Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Part-time

2 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

FINARTMA

Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Part-time

2 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

FINARTMA

MA Fine Art MA Fine Art

The School of Fine and Performing Arts is a centre of creativity with a purpose-built arts venue, studios, and gallery. It is home to a vibrant artistic community where students and staff work alongside one another to explore new synergies between fine and performing arts.

Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Part-time

2 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

FINARTMA

Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Part-time

2 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

FINARTMA

 Andrew Bracey - Programme Leader

Andrew Bracey - Programme Leader

Andrew teaches on the MA and BA Fine Art courses, organises the ART TALKS lectures as well as being the College of Arts postgraduate taught programme lead. His practice-based research focuses on the slippage and overlap between the artist and the curator and his current PhD research is an exploration of parasitical tendencies of the contemporary artist using existing paintings as a host for new artworks.

School Staff List Make an Enquiry

Welcome to MA Fine Art

MA Fine Art is a studio-based course that is aimed at those who wish to develop the critical, research, practical, and professional aspects of their art practice at the highest level.

This interdisciplinary programme encourages creative risk-taking and intellectual inquiry. Alongside a strong emphasis on the richness and breadth of art from around the world, staff and students on the programme are encouraged to take an active role in Lincoln’s contemporary art community.

Students will have access to studio space and benefit from strong links with national and international artists and curators, which in the past have included working with the Collection, Lincolnshire Archives, The Blue Room, and others on collaborative projects.

A range of artists and professionals are invited to deliver guest lectures and tutorials as part of ART TALKS. Recent speakers include Assemble, Heath Bunting, Esther Leslie, Maurice Carlin, Danica Maier, Rachel Goodyear, and Alex Pearl.

Medium-specific specialist themes are available, recognising the increased material focus of advanced practice in fine art.

Welcome to MA Fine Art

MA Fine Art is a studio-based course that is aimed at those who wish to develop the critical, research, practical, and professional aspects of their art practice at the highest level.

This interdisciplinary programme encourages creative risk-taking and intellectual inquiry. Alongside a strong emphasis on the richness and breadth of art from around the world, staff and students on the programme are encouraged to take an active role in Lincoln’s contemporary art community.

Students will have access to studio space and benefit from strong links with national and international artists and curators, which in the past have included working with the Collection, Lincolnshire Archives, The Blue Room, and others on collaborative projects.

A range of artists and professionals are invited to deliver guest lectures and tutorials as part of ART TALKS. Recent speakers include Assemble, Heath Bunting, Esther Leslie, Maurice Carlin, Danica Maier, Rachel Goodyear, and Alex Pearl.

Medium-specific specialist themes are available, recognising the increased material focus of advanced practice in fine art.

How You Study

MA Fine Art is based in a dedicated studio and the production of work through studio practice is central to the programme.

The structure of the course is designed to be supportive, but geared towards independent research and practice. Teaching occurs through tutorials, critiques, seminars, lectures, visiting artists and curators, study visits and, importantly, through sharing of research and ideas among the peer group.

Full-time students will be taught on a Tuesday and Wednesday (full day), as well as occasionally on other days. We expect all of our full-time students to work independently in addition to taught hours, to make up the full five days.

Part-time students will be taught on a Tuesday (full days) and some Wednesdays. Part-time students will be given a timetable upon enrolment in September for the whole academic year which will confirm which Wednesdays they will be in attendance. As a part-time student, there is an expectation of 2.5 days committed to studies per week which includes the teaching time.

It is expected that a full-time student will work independently for a minimum of 30 hours in addition to taught sessions, for part-time students it should be a minimum of 12 hours.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs. For research programmes this includes research fees and research support fees.

Find out More

How You Study

MA Fine Art is based in a dedicated studio and the production of work through studio practice is central to the programme.

The structure of the course is designed to be supportive, but geared towards independent research and practice. Teaching occurs through tutorials, critiques, seminars, lectures, visiting artists and curators, study visits and, importantly, through sharing of research and ideas among the peer group.

Full-time students will be taught on a Tuesday and Wednesday (full day), as well as occasionally on other days. We expect all of our full-time students to work independently in addition to taught hours, to make up the full five days.

Part-time students will be taught on a Tuesday (full days) and some Wednesdays. Part-time students will be given a timetable upon enrolment in September for the whole academic year which will confirm which Wednesdays they will be in attendance. As a part-time student, there is an expectation of 2.5 days committed to studies per week which includes the teaching time.

It is expected that a full-time student will work independently for a minimum of 30 hours in addition to taught sessions, for part-time students it should be a minimum of 12 hours.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs. For research programmes this includes research fees and research support fees.

Find out More

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

This module is concerned with testing and progressing research through the production of studio work and a written critical article to enable students to confirm the parameters for ongoing studio practice. The emphasis will be on developing knowledge and an understanding of the relationship between students’ studio work and its wider external contexts. Students may be able to engage in and extend the analysis of their personal research topic through the production of studio work. The work produced should be evidenced through use of appropriate media and a self-evaluation document - a focused investigation pursued with a critical rigour. The studio work produced should be informed and supported by the critical article that should adopt a discursive approach to the identified research topic. The article is not concerned with descriptive or confirmatory statements or retrospective analysis. It should adopt a discursive approach to identified topic(s), to be explored with a critical rigour, resulting in an informed argument. Students are encouraged to develop their own structure for this document that best fits the specialist field in which they are working and the position they are developing though their practice and research.

Module Overview

This module profiles research methods for theoretical study and their application in the production of Fine Art studio work and writing. The module identifies the function and applications of research as a mechanism through which to develop both fine art thinking and studio work. Students can learn about effective methodologies for researching, enabling the acquisition of knowledge to inform the development and application of both studio and theoretical work. Students will be expected to identify personal research topics for the production of a range of studio work that indicates investigation and enquiry as distinct from work that may be specifically for exhibition. The studio work should be supported by a written report that clearly identifies the research topic, its contexts, and reflects critically on the studio work. In addition, students will be expected to self-evaluate their learning at the assessment point. This research topic will subsequently be pursued during the remainder of MA programme.

Module Overview

This module is wholly concerned with the production of a body of work for public exhibition. This intensive period of study aims to enable students to develop a major, and substantial, body of work that clearly evidences an understanding of, and critical engagement with, the identified research topic. A self-evaluation document of no more than 1,500 words outlines the critical thinking behind and contextual context for the exhibited body of work. This self-evaluation replaces the need to submit supporting work for assessment and therefore reflects the professional orientation of this module, demanding that all critical thinking is sublimated into the practice and into this document. The student takes responsibility for outlining succulently their key decision making and contextual positioning developed through the course of the module. A maximum of ten images with discursive notes of developmental work in studio, sketchbook pages, other artists’ work and/or curatorial decisions can be incorporated into the document. References to the student’s own and specific contribution to the teamwork of generating an exhibition are expected in the self-evaluation. It is expected that the body of work and exhibition be produced to a high professional standard of presentation. Students are expected to manage all aspects of the exhibition, including curation, invigilation, risk assessment, marketing, and fundraising if applicable.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

This module is concerned with testing and progressing research through the production of studio work and a written critical article to enable students to confirm the parameters for ongoing studio practice. The emphasis will be on developing knowledge and an understanding of the relationship between students’ studio work and its wider external contexts. Students may be able to engage in and extend the analysis of their personal research topic through the production of studio work. The work produced should be evidenced through use of appropriate media and a self-evaluation document - a focused investigation pursued with a critical rigour. The studio work produced should be informed and supported by the critical article that should adopt a discursive approach to the identified research topic. The article is not concerned with descriptive or confirmatory statements or retrospective analysis. It should adopt a discursive approach to identified topic(s), to be explored with a critical rigour, resulting in an informed argument. Students are encouraged to develop their own structure for this document that best fits the specialist field in which they are working and the position they are developing though their practice and research.

Module Overview

This module profiles research methods for theoretical study and their application in the production of Fine Art studio work and writing. The module identifies the function and applications of research as a mechanism through which to develop both fine art thinking and studio work. Students can learn about effective methodologies for researching, enabling the acquisition of knowledge to inform the development and application of both studio and theoretical work. Students will be expected to identify personal research topics for the production of a range of studio work that indicates investigation and enquiry as distinct from work that may be specifically for exhibition. The studio work should be supported by a written report that clearly identifies the research topic, its contexts, and reflects critically on the studio work. In addition, students will be expected to self-evaluate their learning at the assessment point. This research topic will subsequently be pursued during the remainder of MA programme.

Module Overview

This module is wholly concerned with the production of a body of work for public exhibition. This intensive period of study aims to enable students to develop a major, and substantial, body of work that clearly evidences an understanding of, and critical engagement with, the identified research topic. A self-evaluation document of no more than 1,500 words outlines the critical thinking behind and contextual context for the exhibited body of work. This self-evaluation replaces the need to submit supporting work for assessment and therefore reflects the professional orientation of this module, demanding that all critical thinking is sublimated into the practice and into this document. The student takes responsibility for outlining succulently their key decision making and contextual positioning developed through the course of the module. A maximum of ten images with discursive notes of developmental work in studio, sketchbook pages, other artists’ work and/or curatorial decisions can be incorporated into the document. References to the student’s own and specific contribution to the teamwork of generating an exhibition are expected in the self-evaluation. It is expected that the body of work and exhibition be produced to a high professional standard of presentation. Students are expected to manage all aspects of the exhibition, including curation, invigilation, risk assessment, marketing, and fundraising if applicable.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

How you are assessed

Students are assessed in a variety of ways, including spoken presentations, written submission, and the presentation of critically grounded art work.

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days of the submission date (unless stated differently above).

Students are assessed in a variety of ways, including spoken presentations, written submission, and the presentation of critically grounded art work.

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days of the submission date (unless stated differently above).

Fees and Scholarships

Postgraduate study is an investment in yourself and your future, and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

There are more ways than ever before to fund your postgraduate study, whether you want to do a taught or research course. For those wishing to undertake a Master's course, you can apply for a loan as a contribution towards the course and living costs. Loans are also available to those who wish to undertake doctoral study. The University offers a number of scholarships and funded studentships for those interested in postgraduate study. Learn how Master's and PhD loans, scholarships, and studentships can help you fund your studies on our Postgraduate Fees and Funding pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

All students are supported in the development of their practice and its documentation. Students have access to photography, video, and audio facilities; acrylic resist etching, digital imagery, and screen printing equipment, as well as facilities enabling wood, metal, plaster, plastics, and resin work.

As each student develops their own artwork there are material costs involved with can range from £0-£2,000 depending on their individual work on the course. There are costs involved with study trips which are around £15 for UK trips and £400-500 for any overseas optional study trips.

Postgraduate study is an investment in yourself and your future, and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

There are more ways than ever before to fund your postgraduate study, whether you want to do a taught or research course. For those wishing to undertake a Master's course, you can apply for a loan as a contribution towards the course and living costs. Loans are also available to those who wish to undertake doctoral study. The University offers a number of scholarships and funded studentships for those interested in postgraduate study. Learn how Master's and PhD loans, scholarships, and studentships can help you fund your studies on our Postgraduate Fees and Funding pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

All students are supported in the development of their practice and its documentation. Students have access to photography, video, and audio facilities; acrylic resist etching, digital imagery, and screen printing equipment, as well as facilities enabling wood, metal, plaster, plastics, and resin work.

As each student develops their own artwork there are material costs involved with can range from £0-£2,000 depending on their individual work on the course. There are costs involved with study trips which are around £15 for UK trips and £400-500 for any overseas optional study trips.

Entry Requirements 2020-21

First or upper second class honours degree in a relevant subject or equivalent professional experience.

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.5 overall, with a minimum of 6.0 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-session English and Academic Study Skills courses. https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/pre-sessionalenglishandacademicstudyskills/ . These specialist courses are designed to help students meet the English language requirements for their intended programme of study.

Entry Requirements 2021-22

First or upper second class honours degree in a relevant subject or equivalent professional experience.

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.5 overall, with a minimum of 6.0 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-session English and Academic Study Skills courses. https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/pre-sessionalenglishandacademicstudyskills/ . These specialist courses are designed to help students meet the English language requirements for their intended programme of study.

Teaching and Learning During Covid-19

At Lincoln, Covid-19 has encouraged us to review our practices and, as a result, to take the opportunity to find new ways to enhance the student experience. We have made changes to our teaching and learning approach and to our campus, to ensure that students and staff can enjoy a safe and positive learning experience. We will continue to follow Government guidance and work closely with the local Public Health experts as the situation progresses, and adapt our teaching and learning accordingly to keep our campus as safe as possible.

Exhibitions

Students are encouraged to work professionally. As part of the course, the School has previously organised group exhibitions including at General Practice, The Collection, The Blue Room, and Project Space Plus.

The course provides the opportunity to visit exhibitions and local galleries in Lincoln and there have been visits in previous years to Sheffield, Nottingham, London, and optional study overseas visits to Venice, Rome, and Berlin. Please see the Additional Costs tab for more information about the costs involved in these trips.

Guest Lectures

A range of artists and professionals are invited to deliver guest lectures and tutorials as part of ART TALKS. Recent speakers include Assemble, Heath Bunting, Esther Leslie, Maurice Carlin, Danica Maier, Rachel Goodyear, and Alex Pearl.

Interviews and Applicant Days

All applicants should submit a digital portfolio and statement, which will be reviewed. Shortlisted applicants will be invited to attend an interview where they will be required to present a portfolio of their recent fine art work. For international applicants we offer Skype interviews.

Career and Personal Development

The MA Fine Art is designed to enhance students’ practical, theoretical, and creative understanding of their chosen artistic discipline. Graduates have gone on to exhibit their work and undertake commissions.

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing your course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual and website resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities.
The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Postgraduate Events

Find out more about how postgraduate study can help further your career, develop your knowledge, or even prepare you to start your own business at one of our postgraduate events.

Find out More

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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