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MSc Games Development and Design

MSc Games Development and Design

This industry-led course is taught by experienced staff and is supported by the Lincoln Games Research Network, providing a rich source of inputs and perspectives as well as many opportunities for creative interactions beyond the School.

The Course

MSc Games Development and Design is designed to build on students’ existing computer programming skills to provide the knowledge and skills to develop contemporary video games, using a variety of advanced tools and platforms, such as virtual reality.

Industry context is an important aspect of this programme, and students also study game design topics which are applicable to industry work and independent game creation, as well as research techniques appropriate for further postgraduate study. This is underpinned by the industry experience of our staff, many of which have either been employed in the games industry, or have current active connections with industry.

The course is informed by the work of staff who specialise in games, either with industry experience or from their research backgrounds in relevant areas. It is further supported by the Lincoln Games Research Network which connects staff with an interest in games across the University and beyond, providing a rich source of input and perspectives.

Guest speakers from industry, both from games companies and other related areas, will contribute to the Frontiers of Games Research module. This is designed to help students to develop industry perspectives, and better prepare them for employment or further study.

The Course

MSc Games Development and Design is designed to build on students’ existing computer programming skills, providing them with the knowledge and expertise to develop contemporary video games using a variety of advanced tools and platforms such as virtual reality.

Industry context is an important aspect of this programme, and students can study game design topics that are applicable to working within the sector and to independent game creation, as well as familiarise themselves with research techniques that are appropriate for further postgraduate study.

The course is informed by the work and research of academic staff who specialise in games, with a combination of industry experience and research backgrounds in relevant areas. It is further supported by the Lincoln Games Research Network, which connects staff with an interest in games across the University and beyond. This environment provides a rich source of inputs and perspectives, as well as many opportunities for constructive and creative multidisciplinary interactions.

Guest speakers from games companies and other related areas contribute to the Frontiers of Games Research module. This is designed to help students develop industry perspectives, and better prepare them for employment or further study.

Students on this course have the opportunity to study a range of core modules covering areas including Advanced Programming, Virtual and Augmented Reality for Games, Frontiers of Games Research, Prototyping and Evaluation for Games, Advanced Graphics, and Games Design Methods and Approaches. There is also the opportunity to select from a number of optional modules which allow you to further specialise in a specific area.

Students also undertake a Research Methods module designed to cover the fundamental skills and background knowledge that students may need to undertake research in this area. Students then have the opportunity to undertake a substantial research project focusing on an area of particular personal and professional interest, through the development of a dissertation and substantive software implementation.

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Postgraduate level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend at least two - three hours in independent study. For more detailed information please contact the programme leader.

Advanced Artificial Intelligence (Option)
Find out more

Advanced Artificial Intelligence (Option)

This module aims to cover the theoretical fundamentals and practical applications of decision-making, problem-solving and learning abilities in software agents.

Search is introduced as a unifying framework for Artificial Intelligence (AI), followed by key topics including blind and informed search algorithms, planning and reasoning, both with certain and uncertain (e.g. probabilistic) knowledge. Practical exercises in AI programming will complement and apply the theoretical knowledge acquired to real-world problems.

Advanced Programming (Core)
Find out more

Advanced Programming (Core)

This module aims to explore advanced topics using a contemporary object-oriented programming language. The objective is to prepare students for professional-level programming in scientific and commercial computing, and to support programming tasks in other modules of this award.

Students can explore a range of programming topics through a series of lectures and practical workshops, and will work on producing an individual programming assignment.

Advanced Software Engineering (Option)
Find out more

Advanced Software Engineering (Option)

This module aims to provide students with advanced concepts of Software Engineering principles and practices. Students can explore up-to-date methodologies and their application to real-world products and services will be covered.

Indicative topics of study will include (but are not limited to):

  • Agile methods of software engineering;
  • Requirements engineering, design, software components, software reuse, verification and validation, maintenance and configuration management, software evolution;
  • Critical system development and the ethical implications of software engineering;
  • Fault Tree Analysis.

Frontiers of Games Research (Core)
Find out more

Frontiers of Games Research (Core)

This module provides an introduction to cutting-edge topics in games research, including both theoretical and practical applications relevant to industry practice. The module will follow a research seminar format, involving input from colleagues within the games delivery team at Lincoln, colleagues from other schools, guest lectures from industry, international researchers in the field.

Interaction Design (Option)
Find out more

Interaction Design (Option)

This module provides the opportunity to develop advanced knowledge of the processes and principles of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and Interaction Design. Students can become familiar with cutting-edge theory and practice in this field.

The module aims to guide students through the process of User-Centred Design, which involves using established techniques to gather user requirements, conceptually design solutions to those requirements, prototype those solutions, and conduct valid user evaluations. This will be carried out with reference to recently published academic literature. The professional, ethical, social and legal issues in designing interactive technology will be considered throughout.

Machine Learning (Option)
Find out more

Machine Learning (Option)

This module aims to cover the theoretical fundamentals and practical application of machine learning algorithms, including supervised, unsupervised, reinforcement and evolutionary learning. Practical programming exercises complement and apply the theoretical knowledge acquired to real-world problems such as data mining.

Mobile and Connected Devices (Option)
Find out more

Mobile and Connected Devices (Option)

This module aims to explore the cutting-edge computing concepts and in-the-field deployment of emerging Internet of Things (IoT) platforms and devices.

The module will investigate, through practical implementation, the low-barrier capture, communication, and highly scalable consumption of data from geographically dispersed physical objects and sensors, with a view to creating novel end-user experiences.

Physical objects can now be easily connected to the internet and other objects through small, low-power, and inexpensive lightweight computing devices; creating hugely scalable networks of ‘things’ that can interoperate and stream data using simple web standards such as REST. IoT enabled objects and infrastructure can enable unforeseen opportunities for novel application scenarios, data collection and consumption, as well as create new markets around open data and third party applications. Additionally, the module will aim to cover how emerging capability such as locative and context aware technology can be exploited in cloud-connected prototypes and mobile applications. In terms of practical development, special attention is given to: creating data stream assets from sensor boards and smartphones, building a cloud information hub to store sensor data, and developing cloud services for consumption by mobile and other third party applications. Students will be given the opportunity to design and prototype IoT enabled applications, based on themed societal issues, using a combination of development boards and sensors, cloud computing services, and mobile applications.

Prototyping and Evaluation for Games (Core)
Find out more

Prototyping and Evaluation for Games (Core)

This module is guided by the industry experience of lecturing staff, and underpinned by theoretical considerations from game design and player experience, to deliver an industry-relevant experience of building and evaluate game concepts.

Research Methods (MSc Computer Science) (Core)
Find out more

Research Methods (MSc Computer Science) (Core)

This module is designed to cover the fundamental skills and background knowledge that students may need to undertake research related to the title of the award being studied, including: surveying literature; selecting and justifying a research topic; planning of research; selection of appropriate research methods; evaluation of research; presentation and reporting of research; and legal, social, ethical and professional considerations.

Research Project (Core)
Find out more

Research Project (Core)

This module gives students with the opportunity to carry out a significant project, focusing on an area of particular personal and professional interest, through the development of a dissertation and substantive software implementation.

The research project is an individual piece of work, which gives students the chance to apply and integrate elements of study from a range of modules, centred on a specific research question. Students are expected to undertake work that is relevant to the ongoing research in one of the established research centres within the Lincoln School of Computer Science and will work closely under the supervision of a member of that research centre.

Students are required to undertake the development of a software artefact that is non-trivial in scale and goals, and is supported by best-practice application of appropriate theoretical frameworks.

Virtual and Augmented Reality for Games (Core)
Find out more

Virtual and Augmented Reality for Games (Core)

On this module students can learn about emerging Virtual and Augmented Reality platforms from both design and development perspective. Students will have the opportunity to design, build and evaluate their VR and AR apps using state-of-the-art platforms.

Advanced Graphics (Core)
Find out more

Advanced Graphics (Core)

This module aims to enhance students understanding of concepts and theory around computer graphics, as well as enhancing their practical techniques. Advanced techniques available for graphics processing units (GPUs) are explored along with their practical implementation.

Cyber Security (M) (Option)
Find out more

Cyber Security (M) (Option)

This module provides an understanding of the challenges in cyber security faced by society and industry. This includes an examination of the impact of threats and develops an understanding of mechanisms to reduce the risk of attack. The module examines a range of cyber threats and attack types and introduces strategies to mitigate these. It also prompts students to consider the legal, social, and ethical implications of cyber security. As a Master's level module students are also encouraged to consider current research in the field of cyber security.

Game Design Methods and Approaches (Core)
Find out more

Game Design Methods and Approaches (Core)

This module explores the various conceptual tools that can be applied to the games design process. The module will be broadly split between theory and practical applications, contextualised against both commercial and academic applications. Students will be encouraged to develop as reflective design practitioners, through critiquing their own designs and those of their peers.

There is a specific focus on the design pipeline, starting from requirements gathering, through conceptualisation and prototyping, to evaluation and iteration. Students have the opportunity to learn various methods to help them tackle the specific challenges at each stage in this process. The module is grounded in practical experimentation, and student-centered exploration of the module themes. Through this module students can develop an understanding of the interplay between the different components and mechanics of a game, and how small changes can impact the gameplay experience.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

The programme may be assessed through a variety of means, including in-class tests, coursework, projects and examinations.

The final stage research project provides the opportunity to specialise and to complete a piece of work of significant complexity.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Students in the School of Computer Science are taught by academics with specialist experience in areas including computer vision and medical imaging, autonomous systems and robotics, and cloud computing.

Research within the School has been internationally recognised, such as a research project into medical imaging by Distinguished Professor of Image Engineering, Nigel Allinson MBE, who was recently awarded a £1.6 million grant from the Wellcome Trust.

 2020/21 Entry*
Home/EU £7,700

Home/EU
(including Alumni Scholarship 20% reduction )**

£6,160
International £16,000
International
(Including International Alumni / Global Postgraduate Scholarship £2,000 reduction)**
£14,000
   
 Part-time Home/EU £43 per credit point
 Part-time International £89 per credit point

 

Loans

A Postgraduate Master's Loan can help with course fees and living costs while you study. Individuals** will be able to borrow up to £10,906 for the purpose of completing an eligible postgraduate Master's qualification. The amount available will depend on the start date of your course.

Scholarships

As a postgraduate student you may be eligible for scholarships in addition to those shown above.

Guidance for Part-time Postgraduate Fees

To complete a standard Master's Taught programme, you must complete 180 credit points.

Full time students will be invoiced for the programme in full upon initial enrolment.

For part-time students, tuition fees are payable each credit point enrolled. To calculate your part-time fees, multiply the part-time fee per credit point by the number of credits you intend to complete within that academic year. This is usually between 60 and 90 credit points per year.

For example, if the fee per credit point for your programme is £49, and you enrol on 60 credits, the tuition fee payable for that academic year will be £2,940.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

Exceptionally tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For further information and for details about funding your study, scholarships and bursaries, please see our Postgraduate Fees & Funding pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/postgraduateprogrammes/feesandfunding/].

Other Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for travel and accommodation will be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional, you will normally be required to pay your own transport, accommodation and general living costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost.

First or second class honours degree in a discipline involving a significant element of computer programming, such as Computer Science, Engineering, or other Science and Technology subjects.

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-session English and Academic Study Skills courses. https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/pre-sessionalenglishandacademicstudyskills/ . These specialist courses are designed to help students meet the English language requirements for their intended programme of study.

This course comprises a range of core modules, including Advanced Programming; Virtual and Augmented Reality for Games; Frontiers of Games Research, Prototyping and Evaluation for Games; Advanced Graphics; and Games Design Methods and Approaches. Students can also select from a number of optional modules covering a range of specialist subject areas.

The Research Methods module is designed to cover the fundamental skills and background knowledge needed to undertake research in this area. Students are then able to undertake a substantial research project focusing on an area of particular personal and professional interest, through substantive software implementation and the development of a dissertation.

Postgraduate level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour spent in class students are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

For more detailed information, please contact the programme leader.

Advanced Artificial Intelligence (Option)
Find out more

Advanced Artificial Intelligence (Option)

This module aims to cover the theoretical fundamentals and practical applications of decision-making, problem-solving and learning abilities in software agents.

Search is introduced as a unifying framework for Artificial Intelligence (AI), followed by key topics including blind and informed search algorithms, planning and reasoning, both with certain and uncertain (e.g. probabilistic) knowledge. Practical exercises in AI programming will complement and apply the theoretical knowledge acquired to real-world problems.

Advanced Programming (Core)
Find out more

Advanced Programming (Core)

This module aims to explore advanced topics using a contemporary object-oriented programming language. The objective is to prepare students for professional-level programming in scientific and commercial computing, and to support programming tasks in other modules of this award.

Students can explore a range of programming topics through a series of lectures and practical workshops, and will work on producing an individual programming assignment.

Advanced Software Engineering (Option)
Find out more

Advanced Software Engineering (Option)

This module aims to provide students with advanced concepts of Software Engineering principles and practices. Students can explore up-to-date methodologies and their application to real-world products and services will be covered.

Indicative topics of study will include (but are not limited to):

  • Agile methods of software engineering;
  • Requirements engineering, design, software components, software reuse, verification and validation, maintenance and configuration management, software evolution;
  • Critical system development and the ethical implications of software engineering;
  • Fault Tree Analysis.

Frontiers of Games Research (Core)
Find out more

Frontiers of Games Research (Core)

This module provides an introduction to cutting-edge topics in games research, including both theoretical and practical applications relevant to industry practice. The module will follow a research seminar format, involving input from colleagues within the games delivery team at Lincoln, colleagues from other schools, guest lectures from industry, international researchers in the field.

Interaction Design (Option)
Find out more

Interaction Design (Option)

This module provides the opportunity to develop advanced knowledge of the processes and principles of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and Interaction Design. Students can become familiar with cutting-edge theory and practice in this field.

The module aims to guide students through the process of User-Centred Design, which involves using established techniques to gather user requirements, conceptually design solutions to those requirements, prototype those solutions, and conduct valid user evaluations. This will be carried out with reference to recently published academic literature. The professional, ethical, social and legal issues in designing interactive technology will be considered throughout.

Machine Learning (Option)
Find out more

Machine Learning (Option)

This module aims to cover the theoretical fundamentals and practical application of machine learning algorithms, including supervised, unsupervised, reinforcement and evolutionary learning. Practical programming exercises complement and apply the theoretical knowledge acquired to real-world problems such as data mining.

Mobile and Connected Devices (Option)
Find out more

Mobile and Connected Devices (Option)

This module aims to explore the cutting-edge computing concepts and in-the-field deployment of emerging Internet of Things (IoT) platforms and devices.

The module will investigate, through practical implementation, the low-barrier capture, communication, and highly scalable consumption of data from geographically dispersed physical objects and sensors, with a view to creating novel end-user experiences.

Physical objects can now be easily connected to the internet and other objects through small, low-power, and inexpensive lightweight computing devices; creating hugely scalable networks of ‘things’ that can interoperate and stream data using simple web standards such as REST. IoT enabled objects and infrastructure can enable unforeseen opportunities for novel application scenarios, data collection and consumption, as well as create new markets around open data and third party applications. Additionally, the module will aim to cover how emerging capability such as locative and context aware technology can be exploited in cloud-connected prototypes and mobile applications. In terms of practical development, special attention is given to: creating data stream assets from sensor boards and smartphones, building a cloud information hub to store sensor data, and developing cloud services for consumption by mobile and other third party applications. Students will be given the opportunity to design and prototype IoT enabled applications, based on themed societal issues, using a combination of development boards and sensors, cloud computing services, and mobile applications.

Prototyping and Evaluation for Games (Core)
Find out more

Prototyping and Evaluation for Games (Core)

This module is guided by the industry experience of lecturing staff, and underpinned by theoretical considerations from game design and player experience, to deliver an industry-relevant experience of building and evaluate game concepts.

Research Methods (MSc Computer Science) (Core)
Find out more

Research Methods (MSc Computer Science) (Core)

This module is designed to cover the fundamental skills and background knowledge that students need to undertake research related to the title of the award being studied, including: surveying literature; selecting and justifying a research topic; planning of research; selection of appropriate research methods; evaluation of research; presentation and reporting of research; and legal, social, ethical and professional considerations.

Research Project (Core)
Find out more

Research Project (Core)

This module gives students with the opportunity to carry out a significant project, focusing on an area of particular personal and professional interest, through the development of a dissertation and substantive software implementation.

The research project is an individual piece of work, which gives students the chance to apply and integrate elements of study from a range of modules, centred on a specific research question. Students are expected to undertake work that is relevant to the ongoing research in one of the established research centres within the Lincoln School of Computer Science and will work closely under the supervision of a member of that research centre.

Students are required to undertake the development of a software artefact that is non-trivial in scale and goals, and is supported by best-practice application of appropriate theoretical frameworks.

Virtual and Augmented Reality for Games (Core)
Find out more

Virtual and Augmented Reality for Games (Core)

On this module students can learn about emerging Virtual and Augmented Reality platforms from both design and development perspective. Students will have the opportunity to design, build and evaluate their VR and AR apps using state-of-the-art platforms.

Advanced Graphics (Core)
Find out more

Advanced Graphics (Core)

This module aims to enhance students understanding of concepts and theory around computer graphics, as well as enhancing their practical techniques. Advanced techniques available for graphics processing units (GPUs) are explored along with their practical implementation.

Cyber Security (M) (Option)
Find out more

Cyber Security (M) (Option)

This module provides an understanding of the challenges in cyber security faced by society and industry. This includes an examination of the impact of threats and develops an understanding of mechanisms to reduce the risk of attack. The module examines a range of cyber threats and attack types and introduces strategies to mitigate these. It also prompts students to consider the legal, social, and ethical implications of cyber security. As a Master's level module students are also encouraged to consider current research in the field of cyber security.

Game Design Methods and Approaches (Core)
Find out more

Game Design Methods and Approaches (Core)

This module explores the various conceptual tools that can be applied to the games design process. The module will be broadly split between theory and practical applications, contextualised against both commercial and academic applications. Students will be encouraged to develop as reflective design practitioners, through critiquing their own designs and those of their peers.

There is a specific focus on the design pipeline, starting from requirements gathering, through conceptualisation and prototyping, to evaluation and iteration. Students will learn various methods to help them tackle the specific challenges at each stage in this process. The module is grounded in practical experimentation, and student-centered exploration of the module themes. Through this module students will develop an understanding of the interplay between the different components and mechanics of a game, and how small changes can impact the gameplay experience.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Students on the programme may be assessed through a variety of means, including in-class tests, coursework, projects, and examinations.

The final stage research project enables students to further specialise and complete a piece of work of significant complexity.

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days of the submission date.

Students in the School of Computer Science are taught by academics with specialist experience in areas including computer vision and medical imaging, autonomous systems and robotics, cloud computing, data science, and games computing.
 2020/21 Entry*
Home/EU £7,700

Home/EU
(including Alumni Scholarship 20% reduction )**

£6,160
International £16,000
International
(Including International Alumni / Global Postgraduate Scholarship £2,000 reduction)**
£14,000
   
 Part-time Home/EU £43 per credit point
 Part-time International £89 per credit point

 

Loans

A Postgraduate Master's Loan can help with course fees and living costs while you study. Individuals** will be able to borrow up to £10,906 for the purpose of completing an eligible postgraduate Master's qualification. The amount available will depend on the start date of your course.

Scholarships

As a postgraduate student you may be eligible for scholarships in addition to those shown above.

Guidance for Part-time Postgraduate Fees

To complete a standard Master's Taught programme, you must complete 180 credit points.

Full time students will be invoiced for the programme in full upon initial enrolment.

For part-time students, tuition fees are payable each credit point enrolled. To calculate your part-time fees, multiply the part-time fee per credit point by the number of credits you intend to complete within that academic year. This is usually between 60 and 90 credit points per year.

For example, if the fee per credit point for your programme is £49, and you enrol on 60 credits, the tuition fee payable for that academic year will be £2,940.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

Exceptionally tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For further information and for details about funding your study, scholarships and bursaries, please see our Postgraduate Fees & Funding pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/postgraduateprogrammes/feesandfunding/].

Other Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for travel and accommodation will be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional, you will normally be required to pay your own transport, accommodation, and general living costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost.

First or second class honours degree in a discipline involving a significant element of computer programming, such as computer science, engineering, or other science and technology subjects.

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages for information on equivalent qualifications.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/

Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-session English and Academic Study Skills courses. These specialist courses are designed to help students meet the English language requirements for their intended programme of study.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/pre-sessionalenglishandacademicstudyskills/

Learn from Experts

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may also be supported in their learning by other students.

Patrick Dickinson image

Dr Patrick Dickinson

Programme Leader

Dr Patrick Dickinson's specialisms include computer games, virtual reality, and computer vision. After completing an MSc in 1995, Patrick worked as a programmer in the computer games industry until 2002. He was employed at Rebellion Developments in Oxford, and then at Awesome Developments Ltd, and worked on published game titles including Aliens Vs Predator (PC, 2000), Jimmy White's 2: Cueball (1999, PC, Playstation), and Jimmy White's Cueball World (2002, PC, Dreamcast). He returned academia in 2004 and studied for a PhD in Computer Vision at the University of Lincoln, before becoming a lecturer in 2008.


Your Future Career

Career and Personal Development

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/cam...e/studentsupport/careersservice/.

Career and Personal Development

As one of the world’s largest entertainment industries, the games sector can provide a rewarding and stimulating career. Students on this programme have the chance to develop skills needed by the industry, and the course aims to develop versatile professionals capable of thriving in a wide range of areas and employment destinations.

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities. The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.


Facilities

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our students. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

Technical resources for Computer Science include research facilities and laboratories, a computer engineering workshop, workstations with full development software platforms and a range of equipment for loan including, Raspberry Pi, Oculus Rift and HTC Vive virtual reality kit, smartphones and robots.

Students can study and research in the University's Great Central Warehouse Library, which provides more than 250,000 printed books and approximately 400,000 electronic books and journals, as well as databases and specialist collections. The Library has a range of different spaces for shared and individual learning.


The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.