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LLM Conflict and Disaster Law

LLM Conflict and Disaster Law

The LLM courses at Lincoln Law School are designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop a solid bedrock in terms of knowledge and skills to pursue, or further develop their careers.

The Course

The LLM Conflict and Disaster Law is designed for those who wish to develop specialist expertise in Conflict and Disaster Law.

The aim of the programme is to equip students with a critical understanding of how the law, policy, and practice impacts responses to conflict and disaster in both human and environmental situations.

A substantial dissertation is required as part of your study, which is designed to enable you to enhance your research skills as you undertake a detailed investigation in an area of your choice.

The Course

Conflicts and disasters have affected, and will continue to affect, individuals, communities, states, regions, and continents around the world. According to the United Nations, more than two billion people have been affected by disasters and conflicts since the year 2000, destroying infrastructure, displacing populations, and fundamentally undermining human security.

The LLM Conflict and Disaster Law is designed to equip students with a critical understanding of how law, policy, and practice impacts responses to conflict and disaster in both human and environmental situations.

Students can explore the various elements of the disaster management cycle concerned with preparing for, responding to, and recovering from disasters, and consider the legal framework applicable to these disasters. The programme also allows students to develop their understanding of the law of armed conflict, from the ‘laws of war’ to the strong humanitarian focus of the modern era.

Students can undertake a substantial dissertation, which is designed to enhance research skills through a detailed investigation in an area of their own choice.

The programme is delivered by two-hour seminars, once per week, in each module. Extensive preparation is required for each seminar, and wide reading is expected.

Postgraduate level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

International Criminal Justice (Option)
Find out more

International Criminal Justice (Option)

This module provides the opportunity for students to develop a critical understanding of the idea of international criminal justice. The module aims to address the key issues and concepts in and policies underlying the enforcement of international criminal law considering the legal and political environment in which international criminal courts and tribunals operate. The principle focus will be the international crimes which come within the jurisdiction of the current international courts and tribunals – that is war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide and torture – and analysing whether these institutions are effective for the pursuit of justice and peace within the international system.

International Dispute Resolution (Option)
Find out more

International Dispute Resolution (Option)

In this module students will be introduced to the different methods of international dispute resolution in both a public and private law context. This module explores the legal frameworks governing international dispute resolution along with both the political and legal context and concerns relating to them. The module will examine the principal approaches to the settlement of international disputes in public international law and will also introduce students to the increasingly important area of private international law. Students will gain an understanding of the nature of international disputes, both public and private, and the options for resolving them and how a chosen option might be informed by the type of dispute presented.

International Environmental Law (Option)
Find out more

International Environmental Law (Option)

This module examines the development and operation of international environmental law, considering in particular the historical evolution of the law, the elaboration of multilateral environmental regimes and the increasing judicial attention given to environmental issues. The module will also consider the issue of responsibility and liability for harm from environmental degradation as it is tackled at the international level.

International Human Rights (Core)
Find out more

International Human Rights (Core)

The aim of this module is to provide an opportunity for students to develop a critical understanding of international human rights, and the way in which the concept of such rights is used to promote respect for certain standards and to protect the rights of individuals. The module will involve considering the role of international organisations (such as the United Nations); regional mechanisms (such as the European Convention on Human Rights); and the enforcement of international standards at the global, regional and domestic levels.

LLM Disaster Law: Contemporary Challenges (Core)
Find out more

LLM Disaster Law: Contemporary Challenges (Core)

The aim of this module is to introduce students to a dynamic and emerging area of law. It will introduce students to the various elements of the disaster management cycle concerned with preparing for, responding to, as well as recovering from disasters, both ‘man-made’ and ‘natural’. It will also consider the legal framework applicable to these disasters. The module, therefore, considers the significance of various legal and policy developments, including the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, the International Law Commission’s draft articles on the protection of persons in the event of disasters, and Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement. Specifically, the module introduces students to a body of law called international disaster relief or response law (IDRL). The module will also consider a number of case studies to illustrate the application of these principles and the difficulties in this application.

LLM Dissertation (Conflict and Disaster Law) (Core)
Find out more

LLM Dissertation (Conflict and Disaster Law) (Core)

The Dissertation module comprises two elements:

1. Research methods (20%)

The research methods element of the dissertation module comprises a total of four research training workshops (4 x 2hrs), two taking place in the Autumn term and two taking place in the Spring term. Students are assessed through a dissertation proposal.

2. The Dissertation (80%)

The production of the dissertation itself provides the student with an opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of investigative academic work on a chosen area of conflict and disaster law. In the dissertation the students may develop ideas encountered in the taught modules or with other issues relevant to conflict and disaster law.

The completed dissertation should be an original and independent piece of work. It should, in the context of existing knowledge, demonstrate in-depth understanding, critical analysis and original thinking, as well as general academic and communication skills. Undertaking the necessary research and writing the dissertation can provide academic opportunities to apply the research skills and presentational techniques developed during the programme.

LLM International Law and World Order (Core)
Find out more

LLM International Law and World Order (Core)

The aim of this module is to introduce students to a dynamic area of law that has contemporary relevance in a rapidly changing world order. This module is focussed on the structure of international law. By examining theoretical and practical applications of International Law in both peaceful and non-peaceful contexts. The module will enable students to gain a critical understanding of the impact and operation of this area of law through applying what they have learned to contemporary issues.

LLM Law of Armed Conflict (Option)
Find out more

LLM Law of Armed Conflict (Option)

This module introduces students to the development and current legal framework of the law of armed conflict from the ‘laws of war’ to the more strongly humanitarian focus of the modern era. Students will apply their knowledge of legal principles to practical examples of conflicts, and the module will also explore areas of challenge for the current legal framework such as asymmetric warfare and non-State actors, and the development of new weapons.

LLM The Law of Forced Migration (Option)
Find out more

LLM The Law of Forced Migration (Option)

The module introduces students to a dynamic and complex area of law that aims to respond to the forced migration of persons in the context of conflict and/or disaster. The module exposes students to the breadth of legal, policy and institutional responses to forced migration, and consciously encourages critique in the light of the reality that is continuing forced migration at a seemingly ever-increasing scale. The module also enables students to gain a critical understanding of the impact and operation of this area of law through applying what they have learned to contemporary contexts.

LLM Use of Force and International Law (Core)
Find out more

LLM Use of Force and International Law (Core)

The aim of this module is to examine the law on use of force, with particular focus on self-defence and intervention. The module will examine theoretical and practical applications of international law in this area and will enable students to gain a critical understanding of its impact and operation by applying legal principles to specific conflicts and interventions as case studies. The module has a key focus on controversial and contemporary issues such as self-defence against non-state actors, the unwilling and unable doctrine, and use of force in response to cyber-attacks, and it will engage in debates on the tensions between these and more traditional, established legal principles.

The EU as a Global Actor: EU External Relations Law (Option)
Find out more

The EU as a Global Actor: EU External Relations Law (Option)

This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop an insight into the international role of the European Union (EU) and its global presence in an increasing number of areas beyond the regulation of external trade. The module offers a critical and contextual analysis of the role of the EU as a global actor, which is subdivided into two main parts: the constitutional aspects of EU External Relations Law and substantive aspects of EU External Relations Law.

The module covers the following policy areas: the EU Common Commercial Policy (CCP), the European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP), the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership (EUROMED), the role of the EU in global humanitarian and development action and EU’s Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP).

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

All modules are assessed by written assignments. There is also a requirement to write a substantial dissertation. There are no examinations, written or oral.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

 2020/21 Entry*
Home/EU £8,800
Home/EU 
(including Alumni Scholarship** reduction)
£7,040
International £15,900
International
(Including International Alumni / Global Postgraduate Scholarship** £2,000 reduction)
£13,900
   
Part-time Home/EU £49 per credit point
Part-time International £88 per credit point

 

 2019/20 Entry*
Home/EU £8,600
Home/EU 
(including Alumni Scholarship** reduction)
£6,880
International £15,600
International
(Including International Alumni / Global Postgraduate Scholarship** £2,000 reduction)
£13,600
   
Part-time Home/EU £48 per credit point
Part-time International £87 per credit point

* Academic year September- July
** Subject to eligibility

Loans

Postgraduate Master's Loan can help with course fees and living costs while you study. Individuals** will be able to borrow up to £10,906 for the purpose of completing an eligible postgraduate Master's qualification. The amount available will depend on the start date of your course.

Scholarships

As a postgraduate student you may be eligible for scholarships in addition to those shown above.

Guidance for Part-time Postgraduate Fees

To complete a standard Master's Taught programme, you must complete 180 credit points.

Full time students will be invoiced for the programme in full upon initial enrolment.

For part-time students, tuition fees are payable each credit point enrolled. To calculate your part-time fees, multiply the part-time fee per credit point by the number of credits you intend to complete within that academic year. This is usually between 60 and 90 credit points per year.

For example, if the fee per credit point for your programme is £49, and you enrol on 60 credits, the tuition fee payable for that academic year will be £2,940.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

Exceptionally tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For further information and for details about funding your study, scholarships and bursaries, please see our Postgraduate Fees & Funding pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/postgraduateprogrammes/feesandfunding/].

Other Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for travel and accommodation will be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional, you will normally be required to pay your own transport, accommodation and general living costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost.

A second class honours degree or above in any subject or relevant experience.

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.5 overall, with a minimum of 6.0 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-session English and Academic Study Skills courses:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/pre-sessionalenglishandacademicstudyskills/ . These specialist courses are designed to help students meet the English language requirements for their intended programme of study.

The programme is delivered through weekly two-hour seminars for each module. Extensive preparation is required for each seminar, and wide reading is expected. Students will be expected to undertake five core modules, and are able to select from a range of optional modules allowing them to tailor the programme to their own interests.

Core Modules:

  • International Human Rights
  • LLM Use of Force and International Law
  • LLM Disaster Law: Contemporary Challenges
  • LLM Dissertation (Conflict and Disaster Law)
  • LLM International Law and World Order

Optional Modules:

  • International Criminal Justice
  • International Dispute Resolution
  • International Environmental Law
  • LLM Law of Armed Conflict
  • LLM The Law of Forced Migration
  • The EU as a Global Actor: EU External Relations Law

Contact and Independent Study

Weekly contact hours on this programme vary depending on the module being delivered and the stage of study. Postgraduate level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour spent in class, students are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study. For more detailed information please contact the Programme Leader.

International Criminal Justice (Option)
Find out more

International Criminal Justice (Option)

This module provides the opportunity for students to develop a critical understanding of the idea of international criminal justice. The module aims to address the key issues and concepts in and policies underlying the enforcement of international criminal law considering the legal and political environment in which international criminal courts and tribunals operate. The principle focus will be the international crimes which come within the jurisdiction of the current international courts and tribunals – that is war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide and torture – and analysing whether these institutions are effective for the pursuit of justice and peace within the international system.

International Dispute Resolution (Option)
Find out more

International Dispute Resolution (Option)

In this module students will be introduced to the different methods of international dispute resolution in both a public and private law context. This module explores the legal frameworks governing international dispute resolution along with both the political and legal context and concerns relating to them. The module will examine the principal approaches to the settlement of international disputes in public international law and will also introduce students to the increasingly important area of private international law. Students will gain an understanding of the nature of international disputes, both public and private, and the options for resolving them and how a chosen option might be informed by the type of dispute presented.

International Environmental Law (Option)
Find out more

International Environmental Law (Option)

This module examines the development and operation of international environmental law, considering in particular the historical evolution of the law, the elaboration of multilateral environmental regimes and the increasing judicial attention given to environmental issues. The module will also consider the issue of responsibility and liability for harm from environmental degradation as it is tackled at the international level.

International Human Rights (Core)
Find out more

International Human Rights (Core)

The aim of this module is to provide an opportunity for students to develop a critical understanding of international human rights, and the way in which the concept of such rights is used to promote respect for certain standards and to protect the rights of individuals. The module will involve considering the role of international organisations (such as the United Nations); regional mechanisms (such as the European Convention on Human Rights); and the enforcement of international standards at the global, regional and domestic levels.

LLM Disaster Law: Contemporary Challenges (Core)
Find out more

LLM Disaster Law: Contemporary Challenges (Core)

The aim of this module is to introduce students to a dynamic and emerging area of law. It will introduce students to the various elements of the disaster management cycle concerned with preparing for, responding to, as well as recovering from disasters, both ‘man-made’ and ‘natural’. It will also consider the legal framework applicable to these disasters. The module, therefore, considers the significance of various legal and policy developments, including the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, the International Law Commission’s draft articles on the protection of persons in the event of disasters, and Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement. Specifically, the module introduces students to a body of law called international disaster relief or response law (IDRL). The module will also consider a number of case studies to illustrate the application of these principles and the difficulties in this application.

LLM Dissertation (Conflict and Disaster Law) (Core)
Find out more

LLM Dissertation (Conflict and Disaster Law) (Core)

The Dissertation module comprises two elements:

1. Research methods (20%)

The research methods element of the dissertation module comprises a total of four research training workshops (4 x 2hrs), two taking place in the Autumn term and two taking place in the Spring term. Students are assessed through a dissertation proposal.

2. The Dissertation (80%)

The production of the dissertation itself provides the student with an opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of investigative academic work on a chosen area of conflict and disaster law. In the dissertation the students may develop ideas encountered in the taught modules or with other issues relevant to conflict and disaster law.

The completed dissertation should be an original and independent piece of work. It should, in the context of existing knowledge, demonstrate in-depth understanding, critical analysis and original thinking, as well as general academic and communication skills. Undertaking the necessary research and writing the dissertation can provide academic opportunities to apply the research skills and presentational techniques developed during the programme.

LLM International Law and World Order (Core)
Find out more

LLM International Law and World Order (Core)

The aim of this module is to introduce students to a dynamic area of law that has contemporary relevance in a rapidly changing world order. This module is focussed on the structure of international law. By examining theoretical and practical applications of International Law in both peaceful and non-peaceful contexts. The module will enable students to gain a critical understanding of the impact and operation of this area of law through applying what they have learned to contemporary issues.

LLM Law of Armed Conflict (Option)
Find out more

LLM Law of Armed Conflict (Option)

This module introduces students to the development and current legal framework of the law of armed conflict from the ‘laws of war’ to the more strongly humanitarian focus of the modern era. Students will apply their knowledge of legal principles to practical examples of conflicts, and the module will also explore areas of challenge for the current legal framework such as asymmetric warfare and non-State actors, and the development of new weapons.

LLM The Law of Forced Migration (Option)
Find out more

LLM The Law of Forced Migration (Option)

The module introduces students to a dynamic and complex area of law that aims to respond to the forced migration of persons in the context of conflict and/or disaster. The module exposes students to the breadth of legal, policy and institutional responses to forced migration, and consciously encourages critique in the light of the reality that is continuing forced migration at a seemingly ever-increasing scale. The module also enables students to gain a critical understanding of the impact and operation of this area of law through applying what they have learned to contemporary contexts.

LLM Use of Force and International Law (Core)
Find out more

LLM Use of Force and International Law (Core)

The aim of this module is to examine the law on use of force, with particular focus on self-defence and intervention. The module will examine theoretical and practical applications of international law in this area and will enable students to gain a critical understanding of its impact and operation by applying legal principles to specific conflicts and interventions as case studies. The module has a key focus on controversial and contemporary issues such as self-defence against non-state actors, the unwilling and unable doctrine, and use of force in response to cyber-attacks, and it will engage in debates on the tensions between these and more traditional, established legal principles.

The EU as a Global Actor: EU External Relations Law (Option)
Find out more

The EU as a Global Actor: EU External Relations Law (Option)

This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop an insight into the international role of the European Union (EU) and its global presence in an increasing number of areas beyond the regulation of external trade. The module offers a critical and contextual analysis of the role of the EU as a global actor, which is subdivided into two main parts: the constitutional aspects of EU External Relations Law and substantive aspects of EU External Relations Law.

The module covers the following policy areas: the EU Common Commercial Policy (CCP), the European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP), the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership (EUROMED), the role of the EU in global humanitarian and development action and EU’s Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP).

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

All modules are assessed by written assignments. There is also a requirement to write a substantial dissertation. There are no examinations, written or oral.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

 2020/21 Entry*
Home/EU £7,700
Home/EU
(including Alumni Scholarship 20% reduction)**
£6,160
International £14,600
International
(Including International Alumni / Global Postgraduate Scholarship** £2,000 reduction)
£12,600
   
Part-time Home/EU £43 per credit point
Part-time International £81 per credit point

* Academic year September- July
** Subject to eligibility

Loans

Postgraduate Master's Loan can help with course fees and living costs while you study. Individuals** will be able to borrow up to £10,906 for the purpose of completing an eligible postgraduate Master's qualification. The amount available will depend on the start date of your course.

Scholarships

As a postgraduate student you may be eligible for scholarships in addition to those shown above.

Guidance for Part-time Postgraduate Fees

To complete a standard Master's Taught programme, you must complete 180 credit points.

Full time students will be invoiced for the programme in full upon initial enrolment.

For part-time students, tuition fees are payable each credit point enrolled. To calculate your part-time fees, multiply the part-time fee per credit point by the number of credits you intend to complete within that academic year. This is usually between 60 and 90 credit points per year.

For example, if the fee per credit point for your programme is £49, and you enrol on 60 credits, the tuition fee payable for that academic year will be £2,940.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

Exceptionally tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For further information and for details about funding your study, scholarships and bursaries, please see our Postgraduate Fees & Funding pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/postgraduateprogrammes/feesandfunding/].

Other Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for travel and accommodation will be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional, you will normally be required to pay your own transport, accommodation and general living costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost.

A second class honours degree or above in any subject or relevant experience.

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.5 overall, with a minimum of 6.0 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-session English and Academic Study Skills courses:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/pre-sessionalenglishandacademicstudyskills/ . These specialist courses are designed to help students meet the English language requirements for their intended programme of study.

Learn from Experts

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may also be supported in their learning by other students.

Expert Image - Graham Melling

Dr Graham Melling

Programme Leader

Graham is a Senior Lecturer in Law in Lincoln Law School specialising in Public International Law, in particular in the areas of use of force, intervention, aggression and customary international law. He is always interested to hear from prospective research students within his subject specialisms, which are: Public International Law: use of force; customary international law; rule change and rule creation; IR/IL theory intersections.
Contact: gmelling@lincoln.ac.uk


Your Future Career

Career and Personal Development

The LLM courses at Lincoln Law School are designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop a solid bedrock in terms of knowledge and skills to pursue, or further develop their careers, whether they be in legal practice, working in business or industry, working for governmental or international organisations, for non-governmental organisations or in academia.

For those pursuing legal careers, there has been an increasing demand for lawyers with the necessary knowledge of international law. Many governmental and international organisations such as the United Nations and non-governmental organisations such as the International Committee of the Red Cross require the expertise of those with backgrounds in international law and specific expertise in developing areas such as disaster law.

Lincoln Law School has a strong corpus of lawyers with a range of expertise in different aspects of international law and aims to provide the perfect training ground from which lawyers seeking these types of careers can develop.

For those students seeking careers in academia, the LLM programmes that we offer, provide the opportunity to develop a natural grounding for anyone seeking to go on to study for an MPhil or PhD.

Whatever career path you are pursuing, Lincoln Law School in conjunction with the bespoke careers advice service within the University of Lincoln are on hand to work with you to maximise your potential and aim to ensure that you are best placed to be able to achieve your objectives.

Career and Personal Development

The LLM courses at Lincoln Law School are designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop a solid bedrock in terms of knowledge and skills to pursue, or further develop their careers, whether they be in legal practice, working in business or industry, working for governmental or international organisations, for non-governmental organisations or in academia.

For those pursuing legal careers, there has been an increasing demand for lawyers with the necessary knowledge of international law. Many governmental and international organisations such as the United Nations and non-governmental organisations such as the International Committee of the Red Cross require the expertise of those with backgrounds in international law and specific expertise in developing areas such as disaster law.

Lincoln Law School has a strong corpus of lawyers with a range of expertise in different aspects of international law and aims to provide the perfect training ground from which lawyers seeking these types of careers can develop.

For those students seeking careers in academia, the LLM programmes that we offer, provide the opportunity to develop a natural grounding for anyone seeking to go on to study for an MPhil or PhD.

Whatever career path you are pursuing, Lincoln Law School in conjunction with the bespoke careers advice service within the University of Lincoln are on hand to work with you to maximise your potential and aim to ensure that you are best placed to be able to achieve your objectives.


Facilities

Lincoln Law School is based in Bridge House on the Brayford Pool Campus. Law students can access a range of facilities on campus, including breakout and seminar rooms and the University's Great Central Warehouse Library which has more than 250,000 printed books and approximately 400,000 electronic books and journals, alongside databases and special collections.

We constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our students. The University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

The University has invested more than £300 million in its buildings and facilities. Further plans to invest in additional facilities, along with the refurbishment of existing buildings across our campus, are underway.


The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.