Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Typical Offer

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Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

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Course Code

CRWPUBMA

Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Typical Offer

View

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

CRWPUBMA

MA Creative Writing and Publishing MA Creative Writing and Publishing

Launch your writing career with this exciting and innovative Master’s programme offered by the University of Lincoln in partnership with The Guardian. Learn from industry professionals, acclaimed authors, renowned academics, and publishing insiders.

Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Typical Offer

View

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

CRWPUBMA

Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Typical Offer

View

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

CRWPUBMA

Professor Jason Whittaker - Programme Leader

Professor Jason Whittaker - Programme Leader

Jason joined Lincoln in 2015 as Head of the School of English and Journalism. He worked for more than fifteen years as a journalist and magazine editor, specialising in technology and computer journalism. His main research interests are the posthumous reception of William Blake in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, as well as developments in digital publishing. He has published widely on these subjects, as well as on magazine journalism more generally.

School Staff List

Welcome to MA Creative Writing and Publishing

MA Creative Writing and Publishing is an exciting and innovative Master’s programme offered by the University of Lincoln in partnership with The Guardian.

Fusing academia and creativity with industry insights, this programme offers students the opportunity to develop their skills and build a portfolio with support from an academic coach and professionals in the publishing industry.

Teaching is enhanced by workshops, readings, and masterclasses by acclaimed authors from a range of genres. Past speakers have included Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy and naturalist Chris Packham. Professionals from major publishers will contribute to the teaching and support, alongside Guardian editors and writers such as Associate Editor for Culture Claire Armitstead, Deputy Opinions Editor Toby Moses, and interviewer Simon Hattenstone.

A focus on the business of publishing aims to prepare students for entering the competitive world of contemporary publishing, as well as to develop the necessary skills such as creating an elevator pitch and writing first-rate submission letters to attract publishers and agents, building an understanding of what editors are looking for, and learning about the publisher/reader relationship.

Welcome to MA Creative Writing and Publishing

MA Creative Writing and Publishing is an exciting and innovative Master’s programme offered by the University of Lincoln in partnership with The Guardian.

Fusing academia and creativity with industry insights, this programme offers students the opportunity to develop their skills and build a portfolio with support from an academic coach and professionals in the publishing industry.

Teaching is enhanced by workshops, readings, and masterclasses by acclaimed authors from a range of genres, and professionals from major publishers also contribute to the teaching and support, alongside Guardian editors and writers.

Previous speakers have included former Poet Laureate Dame Carol Ann Duffy; naturalist Chris Packham; poet Patience Agbabi, award-winning children’s writer Laura Dockrill; celebrated authors Max Porter, Elif Shafak, Diana Evans, Kerry Hudson, Bernardine Evaristo, and Nikesh Shukla; literary agent Nicola Barr; as well as The Guardian’s Associate Editor for Culture Claire Armitstead; theatre critic Arifa Akbar; columnist Polly Toynbee; writer Simon Hattenstone; and Observer critic Miranda Sawyer.

A focus on the business of publishing aims to prepare students for entering the competitive world of contemporary publishing, as well as to develop the necessary skills such as creating an elevator pitch and writing first-rate submission letters to attract publishers and agents, building an understanding of what editors are looking for, and learning about the publisher/reader relationship.

How You Study

Students have the opportunity to work across different genres and formats including poetry, fiction, life writing, and script writing, to work with editors and publishers, and to write an extended piece of creative literature.

Staff involved in the teaching of this specialist programme may include published novelists, poets, and scriptwriters. The programme takes advantage of links to professional environments within journalism and London-based publishing to enhance student opportunities. There is the opportunity to engage with editors and journalists working at The Guardian who provide additional masterclasses in aspects of professional writing.

Modules aim to develop the skills required to become a successful writer and to provide the creative freedom to become proficient through practice in a favoured genre. Please refer to the Modules tab for more detailed information.

Teaching is divided between online sessions with The Guardian speakers and the University’s Brayford Pool Campus in the historic city of Lincoln. Students are expected to attend ten one-day sessions in London and ten one-day sessions in Lincoln alternately, as well as optional workshop sessions in Lincoln.

Students are expected to cover the cost of their travel to all teaching sessions, plus any associated accommodation and general living costs.

Contact and Independent Study

Weekly contact hours on this programme may vary depending on the stage of study. Postgraduate level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour spent in class, students are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs. For research programmes this includes research fees and research support fees.

Find out More

How You Study

Students have the opportunity to work across different genres and formats including poetry, fiction, life writing, and script writing, to work with editors and publishers, and to write an extended piece of creative literature.

Staff involved in the teaching of this specialist programme may include published novelists, poets, and scriptwriters. The programme takes advantage of links to professional environments within journalism and London-based publishing to enhance student opportunities. There is the opportunity to engage with editors and journalists working at The Guardian who provide additional masterclasses in aspects of professional writing.

Modules aim to develop the skills required to become a successful writer and to provide the creative freedom to become proficient through practice in a favoured genre. Please refer to the Modules tab for more detailed information.

Teaching is divided between online sessions with The Guardian speakers and the University’s Brayford Pool Campus in the historic city of Lincoln. Students are expected to attend ten one-day sessions in London and ten one-day sessions in Lincoln alternately, as well as optional workshop sessions in Lincoln.

Students are expected to cover the cost of their travel to all teaching sessions, plus any associated accommodation and general living costs.

Contact and Independent Study

Weekly contact hours on this programme may vary depending on the stage of study. Postgraduate level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour spent in class, students are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs. For research programmes this includes research fees and research support fees.

Find out More

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

The dissertation provides the opportunity for students to write an extensive piece of work of their own choosing to a publishable standard. Students may work in any genre of imaginative literature – poetry or fiction – and may enhance their work through illustration, utilising electronic media or the recording of their work as an oral performance. The dissertation is intended to draw upon and reflect the skills gained from previous modules.

Module Overview

In this core module, students have the opportunity to explore contemporary works that have been acclaimed by critics and read by the public in order to discuss the basis of their appeal as singular texts, as a genre and as a commodity in contemporary culture. The module considers what defines a particular category as a genre in 21st Century fiction and whether one can trace a cultural shift in this genre from 20th Century iterations. It also examines the nature of story and drama, how to create a character, different approaches to structuring stories and the different demands made on the story teller by different forms of drama.

Module Overview

This module offer the opportunity to study a selection of contemporary non-fiction texts as an introduction to the thematic concerns and formal qualities of writing for a variety of markets, including feature writing and specialist markets such as health, travel, technology, the arts and history. Masterclasses with writers from The Guardian offer an opportunity to explore techniques for making your writing more effective. Students can examine their chosen specialism across a range of publications and study the particular attributes needed for specialist journalism. Throughout this module, students will be expected to develop a portfolio of work that focus on a particular specialism.

Module Overview

This module enables students to engage in the full creative process of writing in order to work towards a publishable standard within two literary genres of their choice and to compile a portfolio of their writing. The completed portfolio will comprise the entire writing process from original ideas, planning, drafts with edits and completed pieces, as well as an individual reflective log. Emphasis here will be placed on process as much as product. The notion of ‘work in progress’ will be a major focus of this module with frequent opportunities for students to read their on-going work in group workshop scenarios or discuss it on a one-to-one basis with tutors in order to gain feedback.

Module Overview

This module is intended to consider some of the business aspects of the publishing industry and draws on the experience and expertise of writers and editors at The Guardian via masterclasses and workshops. Students will be introduced to the basic requirements of traditional print publishing as well as electronic publishing, using digital media. Learning about these two areas of publishing gives an insight into how editors and publishers work, which in turn can help students to develop the knowledge and skills to publish and promote themselves on and off-line, and to network with others. This may aid preparation for the process of applying for jobs, residencies, grants, internships and other work in the creative industries, as well as for the realities of life as a contemporary writer.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

The dissertation provides the opportunity for students to write an extensive piece of work of their own choosing to a publishable standard. Students may work in any genre of imaginative literature – poetry or fiction – and may enhance their work through illustration, utilising electronic media or the recording of their work as an oral performance. The dissertation is intended to draw upon and reflect the skills gained from previous modules.

Module Overview

In this core module, students have the opportunity to explore contemporary works that have been acclaimed by critics and read by the public in order to discuss the basis of their appeal as singular texts, as a genre and as a commodity in contemporary culture. The module considers what defines a particular category as a genre in 21st Century fiction and whether one can trace a cultural shift in this genre from 20th Century iterations. It also examines the nature of story and drama, how to create a character, different approaches to structuring stories and the different demands made on the story teller by different forms of drama.

Module Overview

This module offer the opportunity to study a selection of contemporary non-fiction texts as an introduction to the thematic concerns and formal qualities of writing for a variety of markets, including feature writing and specialist markets such as health, travel, technology, the arts and history. Masterclasses with writers from The Guardian offer an opportunity to explore techniques for making your writing more effective. Students can examine their chosen specialism across a range of publications and study the particular attributes needed for specialist journalism. Throughout this module, students will be expected to develop a portfolio of work that focus on a particular specialism.

Module Overview

This module enables students to engage in the full creative process of writing in order to work towards a publishable standard within two literary genres of their choice and to compile a portfolio of their writing. The completed portfolio will comprise the entire writing process from original ideas, planning, drafts with edits and completed pieces, as well as an individual reflective log. Emphasis here will be placed on process as much as product. The notion of ‘work in progress’ will be a major focus of this module with frequent opportunities for students to read their on-going work in group workshop scenarios or discuss it on a one-to-one basis with tutors in order to gain feedback.

Module Overview

This module is intended to consider some of the business aspects of the publishing industry and draws on the experience and expertise of writers and editors at The Guardian via masterclasses and workshops. Students will be introduced to the basic requirements of traditional print publishing as well as electronic publishing, using digital media. Learning about these two areas of publishing gives an insight into how editors and publishers work, which in turn can help students to develop the knowledge and skills to publish and promote themselves on and off-line, and to network with others. This may aid preparation for the process of applying for jobs, residencies, grants, internships and other work in the creative industries, as well as for the realities of life as a contemporary writer.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

How you are assessed

Students will be continuously assessed through a variety of exercises. These range from writing prose fiction, poetry, and drama, adapting work from one genre to another, editing, writing within the conventions of a specific genre, or undertaking a piece of life-writing. The final piece of work required is a 15,000-word creative project, including a critical reflection. Submitted works are collated into portfolios, with evaluations on style and technique.

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days of the submission date.

Students will be continuously assessed through a variety of exercises. These range from writing prose fiction, poetry, and drama, adapting work from one genre to another, editing, writing within the conventions of a specific genre, or undertaking a piece of life-writing. The final piece of work required is a 15,000-word creative project, including a critical reflection. Submitted works are collated into portfolios, with evaluations on style and technique.

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days of the submission date.

Fees and Scholarships

Postgraduate study is an investment in yourself and your future, and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

There are more ways than ever before to fund your postgraduate study, whether you want to do a taught or research course. For those wishing to undertake a Master's course, you can apply for a loan as a contribution towards the course and living costs. Loans are also available to those who wish to undertake doctoral study. The University offers a number of scholarships and funded studentships for those interested in postgraduate study. Learn how Master's and PhD loans, scholarships, and studentships can help you fund your studies on our Postgraduate Fees and Funding pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

Students are expected to cover the cost of their travel to all teaching sessions, plus any associated accommodation and general living costs.

Postgraduate study is an investment in yourself and your future, and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

There are more ways than ever before to fund your postgraduate study, whether you want to do a taught or research course. For those wishing to undertake a Master's course, you can apply for a loan as a contribution towards the course and living costs. Loans are also available to those who wish to undertake doctoral study. The University offers a number of scholarships and funded studentships for those interested in postgraduate study. Learn how Master's and PhD loans, scholarships, and studentships can help you fund your studies on our Postgraduate Fees and Funding pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

Students are expected to cover the cost of their travel to all teaching sessions, plus any associated accommodation and general living costs.

Entry Requirements 2020-21

Applicants will require a first or second class honours degree from any subject. Relevant professional experience will also be considered.

International Students who require a Tier 4 student visa are not eligible to apply for this course but international students on alternative appropriate visas may apply.

Entry Requirements 2021-22

Applicants will require a first or second class honours degree from any subject. Relevant professional experience will also be considered.

International Students who require a Tier 4 student visa are not eligible to apply for this course but international students on alternative appropriate visas may apply.

Teaching and Learning During Covid-19

At Lincoln, Covid-19 has encouraged us to review our practices and, as a result, to take the opportunity to find new ways to enhance the student experience. We have made changes to our teaching and learning approach and to our campus, to ensure that students and staff can enjoy a safe and positive learning experience. We will continue to follow Government guidance and work closely with the local Public Health experts as the situation progresses, and adapt our teaching and learning accordingly to keep our campus as safe as possible.

Teaching and Research Expertise

Members of staff involved in teaching Creative Writing have experience of teaching the subject at undergraduate and postgraduate levels – there are currently around one hundred students practicing Creative Writing at BA, MA, and PhD levels in what is a thriving area of the School of English and Journalism.

Their research specialisms include, poetry, experimental fiction, the short story, the historical Novel, television drama, adaptation, film scripting, realism, and the publishing industry.

Staff have published in a variety of these areas and have also worked in the publishing industry.

Facilities

Teaching on this course is divided between sessions at The Guardian offices in London and the University of Lincoln's Brayford Pool Campus. The Guardian offices are located at Kings Place, just 150 metres from King's Cross and St Pancras Stations, one of the most connected locations in London.

The University's Alfred Tennyson Building is equipped with industry standard media suites providing specialist broadcast television, radio and sound equipment. The building is also home to television studios, photography studios and radio editing suites. Siren Radio, our on-campus community radio station, is also based here.

Students can study and research in the University's Great Central Warehouse Library, which provides more than 260,000 printed books and approximately 750,000 electronic books and journals, as well as databases and specialist collections. The Library has a range of different spaces for shared and individual learning.

Alfred Tennyson Building

Career Opportunities

This course aims to prepare students for entering the competitive world of contemporary publishing, as well as to engage with necessary skills such as creating an elevator pitch and writing first-rate submission letters to attract publishers and agents, develop an understanding of what editors are looking for, and learn about the publisher/reader relationship.

Through a combination of academic study and workshop activities, the programme can enhance the transferable skills within creative writing, preparing students for occupations in areas such as publishing, lifestyle journalism, and public relations.

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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