Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Part-time

2 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

CONCONUY

Graduate Diploma Conservation Studies

Students have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in purpose-built laboratories using historical material provided by museums and private collections.

Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Part-time

2 years

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

CONCONUY

Henning Schulze  - Programme Leader

Henning Schulze - Programme Leader

Henning is Senior Lecturer in the School of History and Heritage and Programme Leader for the Graduate Diploma in Conservation Studies. He is a distinguished conservator with more than 35 years of experience specialising in furniture and wooden objects. Henning serves as Conservation Consultant for Lincoln Conservation. His teaching interests cover a wide range of cultural material and objects from various geographical and historic origins. He also specialises in photography and digital documentation methods.

School Staff List Make an Enquiry

Welcome to Graduate Diploma Conservation Studies

The Graduate Diploma Conservation Studies is an intensive one-year conversion course which aims to enable graduates from a non-conservation background to advance their knowledge and skills.

Students have the opportunity to access a range of analytical equipment and learn from practitioners with extensive experience. They can also benefit from the team’s strong links with museums, professional bodies, and heritage agencies.

During this course, students will be expected to produce their own portfolios of specialist drawings and photographs, and have the chance to develop technical skills for the treatment of historic objects. Students will be encouraged to take advantage of opportunities to involve themselves in live projects.

How You Study

Students are able to access a wide variety of historic materials and can focus on their remedial treatment and preventive conservation.

The composition and delivery of the course is different for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practical work in conservation labs, research, and one-to-one learning.

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Weekly contact hours on this programme may vary depending on the individual modules and the stage of study. Postgraduate level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend at least two - three hours in independent study. For more detailed information please contact the programme leader.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs. For research programmes this includes research fees and research support fees.

Find out More

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

This module introduces generic practical skills used in the treatment of a range of historic objects. Beginning with simple objects, students have the opportunity to progress to more complex challenges as their skills and knowledge increase. Students can develops awareness of the practices and procedures common to areas of conservation treatment including laboratory and bench skills, documentation skills and basic decision-making skills.

Module Overview

In semester A of this module students will have the opportunity to study the theory and application of basic conservation principles related to observation, documentation, condition assessment and cleaning of historic objects. In semester B, students have the opportunity to learn the theory and application of basic conservation principles related to the repair of historic objects with a focus on adhesives, consolidants and gap filling.

Module Overview

The module introduces students to basic chemistry concepts, and the scientific study of materials commonly found in cultural heritage. Students can develop a systematic approach to scientific investigation and examination of historic objects and an understanding to the nature of different materials, technological factors and the processes of deterioration. Laboratory skills will be reinforced and an understanding of the application of regulations related to laboratory health and safety procedures.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide the underpinning basic theoretical knowledge related to historic materials, on which the discipline of conservation is based. Students are introduced to a range of conservation techniques, through lectures discussing a range of different material types and their potential deterioration.

Module Overview

This module provides an introduction to the recording skills necessary for a practicing conservator. Various forms of documentation encountered in the practice of conservation will be introduced, and drawing and photography recordings skills developed. Students are introduced to the basic principles of photography, lighting techniques and their application in conservation. The conventions and standard representations used in record drawing are also introduced.

Module Overview

This module provides an introduction to the preventive conservation skills needed to undertake basic care of collections. Students are introduced to practical preventive conservation and collections management procedures, and have the opportunity to gain experience in environmental monitoring and surveying. Topics such as integrated pest management and emergency planning are also discussed.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

How you are assessed

Methods of Assessment

Students on this course may be assessed through coursework comprised of a presentation, an essay, a progress test, reports, practical work, and portfolios of drawings and photographs.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Fees and Scholarships

Postgraduate study is an investment in yourself and your future, and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

There are more ways than ever before to fund your postgraduate study, whether you want to do a taught or research course. For those wishing to undertake a Master's course, you can apply for a loan as a contribution towards the course and living costs. Loans are also available to those who wish to undertake doctoral study. The University offers a number of scholarships and funded studentships for those interested in postgraduate study. Learn how Master's and PhD loans, scholarships, and studentships can help you fund your studies on our Postgraduate Fees and Funding pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs.

Students on this programme will receive a free tool kit and personal protection equipment for use during their studies.

Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for travel and accommodation will be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional, you will normally be required to pay your own transport, accommodation and general living costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost.

Entry Requirements 2020-21

Honours degree in any discipline or equivalent professional experience.

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-session English and Academic Study Skills courses. https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/pre-sessionalenglishandacademicstudyskills/ . These specialist courses are designed to help students meet the English language requirements for their intended programme of study.

Teaching and Learning During Covid-19

At Lincoln, Covid-19 has encouraged us to review our practices and, as a result, to take the opportunity to find new ways to enhance the student experience. We have made changes to our teaching and learning approach and to our campus, to ensure that students and staff can enjoy a safe and positive learning experience. We will continue to follow Government guidance and work closely with the local Public Health experts as the situation progresses, and adapt our teaching and learning accordingly to keep our campus as safe as possible.

Research Areas and Topics

The University of Lincoln’s Centre for Conservation and Cultural Heritage was formed in 2011 to co-ordinate academic research activities in conservation, history, and science in relation to the heritage sector.

Members share an interest in historic material culture and its conservation and analysis. They have access to science-based methodologies for materials analysis and the historical expertise needed to articulate the significance of this analysis. Members work with the museum sector as conservators, curators, and consultants.

Research themes of the group include architectural paint research, cultural history, and historic and ancient materials.

Facilities

Features

Equipment

Students on this programme will receive a free tool kit and personal protection equipment for use during their studies.

"The course has been a very rewarding experience, one that has pushed me to use and build on a wide range of skills. The encouragement and expertise of the teaching staff have been invaluable, helping me to develop my own abilities and explore my interests within the field of conservation."

Mair Trueman, Graduate Diploma Conservation Studies graduate

Postgraduate Events

Find out more about how postgraduate study can help further your career, develop your knowledge, or even prepare you to start your own business at one of our postgraduate events.

Find out More

Career Opportunities

This programme is designed to provide students from non-conservation backgrounds with the opportunity to develop the skills, knowledge, and understanding required to undertake the study of conservation at Master’s level. For others, it may provide a foundation for further training or work in fields allied to conservation.

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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