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MA Historical Studies

MA History

1 year 2-3 years School of History and Heritage Lincoln Campus [L] Validated 1 year 2-3 years School of History and Heritage Lincoln Campus [L] Subject to Validation

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Introduction

This academically rigorous Master’s programme is designed to give you the opportunity to progress your specialist knowledge of history and the chance to develop the advanced research skills that are transferable to a variety of careers paths, including PhD study.

Teaching is informed by research expertise in the School of History & Heritage and you will be encouraged to engage with our interdisciplinary research community.

You can benefit from the historical resources available in the city of Lincoln, including the unique manuscripts at Lincoln Cathedral and one of only four surviving original copies of the Magna Carta, which is housed at Lincoln Castle. There is also an extensive archive of materials at the on campus Media Archive of Central England (MACE) and the International Bomber Command Centre. The Wren Library at Lincoln Cathedral also possesses several thousand early modern books.

You will have the opportunity to undertake an in-depth independent research project and have the chance to produce a detailed dissertation.

How You Study

The taught modules are delivered through a series of seminars. When researching and writing your dissertation you can be supported by a series of tutorial meetings with your supervisor.

Students on this course should expect to receive 3-4 hours of contact time per week. Postgraduate level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

Core Modules:

  • Approaches to Historical Inquiry
  • Research Methods


Students can choose two modules from the option list. Examples of optional modules:

  • Everyday Britain: MACE (The Media Archive For Central England) and the Historian
  • History and the Public
  • A Short History of Time and Space
  • The Study of Political History in Britain
  • Nineteenth-Century Lives: Texts, Histories, Portraits
  • Break Ranks! Antimilitarism, Pacifism and Resistance to War
  • Early Modern Manhood
  • The British Image of the United States (1896-Present day)
  • The Nineteenth-Century Natural World
  • Print Culture and the Book in the Nineteenth Century

How You Are Assessed

A variety of forms of assessment are used, including research projects, documentary critiques, essays, presentations, book reviews, portfolios and the 15,000-20,000 word dissertation.

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above).

Entry Requirements

First or upper second class honours degree in a relevant subject.

International Students will require English Language at IELTS 6.0 with no less than 5.5 in each element, or equivalent. http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/englishrequirements

Key Contacts

Academic:
Dr Christine Grandy
cgrandy@lincoln.ac.uk
01522 88 6901

Enquiries:
unilincolnarts@lincoln.ac.uk
+44 (0)1522 886097

Master's Level

A Short History of Time and Space (Option)

The modern method of dating events according to a single linear time series came into use quite recently. The predominant chronological device in the ancient and medieval worlds was dating by the year of an office, such as a king's reign. This module uses anthropological theories to explore how changing conceptions of historical time and geographical space have impacted on historical writing, and how this has influenced the way in which people at different periods have constructed the present and interpreted the past.

Approaches to Historical Inquiry (Core)

This module is designed to give students the opportunity to engage critically with the development of the discipline of History. A variety of different approaches to the subject are in turn analysed and contextualized. Their relationships with other approaches are examined through scrutiny of a series of historiographical debates. Having engaged critically with these approaches, students then have the opportunity to explore problems and challenges associated with primary source-based research on a practical and ethical level before being able to address these issues in the production of their dissertation proposal.

Break Ranks! Antimilitarism, Pacifism and Resistance to War (Option)

This module aims to examine the history of peace/antiwar movements both nationally and internationally. It also explores forms of noncompliance to war regulations among civilians and in the army. Students can study the theoretical underpinnings of this field and apply that knowledge in designing and developing their own research project for the final assessment. Areas that are covered include theories of pacifism/antimilitarism, war resistance in art and literature, religious opposition to war, women in peace movements and anti-war movements today.

Dissertation (MA History) (Core)

The dissertation is designed to allow students to conduct a sustained piece of work which draws upon their research and self-organisational skills. The dissertation will require students to explore the problematic nature of primary source materials and they will be expected to analyse the relationship between primary and secondary sources. Engagement with recent scholarship in the field and a synthesis of a substantial amount of secondary literature is expected within the dissertation. Where appropriate, as part of their research, students will need to consider critically ethical dimensions associated with their area of inquiry.

Early Modern Manhood (Option)

This module introduces key issues and concepts in gender history, with particular reference to early modern masculinity. An introduction to key ideas and scholars is provided, focussing particularly on the ways in which scholars of the history of masculinity use a variety of texts – from journals and letters to visual material and published works – in order to elucidate the ideals and experiences of both early modern men and women.

The module offers students the opportunity to engage in sustained analysis of developments in scholarship relating to masculinity in the period c.1500-1750. This is designed to enable them to demonstrate their understanding and ability to structure their own research, utilising primary and secondary sources, including works from cognate disciplines such as gender theory and other theoretically-informed approaches.

Everyday Britain: MACE (The Media Archive for Central England) and the Historian (Option)

This archive-based MA module makes use of the considerable holding of the Media Archive for Central England (MACE) as an entrance into the history of the ‘everyday’ in 20th century Britain. Students can familiarise themselves firstly with concepts of the ‘everyday’ within British history and its relationship to a range of identities in the 20th century, secondly with the archival holdings of MACE as a means of exploring these concepts and thirdly, the ‘mediatisation’ of everyday life in the 20th century.

History and the Public (Option)

Recently, public history - the engagement with history now, often outside the academy – has grown in Britain. This module aims to examine how and why the past has permeated culture. It will seek to critically examine how the past is represented in a variety of cultural forms and is designed to equip students with a critical conceptual framework. Students will be given the opportunity to apply these analytical tools to a close scrutiny of a range of ways in which the past is represented and consumed within contemporary society.

Nineteenth-Century Lives: Texts, Histories, Portraits (Option)

The nineteenth century witnessed a rapid expansion in the representation of lives, in personal narratives, historical accounts, and in portraiture that suggests a fascination with the private lives of public figures comparable to our own contemporary moment.

This module takes an interdisciplinary approach to life representation, discussing texts and paintings from the perspective of literary criticism, history, and art history. Students can examine a diverse range of life writing (including autobiographies, biographies, memoirs, diaries, letters, confessions, and collective biographies), consider life writing as a historical discourse, and address the self-fashioning of individuals through portraiture, while also exploring the connections and differences between these auto/biographical modes.

Print Culture and the Book in the Nineteenth Century (Option)

This module is designed to examine the history of the book and print culture over the long nineteenth century, from social, cultural, and economic standpoints.

Questions addressed include: How were Victorian texts written, revised, illustrated, published, printed, distributed, and sold? How did copyright debates over the century affect literary productions? What was the impact of serialisation and the periodical press on both the publishing industry and the reader or consumer? What place did the book-as-object have within Victorian material culture? How do Victorian texts themselves depict reading, writing, and the book? How does reading texts alongside images qualify reading and interpretation?

The module considers a range of printed materials, including but not limited to books, periodicals, newspapers, illustrations and printed ephemera. It provides opportunities to use the extensive and unique resources of the Tennyson Research Centre, conservation labs, and online resources such as Victorian periodical facsimiles. Students are also expected to read a novel in serialised form in a periodical, discussing one or two ‘numbers’ each week, to recapture and explore the experience of reading serially.

Research Methods (MA History) (Core)

This module aims to introduce a range of research methods and focuses on active engagement with the processes of gathering, evaluating and analysing data of various sorts. Students are guided through the process of using archives and gathering oral testimony, and will also have the opportunity to explore a variety of other sources. Students have the chance to develop familiarity with, and the chance to be able to evaluate, different approaches to the analysis and interpretation of historical data.

The British Image of the United States (1896-Present day) (Option)

The Anglo-American relationship has been a central facet of British foreign policy throughout the twentieth century. Its pioneering historian, H.C. Allen, asserted the relationship could only be understood by considering political factors in conjunction with cultural links.

This module examines one aspect of this process through the representation of America and Americans in British novels, films and TV series since the Great Rapprochement of the 1890s. It considers what the British image of the United States was and asks how did it develop over the course of the century? How far do the fictionalised relationships reflect the political relationships of the time in which they were written, and how far do they present an alternative story of Anglo-American relations? How far should we accept Allen’s contention that the cultural dimension of the relationship is critical to understanding its history?

The Nineteenth-Century Natural World (Option)

The ‘long’ nineteenth century was characterised by unprecedented industrial and urban change, which raised fears for the survival of the countryside and its flora and fauna. Simultaneously, new scientific knowledge radically reshaped understandings of humanity’s relationship with the natural world.

This module will consider aspects of nineteenth-century culture that looked to the natural world as a source both for innovation and continuity in those uncertain and increasingly materialistic times. The module will take an interdisciplinary approach to the natural world in the nineteenth century, discussing texts, paintings, collections and landscapes from the perspectives of literary criticism, history, heritage studies, art and architectural history.

Topics include the landscape garden as an expression of national pride; the nostalgic reconstruction of the pastoral childhood; scientific and philosophical debates about the natural world; the popular enthusiasm for natural history and collecting; nature painting; landscape transformation by newly capitalized and industrialized farming methods. The module includes field trips to Lincoln’s preserved common land and its own example of a garden city suburb.

The Study of Political History in Britain (Option)

This module provides students with the opportunity to engage critically with the writing of British political history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. A variety of different approaches to this subject are in turn analysed and contextualized. Their relationships with other approaches are examined through scrutiny of a series of historiographical debates. In the second half of the module, students can examine a number of modern texts and historical writing dealing with the period 1885-1924, in order to test out how these different approaches have influenced political historians.

Career and Personal Development

This programme aims to develop the advanced knowledge and high-level research skills that may be highly valued in the heritage and museum sectors, teaching and research roles. Some graduates progress to doctoral study and a career in academia.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing your course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual and website resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Other Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on your course. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and your meals may be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional you will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay your own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost.

Introduction

This academically rigorous Master’s programme is designed to give you the opportunity to progress your specialist knowledge of history and the chance to develop the advanced research skills that are transferable to a variety of careers paths, including PhD study.

Teaching is informed by research expertise in the School of History & Heritage and you will be encouraged to engage with our interdisciplinary research community.

You can benefit from the historical resources available in the city of Lincoln, including the unique manuscripts at Lincoln Cathedral and one of only four surviving original copies of the Magna Carta, which is housed at Lincoln Castle. There is also an extensive archive of materials at the on campus Media Archive of Central England (MACE) and the International Bomber Command Centre. The Wren Library at Lincoln Cathedral also possesses several thousand early modern books.

You will have the opportunity to undertake an in-depth independent research project and have the chance to produce a detailed dissertation.

How You Study

The taught modules are delivered through a series of seminars. When researching and writing your dissertation you can be supported by a series of tutorial meetings with your supervisor.

Students on this course should expect to receive 3-4 hours of contact time per week. Postgraduate level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

Core Modules:

  • Approaches to Historical Inquiry
  • Research Methods


Students can choose two modules from the option list. Examples of optional modules:

  • Everyday Britain: MACE (The Media Archive For Central England) and the Historian
  • History and the Public
  • A Short History of Time and Space
  • The Study of Political History in Britain
  • Nineteenth-Century Lives: Texts, Histories, Portraits
  • Break Ranks! Antimilitarism, Pacifism and Resistance to War
  • Early Modern Manhood
  • The British Image of the United States (1896-Present day)
  • The Nineteenth-Century Natural World
  • Print Culture and the Book in the Nineteenth Century

How You Are Assessed

A variety of forms of assessment are used, including research projects, documentary critiques, essays, presentations, book reviews, portfolios and the 15,000-20,000 word dissertation.

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above).

Entry Requirements

2:1 honours degree in History or a related subject.

International Students will require English Language at IELTS 6.0 with no less than 5.5 in each element, or equivalent. http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/englishrequirements

Key Contacts

Academic:
Dr Christine Grandy
cgrandy@lincoln.ac.uk
01522 88 6901

Enquiries:
unilincolnarts@lincoln.ac.uk
+44 (0)1522 886097

Master's Level

Break Ranks! Antimilitarism, Pacifism and Resistance to War (Option)

This module aims to examine the history of peace/antiwar movements both nationally and internationally. It also explores forms of noncompliance to war regulations among civilians and in the army. Students can study the theoretical underpinnings of this field and apply that knowledge in designing and developing their own research project for the final assessment. Areas that are covered include theories of pacifism/antimilitarism, war resistance in art and literature, religious opposition to war, women in peace movements and anti-war movements today.

Dissertation (MA History) (Core)

The dissertation is designed to allow students to conduct a sustained piece of work which draws upon their research and self-organisational skills. The dissertation will require students to explore the problematic nature of primary source materials and they will be expected to analyse the relationship between primary and secondary sources. Engagement with recent scholarship in the field and a synthesis of a substantial amount of secondary literature is expected within the dissertation. Where appropriate, as part of their research, students will need to consider critically ethical dimensions associated with their area of inquiry.

Early Modern Manhood (Option)

This module introduces key issues and concepts in gender history, with particular reference to early modern masculinity. An introduction to key ideas and scholars is provided, focussing particularly on the ways in which scholars of the history of masculinity use a variety of texts – from journals and letters to visual material and published works – in order to elucidate the ideals and experiences of both early modern men and women.

The module offers students the opportunity to engage in sustained analysis of developments in scholarship relating to masculinity in the period c.1500-1750. This is designed to enable them to demonstrate their understanding and ability to structure their own research, utilising primary and secondary sources, including works from cognate disciplines such as gender theory and other theoretically-informed approaches.

Everyday Britain: MACE (The Media Archive for Central England) and the Historian (Option)

This archive-based MA module makes use of the considerable holding of the Media Archive for Central England (MACE) as an entrance into the history of the ‘everyday’ in 20th century Britain. Students can familiarise themselves firstly with concepts of the ‘everyday’ within British history and its relationship to a range of identities in the 20th century, secondly with the archival holdings of MACE as a means of exploring these concepts and thirdly, the ‘mediatisation’ of everyday life in the 20th century.

Historical Research (Core)

This module aims to give students advanced expertise in historical research, such that they are prepared to undertake the MA dissertation but also to pursue doctoral research or other professional research work. The focus is not just on practical skills involving the finding and recording of material but on refining skills of analysis and approaches to methodology developed at undergraduate level, and on the critical incorporation of theoretical approaches into research design.

Literature, Politics and Identity in Inter-War Europe (Option)

The inter-war period in Europe was an unprecedented time of political and social upheaval. Also unique, was the way in which literature had a key role, not only in documenting this upheaval but as a powerful tool of self expression and self making. Many writers during this period saw their words as an intervention in the fight between right and left, alongside fights for gender equality, and the right to sexual freedom. This module will examine five key battlegrounds of political, social and sexual change: Russia, Ireland, Germany, Spain and Britain, and the ways in which writers engaged with this process. This will allow students to reflect upon the relationship between fact and fiction and the ways in which both history and life stories are shaped to fit particular narratives.
Aims and Outcomes
The course allows students to critically engage with literary material including novels, poetry, memoir and diaries and use it as a historical source. It will also allow students to interrogate the nature of writing fictional and non-fictional material and the ways in which these genres often overlap in the writing of history and the narrating of individual lives.

Photographing Empire (Option)

This module will examine photographs produced in during the era of European imperialism. The development of and greater accessibility to photography coincided with the era of high imperialism in the late nineteenth century and this module builds on recent scholarship which places the production and the impact of photographs at the heart of studies of the empire. Students will investigate the many ways in which the photographic image became a technology of power in the imperial project.

Sex and Science in the Western World, 1800 to the present (Option)

As above

The British Image of the United States (1896-Present day) (Option)

The Anglo-American relationship has been a central facet of British foreign policy throughout the twentieth century. Its pioneering historian, H.C. Allen, asserted the relationship could only be understood by considering political factors in conjunction with cultural links.

This module examines one aspect of this process through the representation of America and Americans in British novels, films and TV series since the Great Rapprochement of the 1890s. It considers what the British image of the United States was and asks how did it develop over the course of the century? How far do the fictionalised relationships reflect the political relationships of the time in which they were written, and how far do they present an alternative story of Anglo-American relations? How far should we accept Allen’s contention that the cultural dimension of the relationship is critical to understanding its history?

The Dissertation Map: Dissertation Preparation (Core)

This module will focus on developing a dissertation proposal as a type of ‘dissertation map’ that students can refer to as they commence independent research and writing for their MA Dissertation. Students will be introduced to the key aspects of a dissertation proposal (Sources, methodology, and historiography) and develop their own approaches to these as they relate to their chosen project. The module will finish with a ‘Proposal Roundtable’ where students will present their proposals to fellow students and staff within the School of History.

The Making of Contemporary Britain: From Sexual Liberation to Deindustrialisation, 1970-1990 (Option)

The 1970s and 1980s in Britain were contradictory decades. They saw the advent of second wave feminism, gay rights, vibrant youth subcultures and the weakening of the class system, alongside a return to the right in politics, institutionalised sexism and homophobia, and the destruction of the traditional working class. This module will examine key issues and events in these decades to understand these contradictions and analyse their lasting impact on contemporary Britain. Students will be able to engage with various themes such as sexuality, gender, class, race and identity and tailor their assessments to pursue a combination of these areas.

The Study of Political History in Britain (Option)

This module provides students with the opportunity to engage critically with the writing of British political history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. A variety of different approaches to this subject are in turn analysed and contextualized. Their relationships with other approaches are examined through scrutiny of a series of historiographical debates. In the second half of the module, students can examine a number of modern texts and historical writing dealing with the period 1885-1924, in order to test out how these different approaches have influenced political historians.

Themes and issues in the history of gender and sexuality (Option)

As above

Themes in Contemporary British History (Option)

This module will explore recent works and debates within contemporary British history, with a focus on the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will examine key animating questions within the field relating to class, race, gender and sexuality, while further exploring recent new directions such as urban history and the ‘emotional turn’ within contemporary British history. The module is organised thematically with an emphasis on recent work in the field. The module also places central journals, monographs, and online debates at the centre of it, as key sites for contesting and contributing to the field of contemporary British history. Students will thus emerge from the module not only with a strong understanding of contemporary British history as it currently stands, but also the multiple avenues through which it is articulated.

Career and Personal Development

This programme aims to develop the advanced knowledge and high-level research skills that may be highly valued in the heritage and museum sectors, teaching and research roles. Some graduates progress to doctoral study and a career in academia.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing your course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual and website resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Other Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on your course. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and your meals may be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional you will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay your own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost.

Tuition Fees

  2018/19 Entry*
Home/EU £7,300
Home/EU
(including Alumni Scholarship** 25% reduction)
£5,475
International £14,000
International
(Including International Alumni / Global Postgraduate Scholarship** £2,000 reduction)
£12,000
   
Part-time Home/EU £41 per credit point
Part-time International £78 per credit point

* Academic year September- July
** Subject to eligibility

Loans

A new system of postgraduate loans for Master's courses has been introduced in the UK. Under the new scheme individuals will be able to borrow up to £10,000 for the purpose of completing an eligible postgraduate Master's qualification.

Scholarships

As a postgraduate student you may be eligible for scholarships in addition to those shown above.

Guidance for Part-time Postgraduate Fees

To complete a standard Master's Taught programme, you must complete 180 credit points.

Full time students will be invoiced for the programme in full upon initial enrolment.

For part-time students, tuition fees are payable each credit point enrolled. To calculate your part-time fees, multiply the part-time fee per credit point by the number of credits you intend to complete within that academic year. This is usually between 60 and 90 credit points per year.

For example, if the fee per credit point for your programme is £38, and you enrol on 60 credits, the tuition fee payable for that academic year will be £2280.

For further information and for details about funding your study, scholarships and bursaries, please see our Postgraduate Fees & Funding pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/postgraduateprogrammes/feesandfunding/].

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.