Course Information
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3 years School of English and Journalism Lincoln Campus [L] Validated BBC (or equivalent qualifications) PQ53 3 years School of English and Journalism Lincoln Campus [L] Validated BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points) (or equivalent qualifications) PQ53

Introduction

The study of two closely related fields such as English and Journalism encourages students to analyse a diverse range of literary approaches.

The Journalism modules are designed to equip students with essential knowledge and skills relevant to today's rapidly changing world of media. This course also provides the opportunity for students to undertake a chronological study of English Literature and to examine a rich and comprehensive range of works.

At Lincoln, the newsroom culture gives students the opportunity to develop the skills of a journalist, such as spotting a scoop or developing in-depth feature ideas. Our industry-standard newsrooms have print production and design software, and students have access to digital radio and television studios.

There are opportunities to work on the University's student magazine, print and web publications and its community and student radio stations, Siren FM and Brayford Radio, based on campus.

How You Study

During the first and second years, course modules introduce students to literary forms and theories, and texts and authors from the early 19th Century through to the present day. There are modules on producing content for print and broadcast media within a journalistic context.

In the third year, students can choose from a wide range of optional modules and have the opportunity to undertake a work placement to gain real-world experience. Students also produce a dissertation on a topic of their choice. Potential costs relating to optional work placements are outlined in the Features tab.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

How You Are Assessed

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our School of English and Journalism Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2017-18

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits at merit or above will be required.

In addition, applicants should have a minimum of three GCSEs at grade C or above, including English, or the equivalent.

We will also consider applicants with extensive relevant work experience.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Early Victorian Literature: Rebellion and Reform (Core)

The early Victorian period saw some of the most formative changes in modern history: the industrial revolution, the achievement of mass literacy, the rise of class conflict, the growth of freedoms for women, and the increase of religious doubt. Literature of the era both reflected these upheavals, and sought to intervene in shaping how the public responded to them. Students will have the opportunity to read texts of the period by writers such as Charles Dickens, Charlotte Bronte, Robert Browning and Christina Rossetti, and Chartist poets, placing them in their cultural context.

Essential Journalism 1 (Core)

This module will be a blend of practice and theory and aims to create a progression through the key journalistic skills needed to tell stories on the most appropriate platform using traditional, digital and mobile media. This module aims to develop a rounded awareness of the media and to give students the skills and insight that equip them to develop further in levels two and three. The focus is on newsgathering and storytelling skills. The way design influences different media is also analysed.

Essential Law (Core)

Journalism students are required to abide by the law, in terms of newsgathering and research methods, data collection and retention, use of communication networks, publishing and broadcasting material to audiences. This module aims to introduce students to the legal system, to the operation of the courts, and examines the impact of legislation and codes of practice on the work of journalists.

Introduction to Journalism Studies (Core)

Journalism is a key activity not simply in the communication of news and current affairs, but as a primary definer of social, political and psychological contexts in which we live and work as citizens in the twenty-first century. This module introduces students to key cultural, commercial and technological developments that have shaped the modern media, exploring those developments in terms of their history as well as the social impacts of modern mass communications.

Introduction to Narrative (Core)

Narrative is everywhere in our lives: in books, on TV, in history, on the news, on social media, in our conversations and in our heads. This module aims to give students an understanding of how stories work, using the insights that have originated and developed from structuralist theory. Contemporary British fiction by writers such as Kate Atkinson, Hanif Kureishi, Irvine Welsh, Ian McEwan and Ali Smith will be used to introduce a set of critical concepts for the analysis of narrative fiction.

Introduction to Poetry (Core)

This module looks at what makes poetic language different from 'normal' language, at how poets use the sounds and meanings of words, and at how poetry can be used to refresh, change or question our understanding of the world. We look at a range of poetry in English from nursery rhymes to rap and from the 14th century to the 21st. Our aim is to enable students to discuss poetry with confidence, accuracy and clarity, and, we hope, to enjoy more fully “the only art form that you can carry around in your head in its original form”.

Late Victorian to Edwardian Literature: Decadence, Degeneration and the Long Edwardian Summer (Core)

The late Victorian and Edwardian period (leading up to the Great War) is characterised by anxiety – about the self, society and the empire. Writers become preoccupied with decadence (personal and social), crime, sexuality, the changing status of women and the implications of scientific developments. This is also the period that sees the birth of modern literary forms: the short story, science fiction, the detective novel, children's literature, and fiction about the supernatural. These and other themes are examined through the works of writers such as Oscar Wilde, H.G. Wells, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Robert Louis Stevenson and Bram Stoker.

Level 2

Dis-Locations: the Literature of Late Capitalism (Core)

Fragmentation, uncertainty and conflict characterise a world in aftermath of war, at end of empire, and at the beginning of a period of radical social and cultural change. This module aims to chart the emergence of the contemporary world from these fractured beginnings through an introduction to British literature of the period 1950–2000. From the post-war Windrush migration to the rise of the historical novel at the turn of the millennium, the Angry Young Men to new feminist perspectives and postcolonialism, this module explores relevant theoretical perspectives on the late 20th Century and encourages an appreciation of the relationship between texts and their social, political and cultural contexts.

Essential Journalism 2 (Core)

This module aims to develop the basic skills studied in Journalism Skills at Level One. Students are expected to proactively gather news and feature stories employing the full range of research and interview techniques. Students will be encouraged to produce imaginative and original copy conforming to professional standards, with careful consideration of topic, angle, choice of interviewees, necessary attribution and corroboration of facts in a variety of writing styles suitable for a range of traditional, digital and mobile platforms.

Ethics and International Human Rights for Journalists (Option)

This module aims to highlight the importance of human rights issues to the practice of journalism and aims to develop students’ awareness of the range of ethical issues facing journalists.

Histories of Journalism (Option)

This module extends the study of the history of journalism into the twentieth century. It provides students with the opportunity to critically consider the historical background to some of the issues which feature in contemporary news agendas – for example students may have the opportunity to discuss the reporting of war; changes in the National Health Service; critique of ‘care in the community’ relating to mental health, the export of American culture and ‘Globalisation’; the impact of ethnicity on politics and culture particularly in terms of EU debates; etc. Appropriate emphasis will be placed upon the role of the press in recording these social and political developments.

Journalism and Society (Option)

The role of the media as a 'mirror' of society means that journalists encounter cross-cultural issues in their newsgathering and news processing functions. This module aims to prepare students to write stories with cultural sensitivity, care and compassion.

Law, Ethics and Regulation (Core)

This module aims to build on legal and administrative knowledge gleaned in Essential Law at Level One. It examines how criminal and civil legislation affecting print, online and broadcast journalists has developed; identifies areas of conflict and uncertainty; and requires students to apply knowledge of legislation and case law to given scenarios, including responses to actions in the civil courts.

Making It New: An Introduction to Literary Modernism (Core)

In this module students will have the opportunity to explore the early twentieth century, one of the most creative periods in English literature, when writers like James Joyce, T.S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf and D.H. Lawrence were challenging conventional ways of writing and reading, and rewriting how we experience and understand the world and ourselves. Required reading will include some of the most powerful works from the modern movement between 1910 and 1940 including James Joyce’s Ulysses and T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land.

Postcolonialism (Core)

This module examines literary representations of the world that emerge from the history of European exploration and expansion, and considers literary responses from groups that were marginalized through imperialism. Students will be encouraged to look at the treatment by white writers of issues of race and empire in the early twentieth century. They will also have the opportunity to explore ways in which postcolonial literatures develop strategies of 'writing back' to the imperial centre and re-thinking identity in terms of race, gender and nation. The final section offers a study of postcolonial Britain and some global implications of postcolonial writing.

Research methods (Core)

This module is designed to equip students with the understanding of research design and methods for undertaking research. The module gives students the opportunity to develop their observational, analytical and writing skills. It has vocational relevance in enabling students to select a relevant research topic for in-depth analysis and evaluation in their final year.

Study Period Abroad - English and Journalism (Option)

This module provides an opportunity for English and Journalism joint honours students to spend a semester at second level studying at one of the University’s partner institutions, developing academically and personally. During the semester abroad students undertake a course load at the partner institution of equivalent standard to that of one semester of the programme at Lincoln. Participation in study abroad also offers unique opportunities for personal student development in the wider sense, taking in cultural, sporting and social opportunities.

In order to participate, students are usually expected to obtain a 2:1 or higher at Level 1, have a good record of attendance and participation, and must complete an application process. A limited number of places will be available each year, and participation is at the discretion of the Study Abroad Co-ordinators and the Programme Leaders.

Theory Wars (Core)

This module considers the range of theories that we can use when we read and think about literature. Students will have the opportunity to study psychoanalysis, feminism, Marxism and postmodernism, among others, to think about why and how we structure meaning and interpretation in certain ways. We consider questions such as ‘what is an author?’, ‘what is gender?’ and ‘why do certain things frighten us?’ through theorists such as Roland Barthes, Judith Butler and Sigmund Freud.

Level 3

American Detective Fiction and Film: 1930 to the Present Day (Option)

Why have detective narratives proved so enduringly popular? This module will interrogate the iconic figure of the private eye in American popular culture, through the fiction and film of the twentieth and twenty-first century.

Comparative Media History (Option)

This module aims to enable students to appreciate trends and changes within the main media industries (press, radio, TV, cinema, music and the internet) on a comparative basis between countries and between platforms. The module offers an opportunity to understand how the media has reached the state it is now in, and what trends are likely to continue in the future.

Contemporary Drama (Option)

This is a study of drama and performance from the late 1960s to the contemporary moment, and involves a consideration of plays by playwrights including Tom Stoppard, Pam Gems, Eve Ensler, Sarah Kane, Caryl Churchill, Robin Soans and debbie tucker green. Topics emphasised include political theatre, postdramatic theatre, verbatim theatre, in-yer-face theatre, and issues of censorship. This module is taught through workshops involving both academic discussion and practical work.

Gothic in Literature and Film (Option)

Monsters and attics, desolate landscapes, imprisonment and pursuit: the gothic genre emerged in the late eighteenth century to depict our darkest fears and desires. Termed 'the literature of nightmare', gothic departs from a realistic mode of representation and employs a powerful means of symbolic expression. Students are given the opportunity to investigate ways in which the genre has explored psychological and political anxieties, and themes of sexual and social transgression. We consider literary texts from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries, including literature and film, and we give attention to sub-genres such as ‘female gothic’, ‘imperial gothic’ and ‘children’s gothic’.

Growing Up and Growing Old: Youth and Age across the Nineteenth Century (Option)

This module explores what it meant to grow up and to grow old in the nineteenth century, through often contradictory accounts of experiencing age categories from childhood to old age.

Students will have the opportunity to examine various constructions of ageing, to reflect on age as a crucial facet of identity. This module considers age as a lens to explore the nineteenth century as a transitional period of growth and expansion as well as decay and decline, through a range of Romantic and Victorian texts.

Independent Study: English (Option)

In this module students, having first submitted a research proposal and had it agreed by the module convenor, have the opportunity to research in depth an author or topic of their choosing.

Students are expected to commence research over the summer between Levels 2 and 3 and, on their return, have regular, one-to-one meetings with a tutor who is a research specialist in that field. The supervisor offers advice and direction, but primarily this module encourages independent research leading to the production of a 10,000 word dissertation.

International Media Policies (Option)

This module examines broadcasting structures in the UK and in other countries. It aims to develop students’ critical understanding of models of national broadcasting and the implications for media policy and mass media's role in society. The module aims to introduce students to the fundamental contexts of national, cultural and economic systems which inform the development of media policy debates.

Journalism Independent Study (Option)

Students may undertake a dissertation topic of their choice within their chosen field of study and apply theoretical concepts to their research. They will be allocated an individual tutor to support their work but it will require a high degree of personal commitment by the student to work on their own initiative.

Journalists on the Screen (Option)

The purpose of this module is to examine and critically compare the different representations of journalists to be found in film and assess the relation between these portrayals and continuing moral and political issues faced by the profession. The module expects students to study movies in which journalists are portrayed as leading characters.

Life Writing (Option)

This module responds to the recent interest in the representation of lives within literary studies. It discusses a range of life representations (including biography, autobiography, letters, confessions, memoirs, and poems) from the Romantic period to the contemporary moment. Students may consider the origins of autobiography, address Modernist experiments with life representations, and discuss twentieth-century and contemporary innovations, including disability narratives and cross-cultural autobiographies. Themes such as the construction of selfhood, conceptions of memory, the relational self, and the ethics of life writing are addressed.

Literature and the Environment (Option)

The first principle of ecological thinking is that it is not only human beings that are meaningful, and that we are neither so separate from, nor so dominant over, the non-human as we tend to think. In this module we explore what difference it makes to read literature from this perspective. We study literature as part of our complex interaction with our environment, and, perhaps sometimes, as a uniquely valuable one. We will be reading texts from ancient Greek pastoral to contemporary dystopias, and from the poet John Clare to the woodland historian Oliver Rackham.

Literature, Film and Gender (Option)

This module explores a wide range of gender topics (masculinities, the backlash against feminism, crossdressing, queer theory, and transgendering) through a variety of literary texts and films. Shakespeare, Ibsen, Hardy, and Woolf, are considered alongside more popular fiction by writers such as Susanna Moore, and films, including Priscilla: Queen of the Desert and The Crying Game.

Madness, The Body, Literature (Option)

This module looks at long 20th century fiction and culture through the lens of discourses of madness and wellness. Students will have the opportunity to develop their understanding of trends in psychiatric and therapeutic cultures on display in a range of American and British literature from the fin-de-siècle to the contemporary. We look at writers such as Sigmund Freud, Ken Kesey, Rebecca West and Siri Hustvedt, alongside theoretical work by figures such as R.D Laing and Jean-Paul Sartre.

Monsters and Violence in Middle English Romance (Option)

This module explores the representation of East-West contact in Middle English romances, with a particular emphasis on the interlacement of racial and ethnic otherness and on different types of violence, from martial exploits and religious coercion to rape and cannibalism.

Students will have the chance to experience the breadth of the romance genre—its many thematic and topical branches, and its many sub-genres and their respective conventions—as well as insight to the actual act of crusading, and the cultural and social crises that arose from this act.

Peace and Conflict Reporting (Option)

This module explores the history of war reporting and the ways in which journalists have represented conflicts. It also considers the reasons why some conflicts are marginalised, ignored altogether or given extensive coverage by the mainstream media. It studies theoretical aspects and practical implications of conflict-sensitive reporting.

Postmodernism: Apocalypse and Genesis 1967-2000 (Option)

This module will explore the nature of the contemporary through analysis of selected literary texts. The initial date, 1967, has been chosen as it marks a point of transition from a post-war world based upon a liberal consensus to a time of radical uncertainty, extreme and experimental forms of expression, the breakdown of notions of realism in all the arts, sciences and philosophy. Literature, alongside the radicalisation of all intellectual concepts, including reason and common-sense, has played a significant role in debating, illustrating, and disseminating these new ways of thinking both in terms of form and content.

Professional Placement (Option)

Work experience is seen as essential in today's competitive jobs market. This module aims to give students the opportunity to experience the industries that can be linked to their studies, gain vital skills which may prepare them for the job market and also establish and maintain links with industry professionals who may help them in their chosen career.

Science Fiction (Option)

This module considers the genre of modern science fiction (SF) and its evolution into one of today’s most popular narrative genres. Analysing a variety of forms – novel, short story, drama, graphic novel and film – students will have the opportunity to examine the socio-historical contexts of some of the most influential narratives of this period: from the emergence of “scientific romance” in the late nineteenth century, to late twentieth-century forms like cyberpunk and radical fantasy; from the problems of defining “genre fictions” and privileging SF over fantasy, to our enduring fascination with alternate histories, non-human agents (robots, animals, genetic hybrids, the environment), ecocatastrophe and post-apocalypse.

Sex, Texts and Politics: Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (Option)

This module concentrates on the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, with a particular emphasis on The Canterbury Tales, perhaps Chaucer’s most famous work.

Students will have the opportunity to examine the General Prologue and a variety of tales in relation to their historical context and literary antecedents, and, throughout, specific attention will be given to questions of genre (ranging from fable and epic to satire and romance), literary authority, narrative construction, and medieval aesthetics.

Southern Accents (Option)

This optional module explores representations of the southern states of America in prose fiction, film, drama and music. In the first section southern stereotypes and ‘resistant’ representations, produced by southerners and others, are examined in relation to social, political and historical contexts. This is followed by a section on African American representations of the south. Finally, a section on music and vernacular traditions explores the influence of the south on American popular music. Students are encouraged to adopt an interdisciplinary approach to examine questions of regional identity in a wide range of texts.

Specialist Journalism (Core)

Students have the opportunity to examine and analyse their chosen specialism across a wide range of publications, from general readership websites, magazines, and newspapers to specialist and niche publications aimed at the 'expert'. Students can study the particular attributes needed for specialist journalism including: authority, expertise, ability to access specialist information and format requirements. Throughout this module, students will select one particular strand to focus on in order to develop their specialism in the following indicative areas: sport, music, fashion, science, arts or business.

The Literature of Childhood (Option)

This module explores how childhood is constructed in a wide range of literary texts – texts by adults for adults, by adults for children, and by children themselves. Underpinning the module is the notion of ‘childhood’ as a cultural construct into which writers invest various, even contradictory, meanings. Students have the opportunity to explore texts by adults who idealise or demonise the child to suit their personal and philosophical agendas. Students may then analyse the mixture of didactic and therapeutic agendas in enduring genres of children’s literature such as the fairytale, adventure story and cautionary tale. Finally, we turn to children as authors in a study of juvenilia.

The Making of English Literature: Georgian Literature, 1710-1832 (Core)

Students reading Georgian Literature have the opportunity to study a selection of canonical and less well-known texts from the period and explore the historical and cultural context of their production. The module discusses developments in the novel from Daniel Defoe to Jane Austen and innovations in poetry from Alexander Pope to Romantic writers such as William Wordsworth. Important themes include satire, sensibility, the Gothic, popular and polite culture, authorship, and Georgian theatre. Contextual discussion focuses on the ‘construction’ of nation, gender, class and empire, and the relationship of British literature to the Enlightenment and to Revolution.

Twenty-First Century British Fiction (Option)

This module aims to explore new thematic trends, stylistic innovations and cultural developments in post-millennial British fiction, including a focus on globalizing processes, transnational migration and digital technology.

The module also addresses the development (and rethinking of the concepts) of gender and class in literature of the period and account for the continuing importance of the literary form in an age of digital publishing.

Women’s Writing and Feminist Theory (Option)

A diverse range of prose, poetry, and drama written by women from the eighteenth century to the present is considered alongside key concepts in feminist theory and the history of the women’s movement. Writers range from Mary Wollstonecraft to Zora Neale Hurston to Jeanette Winterson. Topics range from the feminine aesthetic and French feminism to feminist utopianism and cyberfeminism.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

Work Opportunities

There are opportunities to work on the University's student magazine, print and web publications and its community and student radio stations, Siren FM and Brayford Radio, based on campus.

Research

Many English and Journalism academics are engaged in research which directly informs teaching. There are particular strengths in 21st Century literature, 19th Century literature and Gothic studies. Staff in the School of English and Journalism currently include award-winning media professionals who bring a diverse range of experience and expertise.

Placements

Students may choose to undertake a work placement to gain valuable experience in the field. Please note that students are required to cover their travel, accommodation and general living costs while undertaking a placement.

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

The Journalism degree course is based in the Media, Humanities and Technology building, where students have access to industry-standard newsrooms, edit and production suites, broadcast equipment and studios.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

Graduates may go on to careers in publishing, journalism, advertising, public relations, marketing, the civil service and communications. Others may choose to continue their studies at postgraduate level. Lincoln graduates have gone on to work at regional and national outlets including the BBC, The Daily Mail, Sky Sports News HQ, The Times and Channel 4.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

In studying the BA (Hons) Drama and English degree at Lincoln, students will be encouraged to make connections between the subjects, explore key differences between them and also develop critical rigour while questioning conventional assumptions about literature, drama, and the world.
The BA (Hons) English degree at the University of Lincoln explores a lively and varied collection of texts within their historical and theoretical contexts, from Medieval literature and the Renaissance to postcolonialism and postmodernism.
This English and History degree invites students to consider literature and the past from a variety of theoretical, historical and cultural perspectives.
The BA (Hons) Film and Television degree is taught by research-active academics working in a variety of fields including national and heritage cinema, gender and sexuality, minority representation, children's TV, and shlock cinema.
BA (Hons) Journalism Studies at Lincoln aims to provide students with an informed understanding of the role of journalism in society, and the intellectual and practical skills required to succeed professionally as a journalist.
On the BA (Hons) Journalism degree students are encouraged to put journalistic theory into practice and have opportunities to produce news content to a professional standard while exploring the ethical and legal considerations of the industry.
The BA (Hons) Journalism and Public Relations degree aims to cover topics that are essential for communications professionals to develop analytical techniques and problem-solving abilities, as well as the cross-disciplinary skills needed for a career in journalism and public relations.

Introduction

The BA (Hons) English and Journalism combines a study of English literature with a grounding in a vibrant newsroom environment.

The study of two closely related fields such as English and Journalism encourages students to analyse a diverse range of literary approaches. The Journalism modules are designed to equip students with essential knowledge and skills relevant to today’s rapidly changing world of media. This course also provides the opportunity for students to undertake a chronological study of English literature and to examine a rich and comprehensive range of works.

At Lincoln, the newsroom culture gives students the opportunity to develop the skills of a journalist, such as spotting a scoop or developing in-depth feature ideas.

How You Study

During the first and second years, students are introduced to literary forms and theories, and texts and authors from the early 19th Century through to the present day. There are modules on producing content for print and broadcast media within a journalistic context.

In the third year, students can choose from a wide range of optional modules and have the opportunity to undertake a work placement to gain real-world experience.

Students also produce a dissertation on a topic of their choice. Potential costs relating to optional work placements are outlined in the Features tab.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

How You Are Assessed

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our School of English and Journalism Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2018-19

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits to include 30 at merit or above will be required.

In addition, applicants should have a minimum of three GCSEs at grade C or above, including English, or the equivalent.

We will also consider applicants with extensive relevant work experience.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Early Victorian Literature: Rebellion and Reform (Core)

The early Victorian period saw some of the most formative changes in modern history: the industrial revolution, the achievement of mass literacy, the rise of class conflict, the growth of freedoms for women, and the increase of religious doubt. Literature of the era both reflected these upheavals, and sought to intervene in shaping how the public responded to them. Students will have the opportunity to read texts of the period by writers such as Charles Dickens, Charlotte Bronte, Robert Browning and Christina Rossetti, and Chartist poets, placing them in their cultural context.

Essential Journalism 1 (Core)

This module will be a blend of practice and theory and aims to create a progression through the key journalistic skills needed to tell stories on the most appropriate platform using traditional, digital and mobile media. This module aims to develop a rounded awareness of the media and to give students the skills and insight that equip them to develop further in levels two and three. The focus is on newsgathering and storytelling skills. The way design influences different media is also analysed.

Essential Law (Core)

Journalism students are required to abide by the law, in terms of newsgathering and research methods, data collection and retention, use of communication networks, publishing and broadcasting material to audiences. This module aims to introduce students to the legal system, to the operation of the courts, and examines the impact of legislation and codes of practice on the work of journalists.

Introduction to Journalism Studies (Core)

Journalism is a key activity not simply in the communication of news and current affairs, but as a primary definer of social, political and psychological contexts in which we live and work as citizens in the twenty-first century. This module introduces students to key cultural, commercial and technological developments that have shaped the modern media, exploring those developments in terms of their history as well as the social impacts of modern mass communications.

Introduction to Narrative (Core)

Narrative is everywhere in our lives: in books, on TV, in history, on the news, on social media, in our conversations and in our heads. This module aims to give students an understanding of how stories work, using the insights that have originated and developed from structuralist theory. Contemporary British fiction by writers such as Kate Atkinson, Hanif Kureishi, Irvine Welsh, Ian McEwan and Ali Smith will be used to introduce a set of critical concepts for the analysis of narrative fiction.

Introduction to Poetry (Core)

This module looks at what makes poetic language different from 'normal' language, at how poets use the sounds and meanings of words, and at how poetry can be used to refresh, change or question our understanding of the world. We look at a range of poetry in English from nursery rhymes to rap and from the 14th century to the 21st. Our aim is to enable students to discuss poetry with confidence, accuracy and clarity, and, we hope, to enjoy more fully “the only art form that you can carry around in your head in its original form”.

Late Victorian to Edwardian Literature: Decadence, Degeneration and the Long Edwardian Summer (Core)

The late Victorian and Edwardian period (leading up to the Great War) is characterised by anxiety – about the self, society and the empire. Writers become preoccupied with decadence (personal and social), crime, sexuality, the changing status of women and the implications of scientific developments. This is also the period that sees the birth of modern literary forms: the short story, science fiction, the detective novel, children's literature, and fiction about the supernatural. These and other themes are examined through the works of writers such as Oscar Wilde, H.G. Wells, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Robert Louis Stevenson and Bram Stoker.

Level 2

Dis-Locations: the Literature of Late Capitalism (Core)

Fragmentation, uncertainty and conflict characterise a world in aftermath of war, at end of empire, and at the beginning of a period of radical social and cultural change. This module aims to chart the emergence of the contemporary world from these fractured beginnings through an introduction to British literature of the period 1950–2000. From the post-war Windrush migration to the rise of the historical novel at the turn of the millennium, the Angry Young Men to new feminist perspectives and postcolonialism, this module explores relevant theoretical perspectives on the late 20th Century and encourages an appreciation of the relationship between texts and their social, political and cultural contexts.

Essential Journalism 2 (Core)

This module aims to develop the basic skills studied in Journalism Skills at Level One. Students are expected to proactively gather news and feature stories employing the full range of research and interview techniques. Students will be encouraged to produce imaginative and original copy conforming to professional standards, with careful consideration of topic, angle, choice of interviewees, necessary attribution and corroboration of facts in a variety of writing styles suitable for a range of traditional, digital and mobile platforms.

Ethics and International Human Rights for Journalists (Option)

This module aims to highlight the importance of human rights issues to the practice of journalism and aims to develop students’ awareness of the range of ethical issues facing journalists.

Histories of Journalism (Option)

This module extends the study of the history of journalism into the twentieth century. It provides students with the opportunity to critically consider the historical background to some of the issues which feature in contemporary news agendas – for example students may have the opportunity to discuss the reporting of war; changes in the National Health Service; critique of ‘care in the community’ relating to mental health, the export of American culture and ‘Globalisation’; the impact of ethnicity on politics and culture particularly in terms of EU debates; etc. Appropriate emphasis will be placed upon the role of the press in recording these social and political developments.

Journalism and Society (Option)

The role of the media as a 'mirror' of society means that journalists encounter cross-cultural issues in their newsgathering and news processing functions. This module aims to prepare students to write stories with cultural sensitivity, care and compassion.

Law, Ethics and Regulation (Core)

This module aims to build on legal and administrative knowledge gleaned in Essential Law at Level One. It examines how criminal and civil legislation affecting print, online and broadcast journalists has developed; identifies areas of conflict and uncertainty; and requires students to apply knowledge of legislation and case law to given scenarios, including responses to actions in the civil courts.

Making It New: An Introduction to Literary Modernism (Core)

In this module students will have the opportunity to explore the early twentieth century, one of the most creative periods in English literature, when writers like James Joyce, T.S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf and D.H. Lawrence were challenging conventional ways of writing and reading, and rewriting how we experience and understand the world and ourselves. Required reading will include some of the most powerful works from the modern movement between 1910 and 1940 including James Joyce’s Ulysses and T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land.

Postcolonialism (Core)

This module examines literary representations of the world that emerge from the history of European exploration and expansion, and considers literary responses from groups that were marginalized through imperialism. Students will be encouraged to look at the treatment by white writers of issues of race and empire in the early twentieth century. They will also have the opportunity to explore ways in which postcolonial literatures develop strategies of 'writing back' to the imperial centre and re-thinking identity in terms of race, gender and nation. The final section offers a study of postcolonial Britain and some global implications of postcolonial writing.

Research methods (Core)

This module is designed to equip students with the understanding of research design and methods for undertaking research. The module gives students the opportunity to develop their observational, analytical and writing skills. It has vocational relevance in enabling students to select a relevant research topic for in-depth analysis and evaluation in their final year.

Study Period Abroad - English and Journalism (Option)

This module provides an opportunity for English and Journalism joint honours students to spend a semester at second level studying at one of the University’s partner institutions, developing academically and personally. During the semester abroad students undertake a course load at the partner institution of equivalent standard to that of one semester of the programme at Lincoln. Participation in study abroad also offers unique opportunities for personal student development in the wider sense, taking in cultural, sporting and social opportunities.

In order to participate, students are usually expected to obtain a 2:1 or higher at Level 1, have a good record of attendance and participation, and must complete an application process. A limited number of places will be available each year, and participation is at the discretion of the Study Abroad Co-ordinators and the Programme Leaders.

Theory Wars (Core)

This module considers the range of theories that we can use when we read and think about literature. Students will have the opportunity to study psychoanalysis, feminism, Marxism and postmodernism, among others, to think about why and how we structure meaning and interpretation in certain ways. We consider questions such as ‘what is an author?’, ‘what is gender?’ and ‘why do certain things frighten us?’ through theorists such as Roland Barthes, Judith Butler and Sigmund Freud.

Level 3

American Detective Fiction and Film: 1930 to the Present Day (Option)

Why have detective narratives proved so enduringly popular? This module will interrogate the iconic figure of the private eye in American popular culture, through the fiction and film of the twentieth and twenty-first century.

Comparative Media History (Option)

This module aims to enable students to appreciate trends and changes within the main media industries (press, radio, TV, cinema, music and the internet) on a comparative basis between countries and between platforms. The module offers an opportunity to understand how the media has reached the state it is now in, and what trends are likely to continue in the future.

Contemporary Drama (Option)

This is a study of drama and performance from the late 1960s to the contemporary moment, and involves a consideration of plays by playwrights including Tom Stoppard, Pam Gems, Eve Ensler, Sarah Kane, Caryl Churchill, Robin Soans and debbie tucker green. Topics emphasised include political theatre, postdramatic theatre, verbatim theatre, in-yer-face theatre, and issues of censorship. This module is taught through workshops involving both academic discussion and practical work.

Gothic in Literature and Film (Option)

Monsters and attics, desolate landscapes, imprisonment and pursuit: the gothic genre emerged in the late eighteenth century to depict our darkest fears and desires. Termed 'the literature of nightmare', gothic departs from a realistic mode of representation and employs a powerful means of symbolic expression. Students are given the opportunity to investigate ways in which the genre has explored psychological and political anxieties, and themes of sexual and social transgression. We consider literary texts from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries, including literature and film, and we give attention to sub-genres such as ‘female gothic’, ‘imperial gothic’ and ‘children’s gothic’.

Growing Up and Growing Old: Youth and Age across the Nineteenth Century (Option)

This module explores what it meant to grow up and to grow old in the nineteenth century, through often contradictory accounts of experiencing age categories from childhood to old age.

Students will have the opportunity to examine various constructions of ageing, to reflect on age as a crucial facet of identity. This module considers age as a lens to explore the nineteenth century as a transitional period of growth and expansion as well as decay and decline, through a range of Romantic and Victorian texts.

Independent Study: English (Option)

In this module students have the opportunity to research in depth an author or topic of their choosing. Students are expected to commence research over the summer between Levels 2 and 3 and, on their return, have regular, one-to-one meetings with a tutor who is a research specialist in that field. The supervisor offers advice and direction, but primarily this module encourages independent research leading to the production of a 10,000 word dissertation.

International Media Policies (Option)

This module examines broadcasting structures in the UK and in other countries. It aims to develop students’ critical understanding of models of national broadcasting and the implications for media policy and mass media's role in society. The module aims to introduce students to the fundamental contexts of national, cultural and economic systems which inform the development of media policy debates.

Journalism Independent Study (Option)

Students may undertake a dissertation topic of their choice within their chosen field of study and apply theoretical concepts to their research. They will be allocated an individual tutor to support their work but it will require a high degree of personal commitment working on their own initiative.

Journalists on the Screen (Option)

The purpose of this module is to examine and critically compare the different representations of journalists to be found in film and assess the relation between these portrayals and continuing moral and political issues faced by the profession. The module expects students to study movies in which journalists are portrayed as leading characters.

Life Writing (Option)

This module responds to the recent interest in the representation of lives within literary studies. It discusses a range of life representations (including biography, autobiography, letters, confessions, memoirs, and poems) from the Romantic period to the contemporary moment. Students may consider the origins of autobiography, address Modernist experiments with life representations, and discuss twentieth-century and contemporary innovations, including disability narratives and cross-cultural autobiographies. Themes such as the construction of selfhood, conceptions of memory, the relational self, and the ethics of life writing are addressed.

Literature and the Environment (Option)

The first principle of ecological thinking is that it is not only human beings that are meaningful, and that we are neither so separate from, nor so dominant over, the non-human as we tend to think. In this module students can explore what difference it makes to read literature from this perspective. We study literature as part of our complex interaction with our environment, and, perhaps sometimes, as a uniquely valuable one. Students can read texts from ancient Greek pastoral to contemporary dystopias, and from the poet John Clare to the woodland historian Oliver Rackham.

Literature, Film and Gender (Option)

This module explores a wide range of gender topics (masculinities, the backlash against feminism, crossdressing, queer theory, and transgendering) through a variety of literary texts and films. Shakespeare, Ibsen, Hardy, and Woolf, are considered alongside more popular fiction by writers such as Susanna Moore, and films, including Priscilla: Queen of the Desert and The Crying Game.

Madness, The Body, Literature (Option)

This module looks at long 20th century fiction and culture through the lens of discourses of madness and wellness. Students will have the opportunity to develop their understanding of trends in psychiatric and therapeutic cultures on display in a range of American and British literature from the fin-de-siècle to the contemporary. We look at writers such as Sigmund Freud, Ken Kesey, Rebecca West and Siri Hustvedt, alongside theoretical work by figures such as R.D Laing and Jean-Paul Sartre.

Monsters and Violence in Middle English Romance (Option)

This module explores the representation of East-West contact in Middle English romances, with a particular emphasis on the interlacement of racial and ethnic otherness and on different types of violence, from martial exploits and religious coercion to rape and cannibalism.

Students will have the chance to experience the breadth of the romance genre—its many thematic and topical branches, and its many sub-genres and their respective conventions—as well as insight to the actual act of crusading, and the cultural and social crises that arose from this act.

Peace and Conflict Reporting (Option)

This module explores the history of war reporting and the ways in which journalists have represented conflicts. It also considers the reasons why some conflicts are marginalised, ignored altogether or given extensive coverage by the mainstream media. It studies theoretical aspects and practical implications of conflict-sensitive reporting.

Postmodernism: Apocalypse and Genesis 1967-2000 (Option)

This module will explore the nature of the contemporary through analysis of selected literary texts. The initial date, 1967, has been chosen as it marks a point of transition from a post-war world based upon a liberal consensus to a time of radical uncertainty, extreme and experimental forms of expression, the breakdown of notions of realism in all the arts, sciences and philosophy. Literature, alongside the radicalisation of all intellectual concepts, including reason and common-sense, has played a significant role in debating, illustrating, and disseminating these new ways of thinking both in terms of form and content.

Professional Placement (Option)

Work experience is seen as essential in today's competitive jobs market. This module aims to give students the opportunity to experience the industries that can be linked to their studies, gain vital skills which may prepare them for the job market and also establish and maintain links with industry professionals who may help them in their chosen career.

Science Fiction (Option)

This module considers the genre of modern science fiction and its evolution into one of today’s most popular narrative genres. Analysing a variety of forms – novel, short story, drama, graphic novel and film – students will have the opportunity to examine the socio-historical contexts of some of the most influential narratives of this period.

This ranges from the emergence of “scientific romance” in the late nineteenth century, to late twentieth-century forms like cyberpunk and radical fantasy; from the problems of defining “genre fictions” and privileging science fiction over fantasy, to our enduring fascination with alternate histories, non-human agents (robots, animals, genetic hybrids, the environment), ecocatastrophe and post-apocalypse.

Sex, Texts and Politics: Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (Option)

This module concentrates on the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, with a particular emphasis on The Canterbury Tales, perhaps Chaucer’s most famous work.

Students will have the opportunity to examine the General Prologue and a variety of tales in relation to their historical context and literary antecedents, and, throughout, specific attention will be given to questions of genre (ranging from fable and epic to satire and romance), literary authority, narrative construction, and medieval aesthetics.

Southern Accents (Option)

This optional module explores representations of the southern states of America in prose fiction, film, drama and music. In the first section southern stereotypes and ‘resistant’ representations, produced by southerners and others, are examined in relation to social, political and historical contexts. This is followed by a section on African American representations of the south. Finally, a section on music and vernacular traditions explores the influence of the south on American popular music. Students are encouraged to adopt an interdisciplinary approach to examine questions of regional identity in a wide range of texts.

Specialist Journalism (Core)

Students have the opportunity to examine and analyse their chosen specialism across a wide range of publications, from general readership websites, magazines, and newspapers to specialist and niche publications aimed at the 'expert'. Students can study the particular attributes needed for specialist journalism including: authority, expertise, ability to access specialist information and format requirements. Throughout this module, students will select one particular strand to focus on in order to develop their specialism in the following indicative areas: sport, music, fashion, science, arts or business.

The Literature of Childhood (Option)

This module explores how childhood is constructed in a wide range of literary texts – texts by adults for adults, by adults for children, and by children themselves. Underpinning the module is the notion of ‘childhood’ as a cultural construct into which writers invest various, even contradictory, meanings. Students have the opportunity to explore texts by adults who idealise or demonise the child to suit their personal and philosophical agendas. Students may then analyse the mixture of didactic and therapeutic agendas in enduring genres of children’s literature such as the fairytale, adventure story and cautionary tale. Finally, we turn to children as authors in a study of juvenilia.

The Making of English Literature: Georgian Literature, 1710-1832 (Core)

Students reading Georgian Literature have the opportunity to study a selection of canonical and less well-known texts from the period and explore the historical and cultural context of their production. The module discusses developments in the novel from Daniel Defoe to Jane Austen and innovations in poetry from Alexander Pope to Romantic writers such as William Wordsworth. Important themes include satire, sensibility, the Gothic, popular and polite culture, authorship, and Georgian theatre. Contextual discussion focuses on the ‘construction’ of nation, gender, class and empire, and the relationship of British literature to the Enlightenment and to Revolution.

Twenty-First Century British Fiction (Option)

This module aims to explore new thematic trends, stylistic innovations and cultural developments in post-millennial British fiction, including a focus on globalising processes, transnational migration and digital technology.

The module also addresses the development (and rethinking of the concepts) of gender and class in literature of the period and account for the continuing importance of the literary form in an age of digital publishing.

Women’s Writing and Feminist Theory (Option)

Students can study a diverse range of prose, poetry, and drama written by women from the eighteenth century to the present is considered alongside key concepts in feminist theory and the history of the women’s movement. Writers range from Mary Wollstonecraft to Zora Neale Hurston to Jeanette Winterson. Topics range from the feminine aesthetic and French feminism to feminist utopianism and cyberfeminism.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

Research

Many English and Journalism academics are engaged in research which directly informs teaching. There are particular strengths in 21st Century literature, 19th Century literature and Gothic studies. Staff in the School of English and Journalism currently include award-winning media professionals who bring a diverse range of experience and expertise. Past visiting speakers have included journalist, newsreader and presenter Angela Rippon, Head of News and Current Affairs at Channel 4 Dorothy Byrne, and journalist and documentary filmmaker John Pilger.

Placements

Students may choose to undertake a work placement to gain valuable experience in the field. Please note that students are required to cover their travel, accommodation and general living costs while undertaking a placement.

There are opportunities to work on the University’s student magazine, print and web publications and at its community and student radio stations, Siren FM and Brayford Radio, based on campus.

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

The Journalism degree course is based in the Media, Humanities and Technology building, where students have access to industry-standard newsrooms, edit and production suites, broadcast equipment and studios.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

Graduates may go on to careers in publishing, journalism, advertising, public relations, marketing, the civil service and communications. Others may choose to continue their studies at postgraduate level. Lincoln graduates have gone on to work at regional and national outlets including the BBC, The Daily Mail, Sky Sports News HQ, The Times and Channel 4.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

In studying the BA (Hons) Drama and English degree at Lincoln, students will be encouraged to make connections between the subjects, explore key differences between them and also develop critical rigour while questioning conventional assumptions about literature, drama, and the world.
The BA (Hons) English degree at the University of Lincoln explores a lively and varied collection of texts within their historical and theoretical contexts, from Medieval literature and the Renaissance to postcolonialism and postmodernism.
This English and History degree invites students to consider literature and the past from a variety of theoretical, historical and cultural perspectives.
The BA (Hons) Film and Television degree is taught by research-active academics working in a variety of fields including national and heritage cinema, gender and sexuality, minority representation, children's TV, and shlock cinema.
BA (Hons) Journalism Studies at Lincoln aims to provide students with an informed understanding of the role of journalism in society, and the intellectual and practical skills required to succeed professionally as a journalist.
On the BA (Hons) Journalism degree students are encouraged to put journalistic theory into practice and have opportunities to produce news content to a professional standard while exploring the ethical and legal considerations of the industry.
The BA (Hons) Journalism and Public Relations degree aims to cover topics that are essential for communications professionals to develop analytical techniques and problem-solving abilities, as well as the cross-disciplinary skills needed for a career in journalism and public relations.

Tuition Fees

2017/18 UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level
£13,650 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2018/19 UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level
£14,700 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

In 2018/19, fees for all new and continuing undergraduate UK and EU students will be £9,250.

Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions [www.lincoln.ac.uk/StudentAdmissionsTermsandConditions].