Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Part-time

4 years with optional placement year

Typical Offer

BCC (104 UCAS Tariff points)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

L900

Course Code

APPSOSUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Part-time

4 years with optional placement year

Typical Offer

BCC (104 UCAS Tariff points)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

L900

Course Code

APPSOSUB

BA (Hons) Applied Social Science BA (Hons) Applied Social Science

The University of Lincoln is ranked in the top 20 UK universities in the Guardian University Guide 2020.

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Part-time

4 years with optional placement year

Typical Offer

BCC (104 UCAS Tariff points)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

L900

Course Code

APPSOSUB

Key Information

Full-time

3 years

Part-time

4 years with optional placement year

Typical Offer

BCC (104 UCAS Tariff points)

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

UCAS Code

L900

Course Code

APPSOSUB

Teaching and Learning During COVID-19

The current COVID-19 pandemic has meant that at Lincoln we are making changes to our teaching and learning approach and to our campus, to ensure that students and staff can enjoy a safe and positive learning experience here at Lincoln.

From autumn 2020 our aim is to provide an on-campus learning experience. Our intention is that teaching will be delivered through a mixture of face-to-face and online sessions. There will be social activities in place for students - all in line with appropriate social distancing and fully adhering to any changes in government guidance as our students' safety is our primary concern.

We want to ensure that your Lincoln experience is as positive, exciting and enjoyable as possible as you embark on the next phase of your life. COVID-19 has encouraged us to review our practices and, as a result, to take the opportunity to find new ways to enhance the Lincoln experience. It has challenged us to find innovative new approaches to supporting students' learning and social interactions. These learning experiences, which blend digital and face-to-face, will be vital in helping to prepare our students for a 21st Century workplace.

Of course at Lincoln, personal tutoring is key to our delivery, providing every student with a dedicated tutor to support them throughout their time here at the University. Smaller class sizes mean our academic staff can engage with each student as an individual, and work with them to enhance their strengths. In this environment we hope that students have more opportunities for discussion and engagement and get to know each other better.

Course learning outcomes are vital to prepare you for your future and we aim to utilise this mix of face-to-face and online teaching to deliver these. Students benefit from and enjoy fieldtrips and placements and, whilst it is currently hard to predict the availability of these, we are working hard and with partners and will aspire to offer these wherever possible - obviously in compliance with whatever government guidance is in place at the time.

We are utilising a range of different digital tools for teaching including our dedicated online managed learning environment. All lectures for larger groups will be delivered online using interactive software and a range of different formats. We aim to make every contact count and seminars and small group sessions will maximise face-to-face interaction. Practicals, workshops, studio sessions and performance-based sessions are planned to be delivered face-to-face, in a socially distanced way with appropriate PPE.

The University of Lincoln is a top 20 TEF Gold University and we have won awards for our approach to teaching and learning, our partnerships and industry links, and the opportunities these provide for our students. Our aim is that our online and socially distanced delivery during this COVID-19 pandemic is engaging and that students can interact with their tutors and each other and contribute to our academic community.

As and when restrictions start to lift, we aim to deliver an increasing amount of face-to-face teaching and external engagements, depending on each course. Safety will continue to be our primary focus and we will respond to any changing circumstances as they arise to ensure our community is supported. More information about the specific approaches for each course will be shared when teaching starts.

Of course as you start a new academic year it will be challenging but we will be working with you every step of the way. For all our students new and established, we look forward to welcoming you to our vibrant community this Autumn. If you have any questions please visit our FAQs or contact us on 01522 886644.

Dr Stephanie Armstrong - Programme Leader

Dr Stephanie Armstrong - Programme Leader

Stephanie is Programme Leader for the BA (Hons) Applied Social Science and teaches on the BSc (Hons) Health and Social Care. She is part of the Child and Adolescent Health Research Unit. Research specialisms include human rights, ethics and disaster management.

School Staff List

Welcome to BA (Hons) Applied Social Science

At the heart of Applied Social Science is a desire to understand our society and the social problems we face in order to make a real difference to communities.

There is the opportunity to undertake various work placements during the course. Students will be able to develop the knowledge and skills needed for a range of careers in different organisations.

Students have access to a range of specialist facilities across several buildings, including the University’s new £19 million Sarah Swift Building, and the University Sports Centre.

The teaching team is made up of experienced academics from across the College. These include the School of Health and Social Care, School of Education, Lincoln Law School, School of Psychology, School of Social and Political Sciences, and School of Sport and Exercise Science. Their expertise encompasses a wide range of disciplines providing students with the opportunity to develop an interest in a specialised area of research.

Welcome to BA (Hons) Applied Social Science

At the heart of Applied Social Science is a desire to understand our society and the social problems we face in order to make a real difference to communities.

This course offers students the chance to gain a broad understanding of a variety of social science disciplines, whilst developing the knowledge and skills needed for a range of careers. Students have the opportunity to undertake work placements during the course to gain hands-on experience.
Students have access to a range of specialist facilities including several state-of-the-art clinical suites and modern psychology laboratories in the £19 million Sarah Swift Building; a moot court, where they can explore the key principles of modern legal practice in a variety of courtroom roles; and the Human Performance Centre, which contains multiple sports laboratories and an ‘endless pool’.

How You Study

In the first year, the programme aims to introduce students to politics, sociology, psychology, social policy, law, sports science, education, and health and social care studies. Students can undertake work experience opportunities which can focus on volunteering in a community-based group.

In years two and three, students can study social science research methods and career planning. They can also undertake a dissertation project and two further work placements.

Optional pathways can lead towards areas of specialism in one or more of the social sciences. These may include preparation for careers in education or teaching; nursing, public health, allied health professions and social work; guidance and counselling; law and criminal justice; health, sports and wellbeing; and policy and research.

The teaching team is made up of experienced academics from across the College. These include the School of Health and Social Care, School of Education, Lincoln Law School, School of Psychology, School of Social and Political Sciences, and School of Sport and Exercise Science. Their expertise encompasses a wide range of disciplines providing students with the opportunity to develop an interest in a specialised area of research.

The course is delivered mainly through lectures and seminars with additional workshops and tutorial support dependent on the module.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

How You Study

In the first year, the programme aims to introduce students to politics, sociology, psychology, social policy, law, sports science, education, and health and social care studies. Students can undertake work experience opportunities which can focus on volunteering in a community-based group.

In years two and three, students can study social science research methods and career planning. They can also undertake a dissertation project and two further work placements.

Optional pathways can lead towards areas of specialism in one or more of the social sciences. These may include preparation for careers in education or teaching; nursing, public health, allied health professions and social work; guidance and counselling; law and criminal justice; health, sports and wellbeing; and policy and research.

The teaching team is made up of experienced academics from across the College. These include the School of Health and Social Care, School of Education, Lincoln Law School, School of Psychology, School of Social and Political Sciences, and School of Sport and Exercise Science. Their expertise encompasses a wide range of disciplines providing students with the opportunity to develop an interest in a specialised area of research.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs.

Find out More

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

This module is designed to develop a range of communication and academic skills. Students can develop their academic writing, referencing, and presentation skills throughout the module. They are expected to gain an understanding of different models and theories of communication including how communication styles may differ depending on the context. The module will also aim to prepare students for different approaches to academic writing and communication across disciplines.

Module Overview

This module considers the history of psychology, critical psychology, the criteria that we can use to determine whether theories in psychology are scientific or not, and the interaction between psychology and society.

Module Overview

This introductory module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of how psychology knowledge can be applied to address real world issues. The module is designed to introduce students to the application of psychology by detailing how psychological research is used to make improvements across multiple contexts in our environment.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide students with the necessary background in anatomy and physiology for understanding the structure and functions of the human body.

It is structured to promote an introductory understanding of human physiology relevant to students of health and social care. The importance of structures will be examined and also what can happen when things go wrong. Anatomy and physiology will be studied in relation to health (and wellbeing) and disease.

Module Overview

This module assumes no prior knowledge of law. It aims to introduce students to legal thinking both in terms of philosophy of law and also how judicial decisions are made. Students will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the history of the English Legal System and its modern operation and processes.

Students have the opportunity to be introduced to human rights as a cornerstone of the English legal system and also look at other legal systems by way of comparison. This module also aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop the skills necessary, such as legal research and construction of arguments, to be successful in their degree and subsequent career. The legal profession can be examined as well as consideration of legal ethics.

Module Overview

This module introduces the key concepts of values and ethics allowing students the opportunity to understand the relationship and differences between personal and professional values.

Module Overview

This foundation module aims to examine some key contexts and practices of social policy in the UK. It aims to provide an overview of contemporary British society and some of its pressing issues and challenges. It explores how social policy, as a broad framework of welfare, justice and rights agendas and interventions has sought to address these issues and challenges. This is set in a historical and comparative context. The module highlights the importance of understanding how social policies are framed, made and implemented and how these can be analysed within understandings of societal inequality and poverty.

Module Overview

The module aims to introduce students to the importance of research and give them an understanding of why research in undertaken. Students can gain an understanding of a variety of research methods both quantitative and qualitative relevant to a range of social science disciplines.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce the students to the wide range of careers opportunities available to them and to help prepare them for the jobs market.

Module Overview

This module is based on the belief that comparative methodology can be a useful tool for social and political analysis. The module begins with a consideration of the development of comparative approaches, the use of a range of comparative techniques and the validity of comparison. It proceeds to an examination of some basic concepts that can help provide an understanding of the bases upon which governments are built and operate. Students then have the opportunity to apply the analytical and theoretical tools from the early parts of the module to consider a variety of features of contemporary politics and policy, particularly in the context of democratic transition in different regions of the world.

Module Overview

The module will take an interdisciplinary approach by examining how people think, act and interact with one another. In doing so it will challenge 'taken for granted' notions about crime and punishment. By focusing upon the development of the individual person behind the crime this allows us to address the question of motivations for crime as well as the role of psychology in responding to crime. Students will be expected to consider the implications of crime not only the prisoner but also the children, the family and wider society.

Module Overview

This module focuses on curricula for learning in education. It considers the purpose, breadth and design of curriculum structures and models and how these can differ in relation to context and culture. Students can gain an understanding of how the curriculum in England has changed and developed, and can describe the subject specific elements within current education provision. This module aims to help students to know, understand and contextualise the core components that make up curricula.

Module Overview

This module aims to enable students to analyse the priorities and developments of welfare states over time, and through analysis of these developments, equip students with the tools to interpret key contemporary social, political and economic trends.

Module Overview

This module aims to examine the concepts, theories, research methods and influencing factors in child development relevant to the period from birth to pre-adolescence.

Module Overview

This module aims to give students the opportunity to examine how different people respond to health, wellbeing and illness. The role of the rapidly expanding discipline of health psychology can be discussed in relation to psychological procedures for the assessment, intervention and prevention of ill health. Students also have the opportunity to consider individuals, families, age, cultures, religions, gender, psychological and social health and wellbeing.

Module Overview

This module aims to explore a fast-growing and controversial subject through a detailed examination of the nature and development of human rights as a concept, and their protection at the national level. It starts by providing students with the opportunity to consider the concept of “rights”, and human rights in particular, drawing on political and philosophical analyses. The module aims to look at the protection of human rights in the UK via the Human Rights Act 1998. The module is devoted to a critical analysis of a range of rights and the extent to which they are recognised and protected within the United Kingdom.

Module Overview

This module aims to examine the underpinning philosophy and theories of law. Students have the opportunity to be introduced to the nature of jurisprudence and its terminology. Major theories of jurisprudential thought, for example natural law, utilitarianism and positivism can be explored. The nature and role of law within society can also be examined along with the concepts of justice and morality, the social contract, as well as the philosophical foundations of various common law principles.

Module Overview

This module is designed to firstly develop and expand on issues of negligence and personal autonomy (assault and consent) first encountered by students in tort law at level 1 and dealt with in this module in the clinical context. Building on this, the module will aim to consider the regulation of clinical practice; and the interface between the law, ethics and regulation focusing on emerging areas of difficulty. Both caselaw, statute law, regulations and current matters of media and policy controversy can be considered.

Module Overview

The module will provide students with an opportunity to study mental health and wellbeing. This will include a broad coverage of the history of research and treatment relating to mental health and illness; the legal framework and the particular role of health and social care practitioners; diagnostic categories and frameworks and typical mental illnesses; social science and social understandings of mental health and illness: mental health problems and particular groups in society, including children and adolescents; the service user movement in mental health; alternative treatments and some current research trends.

Module Overview

The Nutrition for Health and Performance module seeks to further develop the knowledge and skills required for students to effectively assess the diet and nutritional status of a client. The module will explore a range of dietary intake measures, body composition assessment methods and dietary analysis software tools, as well the relative strengths and weaknesses of associated methods and tools. Importantly, the practical elements of this module will allow students to develop the interpersonal/relationship building skills required for effective client interaction in performance nutrition and/or health contexts.

Module Overview

This module aims to explore the powers of the police in England and Wales. It seeks to look at the ways in which the police forces are organised and the different national agencies that operate in the area (such as the Serious Fraud Office, and the Serious Organised Crime Agency). The human rights context can also be examined. Students have the opportunity to be taken through the various stages of policing from stop and search to charge. The module concludes by providing students with the opportunity to consider the ways in which police powers can be challenged.

Module Overview

The module aims to provide an introduction into psychological assessments using psychometrics, including questionnaires and scales. Based on the established theoretical and research context, this module will consider a range of assessment tools used in psychology to assess an individual’s behaviour or behavioural disposition, and provide an introduction into psychometric test development. The modules also aims to provide students with the opportunity to administer, score, and interpret psychological tests.

Module Overview

This module is designed to provide students with an insight into the psychology of education and how psychology can be used to support practice in a range of learning environments. The module provides students with an opportunity to engage with cutting edge research and how this impacts on practice. Students can gain an insight into some of the key ideas in psychology and how these influence educational practice.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide students with a formal introduction to social theory and its application to the study of sociological problems in sport and PE.

It is intended to build on the level one module, Sociological Issues in Sport and PE, by providing the opportunity to examine a variety of topics in sport from different theoretical perspectives. Students are encouraged to understand that all sociological observations are guided by theory, while also comparing and critiquing the range of approaches to sport introduced in the module. A selection of sociological sporting phenomena will be used to illustrate the importance of theory in guiding any sociological study.

Module Overview

This optional module focuses on childhood by comparing the theories and perceptions of children. It reflects on developmental aspects including social, cognitive, emotional, environmental, physical and language. It considers the ways in which children are portrayed in the media and the impact this may have on cultural representations of children. The module draws on classical and contemporary texts, academic studies and media such as television programmes and films.

Module Overview

Aiming to build upon Understanding the Policy Process, this module is designed to support students not only to continue to develop their knowledge of a range of perspectives on the policy process but, in addition, to use these to analyse a case study relevant to their degree programme.

Module Overview

This module aims to examine the developmental disability of Autism (and Autistic Spectrum Disorders). It aims to cover a range of approaches to understanding Autism, from diagnosis and etiology.

Module Overview

This module is designed to introduce students to major issues shaping education today, and to the conceptual tools needed to understand these in an informed way. Students can gain an understanding of key sites of debate in compulsory and alternative education, and critically examine a range of current debates in areas such as educational systems, policies, and reform within the UK and in global context, through multidisciplinary perspectives. This module aims to help students understand and confidently engage with the discursive, social and political contexts of education today.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to a range of contemporary models of counselling and guidance practice. The aim is to give students the opportunity to develop skills and attitudes that can be of value in a variety of human service settings. A key feature of the module will be to allow students the opportunity to make judgements as to the appropriateness of using such techniques in different scenarios.

Module Overview

This module aims to emphasise the importance of a developmental framework for understanding how children come to exhibit adaptive and maladaptive behaviour. The module will seek to address the changing nature of problems, influences and risk factors over the course of development.

Module Overview

This module aims to develop students' knowledge of the development, theory and applications of the Discourse approach, which is a growing field within psychology. The module aims to introduce the Discourse perspective, in which language is seen as a means for people to do social actions: from blamings and invitations, to the establishment and maintenance of social relationships.

Module Overview

This module aims to examine the law in England and Wales relating to the family and in particular the law on marriage, divorce, cohabiting couples, financial and property rights, and rights and duties relating to children. This module seeks to provide students with an interest in this area the opportunity to develop a detailed understanding of the practical law relating to the family and to examine ethical issues and the wider policy considerations that lie behind it.

Module Overview

Students will have the opportunity to undertake an independent research project in the final year of study. This will allow them to develop a deeper understanding of an aspect of social science that have identified as of particular interest to them throughout their studies.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to introduce students to the dynamic, constantly evolving area of international law. Students will have the opportunity to study legal rules which operate in a much broader theatre than national law, with the aim of helping them develop a greater understanding of a changing world order. The module seeks to examine both theoretical and practical applications of International Law and aims to provide students with ample scope for research and independent study.

Module Overview

This module is designed to provide a broad overview of this sub-field, which can be divided into three main areas; job related issues, inter and intra psychological issues, and workplace psychology. Theories from mainstream psychology aim to form the basis for a detailed discussion of key topics in occupational psychology.

Module Overview

This module aims to mobilise the knowledge and skills obtained throughout the sport development and sociological context strands of the degree by engaging students in the critical analysis of central issues in sport development.

The specific objectives of the module are to:

  • Engage students in critical sociological debates (especially on social exclusion) that are central to an understanding sport and sports development.
  • Encourage students to interrogate current policies in sport development policy.
  • Provide students with an opportunity to work on a practical sports development project, thus sensitising them to the pressures and problems currently facing professionals in the field.

Module Overview

This module is designed to focus upon the processes of policy making and implementation at both practical and theoretical levels. It aims to provide students with an introduction to a variety of models of policy making and seeks to discuss the complexities of the distribution of power and decision making, primarily, but not limited to, the field of social policy.

Module Overview

This module aims to develop students' ability to evaluate workplace competencies and reflect on their own skills and abilities. It will give students the chance to build a plan for their own career path.

Module Overview

This module aims to offer students the opportunity to explore in depth the context and issues of adult health and social care and the work roles available within it.

It focuses on both national policy developments and local provision, with the emphasis on the perspectives of service users and practitioners. The module will be of particular value to students as a preparation for making career choices and to enhance their employability.

Module Overview

This module considers how to engage with children and families to assess and respond to needs and how to make professional judgements in decisions to safeguard and promote children’s welfare. A further key theme is working in partnership both with children and families and other agencies, considering how, in practice this can best be promoted at different levels and stages of decision-making.

Emphasis will be on current research and developments. This module will be of particular value to students as a preparation for making career choices and to enhance their employability.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

This module is designed to develop a range of communication and academic skills. Students can develop their academic writing, referencing, and presentation skills throughout the module. They are expected to gain an understanding of different models and theories of communication including how communication styles may differ depending on the context. The module will also aim to prepare students for different approaches to academic writing and communication across disciplines.

Module Overview

This module considers the history of psychology, critical psychology, the criteria that we can use to determine whether theories in psychology are scientific or not, and the interaction between psychology and society.

Module Overview

This introductory module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of how psychology knowledge can be applied to address real world issues. The module is designed to introduce students to the application of psychology by detailing how psychological research is used to make improvements across multiple contexts in our environment.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide students with the necessary background in anatomy and physiology for understanding the structure and functions of the human body.

It is structured to promote an introductory understanding of human physiology relevant to students of health and social care. The importance of structures will be examined and also what can happen when things go wrong. Anatomy and physiology will be studied in relation to health (and wellbeing) and disease.

Module Overview

This module assumes no prior knowledge of law. It aims to introduce students to legal thinking both in terms of philosophy of law and also how judicial decisions are made. Students will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the history of the English Legal System and its modern operation and processes.

Students have the opportunity to be introduced to human rights as a cornerstone of the English legal system and also look at other legal systems by way of comparison. This module also aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop the skills necessary, such as legal research and construction of arguments, to be successful in their degree and subsequent career. The legal profession can be examined as well as consideration of legal ethics.

Module Overview

This module introduces the key concepts of values and ethics allowing students the opportunity to understand the relationship and differences between personal and professional values.

Module Overview

This foundation module aims to examine some key contexts and practices of social policy in the UK. It aims to provide an overview of contemporary British society and some of its pressing issues and challenges. It explores how social policy, as a broad framework of welfare, justice and rights agendas and interventions has sought to address these issues and challenges. This is set in a historical and comparative context. The module highlights the importance of understanding how social policies are framed, made and implemented and how these can be analysed within understandings of societal inequality and poverty.

Module Overview

The module aims to introduce students to the importance of research and give them an understanding of why research in undertaken. Students can gain an understanding of a variety of research methods both quantitative and qualitative relevant to a range of social science disciplines.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce the students to the wide range of careers opportunities available to them and to help prepare them for the jobs market.

Module Overview

This module is based on the belief that comparative methodology can be a useful tool for social and political analysis. The module begins with a consideration of the development of comparative approaches, the use of a range of comparative techniques and the validity of comparison. It proceeds to an examination of some basic concepts that can help provide an understanding of the bases upon which governments are built and operate. Students then have the opportunity to apply the analytical and theoretical tools from the early parts of the module to consider a variety of features of contemporary politics and policy, particularly in the context of democratic transition in different regions of the world.

Module Overview

The module will take an interdisciplinary approach by examining how people think, act and interact with one another. In doing so it will challenge 'taken for granted' notions about crime and punishment. By focusing upon the development of the individual person behind the crime this allows us to address the question of motivations for crime as well as the role of psychology in responding to crime. Students will be expected to consider the implications of crime not only the prisoner but also the children, the family and wider society.

Module Overview

This module focuses on curricula for learning in education. It considers the purpose, breadth and design of curriculum structures and models and how these can differ in relation to context and culture. Students can gain an understanding of how the curriculum in England has changed and developed, and can describe the subject specific elements within current education provision. This module aims to help students to know, understand and contextualise the core components that make up curricula.

Module Overview

This module aims to enable students to analyse the priorities and developments of welfare states over time, and through analysis of these developments, equip students with the tools to interpret key contemporary social, political and economic trends.

Module Overview

This module aims to examine the concepts, theories, research methods and influencing factors in child development relevant to the period from birth to pre-adolescence.

Module Overview

This module aims to give students the opportunity to examine how different people respond to health, wellbeing and illness. The role of the rapidly expanding discipline of health psychology can be discussed in relation to psychological procedures for the assessment, intervention and prevention of ill health. Students also have the opportunity to consider individuals, families, age, cultures, religions, gender, psychological and social health and wellbeing.

Module Overview

This module aims to explore a fast-growing and controversial subject through a detailed examination of the nature and development of human rights as a concept, and their protection at the national level. It starts by providing students with the opportunity to consider the concept of “rights”, and human rights in particular, drawing on political and philosophical analyses. The module aims to look at the protection of human rights in the UK via the Human Rights Act 1998. The module is devoted to a critical analysis of a range of rights and the extent to which they are recognised and protected within the United Kingdom.

Module Overview

This module aims to examine the underpinning philosophy and theories of law. Students have the opportunity to be introduced to the nature of jurisprudence and its terminology. Major theories of jurisprudential thought, for example natural law, utilitarianism and positivism can be explored. The nature and role of law within society can also be examined along with the concepts of justice and morality, the social contract, as well as the philosophical foundations of various common law principles.

Module Overview

The module will provide students with an opportunity to study mental health and wellbeing. This will include a broad coverage of the history of research and treatment relating to mental health and illness; the legal framework and the particular role of health and social care practitioners; diagnostic categories and frameworks and typical mental illnesses; social science and social understandings of mental health and illness: mental health problems and particular groups in society, including children and adolescents; the service user movement in mental health; alternative treatments and some current research trends.

Module Overview

The Nutrition for Health and Performance module seeks to further develop the knowledge and skills required for students to effectively assess the diet and nutritional status of a client. The module will explore a range of dietary intake measures, body composition assessment methods and dietary analysis software tools, as well the relative strengths and weaknesses of associated methods and tools. Importantly, the practical elements of this module will allow students to develop the interpersonal/relationship building skills required for effective client interaction in performance nutrition and/or health contexts.

Module Overview

This module aims to explore the powers of the police in England and Wales. It seeks to look at the ways in which the police forces are organised and the different national agencies that operate in the area (such as the Serious Fraud Office, and the Serious Organised Crime Agency). The human rights context can also be examined. Students have the opportunity to be taken through the various stages of policing from stop and search to charge. The module concludes by providing students with the opportunity to consider the ways in which police powers can be challenged.

Module Overview

The module aims to provide an introduction into psychological assessments using psychometrics, including questionnaires and scales. Based on the established theoretical and research context, this module will consider a range of assessment tools used in psychology to assess an individual’s behaviour or behavioural disposition, and provide an introduction into psychometric test development. The modules also aims to provide students with the opportunity to administer, score, and interpret psychological tests.

Module Overview

This module is designed to provide students with an insight into the psychology of education and how psychology can be used to support practice in a range of learning environments. The module provides students with an opportunity to engage with cutting edge research and how this impacts on practice. Students can gain an insight into some of the key ideas in psychology and how these influence educational practice.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide students with a formal introduction to social theory and its application to the study of sociological problems in sport and PE.

It is intended to build on the level one module, Sociological Issues in Sport and PE, by providing the opportunity to examine a variety of topics in sport from different theoretical perspectives. Students are encouraged to understand that all sociological observations are guided by theory, while also comparing and critiquing the range of approaches to sport introduced in the module. A selection of sociological sporting phenomena will be used to illustrate the importance of theory in guiding any sociological study.

Module Overview

This optional module focuses on childhood by comparing the theories and perceptions of children. It reflects on developmental aspects including social, cognitive, emotional, environmental, physical and language. It considers the ways in which children are portrayed in the media and the impact this may have on cultural representations of children. The module draws on classical and contemporary texts, academic studies and media such as television programmes and films.

Module Overview

Aiming to build upon Understanding the Policy Process, this module is designed to support students not only to continue to develop their knowledge of a range of perspectives on the policy process but, in addition, to use these to analyse a case study relevant to their degree programme.

Module Overview

This module aims to examine the developmental disability of Autism (and Autistic Spectrum Disorders). It aims to cover a range of approaches to understanding Autism, from diagnosis and etiology.

Module Overview

This module is designed to introduce students to major issues shaping education today, and to the conceptual tools needed to understand these in an informed way. Students can gain an understanding of key sites of debate in compulsory and alternative education, and critically examine a range of current debates in areas such as educational systems, policies, and reform within the UK and in global context, through multidisciplinary perspectives. This module aims to help students understand and confidently engage with the discursive, social and political contexts of education today.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students to a range of contemporary models of counselling and guidance practice. The aim is to give students the opportunity to develop skills and attitudes that can be of value in a variety of human service settings. A key feature of the module will be to allow students the opportunity to make judgements as to the appropriateness of using such techniques in different scenarios.

Module Overview

This module aims to emphasise the importance of a developmental framework for understanding how children come to exhibit adaptive and maladaptive behaviour. The module will seek to address the changing nature of problems, influences and risk factors over the course of development.

Module Overview

This module aims to develop students' knowledge of the development, theory and applications of the Discourse approach, which is a growing field within psychology. The module aims to introduce the Discourse perspective, in which language is seen as a means for people to do social actions: from blamings and invitations, to the establishment and maintenance of social relationships.

Module Overview

Students will have the opportunity to undertake an independent research project in the final year of study. This will allow them to develop a deeper understanding of an aspect of social science that have identified as of particular interest to them throughout their studies.

Module Overview

The aim of this module is to introduce students to the dynamic, constantly evolving area of international law. Students will have the opportunity to study legal rules which operate in a much broader theatre than national law, with the aim of helping them develop a greater understanding of a changing world order. The module seeks to examine both theoretical and practical applications of International Law and aims to provide students with ample scope for research and independent study.

Module Overview

This module is designed to provide a broad overview of this sub-field, which can be divided into three main areas; job related issues, inter and intra psychological issues, and workplace psychology. Theories from mainstream psychology aim to form the basis for a detailed discussion of key topics in occupational psychology.

Module Overview

This module aims to mobilise the knowledge and skills obtained throughout the sport development and sociological context strands of the degree by engaging students in the critical analysis of central issues in sport development.

The specific objectives of the module are to:

  • Engage students in critical sociological debates (especially on social exclusion) that are central to an understanding sport and sports development.
  • Encourage students to interrogate current policies in sport development policy.
  • Provide students with an opportunity to work on a practical sports development project, thus sensitising them to the pressures and problems currently facing professionals in the field.

Module Overview

This module is designed to focus upon the processes of policy making and implementation at both practical and theoretical levels. It aims to provide students with an introduction to a variety of models of policy making and seeks to discuss the complexities of the distribution of power and decision making, primarily, but not limited to, the field of social policy.

Module Overview

This module aims to develop students' ability to evaluate workplace competencies and reflect on their own skills and abilities. It will give students the chance to build a plan for their own career path.

Module Overview

This module aims to offer students the opportunity to explore in depth the context and issues of adult health and social care and the work roles available within it.

It focuses on both national policy developments and local provision, with the emphasis on the perspectives of service users and practitioners. The module will be of particular value to students as a preparation for making career choices and to enhance their employability.

Module Overview

This module considers how to engage with children and families to assess and respond to needs and how to make professional judgements in decisions to safeguard and promote children’s welfare. A further key theme is working in partnership both with children and families and other agencies, considering how, in practice this can best be promoted at different levels and stages of decision-making.

Emphasis will be on current research and developments. This module will be of particular value to students as a preparation for making career choices and to enhance their employability.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

How you are assessed

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Fees and Scholarships

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

Students will be responsible for their travel, accommodation and general living costs while on work experience.

Going to university is a life-changing step and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

For eligible undergraduate students going to university for the first time, scholarships and bursaries are available to help cover costs. The University of Lincoln offers a variety of merit-based and subject-specific bursaries and scholarships. For full details and information about eligibility, visit our scholarships and bursaries pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

Students will be responsible for their travel, accommodation and general living costs while on work experience.

Entry Requirements 2020-21

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 104 UCAS Tariff points.

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

Other requirements include:

• Satisfactory completion of an Enhanced Disclosure from the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) (formerly the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB)).

When you choose Health and Social in your UCAS application, you will be asked an additional question regarding criminal convictions. Here you must declare all spent and unspent criminal convictions including (but not limited to) cautions, reprimands, final warnings, bind over orders or similar and details of any minor offences, fixed penalty notices, penalty notices for disorder, ASBOs or VOOs.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

This course is not available to students who require a Tier 4 visa to study in the UK.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Entry Requirements 2021-22

United Kingdom

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 104 UCAS Tariff points.

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

Other requirements include:

• Satisfactory completion of an Enhanced Disclosure from the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) (formerly the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB)).

When you choose Health and Social in your UCAS application, you will be asked an additional question regarding criminal convictions. Here you must declare all spent and unspent criminal convictions including (but not limited to) cautions, reprimands, final warnings, bind over orders or similar and details of any minor offences, fixed penalty notices, penalty notices for disorder, ASBOs or VOOs.

International

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Work Experience Opportunities

Students are encouraged to take part in three work experience opportunities during their studies. There is the option to undertake a work placement year between their second and third year, which may be abroad or in the UK. Students who choose to undertake a work placement are not required to pay tuition fees for that year but will be required to pay their travel, accommodation, and general living costs.

“This popular degree aims to enable students to gain a broad range of research and practice skills.”

Nigel Horner, Senior Academic in the School of Health and Social Care

Virtual Open Days

While you may not be able to visit us in person at the moment, you can still find out more about the University of Lincoln and what it is like to live and study here at one of our live Virtual Open Days.

Book Your Place

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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