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MPhil/PhD Physical Geography

MPhil/PhD Physical Geography

"Geography at Lincoln represents one of the most significant investments in UK university Geography for a generation" Dr Rita Gardner CBE, former Director of the Royal Geographical Society.

Teaching and Learning During COVID-19

The current COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated some adaptations to ensure a safe learning experience for all students and staff.

From autumn 2020 we plan to deliver an on-campus experience with appropriate social distancing. It is our intention that teaching will be delivered through a mixture of face-to-face and online sessions.

Wherever possible, we have adapted and refined practical and hands-on sessions to allow these to take place face-to-face, with smaller class sizes where academic staff engage with each student as an individual, working with them to enhance their strengths. Students get to know each other better and appropriate social distancing measures can be maintained.

All the learning outcomes of the course will be delivered through this approach. As and when restrictions start to lift, we aim to deliver an increasing amount of face-to-face teaching.

Our aim will be that online delivery is engaging and that students have the opportunity to interact with their tutors and be part of a learning community with fellow students through a range of different digital tools, including our dedicated online managed learning environment. This will help prepare students for a 21st Century workplace, with seamless blending of digital and face-to-face interactions.

We will be clear with students at the start of teaching about the specific approach to teaching for their programme.

Lectures involving large groups will be delivered online using interactive software in a range of different formats to ensure an engaging experience.

At Lincoln we aim to make every contact count and seminars and small group sessions will be managed to maximise face-to-face contact.

Practicals, workshops, studio sessions and performance-based sessions are being planned to be delivered face-to-face in a socially distanced way with appropriate PPE.

It is currently hard to predict the availability of trips, placements and other external experiences, but in all cases we are working hard to try and offer these where possible and within the framework of government guidelines at the time.

Personal tutoring is key to our delivery as this provides students with a dedicated tutor to support them throughout their time here at the University of Lincoln.

Safety and adherence to government guidelines is our first concern as we support students to engage in all aspects of their study here at Lincoln.

The Course

The School of Geography offers the opportunity to work at doctoral level alongside academics whose research has been internationally recognised.

You will have the chance to work within a supportive academic community, sharing ideas and experiences with the aim of advancing knowledge.

The Course

Understanding the earth’s climate and how it is changing can help us plan for the future and react to global challenges facing the world. Further study in physical geography enables students to explore the processes and patterns in the natural environment and considers the natural sciences of the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere.

The School of Geography offers the opportunity to work at doctoral level alongside academics whose research has been internationally recognised. Researchers in the School include Professor Mark Macklin, whose expertise lies in river systems, global environmental change, and in catchment hazard and pollution issues, Professor of Climate Science and Meteorology, Edward Hanna, and Dr Gary Bosworth, Reader in Rural Geography.

Students can benefit from a supportive academic community, where ideas and experiences are shared with the aim of advancing knowledge.

Lincoln’s physical geographers are working on projects exploring geoarchaeology and environmental history; quaternary environmental change; ecosystem and human health; floods, droughts and climate change; GIS and remote sensing; glaciology and climatology; coastal and marine environments; and large river systems and deltas.

Potential areas of doctoral research, reflecting the School’s current research strengths and specialisms include, alluvial geoarchaeology and environmental history; biogeochemistry, ecosystem and human health; extreme hydrological events (floods and droughts) and climate change; GIS and remote sensing for assessment of waterrelated diseases; Greenland’s ice sheet mass balance/glaciology; meteorology; climatology; mining impacts on freshwater, coastal and marine environments; morphodynamics of large rivers and deltas and river systems; and quaternary environmental change.
Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. In addition to this, you are strongly encouraged to attend School seminar and guest speaker events, and engage in a range of research and skills training opportunities in support of your studies.

You will have meetings with your academic supervisors, however the regularity of these may vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

You will be required to demonstrate adequate and appropriate progress on an annual basis. Final assessment is by viva voce examination of a research thesis. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.
The key to a successful programme is to find a research subject that you are passionate about, and a supervisory team that have expertise in this area. The first thing that all students should do is directly contact a member of staff who works in an area that they are interested in. We have wide areas of expertise in the School spanning climate change, river and coastal processes and pollution, waterborne diseases, biogeography, environmental behaviour, rural economy, social and political geography, development studies, and more.

Please visit the pages of the School to find the areas you are interested in, and then identify potential academic supervisors:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/geography/

You are invited to contact the supervisors that you feel are best suited to your research area to discuss the process further.

Once you have spoken to potential supervisors, you can follow the formal application process here:

https://my.lincoln.ac.uk/welcome/pages/login.aspx

Enrolment Dates

To support your experience within the postgraduate research community, new students are encouraged to enrol in October, February or May.

In addition to meeting peers across the University who are starting their research programme at the same time, there is access to a central training programme designed around the first three months of study, and targeted support aligned to each stage of the postgraduate research journey. Alternative enrolment dates may be agreed with your supervisor on an individual basis.

Typically, students considered for postgraduate research are interviewed. Interviews may be in person or conducted by Skype or telephone if necessary.
2020/21 Entry*Full-timePart-time
Home/EU £4,407 £2,204
Home/EU 
(including Alumni Scholarship** 20% reduction)
£3,526 £1,763
International £16,100 £8,050
International
(Including International Alumni / Global Postgraduate Scholarship £2,000 reduction)***
£14,100 £7,050
Thesis Pending Home/EU (MPhil/PhD only) £710 £710
Thesis Pending International (MPhil/PhD only) £2,308 £2,308

 

2019/20 Entry*Full-timePart-time
Home/EU £4,327 £2,164
Home/EU 
(including Alumni Scholarship** 20% reduction)
£3,462 £1,731
International £15,800 £7,900
International
(Including International Alumni / Global Postgraduate Scholarship £2,000 reduction)***
£13,800 £6,900
Thesis Pending Home/EU (MPhil/PhD only) £696 £696
Thesis Pending International (MPhil/PhD only) £2,263 £2,263

 

* Academic year August – July

** UoL Alumni students only enrolling on to a Postgraduate Research programme. 20% Offset against the tuition fee payable for each year of study.

*** Subject to eligibility. Reduction applied to first year’s fees only.

Research students may be required to pay additional fees in addition to cover the cost of specialist resources, equipment and access to any specialist collections that may be required to support their research project. These will be informed by the research proposal submitted and will be calculated on an individual basis. Any additional fees will be outlined in your offer letter, prior to accepting your place at the University of Lincoln.

Guidance for Postgraduate Fees

Postgraduate Research

Full time and part time postgraduate research students will be invoiced the published set fee each academic year enrolled, up to the point of thesis submission.

Upon first enrolment, the full set fee is payable.

All continuing students are required to re-enrol on their anniversary of their first enrolment. The relevant set full time or part time fee is payable by all continuing students on re-enrolment.

A reduced 'writing-up' fee in the 12 month period prior to thesis submission may be applicable subject to your progress. After your Viva Voce examination, additional fees will be payable if a second Viva Voce examination is required.

For further information and for details about funding your study, scholarships and bursaries, please see our Postgraduate Fees & Funding pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/postgraduateprogrammes/feesandfunding/].

First or second class honours degree.

Potential areas of work are aligned with the School’s current research strengths and specialisms and include (but are not limited to):

  • Alluvial geoarchaeology and environmental history
  • Biogeochemistry, ecosystems and human health
  • Extreme hydrological events (floods and droughts) and climate change
  • GIS and remote sensing for assessment of water-related diseases
  • Greenland ’s ice sheet mass balance/glaciology
  • Mining impacts on freshwater, coastal, and marine environments
  • Morphodynamics of large rivers, coasts, and deltas
  • Quaternary environmental change.


Research in the School of Geography is conducted within the following centres and groups:

Lincoln Centre for Water and Planetary Health (LCWPH)

Lincoln Centre for Water and Planetary Health focuses on solving the most pressing global environmental and societal problems emerging from the world’s largest rivers. These include climate change impacts on extreme floods and droughts, flood-related contamination from metal mining and processing, and waterborne and vector-borne diseases affecting humans and animals where riverine environments provide the principal habitat.

Rural Visions Research Group

Rural Visions is a collaboration of researchers at Lincoln who embrace an eclectic range of research topics including rural economic and community development, rural landscape histories, animals and nature, environmental issues, rurality in literature and the media, rural migration and demography, rural poverty, and the impacts of technology for rural places.

Find out more on the School’s research pages:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/geography/research/

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the majority of time is spent in independent study and research. In addition, students are encouraged to attend School seminar and guest speaker events, and engage in a range of research and skills training opportunities in support of their studies.

Students will meet with their academic supervisor, however the regularity of this will vary depending on individual requirements, subject area, staff availability, and the stage of their programme.

Students will be required to demonstrate adequate and appropriate progress on an annual basis. Final assessment is by an oral examination (viva voce) of a research thesis. Students are also expected to demonstrate how their research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.
The key to a successful programme is to find a research subject that you are passionate about, and a supervisory team that has expertise in that area. All students should initially contact a member of staff who works in an area that they are interested in. The School has a wide range of expertise spanning climate change, river and coastal processes and pollution, waterborne diseases, biogeography, environmental behaviour, rural economy, social and political geography, development studies, and more.

Please visit the School pages to explore the areas you are interested in, and then identify potential academic supervisors:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/geography/

You are invited to contact the supervisors that you feel are best suited to your research area to discuss the process further.

Once you have spoken to potential supervisors, you can follow the formal application process here:

https://my.lincoln.ac.uk/welcome/pages/login.aspx

Enrolment Dates

To support your experience within the postgraduate research community, new students are encouraged to enrol in October, February or May.

In addition to meeting peers across the University who are starting their research programme at the same time, there is access to a central training programme designed around the first three months of study, and targeted support aligned to each stage of the postgraduate research journey. Alternative enrolment dates may be agreed with your supervisor on an individual basis.

Upon positive evaluation of the online application (including the research proposal), candidates will be interviewed by a panel of qualified academics from within the School of Geography and/or the wider University.
2020/21 Entry*Full-timePart-time
Home/EU £4,407 £2,204
Home/EU 
(including Alumni Scholarship** 20% reduction)
£3,526 £1,763
International £16,100 £8,050
International
(Including International Alumni / Global Postgraduate Scholarship £2,000 reduction)***
£14,100 £7,050
Thesis Pending Home/EU (MPhil/PhD only) £710 £710
Thesis Pending International (MPhil/PhD only) £2,308 £2,308

 

2019/20 Entry*Full-timePart-time
Home/EU £4,327 £2,164
Home/EU 
(including Alumni Scholarship** 20% reduction)
£3,462 £1,731
International £15,800 £7,900
International
(Including International Alumni / Global Postgraduate Scholarship £2,000 reduction)***
£13,800 £6,900
Thesis Pending Home/EU (MPhil/PhD only) £696 £696
Thesis Pending International (MPhil/PhD only) £2,263 £2,263

 

* Academic year August – July

** UoL Alumni students only enrolling on to a Postgraduate Research programme. 20% Offset against the tuition fee payable for each year of study.

*** Subject to eligibility. Reduction applied to first year’s fees only.

Research students may be required to pay additional fees in addition to cover the cost of specialist resources, equipment and access to any specialist collections that may be required to support their research project. These will be informed by the research proposal submitted and will be calculated on an individual basis. Any additional fees will be outlined in your offer letter, prior to accepting your place at the University of Lincoln.

Guidance for Postgraduate Fees

Postgraduate Research

Full time and part time postgraduate research students will be invoiced the published set fee each academic year enrolled, up to the point of thesis submission.

Upon first enrolment, the full set fee is payable.

All continuing students are required to re-enrol on their anniversary of their first enrolment. The relevant set full time or part time fee is payable by all continuing students on re-enrolment.

A reduced 'writing-up' fee in the 12 month period prior to thesis submission may be applicable subject to your progress. After your Viva Voce examination, additional fees will be payable if a second Viva Voce examination is required.

For further information and for details about funding your study, scholarships and bursaries, please see our Postgraduate Fees & Funding pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/postgraduateprogrammes/feesandfunding/].

First or second class honours degree in Geography or related discipline.

For direct PhD entry, applicants should possess a relevant Master's or MPhil degree in Geography or related discipline.

Learn from Experts

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

Edward Hanna Image

Professor Edward Hanna

Academic Contact

Edward Hanna is a Professor of Climate Science and Meteorology. Edward's specialisms include climate change, Greenland Ice Sheet mass balance, meteorology, and North Atlantic Oscillation. Edward has published over 120 research papers in international peer-reviewed journals and has led an international team to reconstruct Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass balance, the results of which have been used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Climate. Edward is a Fellow of the Royal Meteorological Society (FRMetS) and holds memberships of the International Glaciological Society, European Geosciences Union (EGU), and American Geophysical Union. He has also been a Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society.


Your Future Career

Career and Personal Development

This research programme is designed to enable students to expand their knowledge and expertise in an area of specific interest. It provides the opportunity to develop an in-depth foundation for further research or progression to careers across the broad spectrum of physical geographical industries and in academia.


Facilities

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our students. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

Over the past two decades, the University has invested more than £350 million in its Brayford Pool Campus, with further plans to invest in additional facilities and refurbishments of existing buildings.

Students can study and research in the University's Great Central Warehouse Library, which provides more than 250,000 printed books and approximately 400,000 electronic books and journals, as well as databases and specialist collections. The Library has a range of different spaces for shared and individual learning.


The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.