MA Drama

MA Theatre

The School of Fine & Performing Arts is a centre of creativity with a purpose-built arts venue, studios and gallery. It is home to a vibrant artistic community where students and staff work alongside one another to explore new synergies between fine and performing arts.

The Course

The School of Fine and Performing Arts offers a portfolio of taught postgraduate Drama options based on the School's five specialist research groups. Students can choose from five pathways:


MA Drama (Contemporary British Theatre)

  • Contemporary Playwriting
  • Contemporary Theatre Companies
  • Current Issues in Drama, Theatre and Performance
  • Research Methods
  • Final Project

MA Drama (Contemporary Performance Practice)

  • Performance Lab
  • Located Practices
  • Current Issues in Drama, Theatre and Performance
  • Research Methods
  • Final Project

MA Drama (Playwriting)

  • Writing for Performance
  • Script Development
  • Current Issues in Drama, Theatre and Performance
  • Research Methods
  • Final Project

MA Drama (Popular Performance)

  • Popular Performance
  • Making the Modern Musical
  • Current Issues in Drama, Theatre and Performance
  • Research Methods
  • Final Project

MA Drama (Theatre and Consciousness)

  • Theatre and Consciousness
  • Indian Theatre
  • Current Issues in Drama, Theatre and Performance
  • Research Methods
  • Final Project

The Course

MA Theatre offers graduates in Drama, Literature, Dance, Fine Arts and other related areas of study, opportunities to further develop their knowledge and skills in Theatre and Performance, with a view to pursuing careers in the theatrical professions or other creative industries. The course also can serve as a foundation for academic research at MPhil or PhD level.

The emphasis of MA Theatre is on the vast range of recent developments in drama, theatre and performance practice and research. The programme makes full use of the expertise of staff across the Lincoln School of Fine and Performing Arts, which embodies in depth knowledge of contemporary theatre-making.

You will take two modules per semester (one if studying part-time). These modules take the form of three hour workshops and seminars. One module per semester comes from your chosen pathway and the other is a core module, intended to consolidate your understanding of current issues in drama, theatre and performance, and of research methods.

Depending on your chosen pathway, your Final Project can be practice-based or a traditional dissertation. The Final Project module is taken over the summer. It is taught through tutorials, which you can conduct face-to-face with your tutor, online or through a combination of both. This means that you are not required to remain in Lincoln over the summer if you do not wish to be.

MA Drama (Contemporary British Theatre)

The Contemporary Playwriting seminars aim to address not only the written play-text but also its relation to performance and its position within the broader UK theatre industry. Alongside this module you study Contemporary Theatre Companies, which explores a cross-section of productions premiered in the UK and across Europe by British theatre companies during the first decade of the 2000s.

MA Drama (Contemporary Performance Practice)

In Performance Lab you have the opportunity to discover and develop, through studio-based making, the fundamental methodologies of your own unique artistic practices. Located Practices explores approaches to site-based performance, ending with a significant student-produced performance.

MA Drama (Playwriting)

In Writing for Performance you will have the chance to find your own voice as a writer for theatre. You will have the opportunity to develop essential scriptwriting skills, including structure, character, plot, theme and story arc. Script Development gives you the chance to explore script editing and dramaturgy in a real world setting through our partnership with Theatre503 in London. Students on this pathway visit Theatre503 as part of the Script Development module. Travel costs, and if required, accommodation costs related to this trip are covered by the School. Students are required to cover any additional general living expenses that they may incur during the visit.

MA Drama (Popular Performance)

Popular Performance aims to examine, through practice and theory, ideas such as audience, regionality, dialect, class and gender, seeking challenge you to reappraise 'the popular'. You also study Making the Modern Music, which explores the most common examples of musical theatre, and more recent development of the form.

MA Drama (Theatre for Consciousness)

Theatre for Consciousness makes use of a number of traditional and more recent developments in the understanding of consciousness as relevant to acting and reception processes in theatre and drama. Alongside this you study Indian Theatre as text and performance, which aims to extend the possibilities and range of mental and physical processes of perception and expression involved in theatre practice.

Mode of Study

Taught modules are supplemented with guest lectures from visiting industry professionals which centre on workshops and on practical aspects of theatre. There will be opportunities to work on small-scale productions throughout the year, both as part of the programme and outside of your course.

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Students on this programme can expect to receive 114 hours of contact time over the duration of the course. Postgraduate level study also involves a significant proportion of independent study exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend at least four - five hours in independent study.

Contemporary Playwriting (Core)
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Contemporary Playwriting (Core)

This module aims to explore a cross-section of significant new plays premièred in the UK during the first decade of the 2000s. Seminars will address not only the written play-text but also its realisation in performance and, furthermore, its relation to and position within the broader UK theatre industry.

This module is offered alongside ‘Contemporary Theatre Companies’ with a view towards drawing connections and comparisons between ‘writer-led’ and ‘ensemble-led’ production processes, in order to foster holistic approaches to, and understandings of, the landscape of British theatrical production at the beginning of the twenty-first century.

Contemporary Theatre Companies (Core)
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Contemporary Theatre Companies (Core)

This module is offered alongside ‘Contemporary Playwriting’. Seminars will seek to address not only production itself (accessed through a mixture of recorded film, script, promotional/publicity material and the critical writing of the artists involved) but also the devising processes employed to generate the production material.

Current Issues in Drama, Theatre and Performance (Core)
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Current Issues in Drama, Theatre and Performance (Core)

In this module students will have the opportunity to develop knowledge and carry out comparative studies in order to explore and deepen their understanding of key current issues in drama, theatre and performance studies.

Students can be introduced to subject-specific research methods that are suitable for postgraduate level work, and have the chance to be exposed to related practice that defines some of the practical and theoretical issues raised in the module. These issues relate to the dramatic text and its transformation on stage through acting, directing and scenography. While some historical dimension is provided for contextualisation, the emphasis of the module is on contemporary theatre and dramaturgy.

Final Project: Dissertation (MA Drama) (Core)
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Final Project: Dissertation (MA Drama) (Core)

As the culmination of each specific programme students are expected to undertake a conventional dissertation taking the form of an extended piece of academic writing.

All students work under supervision of one member of staff, and they will undertake the programme of study that they designed in their semester B module ‘Research Methods’. Students are expected to undertake a conventional dissertation and write an academic essay of no more than 15,000 words based on their chosen subject.

Each student’s Final Project should demonstrate a deep understanding of the issues chosen by the student, and be pertinent to the student’s MA pathway. The work should exhibit a coherent implementation of research methodology and planning, and show evidence of original research. A level of technical competence in written work, which is equal to postgraduate standards, is also expected.

Final Project: Dissertation by Practice (Core)
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Final Project: Dissertation by Practice (Core)

As the culmination of their specific programme students will have the chance to undertake a practice-based dissertation (PaR). Students will work under supervision of one member of staff, and they will undertake the programme of study that they designed in their semester B module ‘Research Methods’.

The module is designed to give students the opportunity to pursue self-initiated practice-based research and production, based on an area of their choice, resulting in a piece of practical work, plus a 2000 word critical reflection.

Each student’s Final Project should demonstrate a deep understanding of the issues chosen by the student, and be pertinent to the student’s MA pathway. The work should exhibit a coherent implementation of research methodology and pre-production planning, and show evidence of original research. A level of technical competence which is equal to postgraduate standards is also expected, in both written and practical work.

Indian Theatre (Core)
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Indian Theatre (Core)

Theatre in India exists against a large and complex background of Indian world-views, critical and philosophical traditions, creating a most significant multicultural and interdisciplinary theatre tradition.

Indian theatre, theory, text and performance extend the possibilities of the range of mental and physical processes involved in theatre practice, thus enlarging the actor’s capacity of perception and expression. The module uses philosophical traditions, aesthetic concepts and practical models as frames of reference to understand theatre practice in South Asia as a unique cultural expression.

This module aims to introduce students to ideas about the origins and purpose of this area of theatre by focusing the theory and practice with the Natyashastra (the Indian manual of theatre practice and poetics); the Sanskrit theatre of Kudiyattamand subsequent developments of theatre in India in the modern period.

Located Practices (MA Drama) (Core)
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Located Practices (MA Drama) (Core)

This module is designed as an exploration (through the study of performance text, theory and documentation) of an indicative range of site-based performance approaches ending with a significant student-produced performance output either in the City of Lincoln or, by negotiation, in a site owned by a collaborative partner.

The module is designed to further the practice-as-research dialogues studied in Contemporary Performance Methodologies and aims to develop them in the context of the physical, cultural and theoretical fabrics of city and landscape. In doing so it responds to a growing demand for professional performance work which is produced for specific sites outside the traditional forum of the auditorium, and for which a broad range of skills is required.

Making the Modern Musical (Core)
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Making the Modern Musical (Core)

This module is designed to explore the craft of writing for the musical stage. In a series of lectures, several of the most common forms of musical theatre are considered in terms of their structure and their approach to composition. Starting with a close consideration of the integrated musical and its narrative/character basis, we then discuss several different ways in which contemporary writers have developed the form. In particular, we will look at how shows have been structured thematically and post-dramatically, and how the aesthetic of the actor-musician has been utilised as a compositional tool.

At the same time, the module will aim to develop skills in the building blocks of musical theatre: libretto, lyrics and score. It will offer students a chance to specialise in a particular skill and, where appropriate, collaborate with other students to develop work for the musical stage.

Performance Lab (Core)
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Performance Lab (Core)

The Performance Lab module is designed to challenge students to discover and develop the fundamental methodologies of their own unique artistic practices through studio-based making.

Popular Performance (Core)
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Popular Performance (Core)

This module focuses on some of the most important and influential dramatic forms, many of which are ignored, overlooked or marginalised by established theatrical scholarship.

The aim is to enable students to critically engage with popular performances, understanding them in light of artistic convention but also through contemporary theory. Exploring key ideas such as the audience, landscape, space, locality, regionality, dialect, economics, class, nationality, politics, gender and accessibility, this module contends that popular performance reflects and, in turn, influences context.

Research Methods (MA Drama) (Core)
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Research Methods (MA Drama) (Core)

This module provides students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of a range of research methods and skills necessary for the undertaking of their final project; depending upon their MA pathway, this final project can be either a traditional, essay-style dissertation or a dissertation-by-practice.

This module will aim to teach students a range of practice as research, practice-based research and more traditional research methods. Frameworks and methodologies for developing, organising and managing research plans and projects can be explored in a series of lectures, seminars, presentations, practice-based surgeries and tutorials.

Script Development (MA Drama) (Core)
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Script Development (MA Drama) (Core)

Script Development gives you the chance to explore script editing and dramaturgy in a real world setting through our partnership with Theatre503 in London.

Theatre and Consciousness (Core)
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Theatre and Consciousness (Core)

Research into human consciousness has yielded a fascinating framework for understanding the workings of the human mind. This module will discuss a number of approaches that make use of traditional and more recent developments in the understanding of consciousness as relevant to the stage acting and the reception processes in the theatre and consciousness expressed in drama.

Writing for Performance (Core)
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Writing for Performance (Core)

This module aims to acquaint students with essential scriptwriting techniques, providing the opportunity to develop skills such as structure, character, subject, plot, theme and story arc, whilst also devising ways in which the students could find and develop their own writing aesthetic and discover ways to encourage their imaginative sense of play.

The module will also look at areas such as story composition, individual style and dramatic content. As well as aiming to familiarise students with the conventions of naturalism and notions of the “well made play”, the module will also look at ways in which contemporary playwriting has diverged from this norm. For example, postdramatic performance, contemporary meta-theatre, texts for performance, live art, new media, verbatim, site specific, multimedia, interdisciplinary and postmodern performance and how playwriting can be informed by areas such as stand up comedy, performance poetry, live art and contemporary cinema.

Assessment typically occurs at the end of each module, though, depending on your pathway, you may also be asked to submit drafts of work in progress in the middle of each semester. The practical assessments for semester A typically take place in January, as part of a 'mini festival' of work.

The way you will be assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples include essays, performances, portfolios, presentations, reflective critiques, blogs, scripts, reports, proposals and the dissertation/dissertation by practice.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Applicants may be asked to attend an interview in person or over Skype depending on their preferred pathway. Written evidence will be required for the Playwriting pathway, in the form of a recent sample of writing for the stage. Please contact ddubois@lincoln.ac.uk for further information.

For further information and for details about funding your study, scholarships and bursaries, please see our Postgraduate Fees & Funding pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/postgraduateprogrammes/feesandfunding/].

Other Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost.

A 2:1 honours degree in a relevant subject or relevant professional experience.

International Students will require English Language at IELTS 6.0 with no less than 5.5 in each element, or equivalent. http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/englishrequirements

MA Theatre is taught across the academic year through lectures, seminars, group workshops and blended learning strategies utilising facilities including the performance studios of the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre, BlackBoard's online learning environment and the latest digital technologies allowing us to engage diverse learners through a variety of means.

In between scheduled sessions, students are expected to engage in self-directed study, supported by academic staff, which includes allocated and autonomously researched journal articles, book chapters and relevant journalism, as well as watching video content and engaging with other materials, often suggested or made accessible through each module's online learning site. Students also undertake regular formative assignments that are not assessed as part of their final grade, but are designed to have significant benefits to their learning.

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Weekly contact hours on this programme may vary depending on the individual modules and the stage of study. Postgraduate level study also involves a significant proportion of independent study exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend at least four - five hours in independent study.

Collaborative Project (Option)
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Collaborative Project (Option)

What dynamics are at play when making a piece of theatre in collaboration? What is it about collaboration that allows artists to integrate their skill-sets into the theatre-making process? How do you critically reflect on the piece of work you make?

This module provides collaborators with the opportunity to explore a final project together within a practical and theoretical context.

Dramaturgy in Practice (Core)
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Dramaturgy in Practice (Core)

Why are critical skills important within contemporary theatre-making contexts? In what ways might those skills feed into theatre-making processes? How might we market ourselves as critical theatre-makers to attract the interest of arts-based educational institutes, organisations and industries? And how might we contribute meaningfully to the work of such bodies?

This module provides opportunities to apply critical practice to creative processes in mutually beneficial ways.

Perspectives on Performance (Core)
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Perspectives on Performance (Core)

What features characterise contemporary theatre and performance practices? What factors have shaped their development in comparative national and international contexts? How have theatre and performance responded to contemporary society? What are the key issues facing arts practitioners and institutions today? And which theoretical frameworks might help us to understand the contemporary landscapes of theatre and performance?

This module examines these questions by offering a range of perspectives on performance from experts within and beyond the University of Lincoln.

Practice as Research Project (Option)
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Practice as Research Project (Option)

How might the practices used to make theatre and performance be used effectively as research methodologies? What might we discover by applying such practices to the investigation of a chosen topic? And how might those investigations illuminate our understanding of wider issues in history, society, politics and culture?

This module facilitates students in using theatre and performance practices as methodological tools for discovering information, and potentially for producing knowledge, at postgraduate level.

Research Project (Option)
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Research Project (Option)

How might you use the tools of discovery encountered on the MA to produce an extended study with academic rigour? How might the concept pitched during the Perspectives on Performance module evolve with specialist supervision?

This module gives you the opportunity to research and write a bespoke project that is informed and informative, specific to a topic that fascinates you.

Research Territories (Core)
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Research Territories (Core)

How can we deepen our approaches to research? How might deep and specific approaches to research enrich the critical and creative work that we produce? What are the distinctions and overlaps between various research methodologies and the different final projects that they are capable of producing?

This module provides opportunities to see research practices anew: as creative and intellectual stimuli, and as integral to the production of original work.

Writing about Theatre (Core)
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Writing about Theatre (Core)

What do different professional, cultural and theoretical contexts lend to our understanding of theatre? How might we analyse a piece of theatre deeply and communicate that deep knowledge in a range of ways? How might we write about theatre with clarity and precision for different readers?

This module examines and puts into practice a range of professional modes of writing about theatre: as scholars, as critics and as theatre-makers.

Writing for Theatre (Core)
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Writing for Theatre (Core)

How do we write for theatre? How do we perform writing and how does our writing perform? How does what we write reflect who we are and the world in which we live? How might we give voice to the unspoken and speak truth to power? How might we find the words that events make us speak? How might words paint a thousand pictures?

Taking questions such as these, students have the chance to write a new piece of theatre and reflect on that process with a view to becoming a critical theatre-maker.

Modules are assessed by a combination of written essay, critical portfolio, student blog, funding form, prospective journal article, panel discussion, individual and group presentation and/or focused practical workshop or performance. Student progress is subject to continuous assessments on all modules in the programme in addition to final assessed outputs.

Assessment will focus on: demonstration of practical and theoretical engagement with research; articulation and demonstration of knowledge regarding a wide range of theatre performance; critical enquiry and analysis; and contextualising students' own work and the work of others within the field of historical or contemporary performance practice and scholarship.

Students on the MA Theatre play an active role in choosing the focus and, in some cases, even the modes of their assessments in consultation with relevant module tutors and in ways that align with their individual career goals. This practice embraces the University of Lincoln's core ethos of ‘Student as Producer’ by empowering postgraduate students to shape and take ownership of their learning.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Applicants may be asked to attend an interview in person or over Skype. Written evidence will be required in the form of a recent sample of critical or creative writing. Please contact programme leaders for further information:

Dr Siobhan O'Gorman (sogorman@lincoln.ac.uk)

Dr Michael Pinchbeck (mpinchbeck@lincoln.ac.uk)

 2018/19 Entry*
Home/EU £7,300
Home/EU
(including Alumni Scholarship 25% reduction)**
£5,475
International £15,700
International
(Including International Alumni / Global Postgraduate Scholarship £2,000 reduction)**
£13,700
   
 Part-time Home/EU £41 per credit point
 Part-time International £87 per credit point

* Academic year September- July
** Subject to eligibility

Scholarships

As a postgraduate student you may be eligible for scholarships in addition to those shown above.

Guidance for Part-time Postgraduate Fees

To complete a standard Master's Taught programme, you must complete 180 credit points.

Full time students will be invoiced for the programme in full upon initial enrolment.

For part-time students, tuition fees are payable each credit point enrolled. To calculate your part-time fees, multiply the part-time fee per credit point by the number of credits you intend to complete within that academic year. This is usually between 60 and 90 credit points per year.

For example, if the fee per credit point for your programme is £38, and you enrol on 60 credits, the tuition fee payable for that academic year will be £2280.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

Exceptionally tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For further information and for details about funding your study, scholarships and bursaries, please see our Postgraduate Fees & Funding pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/postgraduateprogrammes/feesandfunding/].

Other Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost.

First or upper second class honours degree or equivalent professional experience.

International Students will require English Language at IELTS 6.0 with no less than 5.5 in each element, or equivalent. http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/englishrequirements

Learn from Experts

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may also be supported in their learning by other students.

SiobhanAndMichael

Dr Michael Pinchbeck and Dr Siobhan O'Gorman

Programme Leaders

Michael was a founding member of Metro-Boulot-Dodo theatre company. His work has been selected four times for the British Council Edinburgh Showcase and will feature in the forthcoming Routledge publication, Twenty First Century Performance Reader.

Contact: mpinchbeck@lincoln.ac.uk

Siobhan co-edited Devised Performance in Irish Theatre. Her monograph, Theatre, Performance and Design: Scenographies in a Modernizing Ireland, is forthcoming with Palgrave Macmillan. She is on the executive committee of the Irish Society for Theatre Research and was part of the curatorial team for Ireland's participation in the Prague Quadrennial 2015.

Contact: sogorman@lincoln.ac.uk


Your Future Career

Career and Personal Development

This programme may be suited for graduates with good honours degrees in a relevant subject, and is suitable for those who may not have studied drama as undergraduates. We also welcome creative practitioners who wish to advance their knowledge and skills and attain a higher degree. Students on this programme are mentored by academics and by practitioners with industry contacts. Our students have the opportunity to benefit from a combination of practical experience and theoretical study, which is designed to advance their career prospects as practitioners and aims to prepare them for roles in theatre and media production and management. They may also choose to progress to study at MPhil/PhD level.

Careers Services

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing your course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual and website resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities.
The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages here http://bit.ly/1lAS1Iz.

Career and Personal Development

This programme may be suited for graduates with good honours degrees in a relevant subject, and is suitable for those who may not have studied drama as undergraduates. We also welcome creative practitioners who wish to advance their knowledge and skills and attain a higher degree. Students on this programme are mentored by academics and by practitioners with industry contacts. Our students have the opportunity to benefit from a combination of practical experience and theoretical study, which is designed to advance their career prospects as practitioners and aims to prepare them for roles in theatre and media production and management. They may also choose to progress to study at MPhil/PhD level.

Careers Services

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing your course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual and website resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities.
The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages here http://bit.ly/1lAS1Iz.


Facilities

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our students. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

Students can work and perform in the University’s on-campus Lincoln Performing Arts Centre, a £6 million, 450-seat professional theatre with industry-standard studio spaces. The Centre, part of a busy arts community, hosts professional performances alongside student productions.

Students can study and research in the University's Great Central Warehouse Library, which provides more than 250,000 printed books and approximately 400,000 electronic books and journals, as well as databases and specialist collections. The Library has a range of different spaces for shared and individual learning.


The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.