BA (Hons) Fashion

BA (Hons) Fashion

The University of Lincoln is ranked in the top 20 UK universities in the Guardian University Guide 2020.

The Course

Representing a powerful form of self-expression, the fashion industry is about much more than just clothes, leading the way in influencing cultural and social trends.

The BA (Hons) Fashion degree at Lincoln is creative in focus and aimed at those who wish to challenge and inspire contemporary fashion. Students have the freedom to experience and explore a range of 2D and 3D approaches to fashion and apparel design. This includes creative pattern cutting, tailoring, couture finishing, millinery, and trend forecasting. They also have opportunities to work on collaborative projects.

The course aims to provide a supportive environment in which students can develop their critical thinking skills and knowledge of fashion, culture, and the arts. It provides opportunities in live projects, competitions, and work placements, giving students the chance to gain real-life experience that can enhance their employability.

The degree aims to promote innovation, individuality, and creativity in all aspects of student work and equip students with the confidence to pursue a range of careers in fashion and the wider creative industries.

The Course

BA (Hons) Fashion is a 'classically constructed' degree that focuses on the essential partnership between innovative design and technical excellence.

In line with the contemporary fashion industry, the programme encourages students to consider sustainable approaches to their practice, exploring the relationship between good design and timeless fashion.

The programme aims to give students the opportunity to explore traditional and creative pattern cutting (including zero waste approaches), tailoring, modelling/draping on the stand, specialist finishing, fabric sourcing, handling and embellishment, and digital fabric print. In addition to 3D fashion skills, students can study the fashion design process, traditional and digital visual communication and portfolio development, in addition to other areas such as fashion trends and styling.

As part of their professional development students are expected to engage in external opportunities during their three years on the programme. These typically include internships, international competitions, collaborative projects and exhibitions, and more. External activities are supported by the academic team or University Careers and Employability service.

As creative and academic excellence, employability, and personal wellbeing are at the heart of the programme, learning and teaching has been carefully developed to inspire, nurture, and cultivate individual talent within a supportive environment. The course aims to produce graduates who are prepared on both a personal and professional level for a successful career within fashion or related industries.

During the first year, teaching emphasises creative and technical knowledge, introducing students to the core areas essential to 2D and 3D ideas development. This is taken further in the second year, where students are introduced to conceptual and innovative approaches to fashion, advanced techniques in garment development, portfolio presentation, and critical and cultural knowledge.

In the third and final year, the programme focuses on the refinement and promotion of each student’s individual design aesthetic. Students produce a final collection of work, a portfolio, and a practice-led dissertation.

Students currently have free access to Adobe Creative Cloud software for the duration of their studies but may be required to cover additional costs specific to the study of fashion. These typically include costs for fabric, art materials, printing, cultural visits, and creating a final collection for the third year fashion show. Students undertaking work placements will also need to cover their own travel, accommodation, and general living costs.

Module teaching is delivered through a range of practical, studio, seminar, and lecture-based sessions. In addition. students will be expected to attend supported workshops in which they can develop their practice on a self-directed study basis under the guidance of the technical team. A library of Panopto technical demonstration videos enables students to work at their own pace.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Contextual Studies 1 (Core)
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Contextual Studies 1 (Core)

This module is designed to introduce students to relevant concepts, debates, and case study examples concerning creativity and the creative process, as the basis for the development of a reflective creative practice. This aims to compliment and underpin the studio work students carry out with the programme-specific team during the rest of their programme of study.

Fashion and Communication (Core)
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Fashion and Communication (Core)

As the employability strand of the programme, Fashion and Communication aims to introduce students to the industry aligned fashion design process. Module content is designed to navigate students through all 2D creative stages; from research and sketchbook development to range planning and the visual communication and presentation of ideas. The module aims to develop skills in drawing, design, fashion illustration, and the stylistic and effective communication of 2D/3D creative ideas. Teaching and learning may also explore modernity and contemporary/historic fashion, assisting students in the formation of informed and relevant ideas that align with the fashion industry of today and tomorrow.

Students are expected to develop an early understanding of fashion careers and employability through focused project work, seminars, and in class discussion. Alongside in-class opportunities, careers and employability sessions and workshops may be available for students to attend on an extra-curricular basis.

Fashion Skills 1 (Core)
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Fashion Skills 1 (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to core 'soft’ garment manufacture skills, processes and methods, enabling them to take 2D ideas into 3D forms. Machine and fabric handling skills form an innate part of module learning, as well as an early understanding of key aspects of garment design such as: proportion, scale, style, and fashion aesthetic.

Through the module students will be expected to learn manufacture and pattern cutting techniques necessary to successfully develop innovative 3D responses to fashion design briefs, working both on the stand and from 2D to 3D. Through encouraging independent research and development of personal design processes students can explore, experiment, and consider a range of materials appropriate for different audiences and purposes.

Fashion Skills 2 (Core)
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Fashion Skills 2 (Core)

This module aims to introduces students to a range of practical and theoretical/contextual approaches to fabrics, materials and techniques within the context of fashion. Within this module students are typically introduced to, and gain knowledge and understanding of, the creative potential of using both traditional and contemporary based approaches within fashion/accessory development.
Students have the opportunity to experiment with a range of fabrics and materials, and learn a range of construction and production techniques, encouraging exploration and 'play', aiding future design thinking and potential for different purposes and audiences. Module content aims to encourage independent research, supporting the relationship between design and construction/application, whilst developing students' own creative aesthetic. Module content aims to engage students with a range of equipment, (digital) processes, and techniques to enhance their practice.

Contextual Studies 2 (Core)
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Contextual Studies 2 (Core)

Building upon issues concerning the development of a reflective creative practice, Contextual Studies 2 introduces students to relevant concepts, debates, and case study examples concerning the professional, economic, and socio-cultural contexts of design within the creative industries. It will also discuss ethical issues as they relate to this professional context of the creative industries and shape the creative motivations of areas such as design activism, ecological orientations, and socially engaged creative practices. These themes and debates will form an overarching discussion of professional design practice.

Creative Development 1 (Core)
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Creative Development 1 (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to more advanced methods of pattern cutting and garment manufacture. Garments produced should be more technically challenging and emerge from individual design ideas and the formation of a distinctive creative ethos and design aesthetic. Module content aims to expand student knowledge of materials, processes and finishes, enhancing their 2D to 3D visualisation and communication skills, knowledge, and technical vocabulary. Module teaching and learning will be evidenced through full outfit realisation, responding to contemporary fashion, market level, and individual design aesthetic. This is a studio practice-based module in which students should develop a more inspired approach to pattern making, exploring for example: shape, form, proportion, volume, and scale. Students are expected to develop their own projects independently, evidencing their ability to make considered and informed choices that align with their module goals and creative signature.

Creative Development 2 (Core)
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Creative Development 2 (Core)

This module aims to explore advanced approaches to the production of fashion apparel utilising both traditional skills of couture craftsmanship alongside contemporary technologies, materials, and design practices. Students will be expected to gain an understanding of the development of structured pieces within areas that may include tailoring, apparel/millinery, and outerwear.

Content aims to explore hand, couture, machine, and technological approaches, highlighting the breadth of creative possibilities and practices available to designers and makers, working within differing areas and levels of the fashion industry. It will encourage creative and innovative work, aiming to equip students with an advanced technical knowledge of the specialist skills and techniques required to translate their ideas into a ‘head to toe’ look for different purposes and audiences.

Fashion and Industry (Core)
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Fashion and Industry (Core)

This module aims to engage students with industry aligned projects and experiences, with the purpose of enhancing contemporary fashion knowledge, creative development and employability skills. Students will be expected to explore fashion from a critical and creative perspective, influencing the formation of an individual design aesthetic and ethos, which will be creatively articulated through given tasks/briefs.

Module content aims to explore broader fashion contexts such as; globalisation, environment, consumer behaviour, in order to enhance each student's personal development as a responsible designer, preparing fashion students for this challenging professional environment. The module aims to develop strong skills in problem solving, inventiveness, and the creative articulation of ideas. Industry engagement, externalisation, and self-promotion will be encouraged both within the module and through extra-curricular opportunities.

Contextual Studies 3 (Core)
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Contextual Studies 3 (Core)

Contextual Studies 3 is an independent research study module which takes the form either of a dissertation and/or a number of other options. The module offers students an opportunity to explore in depth a topic of their own choice, chosen generally, but not exclusively in relation to the practice and/or context of their programme-specific studies and studio practice.

Final Collection Stage 1 (Core)
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Final Collection Stage 1 (Core)

Within this module students can explore the creative possibilities for their 'Final Collection'. Collection production may be individual or collaborative in approach (to be negotiated with staff) and should consider a ‘head to toe’ approach in terms of the final outcome. This should then be realised in the Final Collection Stage 2 module in Semester B.

Students can explore their fashion interests, with an emphasis on design, illustration, market, and technical abilities. Research will determine their design criteria and audience for their creative outcome. Student collections should be relevant to the contemporary and/or future fashion industry and align with a clearly defined creative aesthetic and ethos.

This module aims to provide students with design-practice led research, entrepreneurship, creative thinking skills and knowledge, and interdisciplinary approaches to fashion design. This is designed to enable students to confidently communicate their design ideas and define their individual identity as a designer. This module intends to conclude in a fully sampled range of toiles, supporting creative and reflective work, to explain and ‘sell’ the idea, which will be fully realised in Final Collection Stage 2.

Final Collection Stage 2 (Core)
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Final Collection Stage 2 (Core)

This module concludes the students' design journey and results in the final production of a body of work for exhibition. Collection production may be individual or collaborative in approach (to be negotiated with staff) and should consider a ‘head to toe’ approach in terms of the final outcome.

The realised collection comprising of a series of ‘looks' should be carefully aligned and placed within the contemporary fashion industry, with a clearly specified purpose, market, and relevance. Work should be produced to a high standard, ensuring adequate quality to be presented to an external audience as/if required.

Stylistic, aesthetic, fabric, colour and proportional excellence should be addressed to communicate overall design sensitivity, successfully realising a conceptually driven collection. The garment collection may be presented with complimentary design development and reflective practice. The skills that students acquire could prepare them for future opportunities not just in the fashion industry, but in other creative sectors, as well as those planning to start their own business.

Professional Profile (Core)
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Professional Profile (Core)

Final year students will be expected to curate a forward looking portfolio that effectively communicates their creative ethos and signature, and supports their professional ambitions. Students have the opportunity undertake intellectually and creatively challenging briefs that align with the current and developing needs of the fashion and wider creative industries.

The professional design portfolio aims to enhance employability and enterprise skills through the application students' individual style to a range of fashion briefs. Within this module students may participate in live projects, national, and international competitions, and interaction with industrial partners where possible, which should support the transition into the fashion workplace or postgraduate study.

Advanced illustration, portfolio, and presentation skills may support the promotion of creative practice to a range of audiences including potential employers, assessors, and competition judges to enhance professional success. In-depth cultural, aesthetic, technical and commercial research should be harnessed using critical design thinking processes, to synthesise advanced fashion solutions.

Within the Professional Profile module, students will be encouraged to develop innovative and modern fashion responses, engaging with research, concepts, design, and market alignment. Therefore self-determining intellectually challenging briefs that builds upon prior learning, reflecting on personal strengths, career interests and personal design ethos and aesthetic.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Students will experience a variety of module assessment modes which may include portfolio work, sketchbooks, essays, presentations, production of 3D apparel, garments, fashion collections, and milinery. Students may have the opportunity to exhibit their work in an end of year degree/fashion show at level three.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, dissertations, presentations, or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Portfolio Review

Successful applicants will be invited to a portfolio review, where they have the opportunity to go through their portfolio with a member of the academic team.

Your portfolio should contain a range of work that demonstrates your ability to; draw, design, observe, make, translate, and explore ideas in interesting ways. Sketchbooks are of great interest and garments (if you have them) can also be included in the work you bring to interview. We are keen to understand what inspires you and why you want to pursue a fashion degree. All applicants will be offered a tour of the fashion area whilst visiting the department.

We welcome overseas applicants who will be asked to digitally submit their portfolio before interview.

Industry Links

The University has strong links with industry and students may have the opportunity to attend lectures and workshops with visiting experts from fashion, film costume, millinery, and the wider creative industries. Recent speakers include Frankfurt-based fine art/fashion duo Battenberg-Cartwright, the British Fashion Council, and West End theatre designer Matt Kinley.

Adobe Creative Cloud

All Fashion students currently have free access to Adobe Creative Cloud software for the duration of their studies.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Guidance and advice on placements and internships can be sought from either fashion academics or the University's Careers and Employability service. Students are advised to engage in a number of placements during their degree to enhance their CV and employability. It is recommended that placements are undertaken during holiday periods to fit in with the academic calendar.

Currently all fashion students participate in an annual student Internship Programme, which is a two to four week experience at the end of term two. During this time students’ work with a third year student of their choice, assisting them with the final stages of their collection development. Following on from this, students can gain further experience assisting with the production of the end of year Graduate Fashion Show.

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport, accommodation, and general living costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry. Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process

Placements

Some courses offer students the opportunity to undertake placements. When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry (where available). Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Tuition Fees

2020/21UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level* £15,900 per level**
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,900 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

* UK/EU: The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

** International: The fees quoted are for one year of study. For continuing students fees are subject to an increase of 2% each year and rounded to the nearest £100.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

- In exceptional circumstances, students who are required to re-take modules can do so on an 'assessment only' basis. This means that students do not attend timetabled teaching events but are required to take the assessments/examinations associated with the module(s). The 'assessment only' fee is half of the £ per credit point fee for each module.

Exceptionally, tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost.

Other Costs

Students will be required to cover additional costs specific to the study of fashion. These typically include, but are not limited to: fabric, art materials, printing, cultural visits, creating a final collection, and a third-year fashion show contribution.

If students choose to undertake a work placement, they will be responsible for their travel, accommodation, and general living costs.

External visits are recommended as part of student development. It is usual to engage in two (day) trips per academic year, at an average cost of £30-£40 per student per event.

Year one and two students report typically spending £250-300 per year on course materials and equipment, in addition to £100 on printing. Final year expenditure can be greater due to the production of a collection and portfolio. It should be noted however that successful work is not dependent on high costs but on the level of originality, innovation, creativity and resourcefulness.

The University currently awards each student an annual amount Materials Fund which assists with the provision of some key learning materials. This may be subject to change.

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 104 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may be considered.

____________________________________________________

Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages
https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page
https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.
____________________________________________________

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk
____________________________________________________

During the first year, teaching emphasises creative and technical knowledge, introducing students to the core areas essential to 2D and 3D ideas development. This is taken further in the second year, where students are introduced to conceptual and innovative approaches to fashion, advanced techniques in garment development, portfolio presentation, and critical and cultural knowledge.

In the third and final year, the programme focuses on the refinement and promotion of each student’s individual design aesthetic. Students produce a final collection of work, a portfolio, and contextual written study.

Students currently have free access to Adobe Creative Cloud software for the duration of their studies but will be required to cover additional costs specific to the study of fashion. These typically include costs for fabric, art materials, printing, exhibitions, and creating a final collection for the third year show. Students undertaking work placements will also need to cover their own travel, accommodation, and general living costs.

Module teaching is delivered through a range of practical, studio, seminar, and lecture-based sessions. In addition, students will be expected to attend supported workshops in which they can develop their practice on a self-directed study basis under the guidance of technical support staff. A library of Panopto technical demonstration videos enable students to work at their own pace.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Contextual Studies 1 (Core)
Find out more

Contextual Studies 1 (Core)

This module is designed to introduce students to relevant concepts, debates and case study examples concerning creativity and the creative process, as the basis for the development of a reflective creative practice. This aims to compliment and underpin the studio work students carry out with the programme-specific team during the rest of their programme of study.

Fashion and Communication (Core)
Find out more

Fashion and Communication (Core)

As the employability strand of the programme, Fashion and Communication aims to introduce students to the industry aligned fashion design process. Module content is designed to navigate students through all 2D creative stages; from research and sketchbook development to range planning and the visual communication and presentation of ideas. The module aims to develop skills in drawing, design, fashion illustration, and the stylistic and effective communication of 2D/3D creative ideas. Teaching and learning may also explore modernity and contemporary/historic fashion, assisting students in the formation of informed and relevant ideas that align with the fashion industry of today and tomorrow.

Students are expected to develop an early understanding of fashion careers and employability through focused project work, seminars, and in class discussion. Alongside in-class opportunities, careers and employability sessions and workshops may be available for students to attend on an extra-curricular basis.

Fashion Skills 1 (Core)
Find out more

Fashion Skills 1 (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to core 'soft’ garment manufacture skills, processes and methods, enabling them to take 2D ideas into 3D forms. Machine and fabric handling skills form an innate part of module learning, as well as an early understanding of key aspects of garment design such as: proportion, scale, style, and fashion aesthetic.

Through the module students will be expected to learn manufacture and pattern cutting techniques necessary to successfully develop innovative 3D responses to fashion design briefs, working both on the stand and from 2D to 3D. Through encouraging independent research and development of personal design processes students can explore, experiment, and consider a range of materials appropriate for different audiences and purposes.

Fashion Skills 2 (Core)
Find out more

Fashion Skills 2 (Core)

This module aims to introduces students to a range of practical and theoretical/contextual approaches to fabrics, materials and techniques within the context of fashion. Within this module students are typically introduced to, and gain knowledge and understanding of, the creative potential of using both traditional and contemporary based approaches within fashion/accessory development.
Students have the opportunity to experiment with a range of fabrics and materials, and learn a range of construction and production techniques, encouraging exploration and 'play', aiding future design thinking and potential for different purposes and audiences. Module content aims to encourage independent research, supporting the relationship between design and construction/application, whilst developing students' own creative aesthetic. Module content aims to engage students with a range of equipment, (digital) processes, and techniques to enhance their practice.

Contextual Studies 2 (Core)
Find out more

Contextual Studies 2 (Core)

Building upon issues concerning the development of a reflective creative practice, Contextual Studies 2 introduces students to relevant concepts, debates, and case study examples concerning the professional, economic, and socio-cultural contexts of design within the creative industries. It will also discuss ethical issues as they relate to this professional context of the creative industries and shape the creative motivations of areas such as design activism, ecological orientations, and socially engaged creative practices. These themes and debates will form an overarching discussion of professional design practice.

Creative Development 1 (Core)
Find out more

Creative Development 1 (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to more advanced methods of pattern cutting and garment manufacture. Garments produced should be more technically challenging and emerge from individual design ideas and the formation of a distinctive creative ethos and design aesthetic. Module content aims to expand student knowledge of materials, processes and finishes, enhancing their 2D to 3D visualisation and communication skills, knowledge, and technical vocabulary. Module teaching and learning will be evidenced through full outfit realisation, responding to contemporary fashion, market level, and individual design aesthetic. This is a studio practice-based module in which students should develop a more inspired approach to pattern making, exploring for example: shape, form, proportion, volume, and scale. Students are expected to develop their own projects independently, evidencing their ability to make considered and informed choices that align with their module goals and creative signature.

Creative Development 2 (Core)
Find out more

Creative Development 2 (Core)

This module aims to explore advanced approaches to the production of fashion apparel utilising both traditional skills of couture craftsmanship alongside contemporary technologies, materials, and design practices. Students will be expected to gain an understanding of the development of structured pieces within areas that may include tailoring, apparel/millinery, and outerwear.

Content aims to explore hand, couture, machine, and technological approaches, highlighting the breadth of creative possibilities and practices available to designers and makers, working within differing areas and levels of the fashion industry. It will encourage creative and innovative work, aiming to equip students with an advanced technical knowledge of the specialist skills and techniques required to translate their ideas into a ‘head to toe’ look for different purposes and audiences.

Fashion and Industry (Core)
Find out more

Fashion and Industry (Core)

This module aims to engage students with industry aligned projects and experiences, with the purpose of enhancing contemporary fashion knowledge, creative development and employability skills. Students will be expected to explore fashion from a critical and creative perspective, influencing the formation of an individual design aesthetic and ethos, which will be creatively articulated through given tasks/briefs.

Module content aims to explore broader fashion contexts such as; globalisation, environment, consumer behaviour, in order to enhance each student's personal development as a responsible designer, preparing fashion students for this challenging professional environment. The module aims to develop strong skills in problem solving, inventiveness, and the creative articulation of ideas. Industry engagement, externalisation, and self-promotion will be encouraged both within the module and through extra-curricular opportunities.

Contextual Studies 3 (Core)
Find out more

Contextual Studies 3 (Core)

Contextual Studies 3 is an independent research study module which takes the form either of a dissertation and/or a number of other options. The module offers students an opportunity to explore in depth a topic of their own choice, chosen generally, but not exclusively in relation to the practice and/or context of their programme-specific studies and studio practice.

Final Collection Stage 1 (Core)
Find out more

Final Collection Stage 1 (Core)

Within this module students can explore the creative possibilities for their 'Final Collection'. Collection production may be individual or collaborative in approach (to be negotiated with staff) and should consider a ‘head to toe’ approach in terms of the final outcome. This should then be realised in the Final Collection Stage 2 module in Semester B.

Students can explore their fashion interests, with an emphasis on design, illustration, market, and technical abilities. Research will determine their design criteria and audience for their creative outcome. Student collections should be relevant to the contemporary and/or future fashion industry and align with a clearly defined creative aesthetic and ethos.

This module aims to provide students with design-practice led research, entrepreneurship, creative thinking skills and knowledge, and interdisciplinary approaches to fashion design. This is designed to enable students to confidently communicate their design ideas and define their individual identity as a designer. This module intends to conclude in a fully sampled range of toiles, supporting creative and reflective work, to explain and ‘sell’ the idea, which will be fully realised in Final Collection Stage 2.

Final Collection Stage 2 (Core)
Find out more

Final Collection Stage 2 (Core)

This module concludes the students' design journey and results in the final production of a body of work for exhibition. Collection production may be individual or collaborative in approach (to be negotiated with staff) and should consider a ‘head to toe’ approach in terms of the final outcome.

The realised collection comprising of a series of ‘looks' should be carefully aligned and placed within the contemporary fashion industry, with a clearly specified purpose, market, and relevance. Work should be produced to a high standard, ensuring adequate quality to be presented to an external audience as/if required.

Stylistic, aesthetic, fabric, colour and proportional excellence should be addressed to communicate overall design sensitivity, successfully realising a conceptually driven collection. The garment collection may be presented with complimentary design development and reflective practice. The skills that students acquire could prepare them for future opportunities not just in the fashion industry, but in other creative sectors, as well as those planning to start their own business.

Professional Profile (Core)
Find out more

Professional Profile (Core)

Final year students will be expected to curate a forward looking portfolio that effectively communicates their creative ethos and signature, and supports their professional ambitions. Students have the opportunity undertake intellectually and creatively challenging briefs that align with the current and developing needs of the fashion and wider creative industries.

The professional design portfolio aims to enhance employability and enterprise skills through the application students' individual style to a range of fashion briefs. Within this module students may participate in live projects, national, and international competitions, and interaction with industrial partners where possible, which should support the transition into the fashion workplace or postgraduate study.

Advanced illustration, portfolio, and presentation skills may support the promotion of creative practice to a range of audiences including potential employers, assessors, and competition judges to enhance professional success. In-depth cultural, aesthetic, technical and commercial research should be harnessed using critical design thinking processes, to synthesise advanced fashion solutions.

Within the Professional Profile module, students will be encouraged to develop innovative and modern fashion responses, engaging with research, concepts, design, and market alignment. Therefore self-determining intellectually challenging briefs that builds upon prior learning, reflecting on personal strengths, career interests and personal design ethos and aesthetic.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Assessment of student work can vary from module to module, depending on the nature of the assignment and assessment criteria. Assessment most commonly takers the form of Coursework, such as; design projects, garments, research and sketchbooks. In addition assessment can be through written work such as an essay or dissertation. Students can also expect to be assessed on group/individual presentations during their time on the programme.

The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Methods of Assessment

Students should expect to experience a variety of Formative (advisory) and Summative (final) module assessment approaches. These may include formal and informal critiques, individual/group presentations, project hand-in, online submission, and static display. Students may have the opportunity to exhibit their work in an end of year degree/fashion show in year three.

Successful applicants will be invited to attend an interview, during which they will have the opportunity to talk through their portfolio with a member of the fashion team.

Your portfolio should contain a range of work that demonstrates your ability to draw, design, observe, make, translate, and explore ideas in interesting ways. Sketchbooks are of great interest and garments (if you have them) can also be included in the work you bring to interview. We are keen to understand what inspires you and why you want to pursue a fashion degree. Applicants will be offered a tour of the fashion area whilst visiting the department.

We welcome overseas applicants who will be asked to digitally submit their portfolio before interview.

Industry Links

The University has strong links with industry and students may have the opportunity to attend lectures and workshops with visiting experts from the fashion and wider creative industries.

Adobe Creative Cloud

All Fashion students currently have free access to Adobe Creative Cloud software for the duration of their studies.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing. The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Guidance and advice on placements and internships can be sought from either fashion academics or the University's Careers and Employability service. Students are advised to engage in a number of placements during their degree to enhance their CV and employability. It is recommended that placements are undertaken during holiday periods to fit in with the academic calendar.

Currently all fashion students participate in an annual student Internship Programme, which is a two to four week experience at the end of Semester B. During this time students work with a third year student, assisting them with the final stages of their garment collection and final exhibition.

Some courses offer students the opportunity to undertake placements. When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry (where available). Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Placements

Some courses offer students the opportunity to undertake placements. When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry (where available). Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Tuition Fees

2020/21UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level* £15,900 per level**
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,900 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

* UK/EU: The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

** International: The fees quoted are for one year of study. For continuing students fees are subject to an increase of 2% each year and rounded to the nearest £100.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

- In exceptional circumstances, students who are required to re-take modules can do so on an 'assessment only' basis. This means that students do not attend timetabled teaching events but are required to take the assessments/examinations associated with the module(s). The 'assessment only' fee is half of the £ per credit point fee for each module.

Exceptionally, tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost.

Other Costs

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enroll with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost.

Other Costs

Students will be required to cover additional costs specific to the study of Fashion. These typically include, but are not limited to: fabric, art materials, printing, cultural visits, creating a final collection, and a third-year fashion show contribution.
If students choose to undertake a work placement, they will be responsible for their travel, accommodation, and general living costs.
External visits are also recommended as part of student development.

Level 1 and 2 students report typically spending £250-350 per year on course materials and equipment. Level 3-Final year expenditure can be greater due to the production of a final garment collection and portfolio. It should be noted however that successful work is not necessarily dependent on high costs but on the level of originality, innovation, creativity and resourcefulness. It is however expected that students on the programme will have sufficient funding to support the costs of their studies without hindrance.

The University currently awards each student an annual amount Materials Fund which assists with the provision of some key learning materials. This may be subject to change.

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may be considered.
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Non UK Qualifications:

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages
https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/st.../entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

EU and Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page
https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/st...port/englishlanguagerequirements/

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-sessional English and Academic Study Skills courses.
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For applicants who do not meet our standard entry requirements, our Arts Foundation Year can provide an alternative route of entry onto our full degree programmes:
https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/course/afyafyub/
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If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk
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Learn from Experts

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

Expert Image - Victoria Bellandini

Victoria Bellandini

Programme Leader

Victoria has enjoyed a varied career spanning fashion, costume, styling, and illustration. She has worked as fashion illustrator for designer John Richmond; and in costume design for the BBC, television, and film industries. Victoria is Programme Leader for BA (Hons) Fashion.


Your Future Career

This course is designed to prepare graduates for a wide range of careers within fashion and the wider creative industries

Lincoln graduate destinations have included: Alexander McQueen; Anderson and Shepherd Tailors, Savile Row; Angels & Berman's Costumiers, London; Arcadia Group; BBC; The British Fashion Council; Burberry; Conde Nast; Dazed and Confused; Julien MacDonald; London Fashion Week; Matthew Williamson; Paul Smith; Roland Mouret; Royal Opera House; and Stephen Jones Millinery.

Graduate careers may include: styling, illustration, fashion buying, illustration, journalism, theatre costume design, freelance/own label, tailoring, knitwear design, historic costume expert, eyewear design, print design, TV costume design, millinery, and womenswear designer.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.

This course is designed to prepare graduates for a wide range of careers within the fashion and the wider creative industries.

Graduate Careers Include: Women’s/Men’s/Children’s Wear Designer, Stylist, Fashion Buyer, Journalism/PR, Eyewear Design, Film Costume/TV Designer, and Print/Textile Designer, Bespoke Tailor

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.

Student Testimonial - Esme Burgess-Lamb

I chose the course because of the focus on couture manufacturing techniques. Lincoln was one of the only universities I visited which provided an alternative to fast fashion.

Esme Burgess-Lamb, BA (Hons) Fashion graduate, Fashion Student

Facilities

Students on this course are based in the University’s Nicola de la Haye Building, where they can access a range of design studios, technical spaces, workshops, and machine rooms. There is equipment for digital fabric printing, laser cutting, and 3D printing, ceramics, glass, and metal work.

Students also benefit from on-site performance studios, a 450-capacity professional theatre and public gallery. These play host to student fashion shows and exhibitions, professionally supported by the in-house technical team.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.


The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.

Lincoln School of Design