Female student wearing a white lab coat examining an ornate box in a laboratory

Key Information

Full-time

N/A

Part-time

4-5 years

Typical Offer

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Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

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Course Code

HRTCONAM

MA Heritage Conservation

MA Heritage Conservation is studied as part of a Master's level degree apprenticeship and offers a new route for those with no prior conservation knowledge to enter the profession.

Our Alumni Scholarship can reduce fees by up to 20 per cent for UK students. See our Scholarship and Bursaries page for more information.

Key Information

Full-time

N/A

Part-time

4-5 years

Typical Offer

View

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

HRTCONAM

Welcome to MA Heritage Conservation

The MA Heritage Conservation provides an opportunity to combine paid work with hands-on conservation experience and academic teaching.

The programme aims to develop apprentices' professional skills and knowledge within a work-based context, while equipping them with an awareness of the principles of heritage conservation. Apprentices have the opportunity to develop the knowledge and skills to enhance their effectiveness in their field.

Funded by the Government and your employer, this apprenticeship has been designed to provide access to development opportunities for a wide range of individuals, including existing employees, or new recruits who wish to become professional conservators.

The apprenticeship programme has been created by the Institute of Conservation (ICON), employers, and higher education providers and aims to educate future professionals in conservation of cultural heritage materials, supporting specialisation in a range of different areas of conservation.

How You Study

The Heritage Conservation Degree Apprenticeship is centred on work-based learning, with modules delivered through a flexible blended-learning approach, through a combination of online and face-to-face teaching. The structure and timetable will vary depending on whether the student starts in January or September, and on specific timetabling requirements. Classes take place through a combination of day release and block release.

Apprentices will spend 80 per cent of their working time with their employer, and 20 per cent at the University, or on course related activities.

The programme aims to provide students with:
- Skills, knowledge, and understanding relevant to the professional practice of conservation of a wide range of materials and contexts.
- Ethical awareness and an understanding of the professional codes of ethics in the conservation and preservation of cultural heritage.
- A sound scientific, theoretical, and aesthetic appreciation as it applies to the professional practice of conservation of cultural property.
- Decision-making skills and critical thinking as it applies to conservation practice in differing contexts.
- Training and skills in the management and care of museum and historic collections;
- An ability to appraise and manage employability skills within a Continuous Professional Development framework relevant to the discipline.
- An awareness of the relevance of cultural history in relation to object conservation.
- The ability to undertake independent research.
- A sound foundation for later professional accreditation.

It will typically take 4.5 years for the academic part (MA) of the qualification, and a further 6 months preparing for the apprenticeship end point assessment, administered by the Institute of Conservation (ICON). The apprenticeship creates a route for those with no prior conservation knowledge to enter the profession. Applicants with conservation qualifications or experience may be considered for a shorter pathway.

Regular tripartite progress reviews will take place between the apprentice, their allocated employer mentor/supervisor and University personal tutor. Active participation of all parties in the apprenticeship review process is an important part of the learning process.

Students will have a personal tutor to support them in their academic studies and access to support services within the University, including Learning Support, Wellbeing, and ICT. They will have use of our specialist conservation laboratories and wider university facilities such as the library, sports centre, and Students' Union.

An Introduction to Your Modules


† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Apprenticeship Collections Management and Care 2022-23CON9060MLevel 72022-23The module provides the underpinning theoretical study for understanding the principles and practice of collections management and care. The module introduces student to the life-cycle of museum objects and covers key issues concerning collections development, management of the internal and external environment, collections documentation and care. Procedures such as collections surveys, risk management, and emergency planning will be considered.CoreApprenticeship Conservation Skills in Context 2022-23CON9061MLevel 72022-23With changes in the employment patterns of conservators, the need for a diverse range of skills has become more pronounced. This module complements skills learnt in the other core modules. Students will learn through a combination of project based activities, critical reflection and co-creation. The module will build on background understanding and experience to increase their confidence and skills and prepare students to capitalise on a broad range of career possibilities beyond the university.CoreApprenticeship Investigative Techniques in Conservation 2022-23CON9062MLevel 72022-23This module aims to develop knowledge of investigative techniques and its relevance to conservation and heritage science. Students will learn about a range of analytical methods and digital tools that can be used for monitoring and analysis of cultural heritage materials.CoreApprenticeship Material Culture, Conservation and Significance 2022-23CON9063MLevel 72022-23The module challenges conservation students to think broadly about the objects that they conserve. This module will encourage students to explore this process of assessing significance which supports institutions in attaining a deeper understanding objects and the values that they might hold for different audiences. This module will help students develop the analytical skills needed to assess the value of an object and how these fit into current professional structures within the heritage industry. Lectures and workshops will explore different intellectual approaches material culture and how each might contribute to the meaning and significance of an object or collection. The assessments will encourage students to produce professional museological documentation and relate the content of this module to collections management.CoreApprenticeship Research Project 2022-23CON9064MLevel 72022-23This module aims to give students the opportunity to apply and develop their existing knowledge and skills to an independent research project in an area of their own choice. The students will further develop, design and implement a research project in consultation with a supervisory tutor, and they will have the opportunity to reflect critically on a specialist area of cultural heritage relating to their Masters programme.CoreConservation Processes 1 2022-23CON9065MLevel 72022-23In this module students have the chance to learn the theory and application of basic conservation principles related to observation, documentation, condition assessment and cleaning of historic objects.CoreConservation Processes 2 2022-23CON9066MLevel 72022-23In this module students have the chance to learn the theory and application of conservation principles related to adhesives, consolidants, modelling and casting.CoreConservation Science 2022-23CON9067MLevel 72022-23This module is designed to introduce students to basic chemistry concepts, and the scientific study of materials commonly found in cultural heritage. Students may develop a systematic approach to scientific investigation and examination of historic objects and an understanding to the nature of different materials, technological factors and the processes of deteriorationCoreConservation Theory 2022-23CON9068MLevel 72022-23This module aims to provide the underpinning basic theoretical knowledge related to historic materials, on which the discipline of conservation is based. Students are introduced to a range of conservation techniques, through lectures discussing a range of different material types and their potential deteriorationCoreDocumentation Techniques 2022-23CON9069MLevel 72022-23This module provides an introduction to the recording skills necessary for a practicing conservator. Various forms of documentation encountered in the practice of conservation will be introduced, and drawing and photography recordings skills developed. Students are introduced to the basic principles of photography, lighting techniques and their application in conservation. The conventions and standard representations used in record drawing are also introduced.CorePreventive Conservation 2022-23CON9070MLevel 72022-23This module provides an introduction to the preventive conservation skills needed to undertake basic care of collections. Students are introduced to practical preventive conservation and collections management procedures, and have the opportunity to gain experience in environmental monitoring and surveying. Topics such as integrated pest management and emergency planning are also discussed.Core

How you are assessed

The training provision is designed to allow students to build the knowledge, standards, and behaviour (KSB) required for the level 7 Cultural Heritage Conservator apprenticeship.

Successful completion of the MA course is a requirement for students to progress through the apprenticeship gateway for end-point assessment (EPA) of the apprenticeship by ICON. The EPA consists of a portfolio of evidence mapped to the Heritage Conservator standard, a work-based project report, and interviews, all independently assessed.

Fees and Funding

For eligible students, there are more ways than ever before to fund your postgraduate study, whether you want to do a taught or research course. For those wishing to undertake a Master's course, UK students can apply for a loan as a contribution towards the course and living costs. Loans are also available to those who wish to undertake doctoral study. The University offers a number of scholarships and funded studentships for those interested in postgraduate study. Learn how Master's and PhD loans, scholarships, and studentships can help you fund your studies on our Postgraduate Fees and Funding pages.

Programme Fees

Programme-Specific Funding and Bursaries

Apprentices do not pay university fees. Course fees are paid via employer contributions to the Apprenticeship Levee. Small employers who do not contribute to the levee may be asked to pay a small percentage towards the fees.

Programme-Specific Additional Costs

Employers are expected to cover the cost of travel to Lincoln when required. If students wish to join an optional field trip, they will be asked to fund this themselves.

Entry Requirements 2022-23

- An undergraduate degree in any subject, or equivalent experience.

- A suitable job role which allows the development of conservation skills with an employer, and must also be a resident in England prior to applying for this programme.

Facilities

The University of Lincoln has a suite of purpose-built conservation laboratories and a wide range of specialist equipment. Students can view the conservation laboratories by undertaking a virtual walk through below.

How to Apply

Selection for the MA Heritage Conservation Degree Apprenticeship will be conducted in partnership with employers. The admissions process will normally comprise an individual interview, involving members of the academic and administrative team from the University. Before an individual starts an apprenticeship, we will assess their prior learning to determine their ‘starting point’ in relation to the skills, knowledge, and behaviours that are in the apprenticeship standard.

Prospective apprentices should demonstrate motivation/interest to study for a career in conservation; provide evidence of their ability to study academic subjects; demonstrate their availability and personal commitment to undertaking the apprenticeship journey; demonstrate good communication and interpersonal skills; and be able to study independently and manage their time.

The School of History and Heritage requires apprentices to have already achieved Level 2 English and Maths at GCSE grade C/4 or above, and a degree in any subject or equivalent experience as part of the standard entry requirements.

Employers select candidates in discussion with the University of Lincoln. The University is unable to take applications directly from prospective students who do not already have a host organisation in place.

For more information, please contact Dr Cathy Daly or Dr Lynda Skipper:

cdaly@lincoln.ac.uk
lskipper@lincoln.ac.uk

Career Opportunities

Graduates from this subject area may gain employment as conservators in museums, galleries, historic houses, and conservation agencies, nationally and internationally. Internships have included roles in natural history at the Horniman Museum, mechanical objects at Edinburgh Museum, and textile conservation for the National Trust at Blickling.

Postgraduate Events

Find out more about how postgraduate study can help further your career, develop your knowledge, or even prepare you to start your own business at one of our postgraduate events.

Find out More

Prioritising Face-to-Face Teaching

At the University of Lincoln, we strive to ensure our students’ experience is engaging, supportive, and academically challenging. Throughout the Coronavirus pandemic, we have adapted to Government guidance to keep our students, staff, and community safe. All remaining Covid-19 legal restrictions in England were lifted in February 2022 under the Government’s Plan for Living with Covid-19, and we have embraced a safe return to in-person teaching on campus. Where appropriate, face-to-face teaching is enhanced by the use of digital tools and technology and may be complemented by online opportunities where these support learning outcomes.

We are fully prepared to adapt our plans if changes in Government guidance make this necessary, and we will endeavour to keep current and prospective students informed. For more information about how we are working to keep our community safe, please visit our coronavirus web pages.

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.