Course Information
Discover your Future at an Open Day
25 November and 13 December 2017
Book your place
Select year of entry:

Showcase

Conservation & Restoration

View student's work and read their comments about life at Lincoln  

3 years By negotiation School of History and Heritage Lincoln Campus [L] Validated BCC (or equivalent qualifications) W160 3 years By negotiation School of History and Heritage Lincoln Campus [L] Validated BCC (or equivalent qualifications) W160

Introduction

The BA (Hons) Conservation of Cultural Heritage degree offers opportunities to gain extensive, hands-on experience working on a range of historic materials provided by museums, historic houses and private collections. Students can become familiar with different materials, time periods and collections, within their historical context.

The course links the theory and practice of conservation. Students navigate decision-making and ethics through independent research and the guidance of tutors. Throughout the course, students can carry out conservation treatments and scientific analysis of historical artefacts. Starting with simple objects in the first year and increasing in complexity as skills and knowledge are built, the practical aspect culminates in an exhibition of work at the end of the final year.

The second term of year two offers students the opportunity to study at a partner institution, choose from a range of optional modules, or undertake an extended work placement. Students have the opportunity to source their own placement in a historic property, museum or private workshop in the UK or overseas.

How You Study

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

How You Are Assessed

The course is delivered through workshop, studio and laboratory sessions, lectures, demonstrations and seminars. After an initial introduction to conservation skills, materials and techniques, all practical work is on historic objects from museums and private collections.

An assessed vocational placement forms a major component of the course and live projects based in museums and historic houses are used in various aspects of the learning process. The costs of this are outlined in the Features tab and the Fees tab.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Interviews & Applicant Days

Applicants will be invited for interview, where they will have the opportunity to go through their portfolio with a member of the academic team.

The interview visit will also provide an opportunity to tour the campus and course facilities.

Full details will be emailed prior to interview. Applicants attending an interview will be expected to cover their own travel expenses.

What We Look For In Your Application

Those applicants coming from Art, Design, Craft or Technology backgrounds may choose to bring a portfolio of selected previous work. In making the choice of what to include, please bear in mind the skills that we are looking for include precision, dexterity and attention to detail.

Many students applying to study Conservation will have a background that does not offer evidence to present in a portfolio. This is not a problem. In some cases, applicants have a hobby such as needlework, DIY or model-making, that demonstrates potential skills.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our School of History and Heritage Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2017-18

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits at merit or above will be required.

A science based or history based subject is welcomed.

In addition, applicants should have five GCSEs at grade C or above, including English, or the equivalent.

Applicants will need to complete a successful interview.

Mature students with extensive relevant work experience and a portfolio of work, will be selected on individual merit. All relevant work experience should be noted on the application form.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Applied Practical Skills (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to generic practical skills used in the treatment of historic objects. It provides a foundation to future work, although at the early stages the students work on exercises and simulations, prior to being allocated their first object.

Students can develop awareness of the practices and procedures common to areas of conservation treatment including laboratory and bench skills, documentation skills and basic decision-making skills.

Becoming a Professional (Core)

The module supports students in planning and preparing for their professional life by providing a framework to successfully navigate their way through university study, including progression to postgraduate level, and from this springboard to their chosen professional destination. It is intended to provide students with the knowledge, skills and insights into how to manage the transitions into university and from there into the professional world.

Conservation Processes (Core)

In this module students have the chance to learn the theory and application of basic conservation principles related to observation, documentation, condition assessment and cleaning of historic objects; adhesives, consolidants, modelling and casting.

Conservation Science 1 (Core)

The module is designed to introduce students to basic chemistry concepts, and the scientific study of materials commonly found in cultural heritage. Students may develop a systematic approach to scientific investigation and examination of historic objects and an understanding to the nature of different materials, technological factors and the processes of deterioration.

Conservation Theory (Core)

This module aims to provide the underpinning basic theoretical knowledge related to historic materials, on which the discipline of conservation is based. Students are introduced to a range of conservation techniques, through lectures discussing a range of different material types and their potential deterioration.

Documentation techniques (Core)

This module provides an introduction to the recording skills necessary for a practising conservator. Various forms of documentation encountered in the practice of conservation are introduced, and drawing and photography recordings skills developed. Students can be introduced to the basic principles of photography, lighting techniques and their application in conservation. The conventions and standard representations used in record drawing are also introduced.

Introduction to Visual and Material Culture (Core)

This module is designed as an introduction to visual and material culture, embracing the history of art and architecture, historical archaeology, and the conservation of historical buildings. It aims to enable students to interrogate visual and material objects throughout the past and to understand their functions and possible meanings of visual and material objects as primary sources.

Level 2

Applied Practical Conservation 2 (Core)

This module aims to develop the basic skills introduced in year one and apply them to the conservation of objects related to a range of material types. Theoretical concepts introduced in Year 1 can be developed and underpin students’ practice.

The module offers the chance to develop important transferable skills for understanding of the behaviour of materials and manual dexterity. It also looks to reinforce and develop students' skills in conservation report-writing.

Archaeology (Option)

Archaeologists record, excavate and analyse the material evidence of our past to illuminate aspects of human life not otherwise recorded. In this module students will have the opportunity to take part in an excavation and will learn how to collect, interpret and care for archaeological evidence.

Conservation Placement (Option)

This module focuses around a 12 week period of placement in a museum, historic house or private workshop. Students are responsible for negotiating the placement arrangement with support and guidance from their placement tutor. Students are encouraged to select a placement to suit their individual aspirations and needs. This concludes with a presentation, which is designed to allow all group members to benefit from the experience of their peers.

Conservation Science 2: Analytical Techniques (Core)

This module aims to further develop knowledge of materials science and its relevance to conservation. Students have the chance to develop skills in the use of scientific analytical techniques for the examination and identification of materials encountered in historic objects and their treatment.

Digital Heritage (Option)

The cultural heritage sector increasingly offers opportunities for application of these rapidly developing digital technologies, as a communication, research and recording tool. This module offers the opportunity for students to become familiar with some of these advanced recording techniques for the study and recording of objects.

Material Histories: Objects and Analysis (Option)

This module will give students a unique opportunity to develop their practical skills for studying objects while developing their understanding of the relationship between history and material culture.
Students will explore how object-based study can enhance their practice as conservators and historians and how material culture studies can lead to insights that cannot be reached through other approaches.

Preventive Conservation (Core)

This module looks to provide an introduction to the preventive conservation skills needed to set out as a practicing conservator. Students have the chance to develop an understanding of practical preventive conservation and collections management procedures, and can gain experience in environmental monitoring and surveying. Topics such as integrated pest management and emergency planning are also discussed.

Study at a partner institution: Conservation (Option)

This module provides an opportunity for Conservation students to spend a term studying at one of the University’s partner institutions. This opportunity has both academic and personal development dimensions. Study at another institution offers enhanced sporting, cultural and other activities to enhance students' overall profile, alongside the basic experience of adapting to and working effectively within a different academic culture. Please note that a limited number of places will be available each year.

Understanding Practical Making (Option)

This module is designed to introduce the basic skills of working with glass, ceramic and fine metalwork. It provides an opportunity to investigate the potential and limitations of working with various materials, processes and techniques, associated with the practice of object manufacture against a relevant historical background.

World Heritage Management (Option)

This module is designed to explore ideas of heritage protection, management and conservation from around the world. It will consider United Nations' efforts in the field and consider how this international perspective shapes local and national actions.

Level 3

Applied Practical Conservation 3.1 (Core)

This module allows students the opportunity to specialise in a specific material discipline, or alternatively to continue to pursue broader options. Students are encouraged to consider their choice of specialism for this module in line with their choice of dissertation and placement.

Applied Practical Conservation 3.2 (Core)

This is a practical module covering the conservation treatment of one or more complex historic objects. Exact content will depend on object type chosen. This module allows students to choose to specialise in a specific material discipline, or alternatively to continue to pursue broader options.

Applied Preventive Conservation (Core)

The module is designed to extend students' knowledge and awareness of preventive conservation skills. Students can carry out live projects in environmental monitoring, surveying collections and pest management in order to further their experience in these areas, in addition to examining how external factors such as buildings and pollutants can impact on collections care.

Conservation exhibition (Core)

This module covers the production of an exhibition of conservation work completed by students. Initial sessions discuss the theory of exhibition design and managing projects, before moving on to the detail of the exhibition itself. Students will be expected to manage all aspects of the exhibition, including curation, marketing and fundraising if applicable.

Conservation independent study: dissertation (Core)

The module allows students to undertake a major research project in an area of their own choice (approx. 10,000 words).

The student is allocated a dissertation tutor following their decision on the topic to be researched. The initial stage of planning involves the student confirming a working title and agreeing the structure to their work. Regular tutorials with the dissertation tutor will aid the students’ progress and time management.

The research should address clear aims or hypotheses and may involve literature review and / or primary research through fieldwork or experimentation.

The choice of dissertation topic may be related to the students’ choice of placement and practical specialism.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

Renowned conservation consultancy, Lincoln Conservation, has expertise in:

  • Architectural paint research and historic pigments
  • Historic materials analysis
  • Conservation of historic decorative interiors
  • Lead, mortar and renders analysis
  • Gilding and wallpapers
  • 3D laser scanning and digital replication
  • Conservation and restoration of architectural ceramics and tiles


Our conservators have helped to inform the restoration of St Pancras Station, Kenwood House and HMS Victory, among others. The consultancy provides opportunities for students to engage in practical research and conservation projects, offering invaluable professional and commercial experience.

A lab coat, a tool roll and goggles are provided to each student studying Conservation and Cultural Heritage.

ADOBE CREATIVE CLOUD

Students on this course will receive a licence for Adobe Creative Cloud free of charge

Placements

The second year features an optional 12 week placement. Students will have the opportunity to source their own work placement in a museum, historic house or a private conservation studio either in the UK or overseas. Tutors can provide support in obtaining placements when required.

Recent placement destinations have included the Tate Modern in London, the National Museum of Denmark and Calke Abbey, Derbyshire.

Please note that students are required to cover the costs of their accommodation, travel and general living expenses when on placement. Opportunities for travel grants are available, more information can be provided by the programme leader. Please contact the University to find out more.

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

The course aims to equip graduates with the transferable skills to enable them to progress into a range of careers in the conservation and heritage industries. Links with employers around the world have opened up opportunities for our graduates to progress to roles in prominent institutions, such as Historic Royal Palaces, the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Many graduates choose to go on to undertake further study at Master’s or doctoral level.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Other Costs

Students may have to pay travel and accommodation costs for second year placements, particularly for those outside of Lincoln. Opportunities for travel grants are available, more information can be provided by the programme leader. Please contact the University to find out more.

Related Courses

Forensic scientists apply scientific expertise to provide impartial evidence in criminal investigations. They work not only in laboratories, but at crime scenes and in courtrooms. Their highly detailed work encompasses elements of chemistry and biology applied in areas such as toxicology, DNA analysis and trace evidence.
The BA (Hons) History degree at the University of Lincoln is distinctive in the breadth of topics that students can choose to study. These include British, European and American history, from the Roman Empire to the end of the 20th Century.
The BA (Hons) Art History and History course offers students the opportunity to explore the rich artistic and architectural heritage of the past, learning how to interrogate visual and material evidence critically and to construct arguments about societies and cultures, their values and identities. Students can do this alongside the study of texts, from medieval chronicles and modern archives to newspapers and film.

Introduction

The BA (Hons) Conservation of Cultural Heritage degree offers opportunities to gain extensive, hands-on experience working on a range of historic materials provided by museums, historic houses and private collections. Students can become familiar with different materials, time periods and collections, within their historical context.

The course links the theory and practice of conservation. Students navigate decision-making and ethics through independent research and the guidance of tutors. Throughout the course, students can carry out conservation treatments and scientific analysis of historical artefacts. Starting with simple objects in the first year and increasing in complexity as skills and knowledge are built, the practical aspect culminates in an exhibition of work at the end of the final year.

The second term of year two offers students the opportunity to study at a partner institution, choose from a range of optional modules, or undertake an extended work placement. Students have the opportunity to source their own placement in a historic property, museum or private workshop in the UK or overseas.

How You Study

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

How You Are Assessed

The course is delivered through workshop, studio and laboratory sessions, lectures, demonstrations and seminars. After an initial introduction to conservation skills, materials and techniques, all practical work is on historic objects from museums and private collections.

An assessed vocational placement forms a major component of the course and live projects based in museums and historic houses are used in various aspects of the learning process. The costs of this are outlined in the Features tab and the Fees tab.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

What We Look For In Your Application

Applicants will be invited for interview, where they have the opportunity to go through their portfolio with a member of the academic team.

Those applicants coming from Art, Design, Craft or Technology backgrounds should bring a portfolio of selected previous work. In making the choice of what to include, please bear in mind the skills that we are looking for include precision, dexterity and attention to detail.

Students from a background that does not offer artistic evidence to present in a portfolio, do not be unduly concerned. Students will have been selected for interview on the strength of their application, but may also have a hobby, such as needlework, DIY or model-making, that demonstrates potential skills. Students can bring evidence of these instead if appropriate.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our School of History and Heritage Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2018-19

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits to include 30 at merit or above will be required.

A science based or history based subject is welcomed.

In addition, applicants should have three GCSEs at grade C or above, including English, or the equivalent.

Applicants will need to complete a successful interview.

Mature students with extensive relevant work experience and a portfolio of work, will be selected on individual merit. All relevant work experience should be noted on the application form.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Applied Practical Skills (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to generic practical skills used in the treatment of historic objects. It provides a foundation to future work, although at the early stages the students work on exercises and simulations, prior to being allocated their first object.

Students can develop awareness of the practices and procedures common to areas of conservation treatment including laboratory and bench skills, documentation skills and basic decision-making skills.

Becoming a Professional (Core)

The module supports students in planning and preparing for their professional life by providing a framework to successfully navigate their way through university study, including progression to postgraduate level, and from this springboard to their chosen professional destination. It is intended to provide students with the knowledge, skills and insights into how to manage the transitions into university and from there into the professional world.

Conservation Processes (Core)

In this module students have the chance to learn the theory and application of basic conservation principles related to observation, documentation, condition assessment and cleaning of historic objects; adhesives, consolidants, modelling and casting.

Conservation Science 1 (Core)

The module is designed to introduce students to basic chemistry concepts, and the scientific study of materials commonly found in cultural heritage. Students may develop a systematic approach to scientific investigation and examination of historic objects and an understanding to the nature of different materials, technological factors and the processes of deterioration.

Conservation Theory (Core)

This module aims to provide the underpinning basic theoretical knowledge related to historic materials, on which the discipline of conservation is based. Students are introduced to a range of conservation techniques, through lectures discussing a range of different material types and their potential deterioration.

Documentation techniques (Core)

This module provides an introduction to the recording skills necessary for a practising conservator. Various forms of documentation encountered in the practice of conservation are introduced, and drawing and photography recordings skills developed. Students can be introduced to the basic principles of photography, lighting techniques and their application in conservation. The conventions and standard representations used in record drawing are also introduced.

Introduction to Visual and Material Culture (Core)

This module is designed as an introduction to visual and material culture, embracing the history of art and architecture, historical archaeology, and the conservation of historical buildings. It aims to enable students to interrogate visual and material objects throughout the past and to understand their functions and possible meanings of visual and material objects as primary sources.

Level 2

Applied Practical Conservation 2 (Core)

This module aims to develop the basic skills introduced in year one and apply them to the conservation of objects related to a range of material types. Theoretical concepts introduced in Year 1 can be developed and underpin students’ practice.

The module offers the chance to develop important transferable skills for understanding of the behaviour of materials and manual dexterity. It also looks to reinforce and develop students' skills in conservation report-writing.

Archaeology (Option)

Archaeologists record, excavate and analyse the material evidence of our past to illuminate aspects of human life not otherwise recorded. In this module students will have the opportunity to take part in an excavation and will learn how to collect, interpret and care for archaeological evidence.

Conservation Placement (Option)

This module focuses around a 12 week period of placement in a museum, historic house or private workshop. Students are responsible for negotiating the placement arrangement with support and guidance from their placement tutor. Students are encouraged to select a placement to suit their individual aspirations and needs. This concludes with a presentation, which is designed to allow all group members to benefit from the experience of their peers.

Conservation Science 2: Analytical Techniques (Core)

This module aims to further develop knowledge of materials science and its relevance to conservation. Students have the chance to develop skills in the use of scientific analytical techniques for the examination and identification of materials encountered in historic objects and their treatment.

Digital Heritage (Option)

The cultural heritage sector increasingly offers opportunities for application of these rapidly developing digital technologies, as a communication, research and recording tool. This module offers the opportunity for students to become familiar with some of these advanced recording techniques for the study and recording of objects.

Material Histories: Objects and Analysis (Option)

This module will give students a unique opportunity to develop their practical skills for studying objects while developing their understanding of the relationship between history and material culture. Students can explore how object-based study can enhance their practice as conservators and historians and how material culture studies can lead to insights that cannot be reached through other approaches.

Preventive Conservation (Core)

This module looks to provide an introduction to the preventive conservation skills needed to set out as a practicing conservator. Students have the chance to develop an understanding of practical preventive conservation and collections management procedures, and can gain experience in environmental monitoring and surveying. Topics such as integrated pest management and emergency planning are also discussed.

Study at a partner institution: Conservation (Option)

This module provides an opportunity for Conservation students to spend a term studying at one of the University’s partner institutions. This opportunity has both academic and personal development dimensions. Study at another institution offers enhanced sporting, cultural and other activities to enhance students' overall profile, alongside the basic experience of adapting to and working effectively within a different academic culture. Please note that a limited number of places will be available each year.

Understanding Practical Making (Option)

This module is designed to introduce the basic skills of working with glass, ceramic and fine metalwork. It provides an opportunity to investigate the potential and limitations of working with various materials, processes and techniques, associated with the practice of object manufacture against a relevant historical background.

World Heritage Management (Option)

This module is designed to explore ideas of heritage protection, management and conservation from around the world. It will consider United Nations' efforts in the field and consider how this international perspective shapes local and national actions.

Level 3

Applied Practical Conservation 3.1 (Core)

This module allows students the opportunity to specialise in a specific material discipline, or alternatively to continue to pursue broader options. Students are encouraged to consider their choice of specialism for this module in line with their choice of dissertation and placement.

Applied Practical Conservation 3.2 (Core)

This is a practical module covering the conservation treatment of one or more complex historic objects. Exact content will depend on object type chosen. This module allows students to choose to specialise in a specific material discipline, or alternatively to continue to pursue broader options.

Applied Preventive Conservation (Core)

The module is designed to extend students' knowledge and awareness of preventive conservation skills. Students can carry out live projects in environmental monitoring, surveying collections and pest management in order to further their experience in these areas, in addition to examining how external factors such as buildings and pollutants can impact on collections care.

Conservation exhibition (Core)

This module covers the production of an exhibition of conservation work completed by students. Initial sessions discuss the theory of exhibition design and managing projects, before moving on to the detail of the exhibition itself. Students will be expected to manage all aspects of the exhibition, including curation, marketing and fundraising if applicable.

Conservation independent study: dissertation (Core)

The module allows students to undertake a major research project in an area of their own choice (approx. 10,000 words).

The student is allocated a dissertation tutor following their decision on the topic to be researched. The initial stage of planning involves the student confirming a working title and agreeing the structure to their work. Regular tutorials with the dissertation tutor will aid the students’ progress and time management.

The research should address clear aims or hypotheses and may involve literature review and / or primary research through fieldwork or experimentation.

The choice of dissertation topic may be related to the students’ choice of placement and practical specialism.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

Renowned conservation consultancy, Lincoln Conservation, has expertise in:

  • Architectural paint research and historic pigments
  • Historic materials analysis
  • Conservation of historic decorative interiors
  • Lead, mortar and renders analysis
  • Gilding and wallpapers
  • 3D laser scanning and digital replication
  • Conservation and restoration of architectural ceramics and tiles

Our conservators have helped to inform the restoration of St Pancras Station, Kenwood House and HMS Victory, among others. The consultancy provides opportunities for students to engage in practical research and conservation projects, offering invaluable professional and commercial experience.

A lab coat, a tool roll and goggles are provided to each student studying Conservation and Cultural Heritage.

ADOBE CREATIVE CLOUD

Students on this course will receive a licence for Adobe Creative Cloud free of charge

Placements

The second year of the BA (Hons) Conservation of Cultural Heritage features an optional 12 week placement. Students will have the opportunity to source their own work placement in a museum, historic house or a private conservation studio either in the UK or overseas. Tutors can provide support in obtaining placements when required.

Recent placement destinations have included the Tate Modern in London, the National Museum of Denmark and Calke Abbey, Derbyshire.

Please note that students are required to cover the costs of their accommodation, travel and general living expenses when on placement. Opportunities for travel grants are available, more information can be provided by the programme leader. Please contact the University to find out more.

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

The course aims to equip graduates with the transferable skills to enable them to progress into a range of careers in the conservation and heritage industries. Links with employers around the world have opened up opportunities for our graduates to progress to roles in prominent institutions, such as Historic Royal Palaces, the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Many graduates choose to go on to undertake further study at Master’s or doctoral level.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Other Costs

Students may have to pay travel and accommodation costs for second year placements, particularly for those outside of Lincoln. Opportunities for travel grants are available, more information can be provided by the programme leader. Please contact the University to find out more.

Related Courses

Forensic scientists apply scientific expertise to provide impartial evidence in criminal investigations. They work not only in laboratories, but at crime scenes and in courtrooms. Their highly detailed work encompasses elements of chemistry and biology applied in areas such as toxicology, DNA analysis and trace evidence.
The BA (Hons) History degree at the University of Lincoln is distinctive in the breadth of topics that students can choose to study. These include British, European and American history, from the Roman Empire to the end of the 20th Century.
The BA (Hons) Art History and History course offers students the opportunity to explore the rich artistic and architectural heritage of the past, learning how to interrogate visual and material evidence critically and to construct arguments about societies and cultures, their values and identities. Students can do this alongside the study of texts, from medieval chronicles and modern archives to newspapers and film.

Tuition Fees

2017/18UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £14,500 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2018/19UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,600 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

In 2018/19, fees for all new and continuing undergraduate UK and EU students will be £9,250.

Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Showcase

Student Work

  • I got to handle, Babe Ruth's baseball, Abraham Lincoln's handball, Billy Jean Kings tennis outfit, Muhammad Ali’s autographed boxing robe, Roger Banisters 4 minute mile running vest (I knew this must be real as you could see where his mother must have washed it and it had gone pink)
    Ellen Marland

    Student Case Studies

    A Personal Journey

    Ellen MarlandEllen Marland Ellen Marland decided that she was due a career change. She decided it was time to engage in her passion of conservation and left her career in advertising and public relations to do so. Currently, in her third year of BA (Hons) Conservation & Restoration, Ellen has recently finished a placement at the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture in Spokane, Washington.

    The Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture has exhibits and programs that focus on three major disciplines; Regional History, Visual Art, American Indian and other cultures. This placement was very much close to Ellen’s heart as she was born in Cordova Alaska and her mother was 1/4 Tlingit Indian (Alaska Native). During her placement she was able to not only gain essential work experience, but she was also able to explore her heritage.

    “One of the great things about the course that I am on is that we could choose anywhere in the world to apply to go to on placement. I chose the 'MAC' because it has a wonderful collection of American Indian Artifacts which I am very interested in because of my heritage.

    One of the things I was able to do was to do a collection survey on the Manning collection... which included over 150 pre 1916 Indian artifacts... but this was only the tip of the iceberg as far as their Indian collection is concerned.

    I worked on many fascinating things. I was given the privilege of being the conservator doing the survey of the installation of the Smithsonian Institutes travelling sports memorabilia exhibition which is currently at the 'MAC'. As part of this I had to examine each of the items in the exhibit and make observations and notes to add to the condition survey on the arrival at the museum.

    I got to handle, Babe Ruth's baseball, Abraham Lincoln's handball, Billy Jean Kings tennis outfit, Muhammad Ali’s autographed boxing robe, Roger Banisters 4 minute mile running vest (I knew this must be real as you could see where his mother must have washed it and it had gone pink) and many more. Here is a link to the website which tells about the exhibition. “

    Learn more about the School of History and Heritage, our courses and activities.

    Invaluable Insight

    Kate PocklingtonKate Pocklington Kate Pocklington spent six weeks of placement with Simon Moore, Senior Natural Sciences Conservator at Hampshire County Council. Working in both the public and private sector, Kate gained considerable insight into the area in which she wishes to specialise. In accompanying Simon to various National Trust properties she was able to assist in the undertaking of survey work of natural history specimens, providing her with a greater understanding of the problems which arise in specimens, particularly with mounted mammals and birds. With this knowledge she is currently preparing a 10,000 word dissertation on a private taxidermy collection consisting of such specimens.

    During her placement, Kate assisted Simon with a fluid preservation (wet specimen) course that he was running at the Horniman museum in south-east London. By engaging in this Kate was able to communicate with the conservators of a large collection of natural science specimens and shall be returning in the New Year to conserve part of the collection of fluid specimens on display and in storage.

    “The specimens I conserved were each tormented with their own unique problems and this is where I gained many skills and knowledge for the conservation of natural history specimens. By working with instrumentation I hadn’t used before and using methods unknown to me I have been able to expand my skills to cover a wide range of problems of which I’m sure I will come to face in the future. As this is the area in which I hope to specialise in, the whole experience gave me individual skills I did not have before and I now feel I am on the ladder to an exciting and varied career of a wide-range of discoveries to come.”


    National Museum of Iceland

    Johanna OlafsdottirJohanna Olafsdottir Johanna is 25 years old and comes from Sweden, although she is half Swedish and half Icelandic. The funding she received allowed her to spend three months working within a multinational team in the conservation department at the National Museum of Iceland. This experience helped her to understand how conservation is managed in a large Museum department and to further her skills in the treatment of polychrome surfaces through work on mainly Mediaeval altarpieces.

    Johanna intends to study easel painting conservation at Masters level and then to travel widely and use her skills to experience conservation in different countries.


    It was the practical side of the course that really interested me; it was a brilliant opportunity to do ‘hands on’ work on a wide range of artefacts and decorative surfaces. Through this part of the course I discovered gilding, I’d never done any before and found that I really enjoyed it. Lizzie Parker

    By Royal Appointment

    Lizzie ParkerLizzie Parker graduated with a first in BA (Hons) Conservation & Restoration. Since leaving Lincoln she has begun work as a gilding conservator at the Royal Collection in London. The work involves the conservation and restoration of gilt frames and furniture within the collection for exhibitions and use in the royal residences.

    It was the practical side of the course that really interested Lizzie; providing her with the opportunity to do ‘hands on’ work on a wide range of artefacts and decorative surfaces. It was through this part of the course that she discovered gilding, which has gone on to pursue a career in.

    “It was the practical side of the course that really interested me; it was a brilliant opportunity to do ‘hands on’ work on a wide range of artefacts and decorative surfaces. Through this part of the course I discovered gilding, I’d never done any before and found that I really enjoyed it.

    At the end of the second year everyone has to conduct a work placement, which is chosen and arranged by the student. I chose to work in a small company that specialise in the conservation and restoration of gilded furniture in London. I found this to be an excellent experience, as I was able to work alongside craftsmen and women in a ‘real work’ environment and also gain an understanding of the commercial side to conservation and restoration.”


    Viking finds saved by students

    Viking-Age artefacts over a thousand years old have been saved thanks to students from the University of Lincoln.

    And now scientists at the university want to use DNA testing to find out more about the origins of the objects.

    Hull and East Riding Museum enlisted the help of the Conservation and Restoration Department at the University of Lincoln to conserve the unique finds which included braids of hair wrapped in wood, leather and metal and Viking-Age jewellery.

    Third-year students were asked to stabilise the corrosion and clean the historical artefacts as part of their studies this year. Students also designed a new packaging system in which the objects will be stored in on their return to the museum.

    But before they are returned to the museum Dr Ron Dixon, principal lecturer in Forensic Science, will carry out ancient DNA analysis to find out the origins of the hair.

    “The braids of hair are particularly remarkable as they are in an excellent state of preservation,” said Martin Foreman, assistant keeper of archaeology for Hull and East Riding Museum. “This presents an opportunity for potential cutting-edge scientific research.”

    The artefacts were discovered in 1900 at a burial mound in Russia. They were then presented to the curator of Hull and East Riding Museum in 1902 and have remained in the museum’s collection ever since.

    “The university has a good reputation with the Hull and East Riding Museum having worked on numerous objects such as ceramics, medieval leather and archaeological materials in the past,” said Chris Robinson, senior technician in Conservation and Restoration.

    “As part of the course students work on items from various museum collections, the National Trust, English Heritage and private owners.”

    The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions [www.lincoln.ac.uk/StudentAdmissionsTermsandConditions].