchange students. The Moorhead-Fargo twin cities may also offer practical opportunities for students to engage with USA production companies including NBC, Fox, ABC, CBS, and Prairie Public TV, all of whom have local bases.

Module Overview

A broad look at audio-culture from the twentieth century to the present, offering challenge and insight to Film & TV specialists. Vision is often privileged, resulting in a relative paucity of language for discussing sound. This problem is addressed, looking at texts from key theorists and practitioners, considering sound not in addition to vision, but independently, in music, radio, art and daily life.

Module Overview

This module extends an opportunity to students to comprehensively explore the inherent promise and challenge of designing for digital contexts and concerns (in all their social, economic and cultural complexity) without dismissing still pertinent issues relating to analogue forms. In this, it seeks to reinforce a research-engaged ethos which looks outwards to the world at large and acknowledges a diversity of interests. It will not rigidly prescribe specific themes for study but will encourage students to take responsibility and negotiate them with tutors.

Module Overview

Philosophical approaches have begun to contribute to the transformation of Media Studies. In this, we are not dealing simply with the crystallization and institution of a specialist philosophy of media, but rather the bringing together of the two disciplines into a mutually reinvigorating speculative encounter which allows a more expansive, more inclusive and more adventurous rethinking of both. This module, reflecting on the various ‘turns’ in theory in recent years – vital, affective, material, speculative, nonhuman - provides an opportunity to explore concepts and ideas which have emerged from within the ferment of this encounter from a range of exciting thinkers and theoretical perspectives.

Module Overview

The dissertation is the culmination of each student’s undergraduate investigation into the theories and debates surrounding practices of contemporary mediation. It takes the form of an extended essay.

Module Overview

Is the founding principle of the internet freedom, as so many once thought, or is it, in fact, control? This module looks at the politics of digital culture and the new capitalism of networked information technologies. Power, it can be argued, has increasingly come to lie in code, in protocols and algorithm. A new logic of control, simultaneously operating in both centralized and dispersed modes, has replaced hierarchical systems of power. What are the implications of networks as the core organizational structure for contemporary media, culture and life?

Module Overview

This module provides an opportunity to explore the entanglements of human bodies with media devices and processes. With and through media technologies, we transform the body and our understanding of bodily life. Today, this has become so obvious that the distinction between ourselves, machines and other species has been rendered problematic. Some insist on the need to defend the body against the encroachment of media and cybernetic systems. But perhaps the body has always already been mediated? Seizing upon this problematic, theorists, artists and media practitioners have converged upon a preoccupation with speculation upon the present and future condition of the mediatized human body.

Module Overview

This is an ecologically minded module, one that explores media and mediation in the context of contemporary environmental concerns. It foregrounds a variety of geo-centred attempts to rethink the materiality of media and emphasizes the radical consequences of such endeavours. Working collaboratively to produce audiovisual essays, students will explore how the material reality of mediation exposes us to spaces and times beyond human perception.

Module Overview

When studying contemporary media, the rapid pace of technological change can pose a problem for those of us hoping to find some clarity or surety within a dense and often overwhelming media landscape. To study the media of today effectively, therefore, we must also look to the media of the past. In this module, we will accordingly unearth various examples of forgotten, neglected, or underappreciated pre-twentieth century media, discovering how concepts, problems, and debates that still define the discourse surrounding media design and usage today have their origins in much older technological systems, whilst simultaneously challenging the assumptions that have underpinned traditional histories of media.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

How you are assessed

Students on this course are assessed through written and audiovisual essays, dissertation, reports, reflexive journal, lecture diary, creative production, presentations, critical evaluations, and blogs.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Students on this course are assessed through written and audiovisual essays, dissertation, reports, reflexive journal, lecture diary, creative production, presentations, critical evaluations, and blogs.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Fees and Scholarships

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Entry Requirements 2020-21

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Entry Requirements 2021-22

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may be considered.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Teaching and Learning During Covid-19

At Lincoln, Covid-19 has encouraged us to review our practices and, as a result, to take the opportunity to find new ways to enhance the student experience. We have made changes to our teaching and learning approach and to our campus, to ensure that students and staff can enjoy a safe and positive learning experience. We will continue to follow Government guidance and work closely with the local Public Health experts as the situation progresses, and adapt our teaching and learning accordingly to keep our campus as safe as possible.

Specialist Facilities

Critical studies are supported by the extensive print and online resources available at the University’s Great Central Warehouse Library.

For practical work students have the opportunity to make use of the Schools industry-standard facilities, such as television and radio studios, video editing suites, audio editing suites, a sound dubbing theatre, green screen room, writers’ room, colour finishing facilities, and a photography studio.

The University is home to the Media Archive for Central England (MACE), which contains a wealth of film, tape, and digital media resources. There may be opportunities for students to undertake work experience at MACE.

Industry Links

Academic staff within the School are current media practitioners and many are engaged with professional bodies such as the Royal Television Society; the British Society of Cinematographers; and the British Association of Film, Television and Screen Studies. Honorary Doctorates include the digital social entrepreneur Tom Roope.

Media Studies students currently have free access to Adobe Creative Cloud software for the duration of their studies via our media and design labs.

Research

The Lincoln School of Film and Media is home to a number of research projects that investigate, explore, and experiment with media as a fundamental means of expression and communication for different groups within society.

Researchers within the School conduct internationally-recognised research in a variety of topics. These include visual and digital culture, sonic studies, and media philosophy. The co_LAB group, which coordinates the creative practice component of the course, is involved in ongoing collaboration with partners in various European universities.

What We look For In Your Application

We do not specify A level subjects but seek evidence of media-related critical awareness and/or creativity such as qualifications in Media, English, Sociology, Philosophy, Politics, Film Studies, Art, Design, or Theatre Studies.

We particularly value personal statements that demonstrate relevant experience, a broad range of interests and a real passion for thinking critically about media in the 21st Century.

Career Opportunities

Opportunities for Media Studies graduates may include creative or management roles in broadcasting and other media industries, social media management, media journalism, publishing, and education. Others may choose to continue their studies at postgraduate level.

Virtual Open Days

While you may not be able to visit us in person at the moment, you can still find out more about the University of Lincoln and what it is like to live and study here at one of our live Virtual Open Days.

Book Your Place

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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